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The wire
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00062
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: August 2, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00062

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PAGE 1

Page 16 Friday, August 2, 2002 With Air Force Staff Sgt. Diana P. Gallegos Q: Do you think 15 minutes of fame is enough fame for you? A: For here it is! But I dont think fame comes from an interview. I think it comes from the people you meet and friends you make. Q: Well, thanks a lot. A: No, I am honored to be this weeks 15 minutes of fame. Q: Dont make any excuses, youve already hurt my feelings. Just kidding, so how would you describe yourself? A: I am a very motivated, friendly, and stubborn person. I am always on the go. I love to meet people and make friends. Once a per son earns my trust, I am in it for the long haul. But if they break my trust, it is gone forever. Q: What do you do here for fun? A: I love the water. I just recently learned to swim while I was here. I also snorkel. Q: Not a fan of the land? A: No, I am. I also like volleyball and spin ning. Q: Arent you the instructor of the spin class at the gym? A: Why yes I am. Q: And how did you get into that? A: While I was in Hawaii, I was introduced to spinning and just fell in love with it. Q: With all of these physical activities, you must be in great shape. A: Yes, my stay at GTMO has definitely paid off in that way. Q: How much longer will you be here? A: I will be leaving next Saturday. Q: Wow. Are you excited to go? A: Yes and no. I have made some good friends here and will miss them very much. Amelia and Coop, most of all. Q: What have you learned, if anything, while you were here? A: That it is so much simpler living in a tent city than with five other females. Q: Sounds like roommate troubles. Do you have a crazy woman living in your house? A: My roommates are great. If anything, it would probably be me that drives them crazy. I have been a grump lately Im homesick! Q: What do you miss most from home? A: My fiancee. Q: What is the strangest thing that has hap pened to you since you have been here? A: Hmmm, I dont know about strange but I can tell you I have never seen the cops so many times in my life. Q: And what does that mean? A: In the last month the SPs have been to my house three times. First, a busload of Tiki Bar Patrons showed up at my house. Someone had yelled out my house number and the word party. The second time they came was when one of my roommates thought her camera was stolen. And Q: Was it stolen? A: Nope, it was misplaced. And, the last time the SPs stopped by was when the party at the Windjammer moved over to my place. Q: If you could change one thing here, what would it be? A: There is not enough work for a six-day workweek! It is a really bummer to be at work with nothing to do. Q: What do you like most about GTMO? A: The weather! I love the heat. I know its going to be cold when I get back up to North Dakota. I am not looking forward to that. Q: Any advice for future GTMO visitors? A: Bring plenty of civilian clothing, and to take advantage of the great weather and out door activities. Q: Anything to say in closing? A: Farewell Guantanamo Bay, and say goodbye to all my girls in 32 Alpha. It was fun but Im ready to go. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Someone had yelled out my house number and the word party. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Shes spinning out of control in GTMO The nearly 1,000 MP guards and infantrymen that lived there in its heyday are mostly gone home now; the 300 detainees they guarded at Camp X-Ray were all moved to Camp Delta in April, guarded these days by MPs who live at Camp America, sleeping in air-conditioned SEAhuts and showering in concrete latrines. Erected in January by the Marines, who commanded the detention operation here for its first three months, the 78-tent city called Freedom Heights is all but gone now, torn down and packed up Wednesday and Thursday by 57 volunteers from all over the JTF from Camp America and the JTF Headquarters, from the Pink Palace and the motor pool, all pitching in on a hot GTMO day to bid farewell to a relic of the detention opera tions rough infancy. And workers used to the finer living JTFers enjoy these days whether at Camp America or cushy Windward Loop got a firsthand look at the home-awayfrom-home that the Marines and Army MP units like the 401st, 414th and 988th knew all too well: sun-baked tents with makeshift flooring that only arrived a month into their stay, showers made of plywood with pails for faucets. Running water? Not here. And after this week, Freedom Heights wouldnt be here either. What did it all mean? Today is a positive thing, said Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy, J-3. It means that the guards have moved into better quarters and maybe feel a little more appreciated for the job theyre doing. And if X-Ray is ever used again, the next group of guards here should have it a little better than the last. This is what deployments are all about, said Senior Airman Brandon Miranda, J-6. Tearing down the old stuff means youve put up new stuff. When they came here, this was the best we could do. Today is a closure on that part of Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CG PSU 307 tactics protect GTMO Page 6 Army PFT is no sweat for soldiers Page 8 Getting the goods to the detainees Page 12 Dismantling Freedom Friday, August 2, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 8 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See Heights, page 5 A look inside... End of an era at X-Ray as former troop liv ing quarters broken down for repurposing Clockwise from front left: Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, Airman Seth Hub bard, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Charles Brown and Air Force Master Sgt. Mark Mercadal heft a folded-up tent onto the pile Wednesday. Two crews of volunteers broke down most of Freedom Heights in a day.

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Page 2 Friday, August 2, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office John Paul II has made reference to some thing written in 1963 for the theme of the next World Day of Peace. The 36th World Day, to be observed Jan. 1, will emphasize Pacem in Terris (Peace on Earth): A Constant Endeavor. The Vatican explained that the Pope wanted to commemo rate the 40th anniversary of this encyclical written by John XXIII. In Pacem in Terris, four foundations of peace are stressed: truth, justice, charity and liberty. Pacem in Terris was the first encyclical in which a Pontiff not only addressed Catholics but all men of good will. John XXIII underlined the bonds that unite humanity with God. He established spiritual and cultural foundations for new forms of political organization, with the conviction of the natural and equal dignity of human beings. These new forms are called upon to work for the universal common good and, thanks to a public and world authority, protect and pro mote fundamental human rights. The 2003 World Day of Peace will call attention to the shaky state of peace in the world and encourage everyone to prayerfully read the signs of the times, and to take seri ously the values and morals needed to con struct real human coexistence. John Paul II, like most of us, is concerned about terrorism and other forms of fratricide. Hopefully, we will all remember the timeli ness of fundamental values, and commit our selves in favor of peace. LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. With summer in full swing it is important to remember a few basic facts about personal security while on leave. Situational awareness can provide you with a measure of security against criminals, in addition to protecting you against the threat of terrorism. Whether you take leave in the states or in a foreign country, follow these basic steps: Make sure someone knows where you will be and when you expect to return. Never carry a wallet in your back pocket; put it inside your front pocket. Dont carry large amounts of money and never display your money out in public. Ask for directions in hotel lobbies, not on the street, know areas to avoid. If you act lost you will attract attention and make an easy target for criminals. I n the car: Have your keys ready in your hands as you approach your car. Keep doors locked, windows up, and park in well-lighted streets. As you approach your car check all four sides from a distance and note anything unusual, like a van parked too close, also check the rear seat before entering. If someone threat ens you while you are in your car or if you are being followed, blow the horn to attract atten tion. Dont follow other cars too closely boxing in the target vehicle is a common tactic used by carjackers. Do not pick up hitchhikers. On the street: Avoid dark, deserted routes. When using public transportation sit close to the driver. Carry change for emergency phone calls. Be alert and notice who passes you and who is behind you. If a car stops to ask for information, reply from a safe distance. If you are assaulted and the attacker is only after your money or valuables, dont resist. Your life is more important. Above all, always be aware of your sur roundings, especially of the location of fire exits, public telephones, police stations and police officers that may be in the area. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 1963 Letter Answers Terrorism Recently, the Secretary of Defense, Donald H. Rumsfeld, issued a memoran dum addressing the dangers of leaking classified information. It is imperative that every member of this command understands the impact of such leaks and ensures that we do not commit such grave violations of our laws. We are each making a great sacrifice in support of our nation by serving in our respective services. That sacrifice is for naught if we then violate the very laws that are designed to help us protect and defend our nation and our freedom. Leaking classified information puts each of us and our liberties at risk. The impact of leaks diminishes our chances of winning the global war on ter rorism. Therefore, it is up to each and every one of us, regardless of rank, to ensure we do not open a door that would allow our enemies to hurt us to win. When we disclose classified informa tion, we put countless lives at risk. Not only are the lives of those here at GTMO endangered, but also the lives of our friends and families back home. It is imperative that we take special precau tions to ensure we do not expose our selves or our mission in that manner. In some cases, the information being leaked may seem small or inconsequen tial, but even the smallest piece of classi fied information can amount to a tremendous threat to our national secu rity. We are dealing with experienced ter rorist organizations trained to look for ways to breach our security and use the information theyve collected against us. We must take care to ensure that we are safe-guarding classified information at the lowest level. Improper disclosure of classified information can have far reaching effects upon not only our mis sion, but our lives. Take care to ensure that we are able to continue protecting our mission and our freedom. JTF-160 Commander Gen. Rick Baccus Page 15 Friday, August 2, 2002 Cotas return is a smash on the court Williams sisters watch out Julie Cota is back! After giving up the game of tennis for four years, the aerobic instructor at Marine Hills cardio room made her return to the court a memorable one Saturday by wrapping up the GTMO tennis championship 6-3, 6-2 over Olga L. Cowley at the CBQ tennis courts. Cotas straight set win was not easy. There was some tense moments as she and Cowley volleyed long and hard for many points. Cowley was a very strong player, said Cota. The match was very competi tive, with Cota and Cowley exchanging rally points through out. But in the end, the former jun ior college tennis player capped her 5-0 run through the tourna ment bracket with a victory. I started playing again about a month ago. I played a few matches to get ready for this tour nament, said Cota. Coming back was not easy but the rewards were great. Cota also accumulated 50 points for Naval Hospital towards the standings in the Commanders Cup. Its been a lot of fun playing in this tournament, said Cota. The tournament started on July 20, with 12 players set to do bat tle for the tennis cup. The players were representing different teams on base. Because of the tournament the participants were able to meet a lot of new tennis players on the island, said Cota. The new alliance that was built among the players on the tennis court can be used as a tool to influence other players to join the next tournament on the island. Hopefully tennis will become more active on Guantanamo Bay, said Cota. Servicemembers, staffers from Morale, Welfare and Recreation and members of the larger GTMO community all showed their support to the players and the tournament. It was great to get the whole base involved with this tennis tournament, said Cota. On the mens side of the tour nament bracket Navy Capt. Thomas N. Hawkins defeated Air Force Staff Sgt. Mick A. Coffelt 6-1, 6-1 Saturday to advance to a semifinal match against GTMO Fire Inspector Joe Hettler. The skill level has been good in this tournament. I think theres a lot of enthusiasm with tennis right now, said Hawkins. As the excitement of tennis builds on the island and more players come and compete, the competition will get even stronger. Its a great sport. Its a very physical game; you have to move around the court and hit a small ball, said Hawkins. The demands on ones body while they play tennis is different than any other sport. Its not like running for dis tance. You really have to have stamina. The quick starts and stops really show what you are made of as a player, said Hawkins. A tournament like this gives players the chance to show their talent on the tennis courts. It is nice to have these type of events on the island, said Hawkins. Events like this tournament make it easier for a new tennis player to showcase his or her tal ents and network around the ten nis circuit in GTMO. You have a chance to meet new people, said Hawkins. Responding to the increased interest, MWR will continue to do its part. Officials there are planning to resurface the tennis courts and get proper lighting, said Hawkins. Better courts, in turn will attract more people to the games. That will bring a greater num ber of people out to the matches and intrigue them with the game of tennis, said Hawkins. Even though the game is recre ational, Hawkins is all business when it comes to the tournament. Tennis is a lot of fun and I cant wait for my semi-finals match against Hettler. He is an interesting tennis player. Hettler likes to run a lot. We call him the antelope, said Hawkins. Hes in great physical condi tion. It will be a great match, said Hawkins. It will not be an easy match for either opponent in the semifinals, but the future of tennis on the island can assure fans the likeli hood of a rematch between these two competitors. The tournament was very good and I enjoyed competing. I would like to see this continue in the future, said Hawkins. Softball Standings Top Ten JTF-170 7-0 Iguanas 7-1 Regulars 7-1 Hospital 7-1 239 MP Co. 5-2 GTMO Bay 5-3 178 MP Co. 5-3 GTMO Lite 4-3 Blacksheep 4-4 160 MP Bn. 3-4 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Chat Bout 5-0 Navsta 4-1 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-1 JTF-160 2-2 178th MP Co. 1-3 Fire Dept. 1-3 Naval Hospital 1-4 571st MP Co. 0-3 Commanders Cup Competition for the next Commanders Cup runs from Aug. 7 through Sept. 21, with eight male and three female teams competing in six events: basketball, volleyball, soccer, flag football, softball and tennis. Submit your rosters as soon as possible through your chain of command or unit point-of-contact. Flag football rosters due Aug. 5. Questions? Capt. Gormly, #5249 Womens tennis tournament cham pion Julie A. Cota (r) and runner-up Olga L. Cowley (l). Navy Capt.Thomas N. Hawkins returns a serve from Air Force Staff Sgt. Mick A. Coffelt and moves on to the semi final match in the mens tennis tournament.

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Page 14 Friday, August 2, 2002 Entering the warm waters of Guantanamo Bay may not burn you, but the hydroids that dwell within the depths of the sea sure can. Resembling feathery plants, hydroids are actually colonies of plant-like animals equipped with strong stinging cells that are used to capture prey and defend themselves. It is those stinging cells that can cause a quite severe inflammation and burning sensation on the unlucky swimmers skin. When you come out of the water and see red-hot raised-looking things that dont look good and dont feel good, youve got hydroids, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Scott Cota, depart ment head of ambu latory services and a physician at the U.S. Naval Hospital, GTMO Bay, Cuba. You can usually feel them immedi ately, and they can spread through con tact with the skin, but it depends on the person on how severe the reaction will be, he said. Some people arent affected by hydroids at all, said Cota. Like poison ivy or poison oak, it depends on the individuals sensitivity to the venom they produce. Usually, it is the second time exposed to the hydroids that any reaction will take place. If you become exposed to hydroids, do not wash the skin with fresh water because it will only make it worse, said Cota. Wash with sea water first. Putting a cold compress on it should also relieve a lot of the symp toms. Local first aid measures you can use to try to get rid of a reaction to hydroids include using shaving cream, baking soda and even flour. Without treatment, though, the symp toms should disappear within three days. Weve seen a few people that come in that have severe reactions and look terrible, said Cota. If you have respiratory problems or suffer intense pain, you should come in for medical treatment. A prescription cream called End Itch, containing Benadryl and steroids, has proven very effective in decreasing severe inflammatory reac tions to hydroids. In rare, extremely severe cases, oral doses or shots of Benadryl and steroids can become neccessary to com bat the hydroids. In May, we had a lot of severe cases, some so intense that shots of steroids had to be given, said Cota. So how does one simply avoid com ing in contact with these things? Just where the heck are they located? Everywhere. As natural inhabitants of warm tropical seas, they can be anywhere. They can attach onto boats, rocks, shells or seaweeds from low tide to water more than 525 feet deep. The only sure way to avoid them is to stay out of the water. The hydroid season around here usually lasts from April to October. It is believed that during this time the hydroids bloom in their reproductive stage, causing the production of the protein that causes the skin reaction. And what about the popular local myth that when the white butterflies come out, the hydroids go away? I dont know, said Cota, But we havent had as many people coming in lately since the butterflies have been out. Butterflies or no butterflies, the threat of the hydroids remains a reality in the other wise inviting waters of Guantanamo Bay. Theres a chance that you might not be affected, but then again, the next time you come out of the water you just might have the mark of the hydroid on your flesh. Hydroid season at GTMO: forgotten but not gone Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire See Mr. Devon Christie as soon as possible for the next Night Fishing Trip sign-up sheet. Boat leaves from Pelican Petes Marina at 6:30 PM, Friday, August 9th. For more information, call Capt. Gormly at #5249. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8:00PM Free Movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Mon day, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, G.J Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Today, Friday, August 2nd All Day Non-Alcoholic Social Time, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim Deer Point Pool. 5:00PM: GTMO Queen Fishing Trip, Bayview Dock. Saturday, August 3rd 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. All Day Movie Marathon, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. Sunday, August 4th 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:00PM, Chess Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. Monday, August 5th 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 12:00PM1:00AM, Jamaican Pre-Independence Cele bration, Phillips Park. Tuesday, August 6th 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. All Day Puzzle Time, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. 5:15PM6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, G.J. Denich Gymansium. 7:00PM, Dart Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Wedsnesday, August 7th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, First Commanders Cup Event, 8 Ball Tourna ment, Main M.W.R. Liberty, CBQ. Thursday, August 8th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, G.J. Denich Gymnasium. Photo by John Pennington, www.enature.com Hydroids: You dont want to meet them. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Those white butterflies: Natures all clear on hydroids? Page 3 Friday, August 2, 2002 The members of the Navy Organizational Maintenance Department and Navy Search and Rescue team work together to ensure that their HH-1N helicopters are fit for flight. One half keeps the choppers flying with constant main tenance and care. The other will fly out of them and splash down if a troop gets in over his head. So if youre caught in the undertow and you still make it home, thank the collective efforts of the crewmen at McCalla hangar for getting the whole job done. Helicopter Maintenance Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield double-checks gauges in the cockpit. Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Thompson I enjoy making sure periodic maintenance checks are done on the aircraft. I love working here. Its a good duty. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey fixes oil coolers on an HH-1N. Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield Its exciting when were doing rescues. We do a lot of practice scenarios and train hard to prepare our selves. You got to practice like you play. Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey I love doing my job. I love being here. It feels good to rescue people. Jumping out of the helicopter into the water is also great.

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Page 4 Friday, August 2, 2002 This weeks question: If a food fight broke out in the chow hall, what do you think would make the perfect artillery? Navy Chief P. O. Stephanie Williams, MIUWU 204 Id go right for the ice machine. After every one is cold and cov ered in ice, I would go right for the hot coffee. Mr. Christopher Ferguson, Food Service Leader Id throw spaghetti all over the faces. It would be well cooked, so it would stick. A hot cream sauce would also go well. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Albert E. J. Harshaw MIUWU 204 Well, you have to think of the long-term torture effects. Iced tea all over everyone. When they step out side, theyll all get eaten alive by the gnats. Army Spc. John Peck, 342nd Mili tary Police Co. First, Id set up a diversion by tossing salad everywhere. When everyone is distracted, thats when the meatballs start flying. Then, I would start releasing the sauce. Air Force Airman 1st Class William Nelson, Motor Pool Macaroni with cheese covered in Texas Pete hot sauce. It would spread easily and stick on alot of peo ple. The hot sauce should have a blind ing effect. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Before and after: Two volunteer crews made short work of Freedom Heights on Wednesday, breaking down and packing up 78 tents in the hot sun. Across 1 Rowing device 4 Epoch 7 Ocean 10 Clean thoroughly 12 Workplace 13 Priest 15 Ersatz 16 Stage of life 17 Sulfuric and nitric, for example 18 Affirmative 19 West by north 21 Pluck 23 Contender 24 Queen-like 26 Half man, half goat 28 Leered 30 Lovers 31 Island 34 Landing 36 Tap, like a bird 40 French yes 41 Gorilla 42 Clean 43 Compass point 45 City in Ohio 47 Mr. Downs of 60 minutes 48 Ca. University 50 Star 52 Official document 54 Scoundrel 57 Doctoral degree 58 Sign language 60 Greenwich Mean Time 61 Tender loving care 63 Kowtow 65 North American country 67 Devour (2 wds.) 69 Cinder 70 Beige 71 Childrens sliding toys 72 Long time 73 Chicken creation 74 Before, poetically Down 1 Yellow pigment 2 Got up 3 Flee 4 Eagerness 5 Scrap 6 A wager (2 wds.) 7 Pouch 8 Enlighten 9 Zeal 10 Mole 11 Bypath 13 Heathen 14 Vane direction 20 Puffed 22 U.S. Air Force 25 __ Whiz! 27 Cooking measurement 29 Capital of Bangladesh 30 Air-conditioning gas 31 Charged particle 32 Take to court 33 Liberal (abbr.) 35 Rainy mo. 37 Flightless bird 38 Sprocket 39 Kilometers per hour 44 Cashew 45 Beers 46 Criterion 47 Frump 49 Potters needs 51 Election counts 52 Not these 53 Potato state 55 Talk 56 Avoid 57 School group 59 Pear shaped instrument 60 Group of criminals 62 Hertz 64 Lair 66 Droop 68 Lager Page 13 Friday, August 2, 2002 Wretched feelings fill my mind. While my heart accepts, My brain tries to deny. My heart pumps black blood... DANGER IS NEAR. Walking through clouds, With visions unclear. Keeping a straight face, While disguising my fear... SOMETHINGS NOT RIGHT. Seems I cant win in this endless fight. Shooting far for my dreams, But I have them in sight It may be dark now, But someday I will find the light. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the July 26 puzzle Friday, August 2 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2 (PG) 10 p.m. Road to Perdition (R) Saturday, August 3 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann (PG-13) 10 p.m. Windtalkers (R) Sunday, August 4 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood (PG-13) Monday, August 5 8 p.m. The Sum of All Fears (PG-13 Tuesday, August 6 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann (PG-13) Wednesday, August 7 8 p.m. Windtalkers (R) Thursday, August 8 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood (PG-13)

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Supply sergeant keeps the ball rolling for detainee operation Page 12 Friday, August 2, 2002 When new detainees arrive at Camp Delta, they are issued an orange jumpsuit to wear and personal hygiene items such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste and shower shoes. These basic supplies have to be constantly replaced as they are used, and someone has to make sure they get what they need, when they need it. Thats the S-4 shop of the 160th Military Police Battalion out of Tal lahassee, Fla., currently attached to JTF-160 Joint Detention Operations Group (JDOG), which carries out the mission of keeping the detainees well-supplied. The person who makes it all hap pen and handles the day-to-day operation is Army Sgt. Kemeral E. Taylor, the noncommissioned offi cer in charge of supply. We have to make sure that the detainees get all of the comfort items that are required, said Taylor. We are responsible with providing anything related to supply that the camp needs. These items include toothpaste, toothbrushes, toilet paper, uniforms, laundry, trash bags, gloves, hand sanitizers and other basic items. The supplies are not only for the detainees, but also for the guards running the camp as well. We go to the camp three times a day to check the camps supply and make sure that supply is not running low. Early in the morning, Taylor sends her sol diers to Camp Delta to pick up dirty laundry and replace items used the night before. Although Taylors unit is not specifically tasked with overseeing laundry, she has to ensure that bedding and clothing are cleaned on a regular basis. If Taylor needs specific items that are out of stock, she goes to her next line supervisor, who then goes to a central warehouse here to purchase these items. We always have to assess our supply level and replenish our warehouse, said Taylor. In addition to keeping track of the basic comfort items for the camp, a major part of her job is to provide lunch for the detainees. Every day the detainees receive Meals, Ready-to-Eat for lunch. Before we send the meals, we take out all the items that the detainees are not allowed to have, said Taylor. This process is called MREs break down. Taylor supervises a group of soldiers who are tasked to open the vegetarian-based MREs and remove unauthorized food acces sories such as meal condiments, chewing gum, matches, plastic bag, heaters and hot sauce. Anything spicy comes out, she said. After the breakdown process, the meals are then repackaged and delivered to the camp before lunchtime. Even though some of our soldiers go to the camp to deliver the needed supply and the processed MREs, others remain in the supply room and are constantly breaking down MREs, said Taylor. Since the 160th MPBN doesnt have enough personnel to man the operation by itself, Taylor has to rely on soldiers from the different MP companies assigned to her bat talion. The staff that Taylor works with changes almost every week. For many of the staff members its just a detail. But they seem to like it and enjoy working with Taylor. I can be doing worse, said Spc. Michael Beckom of the 178th MP Co. Its a relaxed environment. Beckom has been on the detail for about a week. Cpl. Tracy Brooks, who has been working there for about a month, said, Sgt. Taylor is pretty cool. I like working for her. The work place is really not stressful. Brooks worked at Camp Delta before she was assigned to the supply unit. I think our job is very important, said Spc. Myeva Woods from the 239th MPCo. Without us, the detainees will not have clean clothes and basic issues that they need, she said. We keep the ball rolling. Woods, whose Military Occupational Spe cialty is supply, has been working with Taylor since June. Taylor, who has been in the Army for 13 years, has managed to earn the respect and admiration of her co-workers in the midst of the everyday pressures that come with her job. Sometimes it gets hectic, said Staff Sgt. Bruce Slay, who has been working with her for two years. She can handle the pressure. Thats the reason why I gave her this posi tion. As Taylors first line supervisor, Slay makes sure she has all the sup plies that her shop needs. I dont have to constantly check up on her. She is doing a super job. I can always depend on her. She knows what she has to do and she runs her section her way, said Slay. She is a super soldier. I have a lot of faith and confidence in her. Woods has praise for her as well. She is a nice person. She is very considerate. We can go to her for about anything. Shes like a mother to me. Taylor has two children wait ing for her at home in Florida. Before she came to GTMO, she taught at a Tallahassee public school. She said GTMO is some times like a vacation. She hopes to go back to the same civilian job after this deployment. People have a tendency to take supply for granted, said Taylor. But my job here is vital. We have the reputation of being difficult to work with, but we are not as bad as people think we are, said Taylor. Spc. Woods agreed. We are one big happy family. Its not a bad detail. We have fun. We have great NCOs, she said. Said Slay: Taylor is the glue that keeps it all together. Story and photos By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Army Cpl. Tracy Brooks, Spc. Eric Castellanos, Pfc. Jai Pate and Sgt. Gary French (right) process vege tarian MREs before they are sent to the detainees. Army Sgt. Taylor, supply NCOIC, sorts out orange jumpsuits and basic comfort items for the detainees housed at Camp Delta. the mission. But three soldiers on site, escort guards with the always coming-and-going 342nd MPs now staying at Camp America, had had it both ways and to them, Freedom Heights wasnt all bad. Sometimes Id rather be here than there, said Pfc. Matthew Burns. It sure was warm but it was fun. I liked hanging out with the Marines when they were here at the beginning. There was a little more com munity, said Sgt. Kyle Robin son. You could just look over to the tent next to you and say hello. Even if it was to an iguana. Certainly if youre one of those who find that the air-condi tioned rooms here can get a mite chilly, or you sometimes find yourself craving something a bit more rugged for your deploy ment lifestyle, there was an unde niably attractive hard-core quality to Freedom Heights including the occaisonal scorpion in the mess kit. At least the breaking-down work itself was a change of pace for the crews on site more used to day after day of detainee-watch ing at Camp Delta or the vari ous forms of office slavery at the Pink Palace and the JTF head quarters good, honest, sweaty manual labor. Take all the tents down, pull the stakes, take out all the electri cal wiring, summed up JTF-160 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert. Pull the poles and band them together in piles. Fold the tents, palletize them, get them ready to be shipped out. Stack up the flooring and forklift it away so trucks can come pick it up. The last thingll be the sandbags. With the sun blazing, BDU blouses and caps came off, rank was for gotten, and water breaks were mandatory. The crew from Camp America got into a friendly competition with the crew from the JTF buildings (The outnumbered JTFers lost.) Air Force computer geeks humped tent poles next to Army bus drivers. Sergeant majors stacked floorboards with special ists, Marine and Navy desk jock eys pulled out wiring with shift-working MP guards. Among the ruins of a place dom inated by unshakable routines, everyone on this detail got a wel come break from theirs. Wed pry up floorboards and find scorpions, tarantulas, mice, said Sgt. Major Daniel M. Polin ski of the 361st PCH. We even pulled one up and saw what must have been a four-foot snake chase a mouse across the camp. But given the historical signif icance of the war on terror and the detention operation at Guan tanamo Bay, this was more than another work-detail day in the military. These crews were tear ing down the quarters of the first guards of the first detainees at GTMO, hastily assembled living spaces for what was then, in many ways, a hastily assembled detention mission undergone in response to a war on terror that had just begun in earnest. JTF-160 Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus, who took over the JTF from the Marines and was at GTMO while Freedom Heights still teemed with soldiers, even stopped by Thursday to look in on the crews progress. In many ways, the breakdown was less ceremonious than it was utilitarian. The tents had stood empty since April, and most of the details job was to gather what was still serviceable tents, poles, stakes, wiring for future use. Even the countless sandbags were due to be picked up by the infantry at the end of the week. So was Wednesday a signifi cant moment, or just recycling? The taking down of Freedom Heights symbolizes the end of the conditions present at the begin ning of this operation, both for the detainees and the soldiers who guarded them, said Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., JDOG commader. But a lot of that significance rides on the next chapter in the life of now-empty X-Ray, and that story only time can tell. I have no idea what theyre going to do with this place, so I dont know if its a big moment or not, said Capt. Tony Lloyd of JDOG. All I know is this is hard work, and these guys out here today are doing a great job. Page 5 Friday, August 2, 2002 Heights, from page 1 A crew of volunteers from Camp America folds up whats left of the Freedom Heights chapel Wednesday. Spc. Alton Ellis, left, and Pfc. Justin Gordon from the 114th MP Co. pile up floorboards to be taken away. A volunteer crew from the Pink Palace pull a collapsed tent taut for folding. Army Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy of J3 holds up a tent for workers inside. The camp at Wednesdays end.

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Port Security Unit 307 reservists Page 6 Friday, August 2, 2002 Were junkyard dogs. We guard the junk yard, and if anyone comes near the gate, we bark real loud. That was how Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Sapronetti, assistant boat chief of Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, described his teams mission at Guantanamo Bay. These reservists from St. Petersburg, Fla., provide general port security escorting ships, stopping boats to check identification, checking out suspicious packages and bomb threats, making sure all vessels coming in or out are approved and ensuring that the ports are safe from terrorist attacks. Performing this mission from the land and sea, they are always on the clock making sure the base is safe. In addition to providing security around the ports from the shore, the PSU 307 patrols the surrounding seas in their 25foot-long Boston Whalers, which are equipped with several machine guns. Usually spending up to eight hours out doing patrols, the four-man crew on every boat has a coxswain who, regardless of rank, is in charge of the boat and drives it. An engi neer and two gunners fill out the crew on each patrol. In addition to their time out on the water, the crewmembers must also clean and serv ice their boats and weapons an hour of preparation before and after each shift. But the reservists of the 307 dont complain about the long hours. I love doing my job here, said Sapronetti. Everyone works their tails off. Theyre very professional in how they do their jobs. The reservists of the PSU 307 have been securing the ports here since the beginning of June, but they have been in action a lot longer than that. Immediately after the attacks on Sept. 11, the PSU 307 was called up for port security in New York for two days, before heading out to begin a two-month tour in Boston. When finished at Boston, they headed up and down the East Coast, received some downtime, and then got the call to come to GTMO. Constant deployments can be difficult on reservists, but given the impact of terrorism on the world in this day and age, this crew recognizes that their mission is more impor tant than ever before. What Sept. 11 was all about is what we train for, said Sapronetti. Looking out for terrorism is our job. Everyone in this unit is prepared for it. Some guys in this unit were even deployed after what happened to the USS Cole. Id say the average guy in this unit has been deployed twice in the last year. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire A port security Boston Whaler cuts through the rough seas as its crew heads out to escort a Coast Guard Cutter. Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Sapronetti, assistant boat chief with the Port Security Unit 307, conducts a radio check as he and his crew head out on a mission. The emergency leave process Page 11 Friday, August 2, 2002

PAGE 7

Its a strain on the family and profes sional life, but we train for this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Adam Williams, a crew man with the unit. We definitely see the need for port security here, and the family is supportive. Back at home on our drill weekends, we practice for this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson, a crewman with the 307. The unit is well-trained and weve got good people in here. Well-trained per sonnel are the key to making sure that the mission runs smoothly, and a close attention to training plays a huge factor in keeping the reservists of the PSU 307 ready to rock at any given time, no matter what job needs to get done. The command of the PSU 307 is great, and the unit is always evolving, said Petty Officer 3rd Class William Papi Farias, a coxswain with the 307. Every body gets crosstrained. Everyone has to learn each others jobs, whether it is using the weaponry or being trained to be a coxswain. There are no real set parameters. Were allowed, with the blessing of the command, to adapt in the PSU. As far as the unit goes, the training is awesome, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman, a quartermaster with the 307 and one of the only six females that are in the unit of approximately 157 reservists. They dont care if youre male or female. They say go do your job because they dont want to hear the differences between men and women. The PSU 307, working alongside the Navy Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare unit here, also conducts training exercises with the Army, Air Force and Marine Corps ser vicemembers assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV BASE. Theres a lot of cross-training with the other services as well, said Steinman. Were training with a Navy unit that will replace us when we leave, and its great that theyre showing a lot of enthusiasm for what were offering them. Its typical of port security to be working in a joint environment, more so than other units in the Coast Guard, said Farias. Because of whats going on around the world we have an extremely important job, and everyone serving in the military is in this mission together. That sense of patriotism is what motivates the reservists of the PSU 307 they know they have a job, they know how to do it, and they know theyre going to go and do it. A lot of people asked if I was irritated with the reserve call-up, said Steinman. There is no irritation because its what has to be done. You cant go to school or work and not think about our freedom. And thats why were down here. The base is safer because were here. Back at the docks, all boats are cleaned and serviced to be ready before and after each shift. Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman mans a .50-caliber machine gun while on patrol. Page 7 Friday, August 2, 2002 Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson and his fellow crewmen clean weapons for the next boat shift. make GTMO safer place to serve How to leave and not go AWOL Page 10 Friday, August 2, 2002 So, you say youre going on leave. Your bags are packed, and youre ready to make the voyage back to civilization and the free world. But before you go, there are some things you need to know. Because getting off the island is one thing, but getting back is a whole other mission. There is no guarantee that you will be able to board a space A flight, said Juan Santos, Pas senger Service Supervisor at the Leeward Air Terminal. You have a 50/50 shot on getting onboard, depending on how high of a pri ority you are. Emergency Leave cases hold a higher priority over those traveling on ordinary leave; however, individuals need to understand no one is guaranteed a seat on a space A flight, he said. And without a flight back to GTMO, you could find yourself in a sticky situation. I recently went home for leave, and when I tried to return I was bumped from my flight. I called to inform my chain of com mand about what was going on, however, they informed me that I was absent without leave, said Army Pfc. Ariel L. McCreary from the 215th Finance Co. out of Fort Hood, Texas. So there I was, stuck in Jack sonville waiting for another flight. I ended up sleeping in a motel, and being bumped yet again from another space A flight. Luckily, I ran into some people who were in the same predicament and had discovered a FBI flight to GTMO departing from Miami, she said. In the end, I returned three days late and I was on the AWOL list. I received a counseling state ment and learned a very impor tant lesson: DONT DEPEND ON SPACE A FLIGHTS! My advice to those going on leave is to fly commercial, at least when youre planning to return, she said. Being AWOL is no laughing matter. It may come with some serious consequences. Recently, quite a few people have come into the office seeking advice on what to do with troops who have been deemed AWOL, said Army Capt. Maximino Gon zalez, Deputy Staff Judge Advo cate. The majority of the troops who were AWOL were individu als that were bumped from flights. Anyone going on leave or Emergency Leave needs to understand that being bumped from a flight is not an excuse for not being back on time. They are responsible to return when they are sup posed to. They also need to understand that failing to return on time comes with repercus sions, he said. Ultimately, the service members com manding officer has UCMJ authority and prosecutorial discretion. Pun ishment can range anywhere from admisitra tive, such as a counseling state ment or an Article 15, and be as severe as a court-martial. Being court-martialed may result in confinement with pay forfeiture. Article 86 of the Man ual for Court-Martial 2001 states that absence from duty or unit for not more than three days is pun ishable by confinement of one month and forfeiture of twothirds pay per month for one month. For more than three days, but less than 30, you are subject to confinement for six months and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month for six months. Individuals who make valiant efforts to return but are victims of circumstances out of their control are not likely to face severe pun ishment. UCMJ action is set up not as a means to punish but as a means to correct, said Gonzalez. Although being bumped from a flight may seem like a situation out of your control, it is not. There are other travel alternatives that may be utilized. The best way to ensure a flight both on and off the island is via commercial flight, said San tos. There are two commercial airlines that fly both onto and off the island. They are Lynx Air and Air Tropical. For more information on their flight schedules and fees, contact their websites. They are www.lynxair.com and air-tropi cal.com. Policy letter #4, Leave/Lib erty and Family Member Visita tion, signed by Joint Task Force 160 commander Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, states that members of the JTF-160 will be eligible to request leave after being in coun try for at least 90 days. After 90 days in GTMO, up to 10 days of regular leave may be authorized. If an emergency situation arises at home, such as a death, imminent death or a doctor-certi fied serious illness or injury to a mother, father, sibling, child, mother-in-law or father-in-law, you will be granted emergency leave for a period not to exceed 14 days. This is not to include your grandmother, cousin, aunt or uncle, unless this relative served in Loco Parentis status. This status is defined as an individual who cared for you (or vice versa) for a period of at least five years prior to your coming on active duty. Although the policy does not specify what is considered cir cumstances out of your control you need to know that you are in danger of being AWOL and hav ing to deal with a variety of con sequences. Regardless of what is going on, it is pertinent to keep your chain informed of what is going on. Even if youre not back, you will be accounted for, said Gon zalez. Remember, although youre anxious to get to where you have to go, take the time out to secure travel arrangements and save yourself the sometimes dire con sequences of being AWOL. You may find yourself more stressed out than before you left, with no leave days left to spend. By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Dont get left behind! Plan your leave well in advance. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Air Force Senior Airman Jason Bradford fills out a leave request form.

PAGE 8

Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 2, 2002 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert, left, gets a hand from Master Sgt. Dave Morgan after an allout effort in the two-mile run. An overheated soldier utilizes the water point after finishing the run. This is a test: JTF-160 soldiers sweat APFT JTF-160 soldiers pound the pavement Saturday as the two-mile running event kicks off under the morning sun. Spc. Christian E. Farrell of the 361st PCH, not visible here, was the first to cross the finish line, in 12:15. Maj. Javier A. Reina churns out a sit-up during Saturdays test. A row of soldiers hits the ground for two minutes of push-ups as a grader checks for correct form. Give the soldiers the benefit of the doubt, but flunk em if you have to, Staff Sgt. Steven R. Munnerlyn told the graders Friday. Thats why were here. To show em where theyre at. Saturday was Army PFT time, diagnostic version, for the troops of JTF-160. Some 100 soldiers gathered at McCalla hangar at 5:30 a.m. for two minutes of push-ups, two min utes of sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Some made the standard, some didnt. Everyone got a good workout and found out where they were at. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Sgt. 1st Class Pedro Lizzarda records a score.

PAGE 9

Page 8 Page 9 Friday, August 2, 2002 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert, left, gets a hand from Master Sgt. Dave Morgan after an allout effort in the two-mile run. An overheated soldier utilizes the water point after finishing the run. This is a test: JTF-160 soldiers sweat APFT JTF-160 soldiers pound the pavement Saturday as the two-mile running event kicks off under the morning sun. Spc. Christian E. Farrell of the 361st PCH, not visible here, was the first to cross the finish line, in 12:15. Maj. Javier A. Reina churns out a sit-up during Saturdays test. A row of soldiers hits the ground for two minutes of push-ups as a grader checks for correct form. Give the soldiers the benefit of the doubt, but flunk em if you have to, Staff Sgt. Steven R. Munnerlyn told the graders Friday. Thats why were here. To show em where theyre at. Saturday was Army PFT time, diagnostic version, for the troops of JTF-160. Some 100 soldiers gathered at McCalla hangar at 5:30 a.m. for two minutes of push-ups, two min utes of sit-ups, and a timed two-mile run. Some made the standard, some didnt. Everyone got a good workout and found out where they were at. Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Sgt. 1st Class Pedro Lizzarda records a score.

PAGE 10

Its a strain on the family and profes sional life, but we train for this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Adam Williams, a crew man with the unit. We definitely see the need for port security here, and the family is supportive. Back at home on our drill weekends, we practice for this, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson, a crewman with the 307. The unit is well-trained and weve got good people in here. Well-trained per sonnel are the key to making sure that the mission runs smoothly, and a close attention to training plays a huge factor in keeping the reservists of the PSU 307 ready to rock at any given time, no matter what job needs to get done. The command of the PSU 307 is great, and the unit is always evolving, said Petty Officer 3rd Class William Papi Farias, a coxswain with the 307. Every body gets crosstrained. Everyone has to learn each others jobs, whether it is using the weaponry or being trained to be a coxswain. There are no real set parameters. Were allowed, with the blessing of the command, to adapt in the PSU. As far as the unit goes, the training is awesome, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman, a quartermaster with the 307 and one of the only six females that are in the unit of approximately 157 reservists. They dont care if youre male or female. They say go do your job because they dont want to hear the differences between men and women. The PSU 307, working alongside the Navy Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare unit here, also conducts training exercises with the Army, Air Force and Marine Corps ser vicemembers assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV BASE. Theres a lot of cross-training with the other services as well, said Steinman. Were training with a Navy unit that will replace us when we leave, and its great that theyre showing a lot of enthusiasm for what were offering them. Its typical of port security to be working in a joint environment, more so than other units in the Coast Guard, said Farias. Because of whats going on around the world we have an extremely important job, and everyone serving in the military is in this mission together. That sense of patriotism is what motivates the reservists of the PSU 307 they know they have a job, they know how to do it, and they know theyre going to go and do it. A lot of people asked if I was irritated with the reserve call-up, said Steinman. There is no irritation because its what has to be done. You cant go to school or work and not think about our freedom. And thats why were down here. The base is safer because were here. Back at the docks, all boats are cleaned and serviced to be ready before and after each shift. Petty Officer 3rd Class Melissa Steinman mans a .50-caliber machine gun while on patrol. Page 7 Friday, August 2, 2002 Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson and his fellow crewmen clean weapons for the next boat shift. make GTMO safer place to serve How to leave and not go AWOL Page 10 Friday, August 2, 2002 So, you say youre going on leave. Your bags are packed, and youre ready to make the voyage back to civilization and the free world. But before you go, there are some things you need to know. Because getting off the island is one thing, but getting back is a whole other mission. There is no guarantee that you will be able to board a space A flight, said Juan Santos, Pas senger Service Supervisor at the Leeward Air Terminal. You have a 50/50 shot on getting onboard, depending on how high of a pri ority you are. Emergency Leave cases hold a higher priority over those traveling on ordinary leave; however, individuals need to understand no one is guaranteed a seat on a space A flight, he said. And without a flight back to GTMO, you could find yourself in a sticky situation. I recently went home for leave, and when I tried to return I was bumped from my flight. I called to inform my chain of com mand about what was going on, however, they informed me that I was absent without leave, said Army Pfc. Ariel L. McCreary from the 215th Finance Co. out of Fort Hood, Texas. So there I was, stuck in Jack sonville waiting for another flight. I ended up sleeping in a motel, and being bumped yet again from another space A flight. Luckily, I ran into some people who were in the same predicament and had discovered a FBI flight to GTMO departing from Miami, she said. In the end, I returned three days late and I was on the AWOL list. I received a counseling state ment and learned a very impor tant lesson: DONT DEPEND ON SPACE A FLIGHTS! My advice to those going on leave is to fly commercial, at least when youre planning to return, she said. Being AWOL is no laughing matter. It may come with some serious consequences. Recently, quite a few people have come into the office seeking advice on what to do with troops who have been deemed AWOL, said Army Capt. Maximino Gon zalez, Deputy Staff Judge Advo cate. The majority of the troops who were AWOL were individu als that were bumped from flights. Anyone going on leave or Emergency Leave needs to understand that being bumped from a flight is not an excuse for not being back on time. They are responsible to return when they are sup posed to. They also need to understand that failing to return on time comes with repercus sions, he said. Ultimately, the service members com manding officer has UCMJ authority and prosecutorial discretion. Pun ishment can range anywhere from admisitra tive, such as a counseling state ment or an Article 15, and be as severe as a court-martial. Being court-martialed may result in confinement with pay forfeiture. Article 86 of the Man ual for Court-Martial 2001 states that absence from duty or unit for not more than three days is pun ishable by confinement of one month and forfeiture of twothirds pay per month for one month. For more than three days, but less than 30, you are subject to confinement for six months and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month for six months. Individuals who make valiant efforts to return but are victims of circumstances out of their control are not likely to face severe pun ishment. UCMJ action is set up not as a means to punish but as a means to correct, said Gonzalez. Although being bumped from a flight may seem like a situation out of your control, it is not. There are other travel alternatives that may be utilized. The best way to ensure a flight both on and off the island is via commercial flight, said San tos. There are two commercial airlines that fly both onto and off the island. They are Lynx Air and Air Tropical. For more information on their flight schedules and fees, contact their websites. They are www.lynxair.com and air-tropi cal.com. Policy letter #4, Leave/Lib erty and Family Member Visita tion, signed by Joint Task Force 160 commander Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, states that members of the JTF-160 will be eligible to request leave after being in coun try for at least 90 days. After 90 days in GTMO, up to 10 days of regular leave may be authorized. If an emergency situation arises at home, such as a death, imminent death or a doctor-certi fied serious illness or injury to a mother, father, sibling, child, mother-in-law or father-in-law, you will be granted emergency leave for a period not to exceed 14 days. This is not to include your grandmother, cousin, aunt or uncle, unless this relative served in Loco Parentis status. This status is defined as an individual who cared for you (or vice versa) for a period of at least five years prior to your coming on active duty. Although the policy does not specify what is considered cir cumstances out of your control you need to know that you are in danger of being AWOL and hav ing to deal with a variety of con sequences. Regardless of what is going on, it is pertinent to keep your chain informed of what is going on. Even if youre not back, you will be accounted for, said Gon zalez. Remember, although youre anxious to get to where you have to go, take the time out to secure travel arrangements and save yourself the sometimes dire con sequences of being AWOL. You may find yourself more stressed out than before you left, with no leave days left to spend. By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Dont get left behind! Plan your leave well in advance. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Air Force Senior Airman Jason Bradford fills out a leave request form.

PAGE 11

Port Security Unit 307 reservists Page 6 Friday, August 2, 2002 Were junkyard dogs. We guard the junk yard, and if anyone comes near the gate, we bark real loud. That was how Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Sapronetti, assistant boat chief of Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, described his teams mission at Guantanamo Bay. These reservists from St. Petersburg, Fla., provide general port security escorting ships, stopping boats to check identification, checking out suspicious packages and bomb threats, making sure all vessels coming in or out are approved and ensuring that the ports are safe from terrorist attacks. Performing this mission from the land and sea, they are always on the clock making sure the base is safe. In addition to providing security around the ports from the shore, the PSU 307 patrols the surrounding seas in their 25foot-long Boston Whalers, which are equipped with several machine guns. Usually spending up to eight hours out doing patrols, the four-man crew on every boat has a coxswain who, regardless of rank, is in charge of the boat and drives it. An engi neer and two gunners fill out the crew on each patrol. In addition to their time out on the water, the crewmembers must also clean and serv ice their boats and weapons an hour of preparation before and after each shift. But the reservists of the 307 dont complain about the long hours. I love doing my job here, said Sapronetti. Everyone works their tails off. Theyre very professional in how they do their jobs. The reservists of the PSU 307 have been securing the ports here since the beginning of June, but they have been in action a lot longer than that. Immediately after the attacks on Sept. 11, the PSU 307 was called up for port security in New York for two days, before heading out to begin a two-month tour in Boston. When finished at Boston, they headed up and down the East Coast, received some downtime, and then got the call to come to GTMO. Constant deployments can be difficult on reservists, but given the impact of terrorism on the world in this day and age, this crew recognizes that their mission is more impor tant than ever before. What Sept. 11 was all about is what we train for, said Sapronetti. Looking out for terrorism is our job. Everyone in this unit is prepared for it. Some guys in this unit were even deployed after what happened to the USS Cole. Id say the average guy in this unit has been deployed twice in the last year. Story and photos by Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire A port security Boston Whaler cuts through the rough seas as its crew heads out to escort a Coast Guard Cutter. Petty Officer 1st Class Richard Sapronetti, assistant boat chief with the Port Security Unit 307, conducts a radio check as he and his crew head out on a mission. The emergency leave process Page 11 Friday, August 2, 2002

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Supply sergeant keeps the ball rolling for detainee operation Page 12 Friday, August 2, 2002 When new detainees arrive at Camp Delta, they are issued an orange jumpsuit to wear and personal hygiene items such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste and shower shoes. These basic supplies have to be constantly replaced as they are used, and someone has to make sure they get what they need, when they need it. Thats the S-4 shop of the 160th Military Police Battalion out of Tal lahassee, Fla., currently attached to JTF-160 Joint Detention Operations Group (JDOG), which carries out the mission of keeping the detainees well-supplied. The person who makes it all hap pen and handles the day-to-day operation is Army Sgt. Kemeral E. Taylor, the noncommissioned offi cer in charge of supply. We have to make sure that the detainees get all of the comfort items that are required, said Taylor. We are responsible with providing anything related to supply that the camp needs. These items include toothpaste, toothbrushes, toilet paper, uniforms, laundry, trash bags, gloves, hand sanitizers and other basic items. The supplies are not only for the detainees, but also for the guards running the camp as well. We go to the camp three times a day to check the camps supply and make sure that supply is not running low. Early in the morning, Taylor sends her sol diers to Camp Delta to pick up dirty laundry and replace items used the night before. Although Taylors unit is not specifically tasked with overseeing laundry, she has to ensure that bedding and clothing are cleaned on a regular basis. If Taylor needs specific items that are out of stock, she goes to her next line supervisor, who then goes to a central warehouse here to purchase these items. We always have to assess our supply level and replenish our warehouse, said Taylor. In addition to keeping track of the basic comfort items for the camp, a major part of her job is to provide lunch for the detainees. Every day the detainees receive Meals, Ready-to-Eat for lunch. Before we send the meals, we take out all the items that the detainees are not allowed to have, said Taylor. This process is called MREs break down. Taylor supervises a group of soldiers who are tasked to open the vegetarian-based MREs and remove unauthorized food acces sories such as meal condiments, chewing gum, matches, plastic bag, heaters and hot sauce. Anything spicy comes out, she said. After the breakdown process, the meals are then repackaged and delivered to the camp before lunchtime. Even though some of our soldiers go to the camp to deliver the needed supply and the processed MREs, others remain in the supply room and are constantly breaking down MREs, said Taylor. Since the 160th MPBN doesnt have enough personnel to man the operation by itself, Taylor has to rely on soldiers from the different MP companies assigned to her bat talion. The staff that Taylor works with changes almost every week. For many of the staff members its just a detail. But they seem to like it and enjoy working with Taylor. I can be doing worse, said Spc. Michael Beckom of the 178th MP Co. Its a relaxed environment. Beckom has been on the detail for about a week. Cpl. Tracy Brooks, who has been working there for about a month, said, Sgt. Taylor is pretty cool. I like working for her. The work place is really not stressful. Brooks worked at Camp Delta before she was assigned to the supply unit. I think our job is very important, said Spc. Myeva Woods from the 239th MPCo. Without us, the detainees will not have clean clothes and basic issues that they need, she said. We keep the ball rolling. Woods, whose Military Occupational Spe cialty is supply, has been working with Taylor since June. Taylor, who has been in the Army for 13 years, has managed to earn the respect and admiration of her co-workers in the midst of the everyday pressures that come with her job. Sometimes it gets hectic, said Staff Sgt. Bruce Slay, who has been working with her for two years. She can handle the pressure. Thats the reason why I gave her this posi tion. As Taylors first line supervisor, Slay makes sure she has all the sup plies that her shop needs. I dont have to constantly check up on her. She is doing a super job. I can always depend on her. She knows what she has to do and she runs her section her way, said Slay. She is a super soldier. I have a lot of faith and confidence in her. Woods has praise for her as well. She is a nice person. She is very considerate. We can go to her for about anything. Shes like a mother to me. Taylor has two children wait ing for her at home in Florida. Before she came to GTMO, she taught at a Tallahassee public school. She said GTMO is some times like a vacation. She hopes to go back to the same civilian job after this deployment. People have a tendency to take supply for granted, said Taylor. But my job here is vital. We have the reputation of being difficult to work with, but we are not as bad as people think we are, said Taylor. Spc. Woods agreed. We are one big happy family. Its not a bad detail. We have fun. We have great NCOs, she said. Said Slay: Taylor is the glue that keeps it all together. Story and photos By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Army Cpl. Tracy Brooks, Spc. Eric Castellanos, Pfc. Jai Pate and Sgt. Gary French (right) process vege tarian MREs before they are sent to the detainees. Army Sgt. Taylor, supply NCOIC, sorts out orange jumpsuits and basic comfort items for the detainees housed at Camp Delta. the mission. But three soldiers on site, escort guards with the always coming-and-going 342nd MPs now staying at Camp America, had had it both ways and to them, Freedom Heights wasnt all bad. Sometimes Id rather be here than there, said Pfc. Matthew Burns. It sure was warm but it was fun. I liked hanging out with the Marines when they were here at the beginning. There was a little more com munity, said Sgt. Kyle Robin son. You could just look over to the tent next to you and say hello. Even if it was to an iguana. Certainly if youre one of those who find that the air-condi tioned rooms here can get a mite chilly, or you sometimes find yourself craving something a bit more rugged for your deploy ment lifestyle, there was an unde niably attractive hard-core quality to Freedom Heights including the occaisonal scorpion in the mess kit. At least the breaking-down work itself was a change of pace for the crews on site more used to day after day of detainee-watch ing at Camp Delta or the vari ous forms of office slavery at the Pink Palace and the JTF head quarters good, honest, sweaty manual labor. Take all the tents down, pull the stakes, take out all the electri cal wiring, summed up JTF-160 1st Sgt. Teddy Hebert. Pull the poles and band them together in piles. Fold the tents, palletize them, get them ready to be shipped out. Stack up the flooring and forklift it away so trucks can come pick it up. The last thingll be the sandbags. With the sun blazing, BDU blouses and caps came off, rank was for gotten, and water breaks were mandatory. The crew from Camp America got into a friendly competition with the crew from the JTF buildings (The outnumbered JTFers lost.) Air Force computer geeks humped tent poles next to Army bus drivers. Sergeant majors stacked floorboards with special ists, Marine and Navy desk jock eys pulled out wiring with shift-working MP guards. Among the ruins of a place dom inated by unshakable routines, everyone on this detail got a wel come break from theirs. Wed pry up floorboards and find scorpions, tarantulas, mice, said Sgt. Major Daniel M. Polin ski of the 361st PCH. We even pulled one up and saw what must have been a four-foot snake chase a mouse across the camp. But given the historical signif icance of the war on terror and the detention operation at Guan tanamo Bay, this was more than another work-detail day in the military. These crews were tear ing down the quarters of the first guards of the first detainees at GTMO, hastily assembled living spaces for what was then, in many ways, a hastily assembled detention mission undergone in response to a war on terror that had just begun in earnest. JTF-160 Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus, who took over the JTF from the Marines and was at GTMO while Freedom Heights still teemed with soldiers, even stopped by Thursday to look in on the crews progress. In many ways, the breakdown was less ceremonious than it was utilitarian. The tents had stood empty since April, and most of the details job was to gather what was still serviceable tents, poles, stakes, wiring for future use. Even the countless sandbags were due to be picked up by the infantry at the end of the week. So was Wednesday a signifi cant moment, or just recycling? The taking down of Freedom Heights symbolizes the end of the conditions present at the begin ning of this operation, both for the detainees and the soldiers who guarded them, said Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., JDOG commader. But a lot of that significance rides on the next chapter in the life of now-empty X-Ray, and that story only time can tell. I have no idea what theyre going to do with this place, so I dont know if its a big moment or not, said Capt. Tony Lloyd of JDOG. All I know is this is hard work, and these guys out here today are doing a great job. Page 5 Friday, August 2, 2002 Heights, from page 1 A crew of volunteers from Camp America folds up whats left of the Freedom Heights chapel Wednesday. Spc. Alton Ellis, left, and Pfc. Justin Gordon from the 114th MP Co. pile up floorboards to be taken away. A volunteer crew from the Pink Palace pull a collapsed tent taut for folding. Army Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy of J3 holds up a tent for workers inside. The camp at Wednesdays end.

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Page 4 Friday, August 2, 2002 This weeks question: If a food fight broke out in the chow hall, what do you think would make the perfect artillery? Navy Chief P. O. Stephanie Williams, MIUWU 204 Id go right for the ice machine. After every one is cold and cov ered in ice, I would go right for the hot coffee. Mr. Christopher Ferguson, Food Service Leader Id throw spaghetti all over the faces. It would be well cooked, so it would stick. A hot cream sauce would also go well. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Albert E. J. Harshaw MIUWU 204 Well, you have to think of the long-term torture effects. Iced tea all over everyone. When they step out side, theyll all get eaten alive by the gnats. Army Spc. John Peck, 342nd Mili tary Police Co. First, Id set up a diversion by tossing salad everywhere. When everyone is distracted, thats when the meatballs start flying. Then, I would start releasing the sauce. Air Force Airman 1st Class William Nelson, Motor Pool Macaroni with cheese covered in Texas Pete hot sauce. It would spread easily and stick on alot of peo ple. The hot sauce should have a blind ing effect. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Before and after: Two volunteer crews made short work of Freedom Heights on Wednesday, breaking down and packing up 78 tents in the hot sun. Across 1 Rowing device 4 Epoch 7 Ocean 10 Clean thoroughly 12 Workplace 13 Priest 15 Ersatz 16 Stage of life 17 Sulfuric and nitric, for example 18 Affirmative 19 West by north 21 Pluck 23 Contender 24 Queen-like 26 Half man, half goat 28 Leered 30 Lovers 31 Island 34 Landing 36 Tap, like a bird 40 French yes 41 Gorilla 42 Clean 43 Compass point 45 City in Ohio 47 Mr. Downs of 60 minutes 48 Ca. University 50 Star 52 Official document 54 Scoundrel 57 Doctoral degree 58 Sign language 60 Greenwich Mean Time 61 Tender loving care 63 Kowtow 65 North American country 67 Devour (2 wds.) 69 Cinder 70 Beige 71 Childrens sliding toys 72 Long time 73 Chicken creation 74 Before, poetically Down 1 Yellow pigment 2 Got up 3 Flee 4 Eagerness 5 Scrap 6 A wager (2 wds.) 7 Pouch 8 Enlighten 9 Zeal 10 Mole 11 Bypath 13 Heathen 14 Vane direction 20 Puffed 22 U.S. Air Force 25 __ Whiz! 27 Cooking measurement 29 Capital of Bangladesh 30 Air-conditioning gas 31 Charged particle 32 Take to court 33 Liberal (abbr.) 35 Rainy mo. 37 Flightless bird 38 Sprocket 39 Kilometers per hour 44 Cashew 45 Beers 46 Criterion 47 Frump 49 Potters needs 51 Election counts 52 Not these 53 Potato state 55 Talk 56 Avoid 57 School group 59 Pear shaped instrument 60 Group of criminals 62 Hertz 64 Lair 66 Droop 68 Lager Page 13 Friday, August 2, 2002 Wretched feelings fill my mind. While my heart accepts, My brain tries to deny. My heart pumps black blood... DANGER IS NEAR. Walking through clouds, With visions unclear. Keeping a straight face, While disguising my fear... SOMETHINGS NOT RIGHT. Seems I cant win in this endless fight. Shooting far for my dreams, But I have them in sight It may be dark now, But someday I will find the light. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the July 26 puzzle Friday, August 2 8 p.m. Stuart Little 2 (PG) 10 p.m. Road to Perdition (R) Saturday, August 3 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann (PG-13) 10 p.m. Windtalkers (R) Sunday, August 4 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood (PG-13) Monday, August 5 8 p.m. The Sum of All Fears (PG-13 Tuesday, August 6 8 p.m. Juwanna Mann (PG-13) Wednesday, August 7 8 p.m. Windtalkers (R) Thursday, August 8 8 p.m. Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya Sisterhood (PG-13)

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Page 14 Friday, August 2, 2002 Entering the warm waters of Guantanamo Bay may not burn you, but the hydroids that dwell within the depths of the sea sure can. Resembling feathery plants, hydroids are actually colonies of plant-like animals equipped with strong stinging cells that are used to capture prey and defend themselves. It is those stinging cells that can cause a quite severe inflammation and burning sensation on the unlucky swimmers skin. When you come out of the water and see red-hot raised-looking things that dont look good and dont feel good, youve got hydroids, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Scott Cota, depart ment head of ambu latory services and a physician at the U.S. Naval Hospital, GTMO Bay, Cuba. You can usually feel them immedi ately, and they can spread through con tact with the skin, but it depends on the person on how severe the reaction will be, he said. Some people arent affected by hydroids at all, said Cota. Like poison ivy or poison oak, it depends on the individuals sensitivity to the venom they produce. Usually, it is the second time exposed to the hydroids that any reaction will take place. If you become exposed to hydroids, do not wash the skin with fresh water because it will only make it worse, said Cota. Wash with sea water first. Putting a cold compress on it should also relieve a lot of the symp toms. Local first aid measures you can use to try to get rid of a reaction to hydroids include using shaving cream, baking soda and even flour. Without treatment, though, the symp toms should disappear within three days. Weve seen a few people that come in that have severe reactions and look terrible, said Cota. If you have respiratory problems or suffer intense pain, you should come in for medical treatment. A prescription cream called End Itch, containing Benadryl and steroids, has proven very effective in decreasing severe inflammatory reac tions to hydroids. In rare, extremely severe cases, oral doses or shots of Benadryl and steroids can become neccessary to com bat the hydroids. In May, we had a lot of severe cases, some so intense that shots of steroids had to be given, said Cota. So how does one simply avoid com ing in contact with these things? Just where the heck are they located? Everywhere. As natural inhabitants of warm tropical seas, they can be anywhere. They can attach onto boats, rocks, shells or seaweeds from low tide to water more than 525 feet deep. The only sure way to avoid them is to stay out of the water. The hydroid season around here usually lasts from April to October. It is believed that during this time the hydroids bloom in their reproductive stage, causing the production of the protein that causes the skin reaction. And what about the popular local myth that when the white butterflies come out, the hydroids go away? I dont know, said Cota, But we havent had as many people coming in lately since the butterflies have been out. Butterflies or no butterflies, the threat of the hydroids remains a reality in the other wise inviting waters of Guantanamo Bay. Theres a chance that you might not be affected, but then again, the next time you come out of the water you just might have the mark of the hydroid on your flesh. Hydroid season at GTMO: forgotten but not gone Story by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire See Mr. Devon Christie as soon as possible for the next Night Fishing Trip sign-up sheet. Boat leaves from Pelican Petes Marina at 6:30 PM, Friday, August 9th. For more information, call Capt. Gormly at #5249. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8:00PM Free Movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Mon day, Wednesday and Friday, 5:15PM-6:15PM. Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room, Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM. 1-On-1 Spinning Classes, G.J Denich Gym. MWF, 5:30PM-6:30PM, Tues. & Thurs. 6:15PM-7:15PM. Today, Friday, August 2nd All Day Non-Alcoholic Social Time, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim Deer Point Pool. 5:00PM: GTMO Queen Fishing Trip, Bayview Dock. Saturday, August 3rd 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. All Day Movie Marathon, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. Sunday, August 4th 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill and Deer Point Pools. 11:00PM, Chess Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. Monday, August 5th 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 12:00PM1:00AM, Jamaican Pre-Independence Cele bration, Phillips Park. Tuesday, August 6th 6:00AM6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. All Day Puzzle Time, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center. 5:15PM6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, G.J. Denich Gymansium. 7:00PM, Dart Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Wedsnesday, August 7th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 7:00PM, First Commanders Cup Event, 8 Ball Tourna ment, Main M.W.R. Liberty, CBQ. Thursday, August 8th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, G.J. Denich Gymnasium. Photo by John Pennington, www.enature.com Hydroids: You dont want to meet them. Photo by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Those white butterflies: Natures all clear on hydroids? Page 3 Friday, August 2, 2002 The members of the Navy Organizational Maintenance Department and Navy Search and Rescue team work together to ensure that their HH-1N helicopters are fit for flight. One half keeps the choppers flying with constant main tenance and care. The other will fly out of them and splash down if a troop gets in over his head. So if youre caught in the undertow and you still make it home, thank the collective efforts of the crewmen at McCalla hangar for getting the whole job done. Helicopter Maintenance Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield double-checks gauges in the cockpit. Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Thompson I enjoy making sure periodic maintenance checks are done on the aircraft. I love working here. Its a good duty. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey fixes oil coolers on an HH-1N. Petty Officer 1st Class Mark Chatfield Its exciting when were doing rescues. We do a lot of practice scenarios and train hard to prepare our selves. You got to practice like you play. Petty Officer 3rd Class Chris Downey I love doing my job. I love being here. It feels good to rescue people. Jumping out of the helicopter into the water is also great.

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Page 2 Friday, August 2, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office John Paul II has made reference to some thing written in 1963 for the theme of the next World Day of Peace. The 36th World Day, to be observed Jan. 1, will emphasize Pacem in Terris (Peace on Earth): A Constant Endeavor. The Vatican explained that the Pope wanted to commemo rate the 40th anniversary of this encyclical written by John XXIII. In Pacem in Terris, four foundations of peace are stressed: truth, justice, charity and liberty. Pacem in Terris was the first encyclical in which a Pontiff not only addressed Catholics but all men of good will. John XXIII underlined the bonds that unite humanity with God. He established spiritual and cultural foundations for new forms of political organization, with the conviction of the natural and equal dignity of human beings. These new forms are called upon to work for the universal common good and, thanks to a public and world authority, protect and pro mote fundamental human rights. The 2003 World Day of Peace will call attention to the shaky state of peace in the world and encourage everyone to prayerfully read the signs of the times, and to take seri ously the values and morals needed to con struct real human coexistence. John Paul II, like most of us, is concerned about terrorism and other forms of fratricide. Hopefully, we will all remember the timeli ness of fundamental values, and commit our selves in favor of peace. LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. With summer in full swing it is important to remember a few basic facts about personal security while on leave. Situational awareness can provide you with a measure of security against criminals, in addition to protecting you against the threat of terrorism. Whether you take leave in the states or in a foreign country, follow these basic steps: Make sure someone knows where you will be and when you expect to return. Never carry a wallet in your back pocket; put it inside your front pocket. Dont carry large amounts of money and never display your money out in public. Ask for directions in hotel lobbies, not on the street, know areas to avoid. If you act lost you will attract attention and make an easy target for criminals. I n the car: Have your keys ready in your hands as you approach your car. Keep doors locked, windows up, and park in well-lighted streets. As you approach your car check all four sides from a distance and note anything unusual, like a van parked too close, also check the rear seat before entering. If someone threat ens you while you are in your car or if you are being followed, blow the horn to attract atten tion. Dont follow other cars too closely boxing in the target vehicle is a common tactic used by carjackers. Do not pick up hitchhikers. On the street: Avoid dark, deserted routes. When using public transportation sit close to the driver. Carry change for emergency phone calls. Be alert and notice who passes you and who is behind you. If a car stops to ask for information, reply from a safe distance. If you are assaulted and the attacker is only after your money or valuables, dont resist. Your life is more important. Above all, always be aware of your sur roundings, especially of the location of fire exits, public telephones, police stations and police officers that may be in the area. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 1963 Letter Answers Terrorism Recently, the Secretary of Defense, Donald H. Rumsfeld, issued a memoran dum addressing the dangers of leaking classified information. It is imperative that every member of this command understands the impact of such leaks and ensures that we do not commit such grave violations of our laws. We are each making a great sacrifice in support of our nation by serving in our respective services. That sacrifice is for naught if we then violate the very laws that are designed to help us protect and defend our nation and our freedom. Leaking classified information puts each of us and our liberties at risk. The impact of leaks diminishes our chances of winning the global war on ter rorism. Therefore, it is up to each and every one of us, regardless of rank, to ensure we do not open a door that would allow our enemies to hurt us to win. When we disclose classified informa tion, we put countless lives at risk. Not only are the lives of those here at GTMO endangered, but also the lives of our friends and families back home. It is imperative that we take special precau tions to ensure we do not expose our selves or our mission in that manner. In some cases, the information being leaked may seem small or inconsequen tial, but even the smallest piece of classi fied information can amount to a tremendous threat to our national secu rity. We are dealing with experienced ter rorist organizations trained to look for ways to breach our security and use the information theyve collected against us. We must take care to ensure that we are safe-guarding classified information at the lowest level. Improper disclosure of classified information can have far reaching effects upon not only our mis sion, but our lives. Take care to ensure that we are able to continue protecting our mission and our freedom. JTF-160 Commander Gen. Rick Baccus Page 15 Friday, August 2, 2002 Cotas return is a smash on the court Williams sisters watch out Julie Cota is back! After giving up the game of tennis for four years, the aerobic instructor at Marine Hills cardio room made her return to the court a memorable one Saturday by wrapping up the GTMO tennis championship 6-3, 6-2 over Olga L. Cowley at the CBQ tennis courts. Cotas straight set win was not easy. There was some tense moments as she and Cowley volleyed long and hard for many points. Cowley was a very strong player, said Cota. The match was very competi tive, with Cota and Cowley exchanging rally points through out. But in the end, the former jun ior college tennis player capped her 5-0 run through the tourna ment bracket with a victory. I started playing again about a month ago. I played a few matches to get ready for this tour nament, said Cota. Coming back was not easy but the rewards were great. Cota also accumulated 50 points for Naval Hospital towards the standings in the Commanders Cup. Its been a lot of fun playing in this tournament, said Cota. The tournament started on July 20, with 12 players set to do bat tle for the tennis cup. The players were representing different teams on base. Because of the tournament the participants were able to meet a lot of new tennis players on the island, said Cota. The new alliance that was built among the players on the tennis court can be used as a tool to influence other players to join the next tournament on the island. Hopefully tennis will become more active on Guantanamo Bay, said Cota. Servicemembers, staffers from Morale, Welfare and Recreation and members of the larger GTMO community all showed their support to the players and the tournament. It was great to get the whole base involved with this tennis tournament, said Cota. On the mens side of the tour nament bracket Navy Capt. Thomas N. Hawkins defeated Air Force Staff Sgt. Mick A. Coffelt 6-1, 6-1 Saturday to advance to a semifinal match against GTMO Fire Inspector Joe Hettler. The skill level has been good in this tournament. I think theres a lot of enthusiasm with tennis right now, said Hawkins. As the excitement of tennis builds on the island and more players come and compete, the competition will get even stronger. Its a great sport. Its a very physical game; you have to move around the court and hit a small ball, said Hawkins. The demands on ones body while they play tennis is different than any other sport. Its not like running for dis tance. You really have to have stamina. The quick starts and stops really show what you are made of as a player, said Hawkins. A tournament like this gives players the chance to show their talent on the tennis courts. It is nice to have these type of events on the island, said Hawkins. Events like this tournament make it easier for a new tennis player to showcase his or her tal ents and network around the ten nis circuit in GTMO. You have a chance to meet new people, said Hawkins. Responding to the increased interest, MWR will continue to do its part. Officials there are planning to resurface the tennis courts and get proper lighting, said Hawkins. Better courts, in turn will attract more people to the games. That will bring a greater num ber of people out to the matches and intrigue them with the game of tennis, said Hawkins. Even though the game is recre ational, Hawkins is all business when it comes to the tournament. Tennis is a lot of fun and I cant wait for my semi-finals match against Hettler. He is an interesting tennis player. Hettler likes to run a lot. We call him the antelope, said Hawkins. Hes in great physical condi tion. It will be a great match, said Hawkins. It will not be an easy match for either opponent in the semifinals, but the future of tennis on the island can assure fans the likeli hood of a rematch between these two competitors. The tournament was very good and I enjoyed competing. I would like to see this continue in the future, said Hawkins. Softball Standings Top Ten JTF-170 7-0 Iguanas 7-1 Regulars 7-1 Hospital 7-1 239 MP Co. 5-2 GTMO Bay 5-3 178 MP Co. 5-3 GTMO Lite 4-3 Blacksheep 4-4 160 MP Bn. 3-4 Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Chat Bout 5-0 Navsta 4-1 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-1 JTF-160 2-2 178th MP Co. 1-3 Fire Dept. 1-3 Naval Hospital 1-4 571st MP Co. 0-3 Commanders Cup Competition for the next Commanders Cup runs from Aug. 7 through Sept. 21, with eight male and three female teams competing in six events: basketball, volleyball, soccer, flag football, softball and tennis. Submit your rosters as soon as possible through your chain of command or unit point-of-contact. Flag football rosters due Aug. 5. Questions? Capt. Gormly, #5249 Womens tennis tournament cham pion Julie A. Cota (r) and runner-up Olga L. Cowley (l). Navy Capt.Thomas N. Hawkins returns a serve from Air Force Staff Sgt. Mick A. Coffelt and moves on to the semi final match in the mens tennis tournament.

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Page 16 Friday, August 2, 2002 With Air Force Staff Sgt. Diana P. Gallegos Q: Do you think 15 minutes of fame is enough fame for you? A: For here it is! But I dont think fame comes from an interview. I think it comes from the people you meet and friends you make. Q: Well, thanks a lot. A: No, I am honored to be this weeks 15 minutes of fame. Q: Dont make any excuses, youve already hurt my feelings. Just kidding, so how would you describe yourself? A: I am a very motivated, friendly, and stubborn person. I am always on the go. I love to meet people and make friends. Once a per son earns my trust, I am in it for the long haul. But if they break my trust, it is gone forever. Q: What do you do here for fun? A: I love the water. I just recently learned to swim while I was here. I also snorkel. Q: Not a fan of the land? A: No, I am. I also like volleyball and spin ning. Q: Arent you the instructor of the spin class at the gym? A: Why yes I am. Q: And how did you get into that? A: While I was in Hawaii, I was introduced to spinning and just fell in love with it. Q: With all of these physical activities, you must be in great shape. A: Yes, my stay at GTMO has definitely paid off in that way. Q: How much longer will you be here? A: I will be leaving next Saturday. Q: Wow. Are you excited to go? A: Yes and no. I have made some good friends here and will miss them very much. Amelia and Coop, most of all. Q: What have you learned, if anything, while you were here? A: That it is so much simpler living in a tent city than with five other females. Q: Sounds like roommate troubles. Do you have a crazy woman living in your house? A: My roommates are great. If anything, it would probably be me that drives them crazy. I have been a grump lately Im homesick! Q: What do you miss most from home? A: My fiancee. Q: What is the strangest thing that has hap pened to you since you have been here? A: Hmmm, I dont know about strange but I can tell you I have never seen the cops so many times in my life. Q: And what does that mean? A: In the last month the SPs have been to my house three times. First, a busload of Tiki Bar Patrons showed up at my house. Someone had yelled out my house number and the word party. The second time they came was when one of my roommates thought her camera was stolen. And Q: Was it stolen? A: Nope, it was misplaced. And, the last time the SPs stopped by was when the party at the Windjammer moved over to my place. Q: If you could change one thing here, what would it be? A: There is not enough work for a six-day workweek! It is a really bummer to be at work with nothing to do. Q: What do you like most about GTMO? A: The weather! I love the heat. I know its going to be cold when I get back up to North Dakota. I am not looking forward to that. Q: Any advice for future GTMO visitors? A: Bring plenty of civilian clothing, and to take advantage of the great weather and out door activities. Q: Anything to say in closing? A: Farewell Guantanamo Bay, and say goodbye to all my girls in 32 Alpha. It was fun but Im ready to go. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Someone had yelled out my house number and the word party. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Shes spinning out of control in GTMO The nearly 1,000 MP guards and infantrymen that lived there in its heyday are mostly gone home now; the 300 detainees they guarded at Camp X-Ray were all moved to Camp Delta in April, guarded these days by MPs who live at Camp America, sleeping in air-conditioned SEAhuts and showering in concrete latrines. Erected in January by the Marines, who commanded the detention operation here for its first three months, the 78-tent city called Freedom Heights is all but gone now, torn down and packed up Wednesday and Thursday by 57 volunteers from all over the JTF from Camp America and the JTF Headquarters, from the Pink Palace and the motor pool, all pitching in on a hot GTMO day to bid farewell to a relic of the detention opera tions rough infancy. And workers used to the finer living JTFers enjoy these days whether at Camp America or cushy Windward Loop got a firsthand look at the home-awayfrom-home that the Marines and Army MP units like the 401st, 414th and 988th knew all too well: sun-baked tents with makeshift flooring that only arrived a month into their stay, showers made of plywood with pails for faucets. Running water? Not here. And after this week, Freedom Heights wouldnt be here either. What did it all mean? Today is a positive thing, said Staff Sgt. Tom McCarthy, J-3. It means that the guards have moved into better quarters and maybe feel a little more appreciated for the job theyre doing. And if X-Ray is ever used again, the next group of guards here should have it a little better than the last. This is what deployments are all about, said Senior Airman Brandon Miranda, J-6. Tearing down the old stuff means youve put up new stuff. When they came here, this was the best we could do. Today is a closure on that part of Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. CG PSU 307 tactics protect GTMO Page 6 Army PFT is no sweat for soldiers Page 8 Getting the goods to the detainees Page 12 Dismantling Freedom Friday, August 2, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 8 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See Heights, page 5 A look inside... End of an era at X-Ray as former troop liv ing quarters broken down for repurposing Clockwise from front left: Army Sgt. Deborah Pacheco, Airman Seth Hub bard, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Charles Brown and Air Force Master Sgt. Mark Mercadal heft a folded-up tent onto the pile Wednesday. Two crews of volunteers broke down most of Freedom Heights in a day.