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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00063
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: August 9, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00063

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Page 16 Friday, August 9, 2002 Spc. Guadalupe Bravo, 2/142 INF Co. Q: How does it feel to be here Enduring Freedom? A: I feel happy, excited and magnifico because Ive never done anything like this before. I was a peacekeeper in Bosnia, and now Im in Cuba doing this. Q: Youre an infantry guy, so how fast can you take apart your weapon and put it back together again? A: Five minutes, stripping it down to its nuts and bolts and back together. Then Im ready to start firing off rounds. Q: Youre carrying a pretty big weapon there, you think you can drop a 12-foot griz zly bear with that thing? A: With my M-249 SAW machine gun, yes, I believe so. I would aim for the chest, and with about 150 rounds a minute, I would take him away as a carpet. Q: Whats the craziest thing youve seen while out on patrol? A: Man, crazy drunks who have had too much beer. Theyre so excited and happy. Q: So, if you got lost deep in the woods, do you think you could find your way home? A: Yes, I would. Ive trained for this, and if I had to, I would find my way home with my naked eye. Q: OK, youre stuck out on a mission with no food and youre starving. Would you eat a dead animal carcass to survive? A: Well, Id have to survive somehow. I might try barbecuing an iguana in a pit. Q: If you were attacked in a dark alley, would you need a weapon to defend yourself? A: My combat skills are as lethal as a weapon. Im a very nice guy, but if I was attacked, I can be a real mean Mexican boy. Q: Would you rather be stuck in the desert or on in the frozen tundra? A: Well, if I was in the snow, I could build an igloo to keep warm. In the sun I can only suffer and pay. By the time I get off GTMO, Ill be so dark my family may not recognize me. Q: Do you think your Army survival skills could help you in the civilian world? A: Yes, in the real world, my Combat Life Savers course would help a lot. If I ever see someone choking, Im trained to help. Q: What if you saw a bank being robbed, what would you do then? A: I would go in and tell the bank robbers, I am here! Alto! I am Pancho Villa! Q: Do you think you and your infantry brothers can take on the professional wrestlers of the WWF? A: Yes, me and my amigos could take care of the WWF. We train hard and always accomplish the task. So beware, Undertaker. Q: We know you work hard, but do you play hard? A: Yes, I party with my friends, like Miraza. We enjoy drinking beers and bowling. Q: Have you ever gone in search of any treasure? A: When I was young, I was always in search of treasure. So I would raid my moms piggy-bank. Then I would buy candy. Q: Do you enjoy eating cake? A: Yes, because my cheeks are getting big ger with the sweet stuff. But I have no prob lems with the big cheeks, they go nice with the smile. Q: What food is missing from GTMO? A: Mexican food: Tortillas, tacos and beans. I love beans. Please, no more burgers! Q: Do you feel you are a role model for the kids? A: Yes, I feel I am a role model for my lit tle boy. One day, hell join the military like his dad, travel the world and meet good people. Q: Your final thoughts, Guadalupe? A: I want to say that this is a big experience for me, another chapter in my book. Lets see where the Army takes me next time. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Guadalupe Bravo: The last person Osama Bin Laden would want to meet would be me and my SAW. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Ready for war, infantryman leads the way Youre off from work and sitting around at the bus stop beneath the hot, baking sun waiting for the next bus to pick you up and take you to your destination of choice. This is an experience most of you have been through, but certainly have not enjoyed. Submitted for your approval is a change in policy that is geared to make lives at GTMO a little easier going during those out-of-uniform hours. Policy Letter #3, Requirements For Traveling in Tactical and NonTactical Vehicles, signed by Joint Task Force 160 Commander Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, was reevaluated to clarify what specific equipment, clothing and other requirements are necessary for the members of JTF-160 while they are traveling around GTMO. Previously, servicemembers were required to wear Battle Dress Uniforms plus Kevlar helmets to operate or be a passenger within a tactical vehicle. Now here comes Revision A: the old regulations have been superseded and now allow more comfortable traveling accommodations. As of July 30, operators and pas sengers of tactical vehicles which include Humvees, 5-ton trucks and other vehicles used in a tactical military environment must: Wear a military issue Kevlar helmet at all times when the vehicle is operated off of paved roadways (i.e. cross country or on unpaved dirt roads). Vehicle operators will wear an appropriate military uni form at all times while operating tactical vehicles. Appropriate military uniform is defined as an authorized service uniform (i.e. Battle Dress Uniform, Camouflage Utility Uniform), or an authorized Physical Training uniform. Passengers may wear civilian clothing providing it is IAW JTF 160 Policy Letter #7, Civilian Clothes Policy. The request for the change in policy came down from the people Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. New way to ride Friday, August 9, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 9 Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire A look inside... Change in transportation policy makes traveling around GTMO more comfortable Watch your life away Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This statue near the lighthouse here at GTMO was built In honor of the U.S. Marines who protect democracy at the fenceline. Visitors can come and watch alongside him and contemplate why they are here. Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 See POLICY, page 5

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Page 2 Friday, August 9, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Please fire up your calculator. Enter the number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9. That's 1 though 9 without the 8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 times the multiples of 9 (9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81) = beauty. What you get is 9 digits of . well, see for yourself. It is interesting that the digits in the above multiples when individually added together equal 9. For example, 1 + 8 = 9; 2 + 7 = 9; 3 + 6 = 9; 6 + 3 = 9 and so on. Many radio telescopes are searching for a signal from intelligent life in outer space. Guess what? This is only one example of what many of us already know: All creation proclaims the glory of God! Submitted by LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Deputy JIB Director: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Last week we addressed personal secu rity while on leave. Military bases gener ally have a lower crime rate than cities and towns. However theft of personal property is still prominent. Listed below are helpful hints to secure personal property in your housing. Ensure you secure all items that are of importance to you. Always have windows, rooms and rear and front doors locked. Dont keep valuables out in the open. The same goes for your vehicle (if you are lucky enough to own one). Lock your doors and roll your windows up when you can. Place small valuables in a drawer that has a lock on it. If you own a bike, secure it with a bike lock. Engrave or mark your property in an area that is not easily noticeable with mark ings such as: your last four digits of your social security number on the bottom of your laptop ot your last name on your CDs or DVDs inner ring in permanent marker. Photographs will aid your insurance claims and give law enforcement personnel a visual reference for identification. Keep ing a log of serial numbers, make, model, and identifying marks will also be helpful. Do not keep large sums of money at your housing unit. If you have a work order to have something in your billeting fixed, ensure that someone is home to give access and to keep an eye on things. Be proactive in the safeguarding of your valuables it is the best deterrence against crime. Here are some recommended websites you can use for further information http://www.prevent-crime.com/ http://www.crimepreventiontips.com/ You are responsible for securing your valuables. Submitted by Cpl. Jason Doyle MP AT/FP/PMO Numbers Protecting Your Personal Property Notice of Article 15 Adjudication A soldier was found guilty after a proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, dereliction in the per formance of duty. The Field Grade non-judicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 28 April 2002 at the Camp Frank D. Merrill, Dahlonega Ga., the soldier will fully failed to prepare for and com plete a ruck march. Additionally, on or about 21 June 2002 at Camp Delta, the sol dier failed to stay awake while posted as a guard during the inter view of a detainee. On or about 26 June 2002, at Camp America, the soldier negligently failed to secure a sensitive item, a radio, and will fully failed to tell the truth regard ing the sensitive item when questioned about it, which was his duty to do. The soldier was reduced one grade to Specialist (E-4) and was given 15 days extra duty. NCOs ARE EXPECTED TO SET THE STANDARD AND WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE WHEN THEY ARE DERELICT IN THE PERFORMANCE OF THEIR DUTY. Page 15 Friday, August 9, 2002 New champs emerge after softball showdown The Iguanas and the JTF-160 Regulars had to battle one another to keep their dreams of winning a softball championship alive. The Iguanas, who were the three-year reigning champs, were on the verge of losing the title. Both teams had to win to keep their hopes alive in the league. JTF-160s record was 9-0 coming into this game and the Iguanas record was 8-1 with their only loss to JTF-170. The stakes were high, with the season itself on the line. The tension was high on both benches from the moment they came out of their dugouts to play ball. JTF-160 jumped out to an early lead as their lead-off hitter scored the first run in the game. The Iguanas answered in the bottom of the first by banging out four hits and scoring three times. The score was now 3-1. The hard-hitting sluggers on JTF-160s team went cold after the first inning. The Iguanas pitching and defense shut down the Regulars for the second and third innings. The bottom half of the second inning the Iguanas eighth, ninth and tenth batter in the line-up were retired one, two, three. Things changed in the third inning as the top of the Iguanas line-up started a four-run rally. Their momentum was carried over into the forth inning as they scored another five runs. JTF-160 fought hard and valiantly to keep their hopes for a championship alive, but the Igua nas were too tough. The game concluded with the Iguanas on top, 12 to 5. The win gave hope to the Igua nas as JTF-160 was sent home packing and thinking of next sea son. The Iguanas hope for a fourpeat lied in the hands of JTF-170. We are going to stand by to see if JTF-170 loses. They were the only team to beat the Iguanas. It was a close game and the score was 8 to 5, said Navy Petty Offi cer 1st Class Michael B. Pace. The Iguanas had put away one JTF team and they were hoping to do the same to JTF-170. It felt good beating JTF. They were undefeated in the sea son. It felt good beating an Army team. GO NAVY! said Pace. The score did not indicate the way JTF-160 played; a few errors hurt the team. They were a very good team. They made a couple of mistakes that cost them a few runs, but we were able to hit the ball when it counted and that is what really matters. We did not make too many mistakes in the game that was the key to the win, said Pace. The Iguanas are a tight-knit team that has been playing together for a while, according to Pace. We also have a good team. We had a couple of people come and go, but we basically had the same people playing for us, said Pace. We had a lot of Navy reservists playing with us this year. The team is mostly com prised of active duty sailors. We had the same team for about three scheduled softball seasons, said Pace. The level of play has increased in the last seasons. Both joint task forces helped boost the competition of softball on the island, said Pace. The Iguanas didnt want their hopes of a four-peat to go up in smoke. The destiny of both the Igua nas and JTF-160s Regulars was in the hands of JTF-170. They were in control of the champi onship. JTF-170 was one win away from winning it all. This game wasnt going to be a cakewalk. The 342nd MP Co. was determined to spoil it for JTF-170 but JTF-170 was focused on the outcome of the game. JTF-170 jumped out to a three-run lead in the top of the first with the power of the first three batters in the line-up. 342nd MP came back with two runs in the bottom of the first. The first inning was a hard fought battle both offensively and defensively. This game meant a lot to JTF170. A loss would force them into a play-off game against JTF-160. In the top of the second inning JTF-170 came out swinging and put up five runs on the score board. The MPs where not able to score in the bottom half of the inning because of JTF-170s stel lar defensive performance. Each team scored a run in the third inning. JTF-170 pulled away by adding seven more runs in the forth and fifth innings to cap their undefeated season. When the dust had settled, JTF-170 had taken care of busi ness on the field by crushing the 342nd MP Co. 16 to 3. This win clinched the summer softball league championship for JTF-170. Their unblemished record marked the start of a new king on the softball diamond. At the games end a celebration erupted from JTF-170s dug-out. The war cry was TEAM WORK! That was the key to vic tory for the new champions. The Iguanas championship run fell short this time, but look for them to come back next season. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Sgt. Todd T. Taylor from JTF-160 connects for a double to straight center field. He later scored a run against the Iguanas in the final game of the season. Army Maj. Joyce A. Comstock swings and connects for a hit down the third base line against the Iguanas on Saturday nights game.

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Page 14 Friday, August 9, 2002 The first of a series of events to celebrate the Jamaican PreIndependence Celebration 2002 kicked off Monday at Phillips Park. The festive event commem morated 40 years of independ ence from British rule. The Jamaican Employees Com mittee, COM NAVBASE and the Jamaican Min istry of Labor sponsored the Jamaican Indepen dence Day Cele bration, said Igol Burkett, president of The Jamaican Employees Com mittee. We also had many volun teers from the community help coordinate this event. The ceremony began with an invocation by Pastor Michael Wilks, and was followed by opening remarks by Burkett. At 12:30 p.m., the staff of Morale, Welfare and Recre ation brought out a lunch laden with Jamaican specialties such as curried goat, ackee, codfish, jerk pork, jerk chicken, red beans and rice. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class William Reid was one of the many GTMO servicemembers who took time out to enjoy the party at Phillips Park. The celebration is great and the food is fabulous. The cur ried goat is my favorite, said Reid. The food here is making me think of home. My wife, who is Jamaican, has always cooked and treated me to great Jamaican food back home. Back home, me and my wife would have been celebrat ing [Jamaican] independence day at her mothers house right now at home in Pennsylvania. We attended many festivals there. This was my first festival in GTMO, and it was wonder ful. Just what I needed, said Reid. Feelings of national pride permeated the celebration. I am proud to be Jamaican, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Pamella Mason. I am enjoying the celebra tion very much. The food, the drinks and the Jamaican music are great. I really love Jamaican music, she said. The New Creation Band provided most of the music for the party. The band covered a variety of old and new Jamaican songs. There was also a disc jockey spinning his magic, as the appreciative crowd swayed to reggae beats. The euphoria that the people were showing for their native land is what attracted many to the celebration, regardless of their own nationalities. I have been in GTMO for a year and a half now said Mason. This is my second fes tival. I was working last year so I missed most of that one. This year I made sure I was off from work. I am really enjoying this one. GTMOs Jamaican festival has been going on for 20 years now. Due to its continued suc cess, the Jamaican community here can look forward to this special day for years to come, according to Burkett. I have been organizing the Jamaican Independence Day celebration for 10 years now, said Burkett. We want the people on base to have a good time and enjoy themselves. I feel proud with the response we are getting from the GTMO com munity. The Indepen dence Day cele bration is not only about people enjoying them selves, but it is also an opportu nity to learn about the past struggles the Jamaicans have had. As a Jamaican, we look at Independence Day as a birthright. I am 40 years old now and from where we have come, to where we are right now, to where we are going is a big step for Jamaica, said Bur kett. As the Jamaican people cel ebrate the 40 years of progress that has been made in Jamaica, the GTMO community comes together with them to form a tight bound. I just want to say thank you to the GTMO community for their continued support. We will continue to make great strides in the future together, said Burkett. You can count on that. I may not be here too long. I am going back home to Jamaica to be with my family. I am sad to say I may not be a part of next years celebration. I wish all the Jamaicans and the people of GTMO all the best. Jamaicans celebrate forty years of independence Story by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Flag Football starts this Monday, August 12th and Tuesday, August 13th. Tournament days will run Mon. Sat. Unit personnel still may submit team rosters, but they will be placed on a waiting list at Denich Gym. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8 PM Free movie, Lyceum & Camp Buckeley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower, Paintball Range, Sat. & Weds., 1:00PM-7:00PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Today, Friday, August 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, Night Fishing Trip, M.W.R. Marina. Saturday, August 10th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Tournament Part VIII, Marble Head Lanes. Sunday, August 11th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, JTF Commanders Cup Series Chess Tour nament, CBQ. Monday, August 12th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 13th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round One, JTF 160 Commanders Cup Series Dart Tournament, CBQ. Wednesday, August 14th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Thursday, August 15th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Yudelkis Pimentel dances on stage with one of the Kool Boys during the celebration. Page 3 Friday, August 9, 2002 The servicemembers of the Joint Logistics Support Group are in charge of supplying all of JTF-160 and Camp America here at GTMO. Distributing all over the island, they handle everything from consumable items to office supplies to detainee laundry. They toil away day after day, whether it is in their warehouse or on a delivery mission. If it wasnt for the tireless efforts of this joint force, you wouldnt have your goods when and where theyre are needed. They do their mission to help you do yours. Joint Logistics Support Group Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Dan Auxier, using every ounce of concentration in his body, skillfully places a package down on a load ing platform outside of the warehouse with the aid of a high-speed forklift. Army Spc. Kevin Wetherbee I like doing my job here. Im trained in artillery, so when I came here I had to learn this job field on my own. I picked it up pretty fast though. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Staff Sgt. Russell L. Walker tears into a box to begin inventory on packages at the warehouse. Air Force Staff Sgt. Russell L. Walker I think that JTF-160 is the most unor ganized outfit Ive seen in my nine years in the Air Force. Still, weve changed things for the better here. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Lamberson When I first got here, I was worried I wouldnt have anything to do, but now I couldnt be more a part of the operation here. I love my job. Army Spc. Dan Auxier Our operation here is crucial. We make things happen, and our hands are on everything. We deal with a lot of junk. It never gets dull around here.

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Page 4 Friday, August 9, 2002 This weeks question: Whats the last thing youve broken? Army Staff Sgt. Joseph Ronan, 418th Trans Co. I broke my jaw about two years ago playing basketball. It was rough. Army Sgt. Stacy Powel, Medical Well, my arm isnt broken, I just bruised it tripping over an iquana on my rollerblades. Army Spc. Angelo Baca, 418th Trans Co. I know I broke the golden rule of going to the hair cutting place here. They jacked me up. Mr. Reginald McLean, Kvaerner Contractor I dont break any thing. I am a man of safety. While other people break stuff, I work to fix. Andy Pollak, Young Civilian I broke my com puter. I took it apart experimenting and coulnt get it back together again. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Young guns! Marine Corps Lance Cpl. David M. Hueban of Marine Corps Security Force Company, DET A, Bravo Co. 123, reserve unit from Texas, shows a young GTMO resident the ways of the weapon on top of a combat-ready, mounted Humvee during the 2002 National Night Out, an event held to strengthen police and community partnerships. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Across 1 Ship initials 4 Tender loving care 7 Papa 10 Jacobs father 12 Petite 13 Baseball player Hank __ 15 Bundle 16 Atomic particle 17 Book holder 18 Tangle 19 Fall month 21 __ Chi 23 Entire 24 Cowboy rope 26 Yellow flower 28 Possessive pronoun 30 Pennsylvania (abbr.) 31 Theme 34 Praise 36 World organization 40 Sarcastic 41 __ league school 42 Roman twelve 43 __ upon a time 45 Proposal position 47 Sense 48 Cabana 50 Part to play 52 Chocolate tree 54 Boater 57 Pester 58 South by west 60 Popular presidents initials 61 Can 63 Cool 65 Pride 67 Swarm 69 Scrubs off 70 Glee 71 Places 72 Fixed charge 73 Dynamite 74 Harden Down 1 Normal 2 Father Christmas 3 Pouch 4 British idiot 5 MGMs Lion 6 Coin 7 Dits partner 8 Regions 9 Furniture mover 10 Computer makers 11 Picked 13 From Asia 14 Football assoc. 20 Corporation (abbr.) 22 A foxs hole (2 wds.) 25 That girl 27 Lodge 29 Holy person 30 Money handler 31 Dual 32 Pot 33 New York City 35 Evening 37 Hatchet 38 Truss 39 Grease 44 And so forth 45 Door handle 46 Noble 47 Some 49 Comforts 51 Noblemen 52 Title of Islams head 53 Open 55 Display emotions 56 Tangle 57 North by west 59 Woof 60 Baptistery 62 Agreement 64 Meet 66 Bullet shooter 68 Big truck Page 13 Friday, August 9, 2002 Eagerly anticipating whats to come, I let the brain go numb Release the beast And let the oxygen flow freely From my head This is a life That most others dread So why do I smile? Cause Ive already been hit in the face With a handful of bile, Do you think I still suffer denial? NO CHANCE At a loved ones funeral I dance I can get beat down by life, But Ill still hold my stance. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 2 puzzle Friday, August 9 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min 10 p.m. The Bourne Identity PG13 -118min Saturday, August 10 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70min 10 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 91min Sunday, August 11 8 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Monday, August 12 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, PG13 116min Tuesday, August 13 8 p.m. Road to Perdition, R 119min Wednesday, August 14 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min Thursday, August 15 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG13 91min

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of Camp America, said JTF-160s Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro.The process of change involved a lot of people. It was sent up to the top of the chain where it was inves tigated and blessed by the general. The com mander is here to try to make life and the living conditions as easy as he can for the troops. Making things easier for the troops is a sen timent that those troops definitely share. I think it was a common-sense decision, said Spc. Robert Lovely, Joint Information Bureau via the 43rd MP Brigade. With the buses being as spread out as they are, being able to take a Humvee all around the base without having to get all suited up will defi nitely make life a little bit easier. The new policy is definitely a good one, said Army Staff Sgt. Elgin L. Miller, 239th Military Police Company, who lives out at Camp America. Its hard to catch a bus around here to take you where you have to go. Now, well have some more time to get to our jobs and take care of our personal things on our own time. This will definitely benefit us. The troops out at Camp America should benefit the most from this change, giving them another option for transportation rather than only waiting for that lonely bus that seems to seldom roll their way. More use of the Humvees will mean more transportation assets for the troops, said Funaro. Our troops out at Camp America are a big priority to us, and they should be posi tively affected by the change. It used to be harder for us to transport back and forth from out at Camp America into town, said Miller. Now it is easier for us to get around, and this benefits us for many dif ferent reasons. Overall, this change in policy should act as a healthy dose of morale for those who once had places to go but no way to get there. This is great. Instead of waiting for a bus, I can either throw on a Physical Training uni form and drive the Humvee to the gym, or I can wear civilian clothes and have a buddy in uniform drive me there, said Lovely. I think its a real morale booster, said Miller. Now more servicemembers can get out there and participate in Morale, Welfare and Recreation events. Youll be able to get around and meet new people. Thats a good thing. Not only the servicemembers who are using tactical vehicles for transportation will benefit from this change, but also the troops who already have the job of supplying rides. I could see this policy light ening the load on the buses, said Funaro. A lot of people ride the buses out of Camp America, and they just added another bus to the route, said Spc. Brandon Stanley of the 43rd Military Police Brigade and attached to the 418th Transportation Company. But there are a lot of Humvees around at Camp America and throughout the rest of the base, so the change in policy may somewhat have an effect on the amount of people who choose to ride the buses. Well have to see. Even though the rules of wearing a uniform while traveling in a tacti cal vehicle have soft ened with the new change of policy, the laws of wearing the Kevlar off-road stand firm. As stated in Forces Command Regulation 385, Head protection (Kevlar helmet, CVC or flight helmet as appropriate) will be worn by all personnel operating or riding as a passen ger in Army tactical vehicles in the field. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the commanding general, U.S. Armed Forces Command. Wearing a Kevlar off of the paved road on any military installation is policy Armywide, said Funaro. Safety purposes are of great importance in the military. On the roads around here at GTMO, I dont think a Kevlar is much to worry about, said Lovely. Off of the roadway, the Kevlar could play a different role, maybe even save your life if things get real rough. As the days pass by and the new policy grows older and better-known, more and more servicemembers will be seen traveling around GTMO in their vehicles wearing their more comfortable attire. This is great for us, said Miller. You wont see me waiting for the bus anymore. All is working out well so far, said Funaro. The new policy seems to be making a big difference. In many cases when individuals are given something, it is taken for granted and not accepted as a privilege. When this is the case, sometimes your progress can be lost as fast as it is gained. If people start taking advantage of the pol icy, it will have to be looked over again, said Funaro. So now instead of waiting soaked in per spiration, it will be easier for you to acquire transportation to your next destination. Just have an operator throw on an official suit, and the rest of the crew could be wearing civilian clothes en route. Page 5 Friday, August 9, 2002 POLICY, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Chris Wall, 418th Transportaton Co., pulls out with an empty bus. Is everyone in Humvees? Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Elgin L. Miller, 239th MP Co., lets his mind ponder on how nice it is to be able to roll around GTMO in his civilian attire. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Christian Farrell, JTF-160, returns home from doing yoga at the gym. Young JTF-160 airman awarded junior servicemember of the quarter Page 12 Friday, August 9, 2002 The U.S. Naval Base Command of Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba, selected a junior enlisted servicemember currently assigned to Joint Task Force 160 as the Junior Servicemem ber of the Quarter at a ceremony held Tues day at JTF-160s Headquarters. Airman 1st Class Ashlee L. Gros, from the JTF-160s J-6 shop, competed against a group of junior enlisted service members from the different branches here on base after she was nominated by JTF-160s own selection board made up of Army Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Funaro and other top enlisted personnel of the taskforce. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the commander of JTF-160, stood by Gros as she received a commaders coin and a certificate of recognition from Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, the base commander. Before presenting the certificate, Buehn read its inscription as follows: In recognition of your outstanding performance of duty; exemplary per sonal and military character; pride of service; and your unselfish contribu tions to the welfare of the community and your command. Its a great accomplishment to receive an award like this in a joint environment, said Buehn, looking at the young airman standing firmly at attention. I feel surprised and excited to be recog nized by the JTF-160 and the Navy com mand, said Gros. At first, I didnt think I stood a chance against the other three Navy servicemembers. But I remained calm and confident when I appeared before the board made of top enlisted Navy and Marines per sonnel at Bulkeley Hall. Gros was tested on basic military knowl edge, the military code of conduct and cur rent events. The competition was very tough. All the services were represented, said Navy BMCM (SW) Jack C. Donohoe, senior enlisted advisor and the acting command master chief who chaired the Navy selection board. A1C Gros was outstanding in her answers. She was very professional and sharp when she met with the oral board. Thats why the majority of the votes went in her favor, said Donohoe. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth French, who was selected to represent JTF160 in the senior servicemember category, did not hesitate to say, Gros was an excellent choice from JTF-160 and the Navy. She is a squared away airman. You can tell by her uniform and her military bearing. I could not be happier for her, said French. I think all candidates whose names were submitted presented themselves in a profes sional manner. They are an asset to their branch of service and JTF-160, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham, who collected all the names that were submit ted for the award and sent a letter of com mendation to all of the JTF-160 candidates. Unfortunately, said Cunningham, we had to pick only one senior and one junior of our servicemembers to represent the taskforce. As the servicemember of the quarter, Gros is entitled to a four-day special liberty, a COMNAVBASE ball cap and a Yankee Helo Flight. Her photograph will be displayed at Bulkeley Hall Quarterdeck. For her accomplishment, Gros also received praises from her immediate supervi sors, co-workers and friends. She is the epitome of the junior enlisted across all the other services, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael Forde, the J-6 superintendent and the advisor for the Air Force personnel currently assigned to JTF160. I am really proud of her, he said. It was a great experience for me. It taught me a lot about myself. Now, I know I can do whatever I put my mind to, said Gros. Gros has been in the Air Force for two years. Before she joined, she did four years of Air Force JROTC while she was in high school. She graduated JROTC as a cadet colonel commander. I love it. I was very good at what I did, Gros said. I am all about leadership. I felt that the Air Force was for me, said Gros, who wants to become an officer. She was also an honor guard, where she learned how to manipulate an M-16 rifle and perform drill and ceremony. Gros, who will turn 20 in September, car ries herself with pride. Her battle dress uni form (BDU) is tight and crisp as if it could stand all by itself on a hard surface. Her com bat boots are highly or religiously shined. Thanks to my roommate Spc. Ivey Hodges, who taught me the Iveys magic shine, said Gros. She is mature beyond her years, and she has a focus to the mission beyond her rank, said Air Force Lt. Col. Teresa McGonagill, the officer in charge of the J-6 shop. She is fan tastic, proactive and excited about her work. I like working in a joint envi ronment, said Gros, who works as a watch officer and communic tions operator for J-6. I get to learn about the other branches. Gros takes pride in her work. Before she came here, she used to call me from Andrews Air Force Base, and ask me how it is at GTMO, said Forde. When she came here, she was prepared, and she has not stopped impress ing all of us. Shes doing a super job. I cant say enough. Gros is originally from New Orleans, but she was stationed at Andrews AFB, Md., before she volunteered to come to GTMO. I love it here, she said. I like the water. Ive made some very good friends. I love liv ing in a house with my roommates. Its been like fun having a roommate like Ashlee, said Airman 1st Class Brooke Smith. If I have a bad day, when I come home I complain to her, and she quickly changes the subject and gets me to forget about it. She is very considerate. Ashlee is friendly, open, outgoing and she motivates all of us, especially in the morning, when she reminds all of us why we have to go to work, said Smith. Ashlee was very excited and amazed when Lt. Col. McGonagill dropped by the house to deliver the good news, said another roommate, Army Sgt. Michelle Pessoa. When we heard the news, added Smith, we were very happy. The people who live in the Loop could have heard us rejoicing. McGonagill said, Its a double win for us. I cant be happier to have a J-6 staff member arrive at this level. Thats one of my successes here. And by getting this award, said Forde, Gros opens the door to the other junior enlisted. I hope they follow her footsteps. Story and photo By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, the base commander, A1C Ashlee Gros, the ser vicemember of the quarter, and Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus attending the award ceremony Tuesday at JTF-160s Headquarters.

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Youve seen the patch a shield, a cas tle wall and a pike pointing up toward the sky with three wavy lines under neath. This is the patch of the National Guard 43rd Military Police Brigade, and its meaning is symbolic of the function that they are perform ing at GTMO. The fortification above the wavy bars alludes to the wall surround ing 15th century Rhodes, capital of the Island of Rhodes, in the Eastern Mediterranean, after which the state of Rhode Island was named. The wavy bars repre sent Narra gansett Bay and the many water ways of the state. The pike, a weapon once used by guards, symbolizes the brigades ability to give protection and strong support. And, giving support is exactly what this brigade is doing. Our mis sion here is to take over command and control of the JTF-160, said Army Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro, Command Sgt. Maj.of the JTF160. We provide sup port for the detainee oper ations here, he said. Led by Brig. Gen. Rick Bac cus, JTF-160 commander, and manned with approximately 100 soldiers, they are a force to be reckoned with. They are dis persed throughout the head quarters building and Pink Palace, and are the logistical backbone of this operation. Coming to JTF-160 with 100 soldiers, though, meant spreading the unit across a vari ety of jobs. We have soldiers working in intelligence, legal, civil affairs, and other administrative positions, said Capt. Daniel C. Lutz, commandant for the JTF160. A big plus to being here is being able to cross-train and gain experience in different areas, said Spc. Curtis L. Mathews. We are doing an outstanding job, and are armed with exceptional leadership and dedicated soldiers. The dedication and hard working nature of these sol diers is known and expected by those who lead them. I have complete confidence in all our soldiers, they have been dispersed into various jobs and are doing well. They adapted very quickly to the JTF environment, said Lutz. Being apart of the JTF and in the command seat, the 43rd leaders are concerned for all JTF-160 troops. They all belong to me! I treat everyone of these troops the same. Thats why the JTF160 color is purple, regardless of branch of service, they are all my troops. We all wear the color purple here, Funaro said. Although this is their first deployment overseas, the 43rd Bde has received the Guberna torial Unit Citation several times for exceptional meritori ous conduct in the performance of outstanding service. Most recently, the brigade received a Gubernatorial Unit Citation for serving as the Task Force Headquarters for Home land Security in recognition of their performance while con ducting Airport Security and for their deployment to GTMO in support of Operation Endur ing Freedom. Look for the 43rd to return home to Rhode Island and pick up a few more. 43rd MP BDE: Logistical backbone of JTF-160 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Page 11 Friday, August 9, 2002 Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro pins an award on Pfc. Gerald D. Murphy. All fires require a Hot Work Permit from the Fire Prevention Office Building 2164 Phone #4598/4611. Permits are issued Monday through Friday 0700 1600. No permits are issued after 1600 on Friday. WARNING! ALL NON-PERMIT BONFIRES ARE ILLE GAL AND SHALL BE EXTINGUISHED. THINK BEFORE YOU LIGHT Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The 43rd MP Bde soldiers gather at the McCalla Hill Hanger to be recognized by distinguished visitors from Rhode Island. Meeting the press: GTMO gears Page 6 Friday, August 9, 2002 Army Capt. Sandra M. Orlandella is get ting very busy again these days. As the Joint Information Bureaus operations officer here, its her job to plan and coordinate all media visits to Guantanamo Bay. She makes up the itineraries, sets up interviews and press con ferences, and generally makes sure the U.S. and international media gets the story they come for without, of course, violating operational security. And the GTMO detention operation looks about to enter another phase of media madness. The first round was back in January when the detainees first arrived, she said. The second was in the spring when they were moved from XRay to Delta. And now, with the anniver sary of Sept. 11 get ting close, theyre coming back. Since May 13, Orlandella estimated, only 50 media have come through; this week a group of 12 is on the ground and thats after teams expected from CNN and the BBC rescheduled their visit for the coming weeks. It may only be the beginning. I expect the pace to double by Sept. 11, to two groups of 24 every week, Orlandella said. Some are coming back here to prepare something for Sept. 11, some want to be here that day. Were getting a lot of special requests, like live broadcasts on the anniversary, that were not going to be able to accomodate. But as long as we have quarters for them, they can come and stay as long as they want. This weeks visitors arrived on Wednesday for the full detention-operation treatment visits to approved observation points outside Camp X-Ray and Camp Delta, a tour of GTMO and opportu nities to interview Delta guards Thurs day at their quarters in Camp America. Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, like Orlan della (and the staff of The Wire) a member of the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of New York City, is the escort chief, charged with escort ing the civilian press around GTMO, answering their ques tions about the opera tion and keeping them advised and in line as to what the lim itations of OPSEC are while theyre here. Where they cant pho tograph, where they can, and with what lenses. Interviews with passing soldiers are prohibited; approved interviews are set up through the JIB. And of course, while theyre on the Windward side, civilian media are to stay with their escorts at all times. To a journalist after the whole story, or at least something to beat the competition, those limitations can be frustrating. What wed like to see and what were going to see are two different things, said photographer Harry Page of the British tabloid The Mirror Hopefully well get something its a long way to come to take pictures of OPSEC signs. But The Mirror is here nevertheless. Espe cially as September approaches. We would be here anyway, said Page. But with the Sept. 11th anniversary coming up, the public interest in Europe is going to be as high as ever. That makes whatever story we get that much better. His colleague on the visit, Mirror U.S. edi tor Richard Wallace, is the kind of journalist military public-affairs people tend to keep a close eye on. His paper is aimed at a Euro pean audience deemed more critical of the detention operation here than most American news outlets. But Wallace says hes not here to criticize the operation itself, or its treatment of the detainees at Camp Delta. Instead, he says, he wants to bring up questions not about the operations methods but its very existence why, to what purpose, and for how long. Were not saying that these detainees are all nice boys who love their mothers not at all...the question is, we got these guys, theyre many of them bad guys, what are we going to do with them now? Im here to try to find out what the next step is going to be. Does he expect to find that here, where Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Roy Freddy Andersen of Norwegian newspaper Ver dens Gang takes notes at Camp X-Ray while escort Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg looks on. No wasted time: Members of the civilian press file off the ferry at Windward side and get to work. Photographers Richard Wallace from The Mirror (UK), left, and Thomas Nilsson from Verdens Gang line up shots at Camp X-Ray while escort Spc. Jose Martinez looks on.

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178th MPs: Buckeleys Bulldogs Page 10 Friday, August 9, 2002 The arrow-shaped sign tacked onto the out side of the barracks points up and away, M*A*S*H*-style: Monroe, 1243 miles. After the building number, 1210, someone has scrawled: Roosevelt Road. In between is plastered a University of Georgia Go Dawgs bumper sticker. This is Camp Buckeley, Guantanamo Bay, the suburb of the suburb of the detention area of Camp Delta. But while Camp America down the road teems with a half-dozen guard units or more, the huts of Buckeley is the fulltime home of just one: the 178th Military Police Co., National Guard members out of Monroe, Ga. These hundred-plus MPs work together, live together, eat together, and do their best to make it feel like home. Suffice it to say there isnt much of a problem with unit cohesion. Two things make our unit unique here, says Army Capt. William J. Carlyle. We work in the JIF (Joint Interrogation Facility), moving the detainees back and forth from the interro gation rooms and their detention area and were the only unit to do that as a whole, all together. And were the only unit living fulltime at Buckeley. A while back, they wanted to split us up between Camp America and here, said Wilbanks. I fought it. I wanted to keep the cohesiveness. I want us all to stay right here until were done. The cement barracks of Camp Buckeley may be aging a bit, but as a neighborhood its smaller, quieter, and greener than its SEAhutstudded sibling. Less people, less gravel, more shade. And the 178th has the place all to itself. So it is mostly with the mission manning the JIF with rotating shifts that can stretch to most of the day when new detainees arrive and get their initial interrogations and getting detainees around Camp Delta safely, securely and without any trouble. We take them out of their area, search them, take them to the interrogation room, wait outside until theyre done, search them on the way out, take them back to their area, says Wilbanks. Its pretty basic stuff, just takes common sense and security-minded soldiering. But we feel like were making a real contribu tion to the mission here. This is a great opportunity for our National Guard unit. This is the first time this unit has been deployed overseas in a real-world mission since WWII, Carlyle said. Weve done the Olympics, weve done hurricanes, torna does, floods, snowstorms. When we got called up in February, we went to Fort Benning for the first five months, to help out with force protec tion there. But this is a chance to make a direct contri bution to the war on terror on behalf of our state, and were proud to be doing it, he said. That Georgia pride extends to college foot ball with units down at Camp A from South eastern Conference territories like Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, Bulldog pride is a duty and the units painted rock that, as a bonus, happens to be shaped like its home state. Georgia has been returning the compliment. The University of Georgia sports department sends paraphenalia. The Atlanta Journal-Con stitution came down for a two-part piece. And this week the Macon Telegraph has two reporters at GTMO looking in on these Geor gians down here making good. Like operations chief Master Sgt. Thomas Little, from Eatonton, who left the construction business he owns to be here: I feel good about being here. With so much going on in the world, were helping keep it safe. Or Sgt. Johnny R. Graves, a deputy sherriff and volun teer fireman in Comer, Ga. who was called off of Independent Ready Reserve after 9-11 and moved from Tennessee back to Georgia to be deployed with the 178th. This is what I origi nally got in for, he said. Spc. Stephen Kussmaul transferred from the Marines on the very day the 178th got deployed. Spc. Robert Alvarez, a native Texan, had just gotten off active duty, living in Atlanta, and joined the 178th when suddenly he was active all over again. To be honest, he said, I dont know how I feel about this. Spc. John M. Davis, a police officer (and big Bulldogs fan) at home, said hes not only serv ing his country but getting experience he can take back home. Sgt. Tommy Long worked for PepsiCola in Atlanta. Spc. Tim Durant was a sales rep for Stanley Tools. This is important work, he said. Somebodys got to do it. Spc. Tamara Poole knows this work pretty well shes been a corrections officer in Sandersville, Ga. for eight years. She wouldnt have minded staying at Benning for the dura tion she got to see a lot of her son that way but Buckley isnt so bad and detainee han dling at the JIF could be worse. Weve proba bly got one of the better missions here. I have a great group of friends, and Im glad we didnt get split up. We go to the movies, hang out. I cook a lot of soul food. You just try to make it as close to home as possible. Spc. Julie Edwards, the companys adminis trative clerk, might have grown up in Florida go Gators but with two older sisters in the unit before her, shes known Capt. Carlyle for 12 years and 1st Sgt. Wilbanks for 14. Living at Buckeley makes our unit more like a family, because its just us, she said. I like it here. Im having a good time. And even though I just work in the office and not at Detla or anything, when Im watching a football game and the broadcasters say they want to thank the troops supporting our country I know this sounds corny, but its the greatest feeling in the world. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Army Capt. William J. Carlyle, commander of the 178th, and 1st Sgt. Larry Wilbanks pose with the Georgia-shaped company rock. Spc. Julie Stewart leans against a barracks after her shift on Camp Buckeleys main drag. Clockwise from front left: Spc. Robert Alvarez, Sgt. Tommy Long, Spc. Stephen Kussmaul and Spc. Tamara Poole grab some shade after work. American military policies are carried out but not made? Im not confident because the general, like all of you, will say were doing our duty, weve been asked to take care of this business by the politicians, and were taking care of this business, he said. Im not being superoptimistic that Im going to get an answer here. Maybe well get some clues. But theres no harm in asking the ques tion, he said. Which is what weve been doing all along. Just ask the questions that have to be asked, and hopefully, that will channel the minds of the politicians. Julian Borger works for another British paper, The Guardian and hes playing things a little straighter. Theres plenty of room on the editorial pages to debate the rights and wrongs, which are really the legal issues, he said. Im just coming to describe what its like here. Other wise youre arguing in a vacuum, without a clear idea of what the place is like. The anniversary coverage will be very big, he said. Its a worldwide issue. And for me, I think the angle is going to be what has become of all those inmates at Guantanamo Bay that you heard about all those months ago. Where are they, whats happening with them now. As for the security environment here, the Washington-based Borger has covered wars in Angola, Mozambique and Saudi Arabia. GTMO, he said, is a much more controlled environment for a journalist to work in. Inevitably, its difficult to get a sense of what its like inside the camp. But you have to understand the limitations. Roy Freddy Andersen and Thomas Nils son, with the Norwegian paper Verdens Gang are also here for the big picture. If we were writing for a local American newspaper, we would be doing a military angle. But there are no Norwegian soldiers here. So were going to get whatever we can on the detainees. Well get whatever you let us get. We have to do the best that we can. He paused. The Kvaerner company here is owned by a Norwegian millionaire, he said. Maybe well do a side piece on that. Wayne Partridge and Grant Tyler Blanken ship from the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph though, were indeed here for a miltary angle: the 178th MP company out of Monroe, Ga. (see page 10). Were going to talk to them and do a story for the Georgia audience, Partridge said. Theyre the guys who take the detainees to and from the interrogations. Theyre really the hands-on guys, and its something people at home really want to read about. Whatever angle the stories begun this week will take, if Wednesdays visit was any indication GTMOs expected busy season for media visits in the weeks leading up to the one-year anniversary of Sept. 11 will go smoothly. Journalists seemed understanding of if occasionally frustrated by the security limitations inherent in the detention operation. No one risked expulsion by taking pictures in prohibited areas, or interviewed anybody they werent supposed to, and after the endof-the-day stop at the Naval Exchange every one was back on the bus on time. And JTF-160 will continue to open its arms to the U.S. and international media. Were in an active posture, said Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey, Public Affairs Offi cer of JTF-160. We readily engage the media within our public affairs guidance and the needs of operational security. We have certain limitations, but we actively welcome the media here, he said. Both to tell the servicemembers story and also to clarify what the detention operation is all about, so America and the world knows what were doing, and so families back home can see why their loved one is here. For Orlandella, her job is about just what the JIB name suggests: information. People outside the military need to know what we do here. I think we need to give the most we can without violating security and putting anyone in danger. We need to put a face on the uniform and on the detainee mis sion here. American citizens deserve to know whats going on, especially after Sept. 11. Everyone saw that, she said. This is what were doing about it. This is what were doing to prevent it from happening again, and its important that the American people and the world get to see that too. Ian James of the Associated Press jots down a few facts at the Camp X-Ray observation point, assisted by Navy JO1 Christopher G. Sherwood. Page 7 Friday, August 9, 2002 up for Sept. 11 anniversary rush JIB says: Theres no such thing as off the record! Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds briefs writers and photographers at the Camp X-Ray observation point.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 9, 2002 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa JTF-160 force protection staff, together with base firemen and hospital personnel, conducted an accident response exercise on Friday to gauge preparedness for rescuing someone who has fallen down a cliffside. The spot chosen was the cliffs near the Seaside Galley at Camp America. At approximately 10 a.m., a mannequin was cast over the side of the cliff to simulate what could happen to a ser vicemember who had strayed too close to the edge. Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walterman immediately called 911 to report the accident. You need to get the patient to medical attention within what is known as the golden hour, said HT1 David W. Glasgow, part of the force protection team. However, the response time were looking for here is 30 minutes. Within six minutes, sirens could be heard as the ladder and Emergency Medical Services trucks streaked across the base and rushed to the scene. Twelve minutes from the time of the call, the rescuers found the site of the accident. John Sewell, the captain of the response team, leapt to the ground and got a quick update on the situation from Walterman. Firemen Patrick Wil son and Noel King rapidly tossed aside some heavy debris that was blocking the ladder truck and brought the vehi cle within 20 feet of the edge of the cliff. Meanwhile, Emergency Medical Technician Oliver Channer donned his safety helmet and strapped on his first responder medical kit. Sewell checked the tension in the rappelling cables that were harnessed to Channer. On the leaders signal Channer rappelled down the cliff to stabilize the injured dummy by adding a neck brace. Next, a Stokes Basket was lowered and a sec ond rappeller joined the first to help secure the patient. At the cry of BEEF! the firemen at the top of the cliff began steadily pulling on the rope-and-pulley system attached to the basket. A series of strong pulls brought the dummy back up to the safety of level ground. From there, the patient was placed on a stretcher and whisked away in an ambulance. minutes! announced Navy Lt. Kenneth Pace, staff nurse at the base hos pital. Excellent time. Were this a real accident, the next step would be for a sec ond survey to be taken of the patient on the way to the hospital. We would look for obvious injuries, stabilize fractures and regulate breathing. A trauma team would be alerted to stand by at the hospital. Their job successfully done, the firemen briefly celebrated with some hugs and began securing their gear immediately. When they get back to the station, theyll carefully check all of the equip ment for breaks and tears, said Walterman. The men know that next time they could be the one at the other end of the line. From (l to r): Assistant training officer Roger L. Jeffries, Army Master Sgt. David R. Morgan, HT1 David W. Glasgow and Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walterman dis cuss safety issues and benchmarks in preparation for the days exercise. Fireman Patrick Wilson and John Sewell, acting captain of Fire Company 3, exchange hugs at the successful conclusion of the exercise. HT1 David W. Glasgow, Navy Lt. Kenneth Pace, and assistant training officer Roger L. Jeffries toss a mannikin off a cliff to set the rescue mission in motion. Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walerman phones 911 to let the EMTs know that there is a man down near Camp America. Army Master Sgt. David R. Morgan evaluates the timeliness of the response team in order to pre pare an after-action report. EMT Oliver Channer prepares to rappel down the side of the cliff to triage the wounded dummy below. Acting captain John Sewell checks to make sure that the line has the proper tension. Dont be a dummy! The seaside may look inviting on a hot summer day, but the cliffs around the base are not as stable as they may seem. Noel King, driver of the ladder truck, leads the way as the Beef Team (called such because they consider themselves strong as oxen) methodically pulls the Stokes Bas ket containing the casualty back up to solid ground. Beef Team pulls weight in force protection cliff rescue exercise

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 9, 2002 Story and photos by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa JTF-160 force protection staff, together with base firemen and hospital personnel, conducted an accident response exercise on Friday to gauge preparedness for rescuing someone who has fallen down a cliffside. The spot chosen was the cliffs near the Seaside Galley at Camp America. At approximately 10 a.m., a mannequin was cast over the side of the cliff to simulate what could happen to a ser vicemember who had strayed too close to the edge. Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walterman immediately called 911 to report the accident. You need to get the patient to medical attention within what is known as the golden hour, said HT1 David W. Glasgow, part of the force protection team. However, the response time were looking for here is 30 minutes. Within six minutes, sirens could be heard as the ladder and Emergency Medical Services trucks streaked across the base and rushed to the scene. Twelve minutes from the time of the call, the rescuers found the site of the accident. John Sewell, the captain of the response team, leapt to the ground and got a quick update on the situation from Walterman. Firemen Patrick Wil son and Noel King rapidly tossed aside some heavy debris that was blocking the ladder truck and brought the vehi cle within 20 feet of the edge of the cliff. Meanwhile, Emergency Medical Technician Oliver Channer donned his safety helmet and strapped on his first responder medical kit. Sewell checked the tension in the rappelling cables that were harnessed to Channer. On the leaders signal Channer rappelled down the cliff to stabilize the injured dummy by adding a neck brace. Next, a Stokes Basket was lowered and a sec ond rappeller joined the first to help secure the patient. At the cry of BEEF! the firemen at the top of the cliff began steadily pulling on the rope-and-pulley system attached to the basket. A series of strong pulls brought the dummy back up to the safety of level ground. From there, the patient was placed on a stretcher and whisked away in an ambulance. minutes! announced Navy Lt. Kenneth Pace, staff nurse at the base hos pital. Excellent time. Were this a real accident, the next step would be for a sec ond survey to be taken of the patient on the way to the hospital. We would look for obvious injuries, stabilize fractures and regulate breathing. A trauma team would be alerted to stand by at the hospital. Their job successfully done, the firemen briefly celebrated with some hugs and began securing their gear immediately. When they get back to the station, theyll carefully check all of the equip ment for breaks and tears, said Walterman. The men know that next time they could be the one at the other end of the line. From (l to r): Assistant training officer Roger L. Jeffries, Army Master Sgt. David R. Morgan, HT1 David W. Glasgow and Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walterman dis cuss safety issues and benchmarks in preparation for the days exercise. Fireman Patrick Wilson and John Sewell, acting captain of Fire Company 3, exchange hugs at the successful conclusion of the exercise. HT1 David W. Glasgow, Navy Lt. Kenneth Pace, and assistant training officer Roger L. Jeffries toss a mannikin off a cliff to set the rescue mission in motion. Assistant Fire Chief Steve Walerman phones 911 to let the EMTs know that there is a man down near Camp America. Army Master Sgt. David R. Morgan evaluates the timeliness of the response team in order to pre pare an after-action report. EMT Oliver Channer prepares to rappel down the side of the cliff to triage the wounded dummy below. Acting captain John Sewell checks to make sure that the line has the proper tension. Dont be a dummy! The seaside may look inviting on a hot summer day, but the cliffs around the base are not as stable as they may seem. Noel King, driver of the ladder truck, leads the way as the Beef Team (called such because they consider themselves strong as oxen) methodically pulls the Stokes Bas ket containing the casualty back up to solid ground. Beef Team pulls weight in force protection cliff rescue exercise

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178th MPs: Buckeleys Bulldogs Page 10 Friday, August 9, 2002 The arrow-shaped sign tacked onto the out side of the barracks points up and away, M*A*S*H*-style: Monroe, 1243 miles. After the building number, 1210, someone has scrawled: Roosevelt Road. In between is plastered a University of Georgia Go Dawgs bumper sticker. This is Camp Buckeley, Guantanamo Bay, the suburb of the suburb of the detention area of Camp Delta. But while Camp America down the road teems with a half-dozen guard units or more, the huts of Buckeley is the fulltime home of just one: the 178th Military Police Co., National Guard members out of Monroe, Ga. These hundred-plus MPs work together, live together, eat together, and do their best to make it feel like home. Suffice it to say there isnt much of a problem with unit cohesion. Two things make our unit unique here, says Army Capt. William J. Carlyle. We work in the JIF (Joint Interrogation Facility), moving the detainees back and forth from the interro gation rooms and their detention area and were the only unit to do that as a whole, all together. And were the only unit living fulltime at Buckeley. A while back, they wanted to split us up between Camp America and here, said Wilbanks. I fought it. I wanted to keep the cohesiveness. I want us all to stay right here until were done. The cement barracks of Camp Buckeley may be aging a bit, but as a neighborhood its smaller, quieter, and greener than its SEAhutstudded sibling. Less people, less gravel, more shade. And the 178th has the place all to itself. So it is mostly with the mission manning the JIF with rotating shifts that can stretch to most of the day when new detainees arrive and get their initial interrogations and getting detainees around Camp Delta safely, securely and without any trouble. We take them out of their area, search them, take them to the interrogation room, wait outside until theyre done, search them on the way out, take them back to their area, says Wilbanks. Its pretty basic stuff, just takes common sense and security-minded soldiering. But we feel like were making a real contribu tion to the mission here. This is a great opportunity for our National Guard unit. This is the first time this unit has been deployed overseas in a real-world mission since WWII, Carlyle said. Weve done the Olympics, weve done hurricanes, torna does, floods, snowstorms. When we got called up in February, we went to Fort Benning for the first five months, to help out with force protec tion there. But this is a chance to make a direct contri bution to the war on terror on behalf of our state, and were proud to be doing it, he said. That Georgia pride extends to college foot ball with units down at Camp A from South eastern Conference territories like Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, Bulldog pride is a duty and the units painted rock that, as a bonus, happens to be shaped like its home state. Georgia has been returning the compliment. The University of Georgia sports department sends paraphenalia. The Atlanta Journal-Con stitution came down for a two-part piece. And this week the Macon Telegraph has two reporters at GTMO looking in on these Geor gians down here making good. Like operations chief Master Sgt. Thomas Little, from Eatonton, who left the construction business he owns to be here: I feel good about being here. With so much going on in the world, were helping keep it safe. Or Sgt. Johnny R. Graves, a deputy sherriff and volun teer fireman in Comer, Ga. who was called off of Independent Ready Reserve after 9-11 and moved from Tennessee back to Georgia to be deployed with the 178th. This is what I origi nally got in for, he said. Spc. Stephen Kussmaul transferred from the Marines on the very day the 178th got deployed. Spc. Robert Alvarez, a native Texan, had just gotten off active duty, living in Atlanta, and joined the 178th when suddenly he was active all over again. To be honest, he said, I dont know how I feel about this. Spc. John M. Davis, a police officer (and big Bulldogs fan) at home, said hes not only serv ing his country but getting experience he can take back home. Sgt. Tommy Long worked for PepsiCola in Atlanta. Spc. Tim Durant was a sales rep for Stanley Tools. This is important work, he said. Somebodys got to do it. Spc. Tamara Poole knows this work pretty well shes been a corrections officer in Sandersville, Ga. for eight years. She wouldnt have minded staying at Benning for the dura tion she got to see a lot of her son that way but Buckley isnt so bad and detainee han dling at the JIF could be worse. Weve proba bly got one of the better missions here. I have a great group of friends, and Im glad we didnt get split up. We go to the movies, hang out. I cook a lot of soul food. You just try to make it as close to home as possible. Spc. Julie Edwards, the companys adminis trative clerk, might have grown up in Florida go Gators but with two older sisters in the unit before her, shes known Capt. Carlyle for 12 years and 1st Sgt. Wilbanks for 14. Living at Buckeley makes our unit more like a family, because its just us, she said. I like it here. Im having a good time. And even though I just work in the office and not at Detla or anything, when Im watching a football game and the broadcasters say they want to thank the troops supporting our country I know this sounds corny, but its the greatest feeling in the world. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Army Capt. William J. Carlyle, commander of the 178th, and 1st Sgt. Larry Wilbanks pose with the Georgia-shaped company rock. Spc. Julie Stewart leans against a barracks after her shift on Camp Buckeleys main drag. Clockwise from front left: Spc. Robert Alvarez, Sgt. Tommy Long, Spc. Stephen Kussmaul and Spc. Tamara Poole grab some shade after work. American military policies are carried out but not made? Im not confident because the general, like all of you, will say were doing our duty, weve been asked to take care of this business by the politicians, and were taking care of this business, he said. Im not being superoptimistic that Im going to get an answer here. Maybe well get some clues. But theres no harm in asking the ques tion, he said. Which is what weve been doing all along. Just ask the questions that have to be asked, and hopefully, that will channel the minds of the politicians. Julian Borger works for another British paper, The Guardian and hes playing things a little straighter. Theres plenty of room on the editorial pages to debate the rights and wrongs, which are really the legal issues, he said. Im just coming to describe what its like here. Other wise youre arguing in a vacuum, without a clear idea of what the place is like. The anniversary coverage will be very big, he said. Its a worldwide issue. And for me, I think the angle is going to be what has become of all those inmates at Guantanamo Bay that you heard about all those months ago. Where are they, whats happening with them now. As for the security environment here, the Washington-based Borger has covered wars in Angola, Mozambique and Saudi Arabia. GTMO, he said, is a much more controlled environment for a journalist to work in. Inevitably, its difficult to get a sense of what its like inside the camp. But you have to understand the limitations. Roy Freddy Andersen and Thomas Nils son, with the Norwegian paper Verdens Gang are also here for the big picture. If we were writing for a local American newspaper, we would be doing a military angle. But there are no Norwegian soldiers here. So were going to get whatever we can on the detainees. Well get whatever you let us get. We have to do the best that we can. He paused. The Kvaerner company here is owned by a Norwegian millionaire, he said. Maybe well do a side piece on that. Wayne Partridge and Grant Tyler Blanken ship from the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph though, were indeed here for a miltary angle: the 178th MP company out of Monroe, Ga. (see page 10). Were going to talk to them and do a story for the Georgia audience, Partridge said. Theyre the guys who take the detainees to and from the interrogations. Theyre really the hands-on guys, and its something people at home really want to read about. Whatever angle the stories begun this week will take, if Wednesdays visit was any indication GTMOs expected busy season for media visits in the weeks leading up to the one-year anniversary of Sept. 11 will go smoothly. Journalists seemed understanding of if occasionally frustrated by the security limitations inherent in the detention operation. No one risked expulsion by taking pictures in prohibited areas, or interviewed anybody they werent supposed to, and after the endof-the-day stop at the Naval Exchange every one was back on the bus on time. And JTF-160 will continue to open its arms to the U.S. and international media. Were in an active posture, said Army Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey, Public Affairs Offi cer of JTF-160. We readily engage the media within our public affairs guidance and the needs of operational security. We have certain limitations, but we actively welcome the media here, he said. Both to tell the servicemembers story and also to clarify what the detention operation is all about, so America and the world knows what were doing, and so families back home can see why their loved one is here. For Orlandella, her job is about just what the JIB name suggests: information. People outside the military need to know what we do here. I think we need to give the most we can without violating security and putting anyone in danger. We need to put a face on the uniform and on the detainee mis sion here. American citizens deserve to know whats going on, especially after Sept. 11. Everyone saw that, she said. This is what were doing about it. This is what were doing to prevent it from happening again, and its important that the American people and the world get to see that too. Ian James of the Associated Press jots down a few facts at the Camp X-Ray observation point, assisted by Navy JO1 Christopher G. Sherwood. Page 7 Friday, August 9, 2002 up for Sept. 11 anniversary rush JIB says: Theres no such thing as off the record! Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds briefs writers and photographers at the Camp X-Ray observation point.

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Youve seen the patch a shield, a cas tle wall and a pike pointing up toward the sky with three wavy lines under neath. This is the patch of the National Guard 43rd Military Police Brigade, and its meaning is symbolic of the function that they are perform ing at GTMO. The fortification above the wavy bars alludes to the wall surround ing 15th century Rhodes, capital of the Island of Rhodes, in the Eastern Mediterranean, after which the state of Rhode Island was named. The wavy bars repre sent Narra gansett Bay and the many water ways of the state. The pike, a weapon once used by guards, symbolizes the brigades ability to give protection and strong support. And, giving support is exactly what this brigade is doing. Our mis sion here is to take over command and control of the JTF-160, said Army Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro, Command Sgt. Maj.of the JTF160. We provide sup port for the detainee oper ations here, he said. Led by Brig. Gen. Rick Bac cus, JTF-160 commander, and manned with approximately 100 soldiers, they are a force to be reckoned with. They are dis persed throughout the head quarters building and Pink Palace, and are the logistical backbone of this operation. Coming to JTF-160 with 100 soldiers, though, meant spreading the unit across a vari ety of jobs. We have soldiers working in intelligence, legal, civil affairs, and other administrative positions, said Capt. Daniel C. Lutz, commandant for the JTF160. A big plus to being here is being able to cross-train and gain experience in different areas, said Spc. Curtis L. Mathews. We are doing an outstanding job, and are armed with exceptional leadership and dedicated soldiers. The dedication and hard working nature of these sol diers is known and expected by those who lead them. I have complete confidence in all our soldiers, they have been dispersed into various jobs and are doing well. They adapted very quickly to the JTF environment, said Lutz. Being apart of the JTF and in the command seat, the 43rd leaders are concerned for all JTF-160 troops. They all belong to me! I treat everyone of these troops the same. Thats why the JTF160 color is purple, regardless of branch of service, they are all my troops. We all wear the color purple here, Funaro said. Although this is their first deployment overseas, the 43rd Bde has received the Guberna torial Unit Citation several times for exceptional meritori ous conduct in the performance of outstanding service. Most recently, the brigade received a Gubernatorial Unit Citation for serving as the Task Force Headquarters for Home land Security in recognition of their performance while con ducting Airport Security and for their deployment to GTMO in support of Operation Endur ing Freedom. Look for the 43rd to return home to Rhode Island and pick up a few more. 43rd MP BDE: Logistical backbone of JTF-160 Story by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Page 11 Friday, August 9, 2002 Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro pins an award on Pfc. Gerald D. Murphy. All fires require a Hot Work Permit from the Fire Prevention Office Building 2164 Phone #4598/4611. Permits are issued Monday through Friday 0700 1600. No permits are issued after 1600 on Friday. WARNING! ALL NON-PERMIT BONFIRES ARE ILLE GAL AND SHALL BE EXTINGUISHED. THINK BEFORE YOU LIGHT Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The 43rd MP Bde soldiers gather at the McCalla Hill Hanger to be recognized by distinguished visitors from Rhode Island. Meeting the press: GTMO gears Page 6 Friday, August 9, 2002 Army Capt. Sandra M. Orlandella is get ting very busy again these days. As the Joint Information Bureaus operations officer here, its her job to plan and coordinate all media visits to Guantanamo Bay. She makes up the itineraries, sets up interviews and press con ferences, and generally makes sure the U.S. and international media gets the story they come for without, of course, violating operational security. And the GTMO detention operation looks about to enter another phase of media madness. The first round was back in January when the detainees first arrived, she said. The second was in the spring when they were moved from XRay to Delta. And now, with the anniver sary of Sept. 11 get ting close, theyre coming back. Since May 13, Orlandella estimated, only 50 media have come through; this week a group of 12 is on the ground and thats after teams expected from CNN and the BBC rescheduled their visit for the coming weeks. It may only be the beginning. I expect the pace to double by Sept. 11, to two groups of 24 every week, Orlandella said. Some are coming back here to prepare something for Sept. 11, some want to be here that day. Were getting a lot of special requests, like live broadcasts on the anniversary, that were not going to be able to accomodate. But as long as we have quarters for them, they can come and stay as long as they want. This weeks visitors arrived on Wednesday for the full detention-operation treatment visits to approved observation points outside Camp X-Ray and Camp Delta, a tour of GTMO and opportu nities to interview Delta guards Thurs day at their quarters in Camp America. Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, like Orlan della (and the staff of The Wire) a member of the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of New York City, is the escort chief, charged with escort ing the civilian press around GTMO, answering their ques tions about the opera tion and keeping them advised and in line as to what the lim itations of OPSEC are while theyre here. Where they cant pho tograph, where they can, and with what lenses. Interviews with passing soldiers are prohibited; approved interviews are set up through the JIB. And of course, while theyre on the Windward side, civilian media are to stay with their escorts at all times. To a journalist after the whole story, or at least something to beat the competition, those limitations can be frustrating. What wed like to see and what were going to see are two different things, said photographer Harry Page of the British tabloid The Mirror Hopefully well get something its a long way to come to take pictures of OPSEC signs. But The Mirror is here nevertheless. Espe cially as September approaches. We would be here anyway, said Page. But with the Sept. 11th anniversary coming up, the public interest in Europe is going to be as high as ever. That makes whatever story we get that much better. His colleague on the visit, Mirror U.S. edi tor Richard Wallace, is the kind of journalist military public-affairs people tend to keep a close eye on. His paper is aimed at a Euro pean audience deemed more critical of the detention operation here than most American news outlets. But Wallace says hes not here to criticize the operation itself, or its treatment of the detainees at Camp Delta. Instead, he says, he wants to bring up questions not about the operations methods but its very existence why, to what purpose, and for how long. Were not saying that these detainees are all nice boys who love their mothers not at all...the question is, we got these guys, theyre many of them bad guys, what are we going to do with them now? Im here to try to find out what the next step is going to be. Does he expect to find that here, where Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Roy Freddy Andersen of Norwegian newspaper Ver dens Gang takes notes at Camp X-Ray while escort Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg looks on. No wasted time: Members of the civilian press file off the ferry at Windward side and get to work. Photographers Richard Wallace from The Mirror (UK), left, and Thomas Nilsson from Verdens Gang line up shots at Camp X-Ray while escort Spc. Jose Martinez looks on.

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of Camp America, said JTF-160s Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond W. Funaro.The process of change involved a lot of people. It was sent up to the top of the chain where it was inves tigated and blessed by the general. The com mander is here to try to make life and the living conditions as easy as he can for the troops. Making things easier for the troops is a sen timent that those troops definitely share. I think it was a common-sense decision, said Spc. Robert Lovely, Joint Information Bureau via the 43rd MP Brigade. With the buses being as spread out as they are, being able to take a Humvee all around the base without having to get all suited up will defi nitely make life a little bit easier. The new policy is definitely a good one, said Army Staff Sgt. Elgin L. Miller, 239th Military Police Company, who lives out at Camp America. Its hard to catch a bus around here to take you where you have to go. Now, well have some more time to get to our jobs and take care of our personal things on our own time. This will definitely benefit us. The troops out at Camp America should benefit the most from this change, giving them another option for transportation rather than only waiting for that lonely bus that seems to seldom roll their way. More use of the Humvees will mean more transportation assets for the troops, said Funaro. Our troops out at Camp America are a big priority to us, and they should be posi tively affected by the change. It used to be harder for us to transport back and forth from out at Camp America into town, said Miller. Now it is easier for us to get around, and this benefits us for many dif ferent reasons. Overall, this change in policy should act as a healthy dose of morale for those who once had places to go but no way to get there. This is great. Instead of waiting for a bus, I can either throw on a Physical Training uni form and drive the Humvee to the gym, or I can wear civilian clothes and have a buddy in uniform drive me there, said Lovely. I think its a real morale booster, said Miller. Now more servicemembers can get out there and participate in Morale, Welfare and Recreation events. Youll be able to get around and meet new people. Thats a good thing. Not only the servicemembers who are using tactical vehicles for transportation will benefit from this change, but also the troops who already have the job of supplying rides. I could see this policy light ening the load on the buses, said Funaro. A lot of people ride the buses out of Camp America, and they just added another bus to the route, said Spc. Brandon Stanley of the 43rd Military Police Brigade and attached to the 418th Transportation Company. But there are a lot of Humvees around at Camp America and throughout the rest of the base, so the change in policy may somewhat have an effect on the amount of people who choose to ride the buses. Well have to see. Even though the rules of wearing a uniform while traveling in a tacti cal vehicle have soft ened with the new change of policy, the laws of wearing the Kevlar off-road stand firm. As stated in Forces Command Regulation 385, Head protection (Kevlar helmet, CVC or flight helmet as appropriate) will be worn by all personnel operating or riding as a passen ger in Army tactical vehicles in the field. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the commanding general, U.S. Armed Forces Command. Wearing a Kevlar off of the paved road on any military installation is policy Armywide, said Funaro. Safety purposes are of great importance in the military. On the roads around here at GTMO, I dont think a Kevlar is much to worry about, said Lovely. Off of the roadway, the Kevlar could play a different role, maybe even save your life if things get real rough. As the days pass by and the new policy grows older and better-known, more and more servicemembers will be seen traveling around GTMO in their vehicles wearing their more comfortable attire. This is great for us, said Miller. You wont see me waiting for the bus anymore. All is working out well so far, said Funaro. The new policy seems to be making a big difference. In many cases when individuals are given something, it is taken for granted and not accepted as a privilege. When this is the case, sometimes your progress can be lost as fast as it is gained. If people start taking advantage of the pol icy, it will have to be looked over again, said Funaro. So now instead of waiting soaked in per spiration, it will be easier for you to acquire transportation to your next destination. Just have an operator throw on an official suit, and the rest of the crew could be wearing civilian clothes en route. Page 5 Friday, August 9, 2002 POLICY, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Chris Wall, 418th Transportaton Co., pulls out with an empty bus. Is everyone in Humvees? Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Staff Sgt. Elgin L. Miller, 239th MP Co., lets his mind ponder on how nice it is to be able to roll around GTMO in his civilian attire. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Christian Farrell, JTF-160, returns home from doing yoga at the gym. Young JTF-160 airman awarded junior servicemember of the quarter Page 12 Friday, August 9, 2002 The U.S. Naval Base Command of Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba, selected a junior enlisted servicemember currently assigned to Joint Task Force 160 as the Junior Servicemem ber of the Quarter at a ceremony held Tues day at JTF-160s Headquarters. Airman 1st Class Ashlee L. Gros, from the JTF-160s J-6 shop, competed against a group of junior enlisted service members from the different branches here on base after she was nominated by JTF-160s own selection board made up of Army Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Funaro and other top enlisted personnel of the taskforce. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the commander of JTF-160, stood by Gros as she received a commaders coin and a certificate of recognition from Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn, the base commander. Before presenting the certificate, Buehn read its inscription as follows: In recognition of your outstanding performance of duty; exemplary per sonal and military character; pride of service; and your unselfish contribu tions to the welfare of the community and your command. Its a great accomplishment to receive an award like this in a joint environment, said Buehn, looking at the young airman standing firmly at attention. I feel surprised and excited to be recog nized by the JTF-160 and the Navy com mand, said Gros. At first, I didnt think I stood a chance against the other three Navy servicemembers. But I remained calm and confident when I appeared before the board made of top enlisted Navy and Marines per sonnel at Bulkeley Hall. Gros was tested on basic military knowl edge, the military code of conduct and cur rent events. The competition was very tough. All the services were represented, said Navy BMCM (SW) Jack C. Donohoe, senior enlisted advisor and the acting command master chief who chaired the Navy selection board. A1C Gros was outstanding in her answers. She was very professional and sharp when she met with the oral board. Thats why the majority of the votes went in her favor, said Donohoe. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Elizabeth French, who was selected to represent JTF160 in the senior servicemember category, did not hesitate to say, Gros was an excellent choice from JTF-160 and the Navy. She is a squared away airman. You can tell by her uniform and her military bearing. I could not be happier for her, said French. I think all candidates whose names were submitted presented themselves in a profes sional manner. They are an asset to their branch of service and JTF-160, said Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham, who collected all the names that were submit ted for the award and sent a letter of com mendation to all of the JTF-160 candidates. Unfortunately, said Cunningham, we had to pick only one senior and one junior of our servicemembers to represent the taskforce. As the servicemember of the quarter, Gros is entitled to a four-day special liberty, a COMNAVBASE ball cap and a Yankee Helo Flight. Her photograph will be displayed at Bulkeley Hall Quarterdeck. For her accomplishment, Gros also received praises from her immediate supervi sors, co-workers and friends. She is the epitome of the junior enlisted across all the other services, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael Forde, the J-6 superintendent and the advisor for the Air Force personnel currently assigned to JTF160. I am really proud of her, he said. It was a great experience for me. It taught me a lot about myself. Now, I know I can do whatever I put my mind to, said Gros. Gros has been in the Air Force for two years. Before she joined, she did four years of Air Force JROTC while she was in high school. She graduated JROTC as a cadet colonel commander. I love it. I was very good at what I did, Gros said. I am all about leadership. I felt that the Air Force was for me, said Gros, who wants to become an officer. She was also an honor guard, where she learned how to manipulate an M-16 rifle and perform drill and ceremony. Gros, who will turn 20 in September, car ries herself with pride. Her battle dress uni form (BDU) is tight and crisp as if it could stand all by itself on a hard surface. Her com bat boots are highly or religiously shined. Thanks to my roommate Spc. Ivey Hodges, who taught me the Iveys magic shine, said Gros. She is mature beyond her years, and she has a focus to the mission beyond her rank, said Air Force Lt. Col. Teresa McGonagill, the officer in charge of the J-6 shop. She is fan tastic, proactive and excited about her work. I like working in a joint envi ronment, said Gros, who works as a watch officer and communic tions operator for J-6. I get to learn about the other branches. Gros takes pride in her work. Before she came here, she used to call me from Andrews Air Force Base, and ask me how it is at GTMO, said Forde. When she came here, she was prepared, and she has not stopped impress ing all of us. Shes doing a super job. I cant say enough. Gros is originally from New Orleans, but she was stationed at Andrews AFB, Md., before she volunteered to come to GTMO. I love it here, she said. I like the water. Ive made some very good friends. I love liv ing in a house with my roommates. Its been like fun having a roommate like Ashlee, said Airman 1st Class Brooke Smith. If I have a bad day, when I come home I complain to her, and she quickly changes the subject and gets me to forget about it. She is very considerate. Ashlee is friendly, open, outgoing and she motivates all of us, especially in the morning, when she reminds all of us why we have to go to work, said Smith. Ashlee was very excited and amazed when Lt. Col. McGonagill dropped by the house to deliver the good news, said another roommate, Army Sgt. Michelle Pessoa. When we heard the news, added Smith, we were very happy. The people who live in the Loop could have heard us rejoicing. McGonagill said, Its a double win for us. I cant be happier to have a J-6 staff member arrive at this level. Thats one of my successes here. And by getting this award, said Forde, Gros opens the door to the other junior enlisted. I hope they follow her footsteps. Story and photo By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Navy Capt. Robert Buehn, the base commander, A1C Ashlee Gros, the ser vicemember of the quarter, and Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus attending the award ceremony Tuesday at JTF-160s Headquarters.

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Page 4 Friday, August 9, 2002 This weeks question: Whats the last thing youve broken? Army Staff Sgt. Joseph Ronan, 418th Trans Co. I broke my jaw about two years ago playing basketball. It was rough. Army Sgt. Stacy Powel, Medical Well, my arm isnt broken, I just bruised it tripping over an iquana on my rollerblades. Army Spc. Angelo Baca, 418th Trans Co. I know I broke the golden rule of going to the hair cutting place here. They jacked me up. Mr. Reginald McLean, Kvaerner Contractor I dont break any thing. I am a man of safety. While other people break stuff, I work to fix. Andy Pollak, Young Civilian I broke my com puter. I took it apart experimenting and coulnt get it back together again. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Young guns! Marine Corps Lance Cpl. David M. Hueban of Marine Corps Security Force Company, DET A, Bravo Co. 123, reserve unit from Texas, shows a young GTMO resident the ways of the weapon on top of a combat-ready, mounted Humvee during the 2002 National Night Out, an event held to strengthen police and community partnerships. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Across 1 Ship initials 4 Tender loving care 7 Papa 10 Jacobs father 12 Petite 13 Baseball player Hank __ 15 Bundle 16 Atomic particle 17 Book holder 18 Tangle 19 Fall month 21 __ Chi 23 Entire 24 Cowboy rope 26 Yellow flower 28 Possessive pronoun 30 Pennsylvania (abbr.) 31 Theme 34 Praise 36 World organization 40 Sarcastic 41 __ league school 42 Roman twelve 43 __ upon a time 45 Proposal position 47 Sense 48 Cabana 50 Part to play 52 Chocolate tree 54 Boater 57 Pester 58 South by west 60 Popular presidents initials 61 Can 63 Cool 65 Pride 67 Swarm 69 Scrubs off 70 Glee 71 Places 72 Fixed charge 73 Dynamite 74 Harden Down 1 Normal 2 Father Christmas 3 Pouch 4 British idiot 5 MGMs Lion 6 Coin 7 Dits partner 8 Regions 9 Furniture mover 10 Computer makers 11 Picked 13 From Asia 14 Football assoc. 20 Corporation (abbr.) 22 A foxs hole (2 wds.) 25 That girl 27 Lodge 29 Holy person 30 Money handler 31 Dual 32 Pot 33 New York City 35 Evening 37 Hatchet 38 Truss 39 Grease 44 And so forth 45 Door handle 46 Noble 47 Some 49 Comforts 51 Noblemen 52 Title of Islams head 53 Open 55 Display emotions 56 Tangle 57 North by west 59 Woof 60 Baptistery 62 Agreement 64 Meet 66 Bullet shooter 68 Big truck Page 13 Friday, August 9, 2002 Eagerly anticipating whats to come, I let the brain go numb Release the beast And let the oxygen flow freely From my head This is a life That most others dread So why do I smile? Cause Ive already been hit in the face With a handful of bile, Do you think I still suffer denial? NO CHANCE At a loved ones funeral I dance I can get beat down by life, But Ill still hold my stance. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the August 2 puzzle Friday, August 9 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min 10 p.m. The Bourne Identity PG13 -118min Saturday, August 10 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2, PG13 70min 10 p.m. Austin Powers 3, PG13 91min Sunday, August 11 8 p.m. Windtalkers, R 133min Monday, August 12 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood, PG13 116min Tuesday, August 13 8 p.m. Road to Perdition, R 119min Wednesday, August 14 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann, PG13 91min Thursday, August 15 8 p.m. Men in Black II, PG13 91min

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Page 14 Friday, August 9, 2002 The first of a series of events to celebrate the Jamaican PreIndependence Celebration 2002 kicked off Monday at Phillips Park. The festive event commem morated 40 years of independ ence from British rule. The Jamaican Employees Com mittee, COM NAVBASE and the Jamaican Min istry of Labor sponsored the Jamaican Indepen dence Day Cele bration, said Igol Burkett, president of The Jamaican Employees Com mittee. We also had many volun teers from the community help coordinate this event. The ceremony began with an invocation by Pastor Michael Wilks, and was followed by opening remarks by Burkett. At 12:30 p.m., the staff of Morale, Welfare and Recre ation brought out a lunch laden with Jamaican specialties such as curried goat, ackee, codfish, jerk pork, jerk chicken, red beans and rice. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class William Reid was one of the many GTMO servicemembers who took time out to enjoy the party at Phillips Park. The celebration is great and the food is fabulous. The cur ried goat is my favorite, said Reid. The food here is making me think of home. My wife, who is Jamaican, has always cooked and treated me to great Jamaican food back home. Back home, me and my wife would have been celebrat ing [Jamaican] independence day at her mothers house right now at home in Pennsylvania. We attended many festivals there. This was my first festival in GTMO, and it was wonder ful. Just what I needed, said Reid. Feelings of national pride permeated the celebration. I am proud to be Jamaican, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Pamella Mason. I am enjoying the celebra tion very much. The food, the drinks and the Jamaican music are great. I really love Jamaican music, she said. The New Creation Band provided most of the music for the party. The band covered a variety of old and new Jamaican songs. There was also a disc jockey spinning his magic, as the appreciative crowd swayed to reggae beats. The euphoria that the people were showing for their native land is what attracted many to the celebration, regardless of their own nationalities. I have been in GTMO for a year and a half now said Mason. This is my second fes tival. I was working last year so I missed most of that one. This year I made sure I was off from work. I am really enjoying this one. GTMOs Jamaican festival has been going on for 20 years now. Due to its continued suc cess, the Jamaican community here can look forward to this special day for years to come, according to Burkett. I have been organizing the Jamaican Independence Day celebration for 10 years now, said Burkett. We want the people on base to have a good time and enjoy themselves. I feel proud with the response we are getting from the GTMO com munity. The Indepen dence Day cele bration is not only about people enjoying them selves, but it is also an opportu nity to learn about the past struggles the Jamaicans have had. As a Jamaican, we look at Independence Day as a birthright. I am 40 years old now and from where we have come, to where we are right now, to where we are going is a big step for Jamaica, said Bur kett. As the Jamaican people cel ebrate the 40 years of progress that has been made in Jamaica, the GTMO community comes together with them to form a tight bound. I just want to say thank you to the GTMO community for their continued support. We will continue to make great strides in the future together, said Burkett. You can count on that. I may not be here too long. I am going back home to Jamaica to be with my family. I am sad to say I may not be a part of next years celebration. I wish all the Jamaicans and the people of GTMO all the best. Jamaicans celebrate forty years of independence Story by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Flag Football starts this Monday, August 12th and Tuesday, August 13th. Tournament days will run Mon. Sat. Unit personnel still may submit team rosters, but they will be placed on a waiting list at Denich Gym. Contact Capt. Gormly at x5249 for more information. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8 PM Free movie, Lyceum & Camp Buckeley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Climbing Classes, Rappel Tower, Paintball Range, Sat. & Weds., 1:00PM-7:00PM. Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym, 5:15PM6:15PM, Tues. & Thurs. Today, Friday, August 9th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, Night Fishing Trip, M.W.R. Marina. Saturday, August 10th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Tournament Part VIII, Marble Head Lanes. Sunday, August 11th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, JTF Commanders Cup Series Chess Tour nament, CBQ. Monday, August 12th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Tuesday, August 13th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, Round One, JTF 160 Commanders Cup Series Dart Tournament, CBQ. Wednesday, August 14th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Thursday, August 15th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Yudelkis Pimentel dances on stage with one of the Kool Boys during the celebration. Page 3 Friday, August 9, 2002 The servicemembers of the Joint Logistics Support Group are in charge of supplying all of JTF-160 and Camp America here at GTMO. Distributing all over the island, they handle everything from consumable items to office supplies to detainee laundry. They toil away day after day, whether it is in their warehouse or on a delivery mission. If it wasnt for the tireless efforts of this joint force, you wouldnt have your goods when and where theyre are needed. They do their mission to help you do yours. Joint Logistics Support Group Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Dan Auxier, using every ounce of concentration in his body, skillfully places a package down on a load ing platform outside of the warehouse with the aid of a high-speed forklift. Army Spc. Kevin Wetherbee I like doing my job here. Im trained in artillery, so when I came here I had to learn this job field on my own. I picked it up pretty fast though. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Staff Sgt. Russell L. Walker tears into a box to begin inventory on packages at the warehouse. Air Force Staff Sgt. Russell L. Walker I think that JTF-160 is the most unor ganized outfit Ive seen in my nine years in the Air Force. Still, weve changed things for the better here. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Lamberson When I first got here, I was worried I wouldnt have anything to do, but now I couldnt be more a part of the operation here. I love my job. Army Spc. Dan Auxier Our operation here is crucial. We make things happen, and our hands are on everything. We deal with a lot of junk. It never gets dull around here.

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Page 2 Friday, August 9, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Please fire up your calculator. Enter the number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9. That's 1 though 9 without the 8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 times the multiples of 9 (9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81) = beauty. What you get is 9 digits of . well, see for yourself. It is interesting that the digits in the above multiples when individually added together equal 9. For example, 1 + 8 = 9; 2 + 7 = 9; 3 + 6 = 9; 6 + 3 = 9 and so on. Many radio telescopes are searching for a signal from intelligent life in outer space. Guess what? This is only one example of what many of us already know: All creation proclaims the glory of God! Submitted by LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Deputy JIB Director: Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Last week we addressed personal secu rity while on leave. Military bases gener ally have a lower crime rate than cities and towns. However theft of personal property is still prominent. Listed below are helpful hints to secure personal property in your housing. Ensure you secure all items that are of importance to you. Always have windows, rooms and rear and front doors locked. Dont keep valuables out in the open. The same goes for your vehicle (if you are lucky enough to own one). Lock your doors and roll your windows up when you can. Place small valuables in a drawer that has a lock on it. If you own a bike, secure it with a bike lock. Engrave or mark your property in an area that is not easily noticeable with mark ings such as: your last four digits of your social security number on the bottom of your laptop ot your last name on your CDs or DVDs inner ring in permanent marker. Photographs will aid your insurance claims and give law enforcement personnel a visual reference for identification. Keep ing a log of serial numbers, make, model, and identifying marks will also be helpful. Do not keep large sums of money at your housing unit. If you have a work order to have something in your billeting fixed, ensure that someone is home to give access and to keep an eye on things. Be proactive in the safeguarding of your valuables it is the best deterrence against crime. Here are some recommended websites you can use for further information http://www.prevent-crime.com/ http://www.crimepreventiontips.com/ You are responsible for securing your valuables. Submitted by Cpl. Jason Doyle MP AT/FP/PMO Numbers Protecting Your Personal Property Notice of Article 15 Adjudication A soldier was found guilty after a proceeding conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for violations of Article 92, dereliction in the per formance of duty. The Field Grade non-judicial punishment authority found beyond a reasonable doubt that on or about 28 April 2002 at the Camp Frank D. Merrill, Dahlonega Ga., the soldier will fully failed to prepare for and com plete a ruck march. Additionally, on or about 21 June 2002 at Camp Delta, the sol dier failed to stay awake while posted as a guard during the inter view of a detainee. On or about 26 June 2002, at Camp America, the soldier negligently failed to secure a sensitive item, a radio, and will fully failed to tell the truth regard ing the sensitive item when questioned about it, which was his duty to do. The soldier was reduced one grade to Specialist (E-4) and was given 15 days extra duty. NCOs ARE EXPECTED TO SET THE STANDARD AND WILL BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE WHEN THEY ARE DERELICT IN THE PERFORMANCE OF THEIR DUTY. Page 15 Friday, August 9, 2002 New champs emerge after softball showdown The Iguanas and the JTF-160 Regulars had to battle one another to keep their dreams of winning a softball championship alive. The Iguanas, who were the three-year reigning champs, were on the verge of losing the title. Both teams had to win to keep their hopes alive in the league. JTF-160s record was 9-0 coming into this game and the Iguanas record was 8-1 with their only loss to JTF-170. The stakes were high, with the season itself on the line. The tension was high on both benches from the moment they came out of their dugouts to play ball. JTF-160 jumped out to an early lead as their lead-off hitter scored the first run in the game. The Iguanas answered in the bottom of the first by banging out four hits and scoring three times. The score was now 3-1. The hard-hitting sluggers on JTF-160s team went cold after the first inning. The Iguanas pitching and defense shut down the Regulars for the second and third innings. The bottom half of the second inning the Iguanas eighth, ninth and tenth batter in the line-up were retired one, two, three. Things changed in the third inning as the top of the Iguanas line-up started a four-run rally. Their momentum was carried over into the forth inning as they scored another five runs. JTF-160 fought hard and valiantly to keep their hopes for a championship alive, but the Igua nas were too tough. The game concluded with the Iguanas on top, 12 to 5. The win gave hope to the Igua nas as JTF-160 was sent home packing and thinking of next sea son. The Iguanas hope for a fourpeat lied in the hands of JTF-170. We are going to stand by to see if JTF-170 loses. They were the only team to beat the Iguanas. It was a close game and the score was 8 to 5, said Navy Petty Offi cer 1st Class Michael B. Pace. The Iguanas had put away one JTF team and they were hoping to do the same to JTF-170. It felt good beating JTF. They were undefeated in the sea son. It felt good beating an Army team. GO NAVY! said Pace. The score did not indicate the way JTF-160 played; a few errors hurt the team. They were a very good team. They made a couple of mistakes that cost them a few runs, but we were able to hit the ball when it counted and that is what really matters. We did not make too many mistakes in the game that was the key to the win, said Pace. The Iguanas are a tight-knit team that has been playing together for a while, according to Pace. We also have a good team. We had a couple of people come and go, but we basically had the same people playing for us, said Pace. We had a lot of Navy reservists playing with us this year. The team is mostly com prised of active duty sailors. We had the same team for about three scheduled softball seasons, said Pace. The level of play has increased in the last seasons. Both joint task forces helped boost the competition of softball on the island, said Pace. The Iguanas didnt want their hopes of a four-peat to go up in smoke. The destiny of both the Igua nas and JTF-160s Regulars was in the hands of JTF-170. They were in control of the champi onship. JTF-170 was one win away from winning it all. This game wasnt going to be a cakewalk. The 342nd MP Co. was determined to spoil it for JTF-170 but JTF-170 was focused on the outcome of the game. JTF-170 jumped out to a three-run lead in the top of the first with the power of the first three batters in the line-up. 342nd MP came back with two runs in the bottom of the first. The first inning was a hard fought battle both offensively and defensively. This game meant a lot to JTF170. A loss would force them into a play-off game against JTF-160. In the top of the second inning JTF-170 came out swinging and put up five runs on the score board. The MPs where not able to score in the bottom half of the inning because of JTF-170s stel lar defensive performance. Each team scored a run in the third inning. JTF-170 pulled away by adding seven more runs in the forth and fifth innings to cap their undefeated season. When the dust had settled, JTF-170 had taken care of busi ness on the field by crushing the 342nd MP Co. 16 to 3. This win clinched the summer softball league championship for JTF-170. Their unblemished record marked the start of a new king on the softball diamond. At the games end a celebration erupted from JTF-170s dug-out. The war cry was TEAM WORK! That was the key to vic tory for the new champions. The Iguanas championship run fell short this time, but look for them to come back next season. Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Sgt. Todd T. Taylor from JTF-160 connects for a double to straight center field. He later scored a run against the Iguanas in the final game of the season. Army Maj. Joyce A. Comstock swings and connects for a hit down the third base line against the Iguanas on Saturday nights game.

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Page 16 Friday, August 9, 2002 Spc. Guadalupe Bravo, 2/142 INF Co. Q: How does it feel to be here Enduring Freedom? A: I feel happy, excited and magnifico because Ive never done anything like this before. I was a peacekeeper in Bosnia, and now Im in Cuba doing this. Q: Youre an infantry guy, so how fast can you take apart your weapon and put it back together again? A: Five minutes, stripping it down to its nuts and bolts and back together. Then Im ready to start firing off rounds. Q: Youre carrying a pretty big weapon there, you think you can drop a 12-foot griz zly bear with that thing? A: With my M-249 SAW machine gun, yes, I believe so. I would aim for the chest, and with about 150 rounds a minute, I would take him away as a carpet. Q: Whats the craziest thing youve seen while out on patrol? A: Man, crazy drunks who have had too much beer. Theyre so excited and happy. Q: So, if you got lost deep in the woods, do you think you could find your way home? A: Yes, I would. Ive trained for this, and if I had to, I would find my way home with my naked eye. Q: OK, youre stuck out on a mission with no food and youre starving. Would you eat a dead animal carcass to survive? A: Well, Id have to survive somehow. I might try barbecuing an iguana in a pit. Q: If you were attacked in a dark alley, would you need a weapon to defend yourself? A: My combat skills are as lethal as a weapon. Im a very nice guy, but if I was attacked, I can be a real mean Mexican boy. Q: Would you rather be stuck in the desert or on in the frozen tundra? A: Well, if I was in the snow, I could build an igloo to keep warm. In the sun I can only suffer and pay. By the time I get off GTMO, Ill be so dark my family may not recognize me. Q: Do you think your Army survival skills could help you in the civilian world? A: Yes, in the real world, my Combat Life Savers course would help a lot. If I ever see someone choking, Im trained to help. Q: What if you saw a bank being robbed, what would you do then? A: I would go in and tell the bank robbers, I am here! Alto! I am Pancho Villa! Q: Do you think you and your infantry brothers can take on the professional wrestlers of the WWF? A: Yes, me and my amigos could take care of the WWF. We train hard and always accomplish the task. So beware, Undertaker. Q: We know you work hard, but do you play hard? A: Yes, I party with my friends, like Miraza. We enjoy drinking beers and bowling. Q: Have you ever gone in search of any treasure? A: When I was young, I was always in search of treasure. So I would raid my moms piggy-bank. Then I would buy candy. Q: Do you enjoy eating cake? A: Yes, because my cheeks are getting big ger with the sweet stuff. But I have no prob lems with the big cheeks, they go nice with the smile. Q: What food is missing from GTMO? A: Mexican food: Tortillas, tacos and beans. I love beans. Please, no more burgers! Q: Do you feel you are a role model for the kids? A: Yes, I feel I am a role model for my lit tle boy. One day, hell join the military like his dad, travel the world and meet good people. Q: Your final thoughts, Guadalupe? A: I want to say that this is a big experience for me, another chapter in my book. Lets see where the Army takes me next time. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Guadalupe Bravo: The last person Osama Bin Laden would want to meet would be me and my SAW. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire Ready for war, infantryman leads the way Youre off from work and sitting around at the bus stop beneath the hot, baking sun waiting for the next bus to pick you up and take you to your destination of choice. This is an experience most of you have been through, but certainly have not enjoyed. Submitted for your approval is a change in policy that is geared to make lives at GTMO a little easier going during those out-of-uniform hours. Policy Letter #3, Requirements For Traveling in Tactical and NonTactical Vehicles, signed by Joint Task Force 160 Commander Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, was reevaluated to clarify what specific equipment, clothing and other requirements are necessary for the members of JTF-160 while they are traveling around GTMO. Previously, servicemembers were required to wear Battle Dress Uniforms plus Kevlar helmets to operate or be a passenger within a tactical vehicle. Now here comes Revision A: the old regulations have been superseded and now allow more comfortable traveling accommodations. As of July 30, operators and pas sengers of tactical vehicles which include Humvees, 5-ton trucks and other vehicles used in a tactical military environment must: Wear a military issue Kevlar helmet at all times when the vehicle is operated off of paved roadways (i.e. cross country or on unpaved dirt roads). Vehicle operators will wear an appropriate military uni form at all times while operating tactical vehicles. Appropriate military uniform is defined as an authorized service uniform (i.e. Battle Dress Uniform, Camouflage Utility Uniform), or an authorized Physical Training uniform. Passengers may wear civilian clothing providing it is IAW JTF 160 Policy Letter #7, Civilian Clothes Policy. The request for the change in policy came down from the people Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. New way to ride Friday, August 9, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 9 Story by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire A look inside... Change in transportation policy makes traveling around GTMO more comfortable Watch your life away Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This statue near the lighthouse here at GTMO was built In honor of the U.S. Marines who protect democracy at the fenceline. Visitors can come and watch alongside him and contemplate why they are here. Page 8 Page 6 Page 15 See POLICY, page 5