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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00061
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: July 26, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00061

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PAGE 1

History, they say, doesn't happen without someone to tell the tale. And military missions don't happen without committed servicemem bers on the ground and taxpay ers back home who are willing to foot the bill. In the detention operation at Guantanamo Bay, some 80 percent of the nearly 2,000 servicemem bers here are now reservists, called away for six months or more from wives and husbands and homes and hometowns. Even in the aftermath of a nation-binding event like Sept. 11, that can be a special test of pub lic support and troop morale. That's where military public affairs comes in. This week, the Army Reserves top public-affairs men from the U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC) came here, visiting GTMO for a three-day fact-finding tour. Their mission: to take the meas ure of the operation here, and keeping in mind the all-too-real demands of operational security look for ways to better tell the reservist's story to his two most important constituencies: the folks back home, and the soldiers them selves. Theres an incredible amount of interest in the mission here back in the U.S., said Mr. Joseph Han ley, Director of Public Affairs for USARC. The exotic locale, the detainees people want to know what servicembers are doing here, and our job is to try to maximize coverage of it so that they do. Hanley, joined by USARC col leagues Army Lt. Col. Boyd Collins, chief of marketing and media relations, and Army Maj. Gerard F. Healy, head of policy and plans, took the full GTMO tour, from JTF-170 headquarters to JTF160 headquarters, from X-Ray to Delta to America to GTMO's own tip of the public-affairs spear, the Joint Information Bureau and the Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 114th MP Co. hoses down fire dept. Page 15 Chaplain lends helping hand to choir Page 10 Attackdog day afternoons Page 6 Telling the GTMO story Friday, July 26, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 7 Return of The Wire Photo by Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See PAOs, page 5 A look inside... After a week in which publication of the paper did not occur, the staff of The Wire was back to work Thursday, hurriedly preparing for print the fine journalistic product you now hold in your hand. So stop reading this cutline and dig in -we hope you missed us a little. USARCs top PAOs come to Cuba to try to give the soldiers on the ground their due Page 16 Friday, July 26, 2002 With Staff Sgt. Steven R. Munnerlyn Q: Why have you been chosen for this weeks 15 Minutes Of Fame? A: You must know something about me that I dont, because I dont think Im ready for 15 minutes of fame. Q: Arent you one of the motivated indi viduals that lead Army PT in the morning? A: Yes. Q: How do you feel about leading soldiers into battle with 2 mile mini-mountains at 0dark-30 in the morning? A: I love being involved in the PT pro gram. I enjoy helping my fellow soldiers get into shape. I know that many of the people involved in the PT program are in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve, and they may not be used to PT on a daily basis. I enjoy watch ing their improvement. Q: Any downside to being a PT leader? A: Only when troops arent motivated. I know it can be hard to be motivated at 5:30 a.m., but I try to make it fun. Q: PT or cake? A: I do PT. Theres nothing wrong with eating cake but I try to steer clear of the fatty foods. If you treat your body good, it will be good to you. Q: And, when youre not doing PT, what do you enjoy doing? A: I just recently got into golfing, and I enjoy snorkeling and hiking. Q: Are you a fan of the Tiki Bar? A: I enjoy the outdoor environment. I feel free to roam about and have a good time there. Hey, its always fun to watch everyone else have a good time. Q: Where do you live? A: Good old Windward Loop. Q: How would you describe it there? A: The Loop is like a soap opera. There is just so much drama that goes on, and there is always someone sitting on their front lawn watching and waiting to gossip about it. Q: If you could pick a theme song for GTMO, what would it be and why? A: The Eagles Hotel California because as hard as folks work around here is about as hard as they party. Q: What do you do to relax? A: In the morning, I like to have a cup of coffee and sit in my backyard, like to watch the sun rise. After work I do the same, but with a cold drink instead. Q: That sounds kind of romantic. Would you say youre romantic, PT man? A: NO! I just like to be alone, it gives me time to reflect and ponder. Q: What are some of the things you think about? A: I think about lots of things, but most of the time my family. Q: So, how would you describe yourself? A: I am down-to-earth and a good listener. One of my major goals in life is to see soldiers succeed. I dedicate as much of my time as possible to trying to help out soldiers, I hope that some of the things I have done with them or advice Ive given to them will have a posi tive impact on them. Q: What would you change, if anything, about GTMO? A: I wish that there were more activities for soldiers that would help them cope with deployment stress. Not necessarily sports activites, and definitely not drinking! Q: Do you think drinking is a problem among soldiers here? A: No, there are just more productive ways to deal with the stress of being away from loved ones. Q: How do you feel about deployment love or relationships? A: If youre looking for love in GTMO, youre looking for love in all the wrong places. Q: If you had access to a bunker and knew that GTMO was about to be attacked, but could only take one person with you, who would it be and why? A: Thats a tough one, but Id say Sgt. Lozano. Hes my compadre from Ft. Sill. We got to know each other down here, but we had seen each other around before. Hes become a good friend of mine. Q: How would you descibe most of the people youve met here? A: Free spirits. Q: Do you have anything to say in closing? A: My home has an open door. If theres a soldier in need of someone to talk to, they should feel free to come visit me. Even those from Camp America are welcome. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko If you treat your body good, it will be good to you. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Cheat your body, and it will cheat you

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Page 2 Friday, July 26, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Science and religion are not natural ene mies. People can believe in God and believe in the Big Bang theory of how the universe was created. Perhaps they might reflect upon the words of King Solomon: It is He who gave me unerring knowl edge of what exists, to know the structure of the world and the activity of the ele ments...for wisdom, the fashioner of all things, taught me (Wisdom 7:17-22). Two questions are on the table. How did creation happen? Why did it happen? The two questions dont contradict one another. They walk hand in hand. Science follows natural law. The believer says that God created the natural law. The natural law cannot contra dict true theology and vice versa. Science answers questions about HOW creation happened. Theology answers ques tions about WHY it happened. Science proposes a Big Bang theory to answer the how? question. Believers say that there is an all-merciful God to answer the why? question. Now then, the real question: Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Over the past three months there have been several reported thefts of personal property, including bicycles, wallets and a personal computer here at GTMO. At approximately 2 p.m. July 11, 2002, a black and blue nylon case containing audio CDs was stolen from the JTF-160 D yel low bus. The bus driver (victim) had been operating a fully loaded bus from the NEX to Camp America all day. The CD case was on the dashboard next to the drivers seat. The victim discovered that the CD case was missing after letting passengers off at Camp America, and reported the incident to NAVBASE Police. All indications are that the CDs were stolen by someone from Camp America. The combined estimated total cost of the 45 CDs and the CD case is over $500.00. It is intolerable that thieves exist among us. Not only is stealing both illegal and immoral, but it also lowers morale and detracts attention from our main mission. When you steal, you take something that does not belong to you. You didnt work for it, you didnt earn it, and you didnt pay for it. And those who help thieves are no less guilty than the thief himself. The CD case is rectangular in shape and is 6 X 12 in size. It has a carry handle and the brand name LOGIC printed on its front. It holds two CDs on the front side and two CDs on the backside of each page. At least two CDs, Primus and Boston had the name Shone marked on them with black magic marker. The CDs were mostly heavy-metal music (i.e. Anthrax, Metallica, Iron Maiden, MegaDeath, Seven Dust, Staind, etc.). Those with information are urged to call the JTF-160 Provost Marshals Office at 5057 or 5061, to help solve this case. Your name will be kept confidential. Please help us keep JTF-160 crime-free by being vigilant, reporting suspicious inci dents, and by marking and securing your personal property. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 The Big Bangs How and Why Showing Off I love showing soldiers off. Recently, we were visited by the command sergeant major from SOUTHCOM as well as the CSM from USARSO. I took great pride in bringing them out to Camp America to meet with and talk to soldiers. They were very impressed with the professionalism displayed by all those that they spoke with. The atti tudes and morale displayed by Americas finest did not surprise these distinguished visitors. Thats why I was proud to bring them out there and show you off, and I will continue to do so when the occasion arises. CSM Draughn (USARSO) was taken aback when we visited the Non-Lethal Weapons training, and he saw the determination and fight ing spirit that was evident in those classes. It is up to all of us to maintain that spirit and determination. We are not judge and jury but professionals who are here to do a job, to maintain a camp that will forever be part of his tory. The eyes of the world are on us, some waiting for us to slip and fall. But they dont know us. Stand tall and walk proud, you are doing great. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro Page 15 Friday, July 26, 2002 114th MPs extinguish Fire Dept. Wednesday night at the G.J. Denich gym, the 114th Military Police Company beat the Guantanamo Bay Fire Department 54 to 40. The 114th MP Co. jumped out to a quick 13-4 lead with the aggressive play and good shot selection of Army Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor. Proctor began the game with a hot hand. We had con fidence in his scoring abilities so we kept giving him the rock,said Army Spc. Was car Viscaino. When Proctors shooting cooled off, though, the Fire Dept. was able to make a comeback. With 11:33 on the clock, the score was 13-8. Fire Dept. scored five unan swered points to tie the game at 13 all. With 10:00 on the clock, the 114th MPs called a timeout to gather themselves. I called a timeout because we were not doing what we were supposed to do, which is play good defense and run the ball, said Viscaino. Fire Dept. was able to come back because the 114th MPs were not playing their style off basketball. We have good shooters on this team. We are a run-andgun team. If we can run the ball, we can get open for the three-point shot, said Vis caino. After the timeout, Army Maj. Sharon D. Green squared up and shot a threepointer to put the MPs in the lead. Fire Dept. had a chance to take the lead with 9:00 on the clock. The score was 16-15 but Fire Dept. was not able to capitalize. Green was playing tough defense and able to steal the ball. Fire Dept. was forced to foul. Green made her two freethrows to put the MPs on top by three. We got out of playing like a team and we had to get back to the basics of basketball, said Green. 114th MP Co. started play ing together as one unit. They were playing a tough zone defense against Fire Dept. We have a good shooting team and we play good defense. That is what we started doing. We were able to build a good lead, said Vis caino. The score at the end of the first half was 29-17. The MPs came out in the second half with renewed energy. We played a man-to-man defense at the start of the sec ond half so to speed up the tempo of the game and force the Fire Dept. to keep up with us, I felt we were a quicker team, said Viscaino. As the tempo increased, the MPs secured the lead for good. The essential part of the game was just to go back to the basics, team basketball. We were not looking to pass the ball. We were play ing selfish basketball. The game changed when we started to pass the ball and look for one another on the court, she said. We were looking for the open player. That was the key to victory for us against Fire Dept., said Green. 114th MP Co. felt they could have played better, but a shortage of players made it tough on the team. This team plays good defense but we were not as intense in this game because we only had five players dress up for the game, said Vis caino. With the win over Fire Dept., the 114th MP Co. stayed undefeated in league play with a record of 4-0. Softball Standings JTF-170 6-0 Iguanas 5-1 Regulars 5-1 Hospital 5-1 GTMO Bay 4-2 GTMO Lite 4-2 239 MP Co. 4-1 XO Staff 3-3 Blacksheep 3-3 178 MP Co. 3-3 160 MP Bn. 2-3 HQ JTF-160 2-3 Hit Squad 2-4 571 MP Co. 1-4 PSU 307 1-4 Wildcats 1-5 Miuw 204 1-5 114 MP Co. A 0-3 114 MP Co. B 0-3 342 MP Co. 0-4 By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Chat Bout 4-0 Navsta 2-1 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-1 JTF-160 2-1 178th MP Co. 1-2 Naval Hospital 1-3 Fire Dept. 0-3 571st MP Co. 0-3 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Wascar Viscaino goes up strong for the dunk in wednesdays night win against Fire Department 54 to 40 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Jeremiah N. Poctor goes up for a lay-up. Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Wascar Viscaino breaks down the enemy defense.

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Page 14 Friday, July 26, 2002 Remember, the next JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series starts soon. It is scheduled to run from Wednesday, August 8th to Saturday, September 21st. Sign up through your chain of command and your units POC. If any unit POC has any questions or wants more information call Capt. Gormly at #5249. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8:00PM Free Movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room. Today, Friday, July 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 5:30PM-12:30AM, Night Fishing Trip, Pelican Petes Marina. Saturday, July 27th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill & Deer Point Pools. 10:00AM, Tennis Tournament, CBQ Tennis Courts. Fans & Rivalry Saturday, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Sunday, July 28th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill & Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament VII, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. Monday, July 29th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 8:30PM, 8-Ball Pool Tournament, Windjammer $5 entry fee. Double elimination. Trophy & Cash Prize. Tuesday, July 30th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 7:00PM, Monopoly Nite, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Wednesday, July 31st 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 7:00PM, Domino Tournament VI, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. Thursday, August 1st 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. Imagine it: You and 20 oth ers start pedaling up and down simulated hills on stationary bicycles as up-tempo dance music is pumped into the room. Ten minutes into the ses sion, your quads start burning with lactic acid from all the pedaling. Youre tired. Youre hurting. Do you stop or do you keep going? Welcome to spinning, the high-octane, fat-burning fit ness craze that is about to take GTMO for a ride. New spinning classes are off and rolling at the G.T. Denich gym on base. The classes are scheduled five days a week: on Monday, Wednes day and Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., and Tuesday and Thursday at 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Spinning is one of the best workouts in the world. It com bines a mental, physical and spiritual workout, said Don nell Daniel (a.k.a. D.D.), Athletic Director of Morale, Recreation and Welfare. Spinning rewards you in many ways and one of the objectives, says Daniel, is per sonal growth. One of the keys to spin ning is, we are about giving you a personal victory. When you walk into the spinning class your mental focus turns from me to we, said Daniel. We want the class to interact together, talk about life while they are riding. Mean while they are working hard and burning fat, said Daniel. As the group becomes one and they prepare their bikes for the class, the instuctor gets them ready for the ride. We get everyone in the same mindset and take the class on a journey they will never forget,said Daniel. Thats when people find that extra energy to keep pedal ing. Spinning is unique because just when you think you cant go any more and your muscles are burning you go a little bit more, he said. People actu ally reach deep down and give it every thing they have, and that is the personal victory giving it your all and seeing the progress one step at a time, said Daniel. The progress comes as the personal victories build up. This type of exercise is a stepping-stone because every one just gets better physically and mentally in every session, said Daniel. This class is not easy. It is tough. But at the same time, it is exhilarating when you complete a spinning class you feel good about yourself. You get what you put into it, said Daniel. Besides the results you can get from the class, spinning also offers something new and different from other kinds of workouts. I just want people to expe rience something new, spin ning is not like lifting weights or running on a treadmill you can get great results from it, said Michelle Cheynne, a certi fied fitness instructor for MWR. This spinning class is something different than the traditional exercises. There will not be any two experi ences that are the same. said Daniel. The variety in every spin ning class just intrigues people. To be part of a spinning class like this is incredible, it is like an infection, he said. Once you do your first class you cant wait til the next one. The results might be enough to fill the class each week. In a spinning class you will burn about 500 to 800 calories in a 45-minute class,said Daniel. With spinning, not only will you see the progress, but the great thing is that you dont need coordination like most exercises. Anyone can spin, you can be 8 or 80 years old, it doesnt matter, said Daniel. Everyone can come to the gym and try spinning its quick, its effective and its something a little different for GTMO servicemembers look ing to get healthy in a hurry. Spinning gives you results fast. You dont want to be in the gym all day long. You want to burn your calories and get on with life, said Daniel. We are here to meet the fit ness needs of the people, said Daniel. We at MWR have purchased 22 of the best spin ning bikes available. We have set up a great spinning room with a high-quality stereo sys tem. This spinning class, he said, is going to rock. New spin at GTMO gym Story by Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez MWR certified fitness instructor Michelle Cheynne as she leads a class Page 3 Friday, July 26, 2002 The Texas National Guard infantrymen attached to the 2/142 are the ones who guard the guards at Camp America. They man the front entrance to the camp and check security badges on all personnel trying to gain access. They also per form internal perimeter security and do patrols around the camp. Working eight hours on and eight hours off for the better part of the week, these troops live and breathe general orders. Their vigilance allows their fellow soldiers at the camp to relax in peace, for these motivated soldiers know how to guard and protect. Checkpoint guards Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Sgt. Tony Maxwell checks security badges at the entrance to Camp America. Sgt. Tony Maxwell We are here to do our part, and then we will move on and go home. Its tough working the day shifts out here in the blazing sun, but that is our job. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Joe Garcia performs a radio check back to his command. Spc. Joe Garcia It aint that bad out here. Were infantrymen, so it doesnt matter if we are here guarding the gate or out on patrol; we have a job to perform. Spc. Guadalupe Bravo I just returned from a six month tour in Bosnia when I received orders to come here. Now, I am enduring freedom, and I like it.

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Page 4 Friday, July 26, 2002 Black flag of heat When you see that black flag waving in the wind here at GTMO, it must be hot 90 degrees Fahrenheit or above to be exact. The flag acts as a guide in regulating intensity of physical exer tion.While white, green, yellow and red flags caution against varying degrees of heat, the black flag is as hot as it gets. The black flag indicates that all physical training and strenuous exercise is to be suspended for all personnel (excluding operational commitments not for training purposes). Hitherto, it is recommended that your water intake be more than two quarts per hour, and the work-rest cycle for outdoor work is to be 20 minutes of work and 40 minutes of rest. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This weeks question: Did you miss the Wire last week? Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Randy Atwood, J1 JPRC I wondered what happened. Some one told me there wasnt a Wire. Nor mally theres one floating around the house. Army Sgt. Michael D. Williams, 114th Military Police Co. I really didnt miss it. There are so many other papers to read. Im pretty up to date on whats going on. CG Petty Officer 1st Class Zenon Ayala, PSU 307 As a matter of fact, I did miss the Wire. I would like to see more of my brothersand cousins-in-arms featured, though. Air Force Staff Sgt. Daniel McCaffrey, Motor Pool I didnt notice because I really dont pay attention to it. I dont even know where to get one. Army 1st Lt. Jorge Rodriguez, 418th Transportation Co. I sure did miss the Wire. I realized there wasnt one when I was looking all over for it. I even checked the Web. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Across 1 Reserved 4 Wall plant 7 Plod 10 Honeyed 12 British drink 13 Powdered chocolate 15 Moses mountain 16 And so forth 17 Ventilated 18 Escudo 19 Long-term memory 21 Barrel 23 Internal Revenue Service 24 Wasteland 26 Minds 28 Friend 30 Ill-bred 31 Connection 34 Japanese dish 36 Compass point 40 Gaiety 41 Beam 42 Also 43 Deceiver 45 Mom 47 Asia 48 Teen hero 50 Engrave 52 Allow 54 Sticky candy 57 Boxer Muhammad 58 Her 60 Big Apple (abbr.) 61 Steal 63 Louis partner 65 Ghosts greeting 67 Dwelling 69 Frozen pizza brand 70 Saloon 71 Seeped out 72 Ball holder 73 Short-term memory 74 Harden Down 1 Slip through hoop 2 Away 3 Affirmative 4 Detail 5 Ex-serviceman 6 Talk 7 Luau dish 8 Pungent 9 People who get things done 10 South southeast 11 The condition of cultivated soil 13 Cooped 14 Spots 20 Because of this 22 Decorative needle case 25 Expert 27 Novel 29 Wall picture 30 Ball and mall, for example 31 Football assoc. 32 French yes 33 Genetic code 35 Surface to air missile 37 Airport abbr. 38 Distress call 39 Toddler 44 Edge 45 Butterflys cousin 46 Lawyer (abbr.) 47 Extremely high frequency (abbr.) 49 CDS 51 Chocolate tree 52 Mete 53 Waitress on Cheers 55 Turned to ice 56 Sing 57 Enact 59 Tides 60 Standard 62 Berth 64 Seed bread 66 Grain 68 Fen Page 13 Friday, July 26, 2002 Obstructions fill my path Causing frustration to resonate I walk rough, tough steps Eyes opened wide Maybe you can see me Im a soldier filled with pride Into the pool of lemon juice From off of the razor blade slide Tongue hanging out, Mouth opened wide Hold on people, Its going to be a bumpy ride. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the July 12 puzzle Friday, July 26 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds PG13 91min 10 p.m. Undercover Brother PG13 89min Saturday, July 27 8 p.m. Men in Black II PG13 91min 10 p.m. Bad Company R -124min Sunday, July 28 8 p.m. Road to Perdition R 119min Monday, July 29 8 p.m. Men in Black II PG13 91min Tuesday, July 30 8 p.m. Undercover Brother PG13 89min Wednesday, July 31 8 p.m. Road to Perdition R 119min Thursday, August 1 8 p.m. The Sum of all Fears R 124min

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Page 12 Friday, July 26, 2002 I feel right at home here, said Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill at the Camp Delta detention center. Back home in Florida, hes a supervisory chaplain with the Federal Bureau of Pris ons, Department of Justice. Theyre classified as detainees here, but its a similar dynamic of controlled behavior in a confined facility, Merrill said. The Army Reserve member is assigned to the 160th Military Police Battalion, Tal lahassee, Fla., part of the security force at Camp Delta. In both civilian and military life, Merrill, a Southern Baptist, comes across all faiths. He said he has some experience ministering to Muslims in his civilian job. But at Camp Delta, he said hes had only minimal involvement with the detainees. But even though theres a Muslim imam here, Ive dealt with some of the detainees, he said. Obviously, the imam has more dealings with them. An imam is an Islamic spiritual leader. In his duty as a chaplain, Merrill said he cant focus on what someone is incarcerated for. In America, if theyre a murderer or druglord, or whatever, I have to relate to them as human beings and block out their crime, he noted. In other words, I have to give them the benefit of the doubt and treat them like there is hope for them to change their life. So down here with the detainees, I have to treat them humanely, Merrill said. And I have to hope that by me being respectful and professional that they see there is a better way than their previous behavior, which, as far as we know, was full of hatred and evil actions. This is called ministry of presence. Just being present and the way you carry yourself goes a long way with some of the detainees. In civilian life, sometimes people in prison who have gone through rough expe riences get in touch with an inward free dom, the chaplain said. So, obviously, there is a big difference between ministering in a confined facility and a church. But the issues are the same regarding purpose in life, mission in life their spiritual issues and why theyre exist ing here on Earth. People in confinement are more helpless because they dont have access to immedi ate family, he said. Like here, their mom cant come visit them, Merrill noted. So youre sort of their support system, whereas in a civilian setting theres more access to a support system of family and friends. In a confined facility there is more reliance upon the chaplain, counselors or other people to provide it for them. To support Camp Delta and the naval base, the Navy and Army have two chap lains each, two Catholics and two Protes tants, plus the Air Force has a Muslim imam. Between the five of us, we try to pro vide well-rounded coverage for the detainees and the U.S. servicemembers, said Merrill. We never compromise our faith tradi tion, but like yesterday, a Catholic soldier came to me and wanted to be confirmed. So I talked with him, counseled him and referred him to the Catholic priest. Merrill said he talks with anyone who asks. Talking to a detainee is similar to talking to a soldier, because the conversa tions for both will be about issues in life and praying, he noted. He said service members come to see him because of homesickness, relationships of boyfriends and girlfriends, marital issues, and sick children. Once you get a few soldiers together, something will happen, Merrill said. Someone will pass away or someone gets into a car accident back home. More of the issues deal with being isolated here at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. However, the base has many things to help the servicemen and women to keep busy, such as recreation sporting events, movies. Waiting quietly to talk to the chaplain was Sgt. Derwin Davis of the 114th Military Police Company, Mississippi Army National Guard from Clinton, Miss. Its great to have a chaplain available because when youre having problems, you know you can go right to the source instead of trying to deal with it yourself, he said. Camp America chaplain feels at home with detainees, GTMO servicemembers Army Sgt. Derwin Davis (left) talks with Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill in the chapel at Camp Delta, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Davis and his unit, the 114th Military Police Company, Mississippi Army National Guard, Clinton, Miss., are providing security at Delta, a detention facility for captured enemy combatants. Story and photo by Rudi Williams American Forces Press Service newsroom of The Wire. All said they were impressed with the level of professionalism and competence among servicemembers and the level of security surrounding the oper ations here wherever they went. But there was one troubling part of the visit: seeing first-hand all the stories that couldn't be told. We came down to see that the American public gets to see what the Army reservists are doing down here, said Healy. Because of security concerns, though, a lot of the superb, even heroic efforts of a lot of Army Reservists and National Guard members as well as the active-duty soldiers and all the other service members working so hard here will never be widely known. That's unfortunate. But a lot can be known, he said. And we're here to find out what can be done to bet ter support the public-affairs effort. We can always do a better job making those military efforts public that can safely be made public. And we're going to try to do that. As any graduate of the militarys Defense Information School (DINFOS) can tell you, that PA effort comes in two prongs. The first is media relations ensuring that civilian news writers and broadcasters get the stories they want promptly and accurately without endan gering the security of the nation or its service members. The media, the so-called fourth estate, is there to keep the public informed as to how their tax dollars are being spent and how their sons and daughters in uniform are being used, said Healy. And its our responsibility to ensure that the sacred trust between the mil itary and the American people is maintained. We have to help the media help us do that. When the media asks questions, our job is to answer them, he said. Theyre asking on behalf of the public, and in the end, we work for them. Besides, with the media the way it is today, in this operation we could get enough press coming down here to sink this island, Healy joked. We have to make sure were ready for anything. The other half of the PA job is internal information keeping the troops themselves informed as to what their command is doing and where they fit in. A nd here at GTMO, you know what that is: The Wire. Its absolutely critical in a place like this, said Hanley. Its important for the service members to understand what the organization is and what it does, and it allows him to see how he fits into the big picture. It may not seem like much sometimes, but when a soldier or sailor or Marine or Coast Guardsman finds himself or his unit featured in the base paper, he can send it home or refer them to the Web site and feel like his family or friends can better understand what hes doing here. And that can make the sepa ration pass less painfully. It can be a real morale booster, said Han ley. This isnt the worst place in the world to be, but the people here are still a long way from home if not in miles, than at least in feeling. That feeling can be particularly strong for reservists and guardsmen, who have to leave homes and jobs sometimes on only a few days or weeks notice and uproot their lives when their country calls. But Hanley says that the large reservist presence at GTMO these days has a special significance. The wide use of reservists in the war on terror demonstrates that the will of the Ameri can people is really invested in the cause, he said. Reserve call-ups make such an impact on homes, and families and communities, that it shows the committment of this country to this cause that the support is still there. And in this visit and previous ones to the places where reservists are serving, Hanley says hes heard time and time again from the commanders on the ground that far from being mere weekend warriors, reservists bring something special to the mission itself. The comments we get are that reservists often bring in a level of experience thats very valuable in a setting like this, he said. Many of the soldiers involved in this detention oper ation are in law eforcement or corrections back home. Bringing that on-the-job experi ence can be a real plus. These are not nice people they're guard ing, Hanley continued. Nobody wants to have a mistake made where one of the ser vicemebers get hurt or one of the detainees get hurt. Sometimes that maturity level can keep that from happening. When we took our tour, there was an active duty company on duty. And I noticed they were very young very professional, but very young. The reservists tend to be older, with more time in the job. And the leadership feels that's a real plus. That makes USARCs external publicaffairs mission maintaining public support for those reservists even more critical. Theyve left their homes, inconvenienced their employers, left their communities, Han ley said. We want to demonstrate to those people what the reservists are doing and why its important. For Lt. Col. Collins, that means getting them on Americas favorite information medium: television. Collins supervises the collection of back ground footage of sol diers on the job, or B-roll, which his office then markets to local and national TV outlets for use in their programming. We let them edit it, record their own voice-overs on it, and run it as if they got it them selves, he said. They love it. It saves them money and gets our story told. Collins said recent placements include Fox, CNN, Americas Most Wanted, and count less local TV stations eager for stories on members of their communities called up to serve. At GTMO, Collins said, the stars of the show are the MPs at Delta. Theres been a lot of interest in the guards down here. Our job is to get the media what they want without compromising security. Of course, part of these PAOs job is to finetune the structure and manning of publicaffairs personnel on the ground, wherever they are deployed. After all, one of the other special charasteristics of reservists is theyre always going back home and being replaced. Part of this visit was making sure that JTF160s own public-affairs operation is running smoothly that the the current crew, the reservist journalists of the 361st PCH, were telling all the GTMO stories that can be told without endangering operational security or servicemembers lives. So next time a print journalist from The Wire comes up to you with a notebook and pen, or a broadcast journalist points a camera in your direction, just try to remember were all in BDUs here. Were doing our part of the JTF-160 mission, doing it the best we can with what weve got. Were doing it for all you servicemembers who are stuck in GTMO a long way from home, just like us. And weve got bosses too. Page 5 Friday, July 26, 2002 PAOs, from page 1 Photo by Army Staff Sgt. Timothy A. Barnes Lt. Col. Dennis Fink, left, commander of the 361st PCH, looks on as (l to r) Lt. Col Collins, Mr. Hanley and Staff Sgt. Johnson watch Spc. Hector Per alta and Spc. Ivey N. Hodges do their broadcasting thing. Photo by Army Staff Sgt. Timothy A. Barnes Maj. Healy checks in with USARC back home.

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Working-class dogs take a big Page 6 Friday, July 26, 2002 There are some here at GTMO that dont mind telling you that they are working like dogs. That statement couldnt be truer than for three canine members of the Joint Task Force 160 team who are assigned to the Joint Deten tion Operations Group, or JDOG. (No pun intended.) No bones about it, Ari, Roni, and Rocko fit the bill. Assigned to JTF-160, they work seven days a week and rarely, if ever, voice a com plaint. These working-class dogs are the lead elements of the military police team working in support of JTF operations. The military working dogs are trained to work in security operations, law enforcement and combat support roles. They, along with their partners, Sgt. Brenden Hiatt of the 179th Military Police Detachment, Fort Stewart, Ga.; Sgt. Bryan Theckston of the 177th MP Detach ment, Fort Drum, N.Y.; and Staff Sgt. Tra panger Stephens of the 148th MP Detachment, Fort Carson, Colo., have a multi-faceted mis sion here at GTMO. Their mission includes not only the broad spectrum of psychological and physical deterrence, but physical security as well. According to the JDOG Commander, Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., the military working-dogs bring to the JTF an asset and capability that fits well into the JTF security posture. They play a critical role in our overall structure and we depend upon the unique abilities that the dogs bring to the security arena. Additionally, they are able to employ a psychological tool that enhances our security procedures, he said. To ensure that the dogs are successful in accomplishing their mission, the canines are assigned to work with a handler. Stephens, Hiatt, and Theckston are military police officers who have earned the Addi tional Skill Identifier of Z6, dog han dler, which enables them to work with the canines. These handlers attended an intensive threemonth training course at Lackland Air Force Base, in San Antonio, Texas before being awarded the ASI. The handlers dont have an easy job. They must maintain rigorous training standards and pristine training records for their canine partners in addition to accom plishing their assigned mission. They must maintain these standards, even though they are deployed. What makes the job even more challenging is that at the end of the day, the handlers cant just go home and leave work behind like most people. The handlers are still responsible for the training and personal care of their assigned dogs. This includes feeding, grooming and tak ing care of the dogs kennels. You have to take care of everything...its like having a small child, said Hiatt, a Top Dog graduate from K-9 school in 2000. There is no day off. We work 365 days a year, said Hiatt, who is assigned to handle Roni, a German Shepherd. Although this is Sgt. Hiatts first deployment with Roni, Roni has received several certificates of achievement for deployments to Bosnia and Kuwait with his previous handler. Regardless of the all the hard work, the handlers love their job. But the most demand ing part of the job, according to Sgt Theckston, is ensuring the dogs stay profi cient and that we keep the training up to standards. Sgt. Theckston is assigned to handle Ari, also a German Shepherd. Ari must be able to search systematically and detect 39 out of 40 training aids to maintain his certification. If he is not certified, he cant be utilized in any task, said Theckston. The job is very rewarding because the dogs show you that they appreciate what you do for them, he said. But the affection the dogs show is no indica tion of their temperament, as Sgt. Theckston knows first-hand, having been bitten by one of his working dogs in the past. Theckston was the unfortunate recipient of a dog bite. Although he was not seriously hurt, he understands and accepts the risks associated with the job. When training the dogs, we also act as decoys. You must be careful and keep safety in mind at all times because the dogs are trained to attack anywhere on the body. A decoy can suf fer a serious injury if he is not careful, he said. Although the dogs are not required to be pure bred, military working dogs are required to meet certain age and physical requirements. When first selected for training, they must be 13 years old, stand 22 inches tall at the shoulders and weigh at least 55 pounds. Once they pass that hurdle, the dogs must complete an inten sive training program at the 341st Military Working Dog Training School at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Each dog is trained a minimum of three to four months after which they are evaluated to determine what type of duty they will perform said Stephens, NCOIC of the military working dog section. Stephens works with Rocko, a Bel gian Malinois. Once the dogs complete their training and certification and are assigned to a handler, they happily perform their mission day in and day By Army Maj. Donna L. Scott The Wire Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott During a training exercise, Sgt. Hiatt prepares to release Roni in pursuit of a suspect. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Sgt. Theckston is searched by Staff Sgt. Stephens as Rocko keeps him at bay. meantime, shes always on the lookout for new members come one, come all. Although we started as one unit, said Taylor, we always look for more people because we are serving God regardless of who we are or what unit we are in. For all that the choir has added to Merrills services, the proud chaplain tries to return the favor. Merrill said he has supported the choir by providing an electronic keyboard, a guitar and a small karaoke PA system for singing. He has also made the chapel available for prac tices after church hours. But a successful weekly service cannot be made by a choir alone. Merrill, in his continu ing quest to reach out to all of the residents of Camp America and the whole personnel that are serving JTF-160, pays close attention to the details keeping the service early in the morning so that servicemembers who work on the weekend can attend before going to work and keeps trying to get the word out. Weve advertised on the radio and televi sion stations and the JTF-160 print medium, The Wire. We also put out posters. It takes, you know, a couple of weeks for the word to get out something exciting is happening here. I want the worship service out here on the field to be a source of encouragement, some thing to challenge the soldier, an instrument to show people that there is hope even in the midst of being in Guantanamo, Cuba, said Merrill. The purpose of the worship service is to find a sanctuary of escape from the headaches and the heartaches of life, said Merrill. Merrill said he believes the choir fits in neatly with the mission of the chapel. Hope fully, when people enter the chapel, they can escape their sorrow and draw a sense of strength and encouragement through the singing, the testimony, preaching and the fel lowship of Christian believers. My vision for the chapel is that it will be an example not only to those of us participat ing, but to Guantanamo Bay and to the world that people of many different backgrounds and faith traditions, he said. Cultures and races can come together as one to worship God, and all those barriers are broken down when you worship God. I want the chapel to be an instrument of healing, reconciliation and unity through Jesus Christ. The chaplaincy is here to support the mil itary. Its a privilege to be a part of this histor ical moment in time, said Merrill. My purpose and vision for being here is to help people see they didnt come here by coin cidence that God brought them down here to perhaps be the one event in their life that will give them the insight to make the right decisions, the healthiest choices and the most blessed life pos sible through God. Merrill, who is now attached to the 160th MP Battalion out of Tallahas see, Fla., worked as a chaplain with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Department of Justice, before he was deployed to GTMO. He said he would like to spend most of his time to help and provide coun seling to the servicemembers currently sta tioned here. He said he also makes himself available to the detainees and that he felt that God used him as an instrument when one of the detainees requested to have a private ses sion with him. The members of Voices of Inspiration said they hope more people will join them as they continue to praise the Lord with their music. If you want to attend one of the serv ices and listen to the new choir, services are at the Camp America chapel, Sundays at 8 a.m. and 6 p.m and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. services a musical voice to reach the heavens Page 11 Friday, July 26, 2002 Led by Marine Maj. Bell of the Joint Informaition Bureau, the assembly sings together three inspirational hymns from a Camp America songs booklet as more faithful enter the chapel to obtain their spiritual nourishment for the week. Chaplain Merrill meets with Army Spc. Scott Belgard from the 239th Military Police Company in the chaplians office at Camp America after the Protestant church service last Sunday.

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out. And the dogs work practically for free! Once they successfully complete a mission or training session their reward is not a paycheck, but a system of praise and rewards. The rewards are either a doggie treat or a toy. All of the dogs assigned to JTF-160 are trained in patrolling techniques. Some of their patrolling missions include scouting, search and rescue, and establishing listening posts and observation posts. The dogs can also be used to search build ings and assist in finding individuals, to include burglars. The dogs dont track suspects, they only use their sense of smell to find what they are looking for, said Hiatt. They can find things much quicker and safer than we can, he said. Each dog must also be trained in the six phases of controlled aggression which allows their handlers to control their actions on or off leash, said Stephens. The six phases include: interview; false run; false run into a bite; stand off; search and re-attack; and bite, he said. But the dogs unique talents dont end there. Each dog also has an operational specialty. Rocko and Roni are trained as patrol/narcotics detection dogs and Ari is a patrol/explosives detection dog. But never let it be said that the military working dogs dont earn their keep. These canines dont have it easy. They must be certi fied annually in order to keep working in the field, said Theckston. Additionally, the dogs must perform their job to tough standards and were not talking 75 percent either. Patrol/narcotics detection dogs must perform a series of tasks to a 90 per cent proficiency rate and patrol/explosive detection dogs must perform to a 95 percent proficiency rate. According to Stephens, in order to maintain their certification, the dogs are required by receive four hours of training in patrolling and four hours in detection each week. And accord ing to Army regulation 190-12, failure to main tain an 90 percent average proficiency for over three months results in automatic de-certifica tion of not just the dog, but the entire team. As a result of stringent training guidelines, these dogs have become highly skilled profes sionals, able to physically stop an individual in his tracks. And Rocko is just as tough as his name sounds. According to Stephens, Rocko was responsible for the recovery of more than $350,000 in drugs and cash in Mexico. Additionally, Rocko and Stephens placed first in the 2000 FORSCOM Military Working Dog competition. So after years of hard work and dedicated service, what do these working class dogs have to look forward to? Well, until the recent pas sage of adoption laws a few years ago, military work dogs didnt have a retirement plan. Now, they have options. On Nov. 6, 2000, Public Law 106-446, amending Title 10 of the U.S. Code was passed. This law facilitated the adop tion of older or excess working dogs. The dogs can also look forward to a teaching assignment once they leave military service. They can return to Lackland Air Force Base where they are assessed and may be selected to assist with training new handlers or they can retire and be adopted. The law, passed by former President Bill Clinton, does, however, restrict adoptions to former handlers, law enforcement agencies, or other qualified individuals who understand the special needs and temperament of military work dogs. According to Stephens, being a military dog handler is the best job in the Army. It would take the average narcotics police officer six to seven years to be able to receive the training and do what we do every day, he said. We also get to work with major agencies such as the DEA, FBI, ATF and the Secret Ser vice, he said. So the next time youre running down Sher man Avenue toward the vet clinic, and hear barking, just keep on running because these dogs arent your average Rin Tin-Tin or Lassie. These are highly trained military working dogs, and they mean business. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Sgt. Theckston fends off an attack by Rocko during a training session. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott PO2 Dodd of NAVSTAGTMO security detachment is stopped by Ari as he simulates an escape. Page 7 Friday, July 26, 2002 Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Staff Sgt. Stephens and Rocko heading out for mandatory training. bite out of terrorism at GTMO Page 10 Friday, July 26, 2002 When Camp America started offering Protestant worship serv ices, only 11 servicemembers showed up to pray. This Sunday, the camps chaplain, Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, was able to boast of an attendance nearly five times that, thanks in large part to good word-of-mouth about some truly heavenly entertainment: the Voices of Inspiration, a new choir that was formed by mem bers of the 114th Military Police Company out of Clinton, Miss. Its great to have the choir, Merrill said. Theyve really helped bring the Protestant serv ices alive for the faithful. Its amazing how everything is just coming together as far as the different types of talents and the people you need to have for a strong worship service, he said. And I think the word is finally getting out. I can see each week more people are getting involved. God has blessed everyones faithfulness. All the while, the choir is blessing every ones ears. Every Sunday, after the opening prayer by the chaplain, and praise and worship by Marine Maj. James W. Bell of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau, Voices of Inspira tion takes over the service by singing con temporary gospel songs to get the worshippers in the mood for thanks and praises to the Lord. It is said that music can soothe the savage beast, but when it comes to religion, though, its a great way to inspire weary, hard-working servicemembers to nourish their souls with some spiritual chow. If you love to sing and praise the Lord, what better way to do it than through music? Express yourself and show your apprecia tion, said Army Pfc. Maxwell Brian, a singer in the choir. We hope that our music inspires anybody who has a problem or who is in distress. We have to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ through music, said Army Sgt. Phillip Patrick, who plays keyboard. For the choirs co-founder and director, Army Sgt. Marilyn E. Taylor, this mission seemed almost heaven-sent. There is a reason for everything, Taylor, an administrative sergeant for the 114th, said. Sgt. Derwin Davis, from my company, came up to me one day and said he wanted to start a choir. He asked me if I wanted to be the choir director. I said yes. I sing in a choir back home, but Ive never directed in my life, she said. It gets hard sometimes, but its a good experience. Ive been singing all my life, she said. I wouldnt feel right if I wasnt doing it. I love to praise the name of the Lord. He gave me this talent. I have to use it before I lose it. Material hasnt been a problem either, Tay lor said. Most of these guys here play for groups back home in Mississippi. Everybody comes up with songs. Weve been blessed with tunes from everybodys husbands and wives. There was still the matter of staffing the group. After talking to Davis, Taylor started looking for devoted Christians to be part of the choir. Not judging anybody, but I didnt want the choir members to do it just for show. That was one of my challenges, said Taylor. I love singing for the Lord and its even better when you have somebody else to sing with you, said Taylor. Or play. Sgt. David Bolden, who plays the guitar for the group, knows how popular the group has become with the Camp America churchgoers, but for him, its an audience of one. We try to do things in the name of the Lord, said Bolden, a junior deacon at home in Mississippi. He directs our path and keeps us focus. I dont do it for any form of passion or show. For her part, Sgt. Taylor would like to organize a concert by the group for a wider GTMO audience, once the fledgling choir has a few more practices under its belt. In the Some of the members of "Voices of Inspiration," a new choir that was formed to help spread the gospel at Camp America and entertain the people who attend the Protestant services held on Sunday and Wednesday. Group members shown are: Army Sgt. Marilyn E. Taylor, Sgt. Patrick Phillip, Sgt. David Bolden, Spc. Angela Williamson and Pfc. Brian Maxwell. New choir gives Camp Americas Protestant Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Servicemembers attending Camp Americas Protestant service Sunday clap their hands as they are enjoying one of the songs being performed by Voices of Inspiration.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, July 26, 2002 Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Food and fun were awaiting the guests at the Air Force Combat Dining-In at McCalla Hangar on Saturday evening. However, there was a catch: you had to navigate an obsta cle course to get to the chow. Tech. Sgt. Tom Siegel, sergeant at arms, carefully scrutinized the guests as they approached the entrance to the obstacle course. If they were foolhardy enough to have forgotten their IDs, they were subjected to a thorough soaking from Staff Sgt. Brian Sapps Super Soaker water pistol. So vigilant was Siegel that people who thought they were exempt from the course because they were involved in its construction were rounded up just like everyone else. Everyone is going to do this, vowed Siegel. Even if you barely make the height requirement, he added as he ushered Senior Airman Mia Delgado to the front of the course. The would-be diners had to tackle four hindrances to get to the barbecued chicken and baked beans awaiting them on the buffet line. The first test was a modified low crawl. Guests had to duck under some camouflaged netting, flop face down on a fluo rescent orange slide and pull themselves from one end to the other with their arms. Next, the guests had to scale a small semi-circular set of monkey bars. Most guests were able to do this rapidly, but stiff joints and a touch of vertigo made it tough for some. The third obstacle was the most daring one. Participants walked up a small platform, grabbed a sturdy black rope and sailed through the air over a tiny 6 x 6 pool filled with about 12 of water. A few unlucky souls lost their grip and landed on the seat of their pants. Surprisingly, it was the final obstacle that resulted in the most mishaps. After landing on the other side of the pool, the guests had to mount one of four spring-action animals (three white ponies and one gray frog) attached to a wooden plank. The seemingly sim ple task turned into a riot of fun as person after person was pitched to the floor by the unpredictable rocking motion of the toy animals. In the end, the only injuries suffered were a few bruised egos that were quickly salved by having a cold beverage and a warm meal with friends. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Air Force Staff Sgt. Brian K. Sapp and Tech Sgt. Eric P. Schaffer enforce the Rules of the Mess by liberally soaking down those who talk shop when theyre supposed to be having fun. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Air Force Master Sgt. Jeri A. Lara gives the swing portion of the course a dry run and endeavors to avoid getting wet. Photo by Airman 1st Class Ashlee L. Gros Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Funaro nimbly mounts the monkey bars enroute to the next obstacle the rope swing. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Maj. Dawnlee J. Roberson does a modified low crawl in phase one of the obstacle course. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Y. Smith gets into the swing of things and sails safely over the pool. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Tech Sgt. Thomas M. Siegel reins in a bucking bronco. Overcoming obstacles, the Air Force way

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, July 26, 2002 Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Food and fun were awaiting the guests at the Air Force Combat Dining-In at McCalla Hangar on Saturday evening. However, there was a catch: you had to navigate an obsta cle course to get to the chow. Tech. Sgt. Tom Siegel, sergeant at arms, carefully scrutinized the guests as they approached the entrance to the obstacle course. If they were foolhardy enough to have forgotten their IDs, they were subjected to a thorough soaking from Staff Sgt. Brian Sapps Super Soaker water pistol. So vigilant was Siegel that people who thought they were exempt from the course because they were involved in its construction were rounded up just like everyone else. Everyone is going to do this, vowed Siegel. Even if you barely make the height requirement, he added as he ushered Senior Airman Mia Delgado to the front of the course. The would-be diners had to tackle four hindrances to get to the barbecued chicken and baked beans awaiting them on the buffet line. The first test was a modified low crawl. Guests had to duck under some camouflaged netting, flop face down on a fluo rescent orange slide and pull themselves from one end to the other with their arms. Next, the guests had to scale a small semi-circular set of monkey bars. Most guests were able to do this rapidly, but stiff joints and a touch of vertigo made it tough for some. The third obstacle was the most daring one. Participants walked up a small platform, grabbed a sturdy black rope and sailed through the air over a tiny 6 x 6 pool filled with about 12 of water. A few unlucky souls lost their grip and landed on the seat of their pants. Surprisingly, it was the final obstacle that resulted in the most mishaps. After landing on the other side of the pool, the guests had to mount one of four spring-action animals (three white ponies and one gray frog) attached to a wooden plank. The seemingly sim ple task turned into a riot of fun as person after person was pitched to the floor by the unpredictable rocking motion of the toy animals. In the end, the only injuries suffered were a few bruised egos that were quickly salved by having a cold beverage and a warm meal with friends. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Air Force Staff Sgt. Brian K. Sapp and Tech Sgt. Eric P. Schaffer enforce the Rules of the Mess by liberally soaking down those who talk shop when theyre supposed to be having fun. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Air Force Master Sgt. Jeri A. Lara gives the swing portion of the course a dry run and endeavors to avoid getting wet. Photo by Airman 1st Class Ashlee L. Gros Command Sgt. Maj. Raymond Funaro nimbly mounts the monkey bars enroute to the next obstacle the rope swing. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Maj. Dawnlee J. Roberson does a modified low crawl in phase one of the obstacle course. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Y. Smith gets into the swing of things and sails safely over the pool. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Tech Sgt. Thomas M. Siegel reins in a bucking bronco. Overcoming obstacles, the Air Force way

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out. And the dogs work practically for free! Once they successfully complete a mission or training session their reward is not a paycheck, but a system of praise and rewards. The rewards are either a doggie treat or a toy. All of the dogs assigned to JTF-160 are trained in patrolling techniques. Some of their patrolling missions include scouting, search and rescue, and establishing listening posts and observation posts. The dogs can also be used to search build ings and assist in finding individuals, to include burglars. The dogs dont track suspects, they only use their sense of smell to find what they are looking for, said Hiatt. They can find things much quicker and safer than we can, he said. Each dog must also be trained in the six phases of controlled aggression which allows their handlers to control their actions on or off leash, said Stephens. The six phases include: interview; false run; false run into a bite; stand off; search and re-attack; and bite, he said. But the dogs unique talents dont end there. Each dog also has an operational specialty. Rocko and Roni are trained as patrol/narcotics detection dogs and Ari is a patrol/explosives detection dog. But never let it be said that the military working dogs dont earn their keep. These canines dont have it easy. They must be certi fied annually in order to keep working in the field, said Theckston. Additionally, the dogs must perform their job to tough standards and were not talking 75 percent either. Patrol/narcotics detection dogs must perform a series of tasks to a 90 per cent proficiency rate and patrol/explosive detection dogs must perform to a 95 percent proficiency rate. According to Stephens, in order to maintain their certification, the dogs are required by receive four hours of training in patrolling and four hours in detection each week. And accord ing to Army regulation 190-12, failure to main tain an 90 percent average proficiency for over three months results in automatic de-certifica tion of not just the dog, but the entire team. As a result of stringent training guidelines, these dogs have become highly skilled profes sionals, able to physically stop an individual in his tracks. And Rocko is just as tough as his name sounds. According to Stephens, Rocko was responsible for the recovery of more than $350,000 in drugs and cash in Mexico. Additionally, Rocko and Stephens placed first in the 2000 FORSCOM Military Working Dog competition. So after years of hard work and dedicated service, what do these working class dogs have to look forward to? Well, until the recent pas sage of adoption laws a few years ago, military work dogs didnt have a retirement plan. Now, they have options. On Nov. 6, 2000, Public Law 106-446, amending Title 10 of the U.S. Code was passed. This law facilitated the adop tion of older or excess working dogs. The dogs can also look forward to a teaching assignment once they leave military service. They can return to Lackland Air Force Base where they are assessed and may be selected to assist with training new handlers or they can retire and be adopted. The law, passed by former President Bill Clinton, does, however, restrict adoptions to former handlers, law enforcement agencies, or other qualified individuals who understand the special needs and temperament of military work dogs. According to Stephens, being a military dog handler is the best job in the Army. It would take the average narcotics police officer six to seven years to be able to receive the training and do what we do every day, he said. We also get to work with major agencies such as the DEA, FBI, ATF and the Secret Ser vice, he said. So the next time youre running down Sher man Avenue toward the vet clinic, and hear barking, just keep on running because these dogs arent your average Rin Tin-Tin or Lassie. These are highly trained military working dogs, and they mean business. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Sgt. Theckston fends off an attack by Rocko during a training session. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott PO2 Dodd of NAVSTAGTMO security detachment is stopped by Ari as he simulates an escape. Page 7 Friday, July 26, 2002 Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Staff Sgt. Stephens and Rocko heading out for mandatory training. bite out of terrorism at GTMO Page 10 Friday, July 26, 2002 When Camp America started offering Protestant worship serv ices, only 11 servicemembers showed up to pray. This Sunday, the camps chaplain, Army Maj. Michael S. Merrill, was able to boast of an attendance nearly five times that, thanks in large part to good word-of-mouth about some truly heavenly entertainment: the Voices of Inspiration, a new choir that was formed by mem bers of the 114th Military Police Company out of Clinton, Miss. Its great to have the choir, Merrill said. Theyve really helped bring the Protestant serv ices alive for the faithful. Its amazing how everything is just coming together as far as the different types of talents and the people you need to have for a strong worship service, he said. And I think the word is finally getting out. I can see each week more people are getting involved. God has blessed everyones faithfulness. All the while, the choir is blessing every ones ears. Every Sunday, after the opening prayer by the chaplain, and praise and worship by Marine Maj. James W. Bell of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau, Voices of Inspira tion takes over the service by singing con temporary gospel songs to get the worshippers in the mood for thanks and praises to the Lord. It is said that music can soothe the savage beast, but when it comes to religion, though, its a great way to inspire weary, hard-working servicemembers to nourish their souls with some spiritual chow. If you love to sing and praise the Lord, what better way to do it than through music? Express yourself and show your apprecia tion, said Army Pfc. Maxwell Brian, a singer in the choir. We hope that our music inspires anybody who has a problem or who is in distress. We have to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ through music, said Army Sgt. Phillip Patrick, who plays keyboard. For the choirs co-founder and director, Army Sgt. Marilyn E. Taylor, this mission seemed almost heaven-sent. There is a reason for everything, Taylor, an administrative sergeant for the 114th, said. Sgt. Derwin Davis, from my company, came up to me one day and said he wanted to start a choir. He asked me if I wanted to be the choir director. I said yes. I sing in a choir back home, but Ive never directed in my life, she said. It gets hard sometimes, but its a good experience. Ive been singing all my life, she said. I wouldnt feel right if I wasnt doing it. I love to praise the name of the Lord. He gave me this talent. I have to use it before I lose it. Material hasnt been a problem either, Tay lor said. Most of these guys here play for groups back home in Mississippi. Everybody comes up with songs. Weve been blessed with tunes from everybodys husbands and wives. There was still the matter of staffing the group. After talking to Davis, Taylor started looking for devoted Christians to be part of the choir. Not judging anybody, but I didnt want the choir members to do it just for show. That was one of my challenges, said Taylor. I love singing for the Lord and its even better when you have somebody else to sing with you, said Taylor. Or play. Sgt. David Bolden, who plays the guitar for the group, knows how popular the group has become with the Camp America churchgoers, but for him, its an audience of one. We try to do things in the name of the Lord, said Bolden, a junior deacon at home in Mississippi. He directs our path and keeps us focus. I dont do it for any form of passion or show. For her part, Sgt. Taylor would like to organize a concert by the group for a wider GTMO audience, once the fledgling choir has a few more practices under its belt. In the Some of the members of "Voices of Inspiration," a new choir that was formed to help spread the gospel at Camp America and entertain the people who attend the Protestant services held on Sunday and Wednesday. Group members shown are: Army Sgt. Marilyn E. Taylor, Sgt. Patrick Phillip, Sgt. David Bolden, Spc. Angela Williamson and Pfc. Brian Maxwell. New choir gives Camp Americas Protestant Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Servicemembers attending Camp Americas Protestant service Sunday clap their hands as they are enjoying one of the songs being performed by Voices of Inspiration.

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Working-class dogs take a big Page 6 Friday, July 26, 2002 There are some here at GTMO that dont mind telling you that they are working like dogs. That statement couldnt be truer than for three canine members of the Joint Task Force 160 team who are assigned to the Joint Deten tion Operations Group, or JDOG. (No pun intended.) No bones about it, Ari, Roni, and Rocko fit the bill. Assigned to JTF-160, they work seven days a week and rarely, if ever, voice a com plaint. These working-class dogs are the lead elements of the military police team working in support of JTF operations. The military working dogs are trained to work in security operations, law enforcement and combat support roles. They, along with their partners, Sgt. Brenden Hiatt of the 179th Military Police Detachment, Fort Stewart, Ga.; Sgt. Bryan Theckston of the 177th MP Detach ment, Fort Drum, N.Y.; and Staff Sgt. Tra panger Stephens of the 148th MP Detachment, Fort Carson, Colo., have a multi-faceted mis sion here at GTMO. Their mission includes not only the broad spectrum of psychological and physical deterrence, but physical security as well. According to the JDOG Commander, Col. John J. Perrone, Jr., the military working-dogs bring to the JTF an asset and capability that fits well into the JTF security posture. They play a critical role in our overall structure and we depend upon the unique abilities that the dogs bring to the security arena. Additionally, they are able to employ a psychological tool that enhances our security procedures, he said. To ensure that the dogs are successful in accomplishing their mission, the canines are assigned to work with a handler. Stephens, Hiatt, and Theckston are military police officers who have earned the Addi tional Skill Identifier of Z6, dog han dler, which enables them to work with the canines. These handlers attended an intensive threemonth training course at Lackland Air Force Base, in San Antonio, Texas before being awarded the ASI. The handlers dont have an easy job. They must maintain rigorous training standards and pristine training records for their canine partners in addition to accom plishing their assigned mission. They must maintain these standards, even though they are deployed. What makes the job even more challenging is that at the end of the day, the handlers cant just go home and leave work behind like most people. The handlers are still responsible for the training and personal care of their assigned dogs. This includes feeding, grooming and tak ing care of the dogs kennels. You have to take care of everything...its like having a small child, said Hiatt, a Top Dog graduate from K-9 school in 2000. There is no day off. We work 365 days a year, said Hiatt, who is assigned to handle Roni, a German Shepherd. Although this is Sgt. Hiatts first deployment with Roni, Roni has received several certificates of achievement for deployments to Bosnia and Kuwait with his previous handler. Regardless of the all the hard work, the handlers love their job. But the most demand ing part of the job, according to Sgt Theckston, is ensuring the dogs stay profi cient and that we keep the training up to standards. Sgt. Theckston is assigned to handle Ari, also a German Shepherd. Ari must be able to search systematically and detect 39 out of 40 training aids to maintain his certification. If he is not certified, he cant be utilized in any task, said Theckston. The job is very rewarding because the dogs show you that they appreciate what you do for them, he said. But the affection the dogs show is no indica tion of their temperament, as Sgt. Theckston knows first-hand, having been bitten by one of his working dogs in the past. Theckston was the unfortunate recipient of a dog bite. Although he was not seriously hurt, he understands and accepts the risks associated with the job. When training the dogs, we also act as decoys. You must be careful and keep safety in mind at all times because the dogs are trained to attack anywhere on the body. A decoy can suf fer a serious injury if he is not careful, he said. Although the dogs are not required to be pure bred, military working dogs are required to meet certain age and physical requirements. When first selected for training, they must be 13 years old, stand 22 inches tall at the shoulders and weigh at least 55 pounds. Once they pass that hurdle, the dogs must complete an inten sive training program at the 341st Military Working Dog Training School at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Each dog is trained a minimum of three to four months after which they are evaluated to determine what type of duty they will perform said Stephens, NCOIC of the military working dog section. Stephens works with Rocko, a Bel gian Malinois. Once the dogs complete their training and certification and are assigned to a handler, they happily perform their mission day in and day By Army Maj. Donna L. Scott The Wire Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott During a training exercise, Sgt. Hiatt prepares to release Roni in pursuit of a suspect. Photo by Army Maj. Donna L. Scott Sgt. Theckston is searched by Staff Sgt. Stephens as Rocko keeps him at bay. meantime, shes always on the lookout for new members come one, come all. Although we started as one unit, said Taylor, we always look for more people because we are serving God regardless of who we are or what unit we are in. For all that the choir has added to Merrills services, the proud chaplain tries to return the favor. Merrill said he has supported the choir by providing an electronic keyboard, a guitar and a small karaoke PA system for singing. He has also made the chapel available for prac tices after church hours. But a successful weekly service cannot be made by a choir alone. Merrill, in his continu ing quest to reach out to all of the residents of Camp America and the whole personnel that are serving JTF-160, pays close attention to the details keeping the service early in the morning so that servicemembers who work on the weekend can attend before going to work and keeps trying to get the word out. Weve advertised on the radio and televi sion stations and the JTF-160 print medium, The Wire. We also put out posters. It takes, you know, a couple of weeks for the word to get out something exciting is happening here. I want the worship service out here on the field to be a source of encouragement, some thing to challenge the soldier, an instrument to show people that there is hope even in the midst of being in Guantanamo, Cuba, said Merrill. The purpose of the worship service is to find a sanctuary of escape from the headaches and the heartaches of life, said Merrill. Merrill said he believes the choir fits in neatly with the mission of the chapel. Hope fully, when people enter the chapel, they can escape their sorrow and draw a sense of strength and encouragement through the singing, the testimony, preaching and the fel lowship of Christian believers. My vision for the chapel is that it will be an example not only to those of us participat ing, but to Guantanamo Bay and to the world that people of many different backgrounds and faith traditions, he said. Cultures and races can come together as one to worship God, and all those barriers are broken down when you worship God. I want the chapel to be an instrument of healing, reconciliation and unity through Jesus Christ. The chaplaincy is here to support the mil itary. Its a privilege to be a part of this histor ical moment in time, said Merrill. My purpose and vision for being here is to help people see they didnt come here by coin cidence that God brought them down here to perhaps be the one event in their life that will give them the insight to make the right decisions, the healthiest choices and the most blessed life pos sible through God. Merrill, who is now attached to the 160th MP Battalion out of Tallahas see, Fla., worked as a chaplain with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Department of Justice, before he was deployed to GTMO. He said he would like to spend most of his time to help and provide coun seling to the servicemembers currently sta tioned here. He said he also makes himself available to the detainees and that he felt that God used him as an instrument when one of the detainees requested to have a private ses sion with him. The members of Voices of Inspiration said they hope more people will join them as they continue to praise the Lord with their music. If you want to attend one of the serv ices and listen to the new choir, services are at the Camp America chapel, Sundays at 8 a.m. and 6 p.m and Wednesdays at 7 p.m. services a musical voice to reach the heavens Page 11 Friday, July 26, 2002 Led by Marine Maj. Bell of the Joint Informaition Bureau, the assembly sings together three inspirational hymns from a Camp America songs booklet as more faithful enter the chapel to obtain their spiritual nourishment for the week. Chaplain Merrill meets with Army Spc. Scott Belgard from the 239th Military Police Company in the chaplians office at Camp America after the Protestant church service last Sunday.

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Page 12 Friday, July 26, 2002 I feel right at home here, said Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill at the Camp Delta detention center. Back home in Florida, hes a supervisory chaplain with the Federal Bureau of Pris ons, Department of Justice. Theyre classified as detainees here, but its a similar dynamic of controlled behavior in a confined facility, Merrill said. The Army Reserve member is assigned to the 160th Military Police Battalion, Tal lahassee, Fla., part of the security force at Camp Delta. In both civilian and military life, Merrill, a Southern Baptist, comes across all faiths. He said he has some experience ministering to Muslims in his civilian job. But at Camp Delta, he said hes had only minimal involvement with the detainees. But even though theres a Muslim imam here, Ive dealt with some of the detainees, he said. Obviously, the imam has more dealings with them. An imam is an Islamic spiritual leader. In his duty as a chaplain, Merrill said he cant focus on what someone is incarcerated for. In America, if theyre a murderer or druglord, or whatever, I have to relate to them as human beings and block out their crime, he noted. In other words, I have to give them the benefit of the doubt and treat them like there is hope for them to change their life. So down here with the detainees, I have to treat them humanely, Merrill said. And I have to hope that by me being respectful and professional that they see there is a better way than their previous behavior, which, as far as we know, was full of hatred and evil actions. This is called ministry of presence. Just being present and the way you carry yourself goes a long way with some of the detainees. In civilian life, sometimes people in prison who have gone through rough expe riences get in touch with an inward free dom, the chaplain said. So, obviously, there is a big difference between ministering in a confined facility and a church. But the issues are the same regarding purpose in life, mission in life their spiritual issues and why theyre exist ing here on Earth. People in confinement are more helpless because they dont have access to immedi ate family, he said. Like here, their mom cant come visit them, Merrill noted. So youre sort of their support system, whereas in a civilian setting theres more access to a support system of family and friends. In a confined facility there is more reliance upon the chaplain, counselors or other people to provide it for them. To support Camp Delta and the naval base, the Navy and Army have two chap lains each, two Catholics and two Protes tants, plus the Air Force has a Muslim imam. Between the five of us, we try to pro vide well-rounded coverage for the detainees and the U.S. servicemembers, said Merrill. We never compromise our faith tradi tion, but like yesterday, a Catholic soldier came to me and wanted to be confirmed. So I talked with him, counseled him and referred him to the Catholic priest. Merrill said he talks with anyone who asks. Talking to a detainee is similar to talking to a soldier, because the conversa tions for both will be about issues in life and praying, he noted. He said service members come to see him because of homesickness, relationships of boyfriends and girlfriends, marital issues, and sick children. Once you get a few soldiers together, something will happen, Merrill said. Someone will pass away or someone gets into a car accident back home. More of the issues deal with being isolated here at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. However, the base has many things to help the servicemen and women to keep busy, such as recreation sporting events, movies. Waiting quietly to talk to the chaplain was Sgt. Derwin Davis of the 114th Military Police Company, Mississippi Army National Guard from Clinton, Miss. Its great to have a chaplain available because when youre having problems, you know you can go right to the source instead of trying to deal with it yourself, he said. Camp America chaplain feels at home with detainees, GTMO servicemembers Army Sgt. Derwin Davis (left) talks with Army Chaplain (Maj.) Michael S. Merrill in the chapel at Camp Delta, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Davis and his unit, the 114th Military Police Company, Mississippi Army National Guard, Clinton, Miss., are providing security at Delta, a detention facility for captured enemy combatants. Story and photo by Rudi Williams American Forces Press Service newsroom of The Wire. All said they were impressed with the level of professionalism and competence among servicemembers and the level of security surrounding the oper ations here wherever they went. But there was one troubling part of the visit: seeing first-hand all the stories that couldn't be told. We came down to see that the American public gets to see what the Army reservists are doing down here, said Healy. Because of security concerns, though, a lot of the superb, even heroic efforts of a lot of Army Reservists and National Guard members as well as the active-duty soldiers and all the other service members working so hard here will never be widely known. That's unfortunate. But a lot can be known, he said. And we're here to find out what can be done to bet ter support the public-affairs effort. We can always do a better job making those military efforts public that can safely be made public. And we're going to try to do that. As any graduate of the militarys Defense Information School (DINFOS) can tell you, that PA effort comes in two prongs. The first is media relations ensuring that civilian news writers and broadcasters get the stories they want promptly and accurately without endan gering the security of the nation or its service members. The media, the so-called fourth estate, is there to keep the public informed as to how their tax dollars are being spent and how their sons and daughters in uniform are being used, said Healy. And its our responsibility to ensure that the sacred trust between the mil itary and the American people is maintained. We have to help the media help us do that. When the media asks questions, our job is to answer them, he said. Theyre asking on behalf of the public, and in the end, we work for them. Besides, with the media the way it is today, in this operation we could get enough press coming down here to sink this island, Healy joked. We have to make sure were ready for anything. The other half of the PA job is internal information keeping the troops themselves informed as to what their command is doing and where they fit in. A nd here at GTMO, you know what that is: The Wire. Its absolutely critical in a place like this, said Hanley. Its important for the service members to understand what the organization is and what it does, and it allows him to see how he fits into the big picture. It may not seem like much sometimes, but when a soldier or sailor or Marine or Coast Guardsman finds himself or his unit featured in the base paper, he can send it home or refer them to the Web site and feel like his family or friends can better understand what hes doing here. And that can make the sepa ration pass less painfully. It can be a real morale booster, said Han ley. This isnt the worst place in the world to be, but the people here are still a long way from home if not in miles, than at least in feeling. That feeling can be particularly strong for reservists and guardsmen, who have to leave homes and jobs sometimes on only a few days or weeks notice and uproot their lives when their country calls. But Hanley says that the large reservist presence at GTMO these days has a special significance. The wide use of reservists in the war on terror demonstrates that the will of the Ameri can people is really invested in the cause, he said. Reserve call-ups make such an impact on homes, and families and communities, that it shows the committment of this country to this cause that the support is still there. And in this visit and previous ones to the places where reservists are serving, Hanley says hes heard time and time again from the commanders on the ground that far from being mere weekend warriors, reservists bring something special to the mission itself. The comments we get are that reservists often bring in a level of experience thats very valuable in a setting like this, he said. Many of the soldiers involved in this detention oper ation are in law eforcement or corrections back home. Bringing that on-the-job experi ence can be a real plus. These are not nice people they're guard ing, Hanley continued. Nobody wants to have a mistake made where one of the ser vicemebers get hurt or one of the detainees get hurt. Sometimes that maturity level can keep that from happening. When we took our tour, there was an active duty company on duty. And I noticed they were very young very professional, but very young. The reservists tend to be older, with more time in the job. And the leadership feels that's a real plus. That makes USARCs external publicaffairs mission maintaining public support for those reservists even more critical. Theyve left their homes, inconvenienced their employers, left their communities, Han ley said. We want to demonstrate to those people what the reservists are doing and why its important. For Lt. Col. Collins, that means getting them on Americas favorite information medium: television. Collins supervises the collection of back ground footage of sol diers on the job, or B-roll, which his office then markets to local and national TV outlets for use in their programming. We let them edit it, record their own voice-overs on it, and run it as if they got it them selves, he said. They love it. It saves them money and gets our story told. Collins said recent placements include Fox, CNN, Americas Most Wanted, and count less local TV stations eager for stories on members of their communities called up to serve. At GTMO, Collins said, the stars of the show are the MPs at Delta. Theres been a lot of interest in the guards down here. Our job is to get the media what they want without compromising security. Of course, part of these PAOs job is to finetune the structure and manning of publicaffairs personnel on the ground, wherever they are deployed. After all, one of the other special charasteristics of reservists is theyre always going back home and being replaced. Part of this visit was making sure that JTF160s own public-affairs operation is running smoothly that the the current crew, the reservist journalists of the 361st PCH, were telling all the GTMO stories that can be told without endangering operational security or servicemembers lives. So next time a print journalist from The Wire comes up to you with a notebook and pen, or a broadcast journalist points a camera in your direction, just try to remember were all in BDUs here. Were doing our part of the JTF-160 mission, doing it the best we can with what weve got. Were doing it for all you servicemembers who are stuck in GTMO a long way from home, just like us. And weve got bosses too. Page 5 Friday, July 26, 2002 PAOs, from page 1 Photo by Army Staff Sgt. Timothy A. Barnes Lt. Col. Dennis Fink, left, commander of the 361st PCH, looks on as (l to r) Lt. Col Collins, Mr. Hanley and Staff Sgt. Johnson watch Spc. Hector Per alta and Spc. Ivey N. Hodges do their broadcasting thing. Photo by Army Staff Sgt. Timothy A. Barnes Maj. Healy checks in with USARC back home.

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Page 4 Friday, July 26, 2002 Black flag of heat When you see that black flag waving in the wind here at GTMO, it must be hot 90 degrees Fahrenheit or above to be exact. The flag acts as a guide in regulating intensity of physical exer tion.While white, green, yellow and red flags caution against varying degrees of heat, the black flag is as hot as it gets. The black flag indicates that all physical training and strenuous exercise is to be suspended for all personnel (excluding operational commitments not for training purposes). Hitherto, it is recommended that your water intake be more than two quarts per hour, and the work-rest cycle for outdoor work is to be 20 minutes of work and 40 minutes of rest. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This weeks question: Did you miss the Wire last week? Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Randy Atwood, J1 JPRC I wondered what happened. Some one told me there wasnt a Wire. Nor mally theres one floating around the house. Army Sgt. Michael D. Williams, 114th Military Police Co. I really didnt miss it. There are so many other papers to read. Im pretty up to date on whats going on. CG Petty Officer 1st Class Zenon Ayala, PSU 307 As a matter of fact, I did miss the Wire. I would like to see more of my brothersand cousins-in-arms featured, though. Air Force Staff Sgt. Daniel McCaffrey, Motor Pool I didnt notice because I really dont pay attention to it. I dont even know where to get one. Army 1st Lt. Jorge Rodriguez, 418th Transportation Co. I sure did miss the Wire. I realized there wasnt one when I was looking all over for it. I even checked the Web. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Across 1 Reserved 4 Wall plant 7 Plod 10 Honeyed 12 British drink 13 Powdered chocolate 15 Moses mountain 16 And so forth 17 Ventilated 18 Escudo 19 Long-term memory 21 Barrel 23 Internal Revenue Service 24 Wasteland 26 Minds 28 Friend 30 Ill-bred 31 Connection 34 Japanese dish 36 Compass point 40 Gaiety 41 Beam 42 Also 43 Deceiver 45 Mom 47 Asia 48 Teen hero 50 Engrave 52 Allow 54 Sticky candy 57 Boxer Muhammad 58 Her 60 Big Apple (abbr.) 61 Steal 63 Louis partner 65 Ghosts greeting 67 Dwelling 69 Frozen pizza brand 70 Saloon 71 Seeped out 72 Ball holder 73 Short-term memory 74 Harden Down 1 Slip through hoop 2 Away 3 Affirmative 4 Detail 5 Ex-serviceman 6 Talk 7 Luau dish 8 Pungent 9 People who get things done 10 South southeast 11 The condition of cultivated soil 13 Cooped 14 Spots 20 Because of this 22 Decorative needle case 25 Expert 27 Novel 29 Wall picture 30 Ball and mall, for example 31 Football assoc. 32 French yes 33 Genetic code 35 Surface to air missile 37 Airport abbr. 38 Distress call 39 Toddler 44 Edge 45 Butterflys cousin 46 Lawyer (abbr.) 47 Extremely high frequency (abbr.) 49 CDS 51 Chocolate tree 52 Mete 53 Waitress on Cheers 55 Turned to ice 56 Sing 57 Enact 59 Tides 60 Standard 62 Berth 64 Seed bread 66 Grain 68 Fen Page 13 Friday, July 26, 2002 Obstructions fill my path Causing frustration to resonate I walk rough, tough steps Eyes opened wide Maybe you can see me Im a soldier filled with pride Into the pool of lemon juice From off of the razor blade slide Tongue hanging out, Mouth opened wide Hold on people, Its going to be a bumpy ride. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the July 12 puzzle Friday, July 26 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds PG13 91min 10 p.m. Undercover Brother PG13 89min Saturday, July 27 8 p.m. Men in Black II PG13 91min 10 p.m. Bad Company R -124min Sunday, July 28 8 p.m. Road to Perdition R 119min Monday, July 29 8 p.m. Men in Black II PG13 91min Tuesday, July 30 8 p.m. Undercover Brother PG13 89min Wednesday, July 31 8 p.m. Road to Perdition R 119min Thursday, August 1 8 p.m. The Sum of all Fears R 124min

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Page 14 Friday, July 26, 2002 Remember, the next JTF-160 Commanders Cup Series starts soon. It is scheduled to run from Wednesday, August 8th to Saturday, September 21st. Sign up through your chain of command and your units POC. If any unit POC has any questions or wants more information call Capt. Gormly at #5249. Daily Free Daytime & Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating at Pelican Petes Marina. Nightly 8:00PM Free Movie, Lyceum & Camp Bulke ley. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Advanced Step Aerobics Classes, Denich Gym, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Monday-Friday, 6:30PM-7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room. Today, Friday, July 26th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 5:30PM-12:30AM, Night Fishing Trip, Pelican Petes Marina. Saturday, July 27th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill & Deer Point Pools. 10:00AM, Tennis Tournament, CBQ Tennis Courts. Fans & Rivalry Saturday, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Sunday, July 28th 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 10:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill & Deer Point Pools. 5:00PM, Chess Tournament VII, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. Monday, July 29th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 8:30PM, 8-Ball Pool Tournament, Windjammer $5 entry fee. Double elimination. Trophy & Cash Prize. Tuesday, July 30th 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 7:00PM, Monopoly Nite, Main M.W.R. Liberty Cen ter. Wednesday, July 31st 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. 7:00PM, Domino Tournament VI, Main M.W.R. Lib erty Center. Thursday, August 1st 6:00AM-6:00PM, Open Swim, Marine Hill Pool. 10:00AM-8:00PM, Open Swim, Windjammer Pool. 11:00AM-7:00PM, Open Swim, Deer Point Pool. 5:15PM-6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class, Denich Gym. 5:30PM, 1-On-1 Spinning Training, Denich Gym. Imagine it: You and 20 oth ers start pedaling up and down simulated hills on stationary bicycles as up-tempo dance music is pumped into the room. Ten minutes into the ses sion, your quads start burning with lactic acid from all the pedaling. Youre tired. Youre hurting. Do you stop or do you keep going? Welcome to spinning, the high-octane, fat-burning fit ness craze that is about to take GTMO for a ride. New spinning classes are off and rolling at the G.T. Denich gym on base. The classes are scheduled five days a week: on Monday, Wednes day and Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., and Tuesday and Thursday at 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Spinning is one of the best workouts in the world. It com bines a mental, physical and spiritual workout, said Don nell Daniel (a.k.a. D.D.), Athletic Director of Morale, Recreation and Welfare. Spinning rewards you in many ways and one of the objectives, says Daniel, is per sonal growth. One of the keys to spin ning is, we are about giving you a personal victory. When you walk into the spinning class your mental focus turns from me to we, said Daniel. We want the class to interact together, talk about life while they are riding. Mean while they are working hard and burning fat, said Daniel. As the group becomes one and they prepare their bikes for the class, the instuctor gets them ready for the ride. We get everyone in the same mindset and take the class on a journey they will never forget,said Daniel. Thats when people find that extra energy to keep pedal ing. Spinning is unique because just when you think you cant go any more and your muscles are burning you go a little bit more, he said. People actu ally reach deep down and give it every thing they have, and that is the personal victory giving it your all and seeing the progress one step at a time, said Daniel. The progress comes as the personal victories build up. This type of exercise is a stepping-stone because every one just gets better physically and mentally in every session, said Daniel. This class is not easy. It is tough. But at the same time, it is exhilarating when you complete a spinning class you feel good about yourself. You get what you put into it, said Daniel. Besides the results you can get from the class, spinning also offers something new and different from other kinds of workouts. I just want people to expe rience something new, spin ning is not like lifting weights or running on a treadmill you can get great results from it, said Michelle Cheynne, a certi fied fitness instructor for MWR. This spinning class is something different than the traditional exercises. There will not be any two experi ences that are the same. said Daniel. The variety in every spin ning class just intrigues people. To be part of a spinning class like this is incredible, it is like an infection, he said. Once you do your first class you cant wait til the next one. The results might be enough to fill the class each week. In a spinning class you will burn about 500 to 800 calories in a 45-minute class,said Daniel. With spinning, not only will you see the progress, but the great thing is that you dont need coordination like most exercises. Anyone can spin, you can be 8 or 80 years old, it doesnt matter, said Daniel. Everyone can come to the gym and try spinning its quick, its effective and its something a little different for GTMO servicemembers look ing to get healthy in a hurry. Spinning gives you results fast. You dont want to be in the gym all day long. You want to burn your calories and get on with life, said Daniel. We are here to meet the fit ness needs of the people, said Daniel. We at MWR have purchased 22 of the best spin ning bikes available. We have set up a great spinning room with a high-quality stereo sys tem. This spinning class, he said, is going to rock. New spin at GTMO gym Story by Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez MWR certified fitness instructor Michelle Cheynne as she leads a class Page 3 Friday, July 26, 2002 The Texas National Guard infantrymen attached to the 2/142 are the ones who guard the guards at Camp America. They man the front entrance to the camp and check security badges on all personnel trying to gain access. They also per form internal perimeter security and do patrols around the camp. Working eight hours on and eight hours off for the better part of the week, these troops live and breathe general orders. Their vigilance allows their fellow soldiers at the camp to relax in peace, for these motivated soldiers know how to guard and protect. Checkpoint guards Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Sgt. Tony Maxwell checks security badges at the entrance to Camp America. Sgt. Tony Maxwell We are here to do our part, and then we will move on and go home. Its tough working the day shifts out here in the blazing sun, but that is our job. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Joe Garcia performs a radio check back to his command. Spc. Joe Garcia It aint that bad out here. Were infantrymen, so it doesnt matter if we are here guarding the gate or out on patrol; we have a job to perform. Spc. Guadalupe Bravo I just returned from a six month tour in Bosnia when I received orders to come here. Now, I am enduring freedom, and I like it.

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Page 2 Friday, July 26, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Science and religion are not natural ene mies. People can believe in God and believe in the Big Bang theory of how the universe was created. Perhaps they might reflect upon the words of King Solomon: It is He who gave me unerring knowl edge of what exists, to know the structure of the world and the activity of the ele ments...for wisdom, the fashioner of all things, taught me (Wisdom 7:17-22). Two questions are on the table. How did creation happen? Why did it happen? The two questions dont contradict one another. They walk hand in hand. Science follows natural law. The believer says that God created the natural law. The natural law cannot contra dict true theology and vice versa. Science answers questions about HOW creation happened. Theology answers ques tions about WHY it happened. Science proposes a Big Bang theory to answer the how? question. Believers say that there is an all-merciful God to answer the why? question. Now then, the real question: Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Submitted by Navy Lt. Cmdr. Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Over the past three months there have been several reported thefts of personal property, including bicycles, wallets and a personal computer here at GTMO. At approximately 2 p.m. July 11, 2002, a black and blue nylon case containing audio CDs was stolen from the JTF-160 D yel low bus. The bus driver (victim) had been operating a fully loaded bus from the NEX to Camp America all day. The CD case was on the dashboard next to the drivers seat. The victim discovered that the CD case was missing after letting passengers off at Camp America, and reported the incident to NAVBASE Police. All indications are that the CDs were stolen by someone from Camp America. The combined estimated total cost of the 45 CDs and the CD case is over $500.00. It is intolerable that thieves exist among us. Not only is stealing both illegal and immoral, but it also lowers morale and detracts attention from our main mission. When you steal, you take something that does not belong to you. You didnt work for it, you didnt earn it, and you didnt pay for it. And those who help thieves are no less guilty than the thief himself. The CD case is rectangular in shape and is 6 X 12 in size. It has a carry handle and the brand name LOGIC printed on its front. It holds two CDs on the front side and two CDs on the backside of each page. At least two CDs, Primus and Boston had the name Shone marked on them with black magic marker. The CDs were mostly heavy-metal music (i.e. Anthrax, Metallica, Iron Maiden, MegaDeath, Seven Dust, Staind, etc.). Those with information are urged to call the JTF-160 Provost Marshals Office at 5057 or 5061, to help solve this case. Your name will be kept confidential. Please help us keep JTF-160 crime-free by being vigilant, reporting suspicious inci dents, and by marking and securing your personal property. Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 The Big Bangs How and Why Showing Off I love showing soldiers off. Recently, we were visited by the command sergeant major from SOUTHCOM as well as the CSM from USARSO. I took great pride in bringing them out to Camp America to meet with and talk to soldiers. They were very impressed with the professionalism displayed by all those that they spoke with. The atti tudes and morale displayed by Americas finest did not surprise these distinguished visitors. Thats why I was proud to bring them out there and show you off, and I will continue to do so when the occasion arises. CSM Draughn (USARSO) was taken aback when we visited the Non-Lethal Weapons training, and he saw the determination and fight ing spirit that was evident in those classes. It is up to all of us to maintain that spirit and determination. We are not judge and jury but professionals who are here to do a job, to maintain a camp that will forever be part of his tory. The eyes of the world are on us, some waiting for us to slip and fall. But they dont know us. Stand tall and walk proud, you are doing great. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 Command Sgt. Maj. R.W. Funaro Page 15 Friday, July 26, 2002 114th MPs extinguish Fire Dept. Wednesday night at the G.J. Denich gym, the 114th Military Police Company beat the Guantanamo Bay Fire Department 54 to 40. The 114th MP Co. jumped out to a quick 13-4 lead with the aggressive play and good shot selection of Army Spc. Jeremiah N. Proctor. Proctor began the game with a hot hand. We had con fidence in his scoring abilities so we kept giving him the rock,said Army Spc. Was car Viscaino. When Proctors shooting cooled off, though, the Fire Dept. was able to make a comeback. With 11:33 on the clock, the score was 13-8. Fire Dept. scored five unan swered points to tie the game at 13 all. With 10:00 on the clock, the 114th MPs called a timeout to gather themselves. I called a timeout because we were not doing what we were supposed to do, which is play good defense and run the ball, said Viscaino. Fire Dept. was able to come back because the 114th MPs were not playing their style off basketball. We have good shooters on this team. We are a run-andgun team. If we can run the ball, we can get open for the three-point shot, said Vis caino. After the timeout, Army Maj. Sharon D. Green squared up and shot a threepointer to put the MPs in the lead. Fire Dept. had a chance to take the lead with 9:00 on the clock. The score was 16-15 but Fire Dept. was not able to capitalize. Green was playing tough defense and able to steal the ball. Fire Dept. was forced to foul. Green made her two freethrows to put the MPs on top by three. We got out of playing like a team and we had to get back to the basics of basketball, said Green. 114th MP Co. started play ing together as one unit. They were playing a tough zone defense against Fire Dept. We have a good shooting team and we play good defense. That is what we started doing. We were able to build a good lead, said Vis caino. The score at the end of the first half was 29-17. The MPs came out in the second half with renewed energy. We played a man-to-man defense at the start of the sec ond half so to speed up the tempo of the game and force the Fire Dept. to keep up with us, I felt we were a quicker team, said Viscaino. As the tempo increased, the MPs secured the lead for good. The essential part of the game was just to go back to the basics, team basketball. We were not looking to pass the ball. We were play ing selfish basketball. The game changed when we started to pass the ball and look for one another on the court, she said. We were looking for the open player. That was the key to victory for us against Fire Dept., said Green. 114th MP Co. felt they could have played better, but a shortage of players made it tough on the team. This team plays good defense but we were not as intense in this game because we only had five players dress up for the game, said Vis caino. With the win over Fire Dept., the 114th MP Co. stayed undefeated in league play with a record of 4-0. Softball Standings JTF-170 6-0 Iguanas 5-1 Regulars 5-1 Hospital 5-1 GTMO Bay 4-2 GTMO Lite 4-2 239 MP Co. 4-1 XO Staff 3-3 Blacksheep 3-3 178 MP Co. 3-3 160 MP Bn. 2-3 HQ JTF-160 2-3 Hit Squad 2-4 571 MP Co. 1-4 PSU 307 1-4 Wildcats 1-5 Miuw 204 1-5 114 MP Co. A 0-3 114 MP Co. B 0-3 342 MP Co. 0-4 By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Chat Bout 4-0 Navsta 2-1 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-1 JTF-160 2-1 178th MP Co. 1-2 Naval Hospital 1-3 Fire Dept. 0-3 571st MP Co. 0-3 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Wascar Viscaino goes up strong for the dunk in wednesdays night win against Fire Department 54 to 40 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Jeremiah N. Poctor goes up for a lay-up. Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Spc. Wascar Viscaino breaks down the enemy defense.

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History, they say, doesn't happen without someone to tell the tale. And military missions don't happen without committed servicemem bers on the ground and taxpay ers back home who are willing to foot the bill. In the detention operation at Guantanamo Bay, some 80 percent of the nearly 2,000 servicemem bers here are now reservists, called away for six months or more from wives and husbands and homes and hometowns. Even in the aftermath of a nation-binding event like Sept. 11, that can be a special test of pub lic support and troop morale. That's where military public affairs comes in. This week, the Army Reserves top public-affairs men from the U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC) came here, visiting GTMO for a three-day fact-finding tour. Their mission: to take the meas ure of the operation here, and keeping in mind the all-too-real demands of operational security look for ways to better tell the reservist's story to his two most important constituencies: the folks back home, and the soldiers them selves. Theres an incredible amount of interest in the mission here back in the U.S., said Mr. Joseph Han ley, Director of Public Affairs for USARC. The exotic locale, the detainees people want to know what servicembers are doing here, and our job is to try to maximize coverage of it so that they do. Hanley, joined by USARC col leagues Army Lt. Col. Boyd Collins, chief of marketing and media relations, and Army Maj. Gerard F. Healy, head of policy and plans, took the full GTMO tour, from JTF-170 headquarters to JTF160 headquarters, from X-Ray to Delta to America to GTMO's own tip of the public-affairs spear, the Joint Information Bureau and the Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 114th MP Co. hoses down fire dept. Page 15 Chaplain lends helping hand to choir Page 10 Attackdog day afternoons Page 6 Telling the GTMO story Friday, July 26, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 7 Return of The Wire Photo by Sgt. Maj. Daniel M. Polinski By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See PAOs, page 5 A look inside... After a week in which publication of the paper did not occur, the staff of The Wire was back to work Thursday, hurriedly preparing for print the fine journalistic product you now hold in your hand. So stop reading this cutline and dig in -we hope you missed us a little. USARCs top PAOs come to Cuba to try to give the soldiers on the ground their due Page 16 Friday, July 26, 2002 With Staff Sgt. Steven R. Munnerlyn Q: Why have you been chosen for this weeks 15 Minutes Of Fame? A: You must know something about me that I dont, because I dont think Im ready for 15 minutes of fame. Q: Arent you one of the motivated indi viduals that lead Army PT in the morning? A: Yes. Q: How do you feel about leading soldiers into battle with 2 mile mini-mountains at 0dark-30 in the morning? A: I love being involved in the PT pro gram. I enjoy helping my fellow soldiers get into shape. I know that many of the people involved in the PT program are in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve, and they may not be used to PT on a daily basis. I enjoy watch ing their improvement. Q: Any downside to being a PT leader? A: Only when troops arent motivated. I know it can be hard to be motivated at 5:30 a.m., but I try to make it fun. Q: PT or cake? A: I do PT. Theres nothing wrong with eating cake but I try to steer clear of the fatty foods. If you treat your body good, it will be good to you. Q: And, when youre not doing PT, what do you enjoy doing? A: I just recently got into golfing, and I enjoy snorkeling and hiking. Q: Are you a fan of the Tiki Bar? A: I enjoy the outdoor environment. I feel free to roam about and have a good time there. Hey, its always fun to watch everyone else have a good time. Q: Where do you live? A: Good old Windward Loop. Q: How would you describe it there? A: The Loop is like a soap opera. There is just so much drama that goes on, and there is always someone sitting on their front lawn watching and waiting to gossip about it. Q: If you could pick a theme song for GTMO, what would it be and why? A: The Eagles Hotel California because as hard as folks work around here is about as hard as they party. Q: What do you do to relax? A: In the morning, I like to have a cup of coffee and sit in my backyard, like to watch the sun rise. After work I do the same, but with a cold drink instead. Q: That sounds kind of romantic. Would you say youre romantic, PT man? A: NO! I just like to be alone, it gives me time to reflect and ponder. Q: What are some of the things you think about? A: I think about lots of things, but most of the time my family. Q: So, how would you describe yourself? A: I am down-to-earth and a good listener. One of my major goals in life is to see soldiers succeed. I dedicate as much of my time as possible to trying to help out soldiers, I hope that some of the things I have done with them or advice Ive given to them will have a posi tive impact on them. Q: What would you change, if anything, about GTMO? A: I wish that there were more activities for soldiers that would help them cope with deployment stress. Not necessarily sports activites, and definitely not drinking! Q: Do you think drinking is a problem among soldiers here? A: No, there are just more productive ways to deal with the stress of being away from loved ones. Q: How do you feel about deployment love or relationships? A: If youre looking for love in GTMO, youre looking for love in all the wrong places. Q: If you had access to a bunker and knew that GTMO was about to be attacked, but could only take one person with you, who would it be and why? A: Thats a tough one, but Id say Sgt. Lozano. Hes my compadre from Ft. Sill. We got to know each other down here, but we had seen each other around before. Hes become a good friend of mine. Q: How would you descibe most of the people youve met here? A: Free spirits. Q: Do you have anything to say in closing? A: My home has an open door. If theres a soldier in need of someone to talk to, they should feel free to come visit me. Even those from Camp America are welcome. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko If you treat your body good, it will be good to you. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Cheat your body, and it will cheat you