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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00059
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: July 12, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00059

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Page 16 Friday, July 12, 2002 With Senior Airman Mia D. Delgado Q: So, Senior Airman Mia Delgado, do you think 15 minutes of fame is enough for you? A: I think it might be a little too much. Q: Well start out easy, then. Where are you from? A: I am from Orlando, Fla. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: Im a fun-loving person. I love to joke around and laugh. I would describe myself as an allaround nice person. Q: What do you do for fun here? A: I like to hang out, go danc ing, snorkeling, and do yoga. Q: What kind of music do you like to dance to? A: Any kind of music with a beat, but if I had to pick one, Id pick techno. Q: And if you had to pick a song to go on a GTMO sound track? What would it be and why? A: Margaritaville because Jimmy Buffet rules, and it would put people in the right frame of mind for here: just kick back and have a good time. Q: So do you enjoy the nightlife much? A: If you can call it that, sure. Q: What is the wildest, craziest or most bizarre thing youve seen or done since youve been here? A: Well, I got a chance to go snorkeling for the first time and I saw a lot of cool things. I know thats not really wild or strange but I thought it was pretty cool. Q: Hmm. What was the biggest adjustment you had to make when you got down to GTMO? A: The heat. No, the humidity. Q: If you could design your own Battle Dress Uniform espe cially made for GTMO, what would it look like? A: A short-sleeved shirt, pair of shorts and a tank top, forget these t-shirts. Q: If you could talk to some one who was about to deploy to GTMO what would you tell them? A: Bring your summer clothes and your snorkel gear. And if youre not over 21, have your orders changed. Q: If you could change one rule or policy here what would it be? A: Actually, I think weve got it pretty good. Theres no curfew, we can drink, and basically do what we want. Q: Where do you live and how would you describe it? A: I live in Windward Loop, with an awesome bunch of girls. Q: What do you think of the hood as a whole? A: Windward Loop should be called the Party Loop; you know theres always something going on over there. Q: How did the move to FP Con Charlie Thursday and Friday level affect you and the party scene? A: Well, obviously we had to lug around all our gear, and there was no drinking, so that was it for the party scene. But better safe than sorry. Q: Where do you go to relax? A: I go to the pool. Its nice and quiet there. Or Ill do yoga meditation is good for the soul. Q: If you could go anywhere in the world right now, where would you go and why? A: Ireland! Theyve got a really interesting history, and everyone Ive ever met from Ire land was kick$@*! Need I state the obvious and say the BEER? Q: How long have you been in the military, and how do you feel about it? A: Ive been in the military for about five-and-a-half years. Per sonally, I love it. Its a guaranteed paycheck, and you dont have to worry about what youre going to wear in the morning. Q: Prior to your mission here, have you ever worked in a Joint environment before? How would you describe each branch of service? A: No, this is my first exposure to a JTF. Id say the Army is dedicated, the Marines are proud, the Coast Guard is laid back, and the Navy is versatile. Oh, and I think everybody knows the Air Force rules! Q: Where are you stationed in the States and how does it com pare to here? A: Im stationed in Utah, so this is much better for me. Q: If you could be a superhero, who would you be and why? A: I would be Wonder Woman because she got to fly a really cool invisible plane. Q: Any advice in closing? A: Be true to yourself. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Senior Airman Mia Delgado, from J4, makes the Air Force look easy. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Shes wasting away again in GTMO-ville Guantanamo Bay was a No-Spin Zone for a day Saturday as Bill OReilly, host of The OReilly Factor on Fox News Chan nel, brought his camera crew here to inter view the military men and women who make Camp Deltas detention operation run. OReilly, greeted at the plane by a pha lanx of public-affairs officers and media escorts, said he had no problem with the security restrictions placed on him and other media for the protection of our troops. He wasnt here for a scoop, or a controversy just a story. Im not here to do a political story like Newsweek, said OReilly. Theres no con troversy surrounding this mission to me. I agree with exactly what the Department of Defense is doing. That, he said, is because of the nature of this war. Obviously, it is harder for the media to cover a war like this because we have to be patriots as well as journalists. We cant break stories that might put peoples lives in dan ger for the better of our own careers. Its not like Vietnam or the Gulf War, where we could hunt our own stories up. We just cant do that; we play it the way the Defense Department wants it to be played. The war is now in the country, and weve got to be very cognizant of that, he said. OReilly and his supporting staff hit the ground running, moving purposefully as they exited their private jet to meet with their media escorts for the day. Mr. OReilly, we welcome you to Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. Following a brief overview of the itinerary and the groundrules, well be ready to get this mission started, said Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, officer in charge of the Media Support Cen ter. After receiving a warm welcome from the rest of a public affairs staff clearly pleased to meet him, OReilly and his team were mission-ready and Windward bound. First stop, JTF-160 Headquarters. Once there, Commanding Gen. Rick Bac cus walked out and introduced himself to OReilly and his staff as they approached. Introductions were brief, however, as the crew quickly departed and headed for their first location for taping: The Northeast Gate. With a handful of Marine guards watch Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 9/11 run for freedom and fun Page 8 24 hours in Camp America Page 6 What the heck is this guy doing? Page 3 GTMO a No-Spin Zone for day Friday, July 12, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 5 By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire See OReilly, page 5 A look inside... Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Master Sgt. Warren Byrd, Media Support Center NCOIC, greets OReilly and his crew on the tarmac. Bill OReilly of Fox News pays base a friendly visit

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Safety Gram: JTF-160 Bicyclists 1. Bicycling is a fun way to achieve and maintain physical fitness. However, there are risks and dangers associated with this excellent form of car diovascular exercise. Rough terrain, rainy weather, banana rats and iguanas are just a few conditions and obstacles that pose risk and danger. 2. Recently, while riding on a bike trail, a soldier hit a patch of rough terrain. He was thrown over the handlebars and landed on his head. His helmet cracked. The soldier suffered several chipped vertebrae in the neck. Treatment was three days in quarters and wearing a soft collar. The outcome could have been much worse if this soldier had not been wearing a helmet. 3. Helmets prevent and/or mini mize injury from unanticipated risks and dangers. Helmets are a required safety measure when bicycle riding. 4. Safety concerns and incidents are reported to your chain of command and section J1 at ext. 5082. RICK BACCUS Brigadier General, USNG Joint Task Force 160, Commander Page 2 Friday, July 12, 2002 Chaplains Corner SJA Blotter Provost Marshalls Office God is a spirit, but He has made us in His image, and in the Bible He often uses the imagery of the human body to describe His actions. His eyes see, His mouth speaks, and His hands reach out to us. Get to know God better by learning mor eabout His anatomy: Know that God wants you to get close to Him. Even though He is infinite, He uses the human body to help us better understand vari ous aspects of His nature because He wants us to be able to relate to Him. Decide to actively pursue God. Confess any sins that are blocking your intimacy with Him, then make Him the top priority in your life. Seek Gods face by seriously studying the details of his nature. Dont pursue a shallow relationship with God out of mere curiosity. Be willing to look at his face by seeking a deep rela tionship in which He is full of compassion. Know that Gods nose delights in the fra grance of your worship. If you make bad deci sions, He isnt above blowing His nose at you to help you learn to grow. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Notice of Article 15 Adjudication A NCO was found guilty after a closed hearing conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for two violations of Article 92. The non-judicial punishment authority found beyond a rea sonable doubt that the NCO had exhibited public drunkenness and had visitors in her quarters after 2400. The NCO received extra duty for 7 days, restriction for 14 days and an oral reprimand. Submitted by the JTF-160 SJA Discover Gods Anatomy Page 15 Friday, July 12, 2002 Summer softball, v-ball get hotter Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin S. Ross from Naval Hospital goes aggres sively for the volleyball as he spikes it on his opponents for a point. The JTF-160 volleyball team improved to 2-0 with a closefought victory over Naval Hospital in Friday-night volleyball action at G.J. Denich Gym. It was a really close match and I thought we had a chance to win, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Frank P. Jama, a player for the Naval Hospital, after JTF-160s two-set victory. We made careless mistakes that cost us the game. But this is just one match, he said. Im confident our team will recover. The Naval Hospital team looked at the game as a learning experience, and is eager to show its skill in future matches. The JTF-160 was a better team on the court this evening, and I am looking forward to the rematch. I am sure it will be not only fun but highly competitive, said Jama. JTF-160 said their win came from simple desire. We played hard and we wanted the win more tonight than the Naval Hospital, said Air Force Maj. Dawn Roberson. The score from the first set was 15 to 10, and the score from the second set was 15 to 14. Naval Hospital fought hard and this was not an easy victory. Our strategy for the game was to have fun and keep the ball off the floor, said Roberson. Cooper Field was busy Friday night as four teams battled it out for supremacy on the diamond in the softball seasons second week. To start the evening off, Team GTMO Lite squared off against a team from the 178th Military Police Company. The game was neck-and-neck during the first three-innings with both teams tied at one run each. In the top of the fourth, GTMO Lite came out swinging with a four-run hitting spree. During the fifth inning they increased their lead even more by bringing two more runs in. The 178th Military Police Company tried to mount a come back in the bottom of the fifth, but the one run they scored barely put a dent in GTMO Lites lead. In the sixth inning, Team GTMO Lite turned it up a notch and finished the 178th off with a 12-run rally to win the game by a final score of 19-2. We turned it up in the sixth inning by working together. This team played as one and that is what counts, said Rob Loop, team member from GTMO Lite, who scored two runs during the game. GTMO Lite attributed their success to their long playing rela tionship and some new power house hitters recently added to their line up. About 75 percent of our team has been playing together for the last six months. We know each others strengths and weaknesses. Also, we added a few new players to the team this season. They add power to our lineup, said Navy Lt. Matt D. Lowe. This season we are a more competitive, stronger team, he said. We are a relaxed on the field and have tons of fun playing the game, he said. As a result of their triumph, GTMO Lite bumped their record up to 3-1. But before the dust could settle on the field, the GTMO Bay Reservists were behind the plate and ready to set it off. And that they did, scoring nine runs in the first inning. We are smoking right now, the team is doing great, said Navy Chief Antonio G. Parris who scored three runs and hit two dou bles and a single for the GTMO Bay Reservists. And what allowed the Reservists to take such a tremen dous lead so early on? Some com mented that it wasnt just the skill level demonstrated by the Reservists, but the lack of concen tration on the field displayed by the 346th MP Co. If it wasnt for the 346th MP Co. helping us out tonight, making so many errors in the field, this could have been a close game, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Napier. In the end, the Reservists lead was too great to overcome, win ning the game 19 to 2, upping their record to 3-1. This win put us in a good posi tion in the standings. We are hold ing our own in the league, said Napier. Although everybody likes to win, Napier said he doesnt just play to win. Its not just about winning. It is good to see everyone come out and compete in this summer league, he said. We have a great time, whether we win or lose. Softball Standings Iguanas 4-0 Blacksheep 4-0 JTF-170 4-0 Hospital 3-0 GTMO Bay 3-1 GTMO Lite 3-1 Regulars 2-1 239 MP Co. 2-1 XO Staff 2-1 571 MP Co. 0-1 JTF-160 0-1 160 MP Bn. 1-2 PSU 307 1-2 Wildcats 1-3 178 MP Co. 1-3 2/142 INF. Co. 0-2 HQ JTF-160 0-2 114 MP Co. A 0-3 Hit Squad 0-3 114 MP Co. B 0-3 342 MP Co. 0-3 By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Navsta 2-0 Chat Bout 2-0 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-0 Naval Hospital 1-1 JTF-160 0-1 Fire Dept. 0-1 571st MP Co. 0-1 178th MP Co. 0-2 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Staff Sgt.Lane Johnson from the 178th MP Co. doubles to deep right against GTMO Lite. Hospitals duel on the court The GTMO Motor Vehicle Code establishes the following: All POVs must be registered at the motor vehicle registration office (Tel. #3730), located next to the NAVBASE Police building. Documents required to register a POV are: (1) proof of ownership, (2) a valid drivers license, and (3) proof of liability insurance. The vehicle will be required to pass a safety and mechanical inspection that includes: lights, turn signals, tires, brakes, mirrors, windshield, horn, exhaust sys tem and safety belts. Seats installed in the cargo area of a truck must have lap belts, be securely fastened to the chassis of the vehicle, and the truck must have a tailgate. REMEMBER that the same motor vehicle rules that apply in the states also apply here at GTMO. Violators will be stopped by NAVBASE Police and receive traffic citations. HEADS UP! In the near future the JTF-160 Motor Maintenance section in coordination with NAVBASE Police will be conducting unannounced motor vehicle checkpoint stops for govern ment vehicles. They will check that operators are performing basic operator maintenance on the vehicles and recording their actions in the vehicle maintenance logs. BUCKLE UP AND DRIVE SAFELY

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Page 3 Friday, July 12, 2002 The Army broadcast journalists of the mighty 361st Press Camp Headquarters, reservists from Fort Totten, N.Y., are tasked with telling servicemembers stories here at GTMO. They are in charge of disseminating command information by using a vast array of top quality digital cameras and digital video editing systems. With assignments ranging from filming morale videos to press conferences to field exercises, these broadcasters are versatile and willing to work hard to get your story out there. They do so by marketing their products internally and to U.S. and overseas television stations. Whether the situation is gory or filled with glory, this group of highly-trained soldiers is ready to shoot your story. Broadcast Journalists Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Hector Peralta hot-wires a digital video editing system before editing raw footage. Spc. Christian Farrell Ive had the great opportunity to tell my fellow soldiers stories by having gone into the Army as a broadcaster. Any time I could go out covering your story Ill be all over it. Spc. Paul Morando This job allows me to capture the essence and spirit of servicemem bers through the lens of my camera. Everyone has a story to tell, and its my job to make sure its told. Spc. Hector Peralta I get to go out in the field and cover things that people with other profes sions could only dream of. Ive got ten down and dirty with generals and many other important people. Spc. Ivy Hodges My job #$@%ing rocks. I get to take an everyday occurence and by putting it on video, make it immortal. My work is smooth like butter when I get on a roll. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Christian Farrell conducts an on-the-spot interview as part of a video that he is producing. Page 14 Friday, July 12, 2002 To remember the victims of the Sept. 11 tragedy, GTMO Morale, Welfare and Recre ation organized a 5K run for the Fourth of July on Thursday. The race, which started at 6:30 a.m., drew a mixed crowd of GTMO residents. More than 350 people, including civilians and servicemembers from all of the military branches, came to show their support. Before the race began, Paul McDonald, one of the organiz ers from MWR, said a few words of motivation to the crowd massed in front of the G.J. Denich Gym. Running brings people together, said McDonald. We organized this run to remember the people who died on Sept. 11. We want to show that MWR and GTMO resi dents care. He also said, We want all of the servicemembers who are supporting the detainee opera tion here to feel close to home on this Independence Day. The crowd applauded with thunderous satisfaction after hearing McDonalds words. All of the participants, even the children in attendance with their parents, looked happy and eager to be part of an event that was held to remember the policemen, firemen and the other people who lost their lives in the 9/11 tragedy that shook all Americans and the whole world. The run was mostly for fun a chance for everyone to dis play their patriotism through their hearts and legs. There was a timekeeper, but the organizers didnt set formal rules for the race. Almost all of the runners stayed in formation for the first mile before the slow runners spread out to continue at their own pace. Although a first place win ner was not officially declared, Spc. Chris Pearce from the 571st Military Police Company was the first one to complete the race. I was happy to run in this race and finish first, said Pearce. The 571st MP Co. was filled with all-stars as Reggie Gokey finished second. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the commanding general of JTF160, came to support the event and was among the first 10 people who crossed the finish line. Most of the runners pushed hard to finish the race, but some people just walked the course with their children. And since it was Indepen dence Day, some of the runners proudly wore costumes dis playing the colors of the U.S. flag. MWR gave out trophies to recognize the best costumes for the day. In the adult category, first place went to Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham from JTF-160 headquarters; second place was Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg of the JTF160 Joint Information Bureau. Winning the youth category for best costume was Army Pvt. Ebony Blane. At the end of the race, MWR gave out T-shirts to all of the participants. GTMO remembers Sept. 11 victims Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Racquetball Tournament begins at 10AM this Saturday, July 13th; the Tennis Tournament begins at 10AM the following Saturday, July 20th. Sign up through your Chain of Command POC at G.J. Denich Gym. For more information call CPT Gormly at #5249. Today, Friday, July 12th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes All classes at Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Tournament/Bowling Party, Mar blehead Lanes Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Saturday, July 13th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 7AM to 2PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, Main Liberty Recre ation Center Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Sunday, July 14th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5PM, Spades Tournament Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Monday, July 15th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes All Classes at Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Free Movie, Downtown or Camp Buckley Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Tuesday, July 16th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Classes, G.J. Denich Gymnasium 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Cricket Classic X Dart Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Recreation Center Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Wednesday, July 17th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina All Day Scrabble Time, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Class, Marine Hill Gym 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Thursday, July 18th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Free Movie, Lyceum or 8PM Camp Bulkeley Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina GTMO civilians and servicemembers from all of the military branches came to show their support to the "911 Liberty 5K Race" in front of the G.J. Denich Gymnasium July 4. The purpose of the run was to remember the Sept. 11th victims and their families. Spc. Chris Pearce, who finished first, displays his t-shirt. Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham displays her hat. Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg and Pvt. Ebony Blane display their tro phies for best costumes.

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Page 4 Friday, July 12, 2002 Halfway down but still flying high Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This weeks question: Is there any place you would rather be than here? Navy Chief Petty Officer Craig Schlesinger, JTF160 J3 Out on the rough seas in an Aegis Class Cruiser filled with missiles. Doing what a sailor should be doing. Navy Seaman Alexis Brown, Naval Media Cen ter (Radio Station) Back home for the birth of my brother and sister-in-laws baby girl. But, Im stuck here doing my thing. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class, Michael Laroche, PSU307 Puerto Rico with my wife and kids. Maybe rent a house on the beach in SanJuan and just get away. Army Spc. Alan LaMar, 418th Transportation Company Back home with the family. Taking the boy to baseball games and going out fishing works for me. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, 418th Transporta tion Company Back on the block at Fort Hood, my home station. Thats where I drink my juice and get my game on. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Flags across GTMO flew at half-mast Tues day in honor of Air Force Gen. Benjamin O. Davis, leader of the famed all-black Tuskegee Airmen of World War II. Davis, who began his military career in the era of segregation and ended it as the Air Forces first black gen eral, died Saturday after a long bout with Alzheimers disease. Across 1 Sports channel 5 Chilled 9 Halite 13 Popular stadium 14 Scat! 15 Hungry __ (childrens game) 16 Entrap 17 Relative 18 Concerning 19 Skin care product 21 Writer Bombeck 23 Compass point 24 Talk 25 Emigrant 29 Morse code T 30 Mantle 32 Bolted 33 Dead language 36 Priest 37 That (possessive) 38 Adams garden 39 Mean 40 Type of cheese 41 Container 42 Aries the Ram 43 Heartbeat 44 To the right! 45 Join metal 46 Vase 47 Ban 49 Self 50 Visualize 53 __ Major (Big Dipper) 55 Nut popular in cooking 57 Devil 60 Christs gift bringer 62 Horses walk 63 Records 64 Doing nothing 65 Diet 66 Prosperous 67 One who gets things done 68 Otherwise Down 1 Painter Richard 2 Plant 3 Serenity 4 Neck 5 Old Testament prophet 6 Lump 7 Billion years 8 Pamper 9 Moses mountain 10 Gorilla 11 Licensed practical nurse 12 Kid 15 Gavel 20 Baseballs Nolan 22 Refund 26 Barbecue 27 Tempos 28 Turn out 29 Sound 30 Given a ticket 31 Deeds 33 Drop (2 wds.) 34 Bye 35 Lore 36 Famous ski resort 39 Groups of workers 40 Hamburger holder 42 Tokens of honor 43 Cotillion 46 More unattractive 48 Midday meal 49 National emblem 50 Escargot 51 Blue-pencils 52 Sugar-free brand 54 Among 56 Leer at 57 Popular presidents initials 58 Caesars three 59 Escudo 61 Hoopla Page 13 Friday, July 12, 2002 Unclear visions, Undecided decisions And hectic conditions Has a soldier on a mission, Wishin For a better day Or an easier way. Unwilling to let My mind go astray, Ill remain strong. Keeping my mind on the goal, Ill refuse to do wrong This is my life, And this is where I belong. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the June 28 puzzle Friday, July 12 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds (PG-13) 10 p.m. About a Boy (PG-13) Saturday, July 13 8 p.m. Lilo & Stitch (PG) 10 p.m. Unfaithful (R) Sunday, July 14 8 p.m. Minority Report (PG-13) Monday, July 15 8 p.m. Bad Company (PG-13) Tuesday, July 16 8 p.m. About a Boy (PG-13) Wednesday, July 17 8 p.m. The New Guy (R) Thursday, July 18 8 p.m. Minority Report (PG-13)

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ing from their posts, Baccus and OReilly strolled for the cameras along what has been GTMOs defining feature for decades: the chain-link, concertina wiretopped fence line dividing the U.S. militarys Cuba and Fidel Castros. After taping OReillys inter view with the commanding gen eral and collecting some background footage of the area, the entourage proceeded to Guantanamo Bays new hotspot of media attention and occa sional political controversy: Camp Delta and Camp America, where the detention operation is located. That operation the soldiers who run it and the detainees who are its mission was what brought OReilly to GTMO. I am here to do a day-in-thelife-of story on the detainees, said OReilly. The American people are curious about what the detainees do all day long, and thats why Im here. I want to find out what their routine is, and what their day is like. During his visit to Camp America, OReilly made a stop for chow at the Seaside Galley, which afforded him the opportu nity to speak with some of the men and women who make the detention facility run. Living up to his image as a working class hero, OReilly could have been one of the troops, chowing down and chatting amiably with hardworking GIs. Im very happy to be here. I think everybody knows that 90 percent of the country is behind the military, the War on Terror, and what these troops are doing here, said OReilly. Theres an enormous amount of people in America that support this cause, and you usually never get this kind of support for a war. The troops should know that were all behind them and want them to stay safe. After signing a few copies of his book, The No-Spin Zone, and taking pictures with eager soldiers, OReilly selected two sergeants to come back to Head quarters with him to be inter viewed along with the Commanding General. The interviewees said OReilly focused on many different aspects of working with the detainees, as well as their dayto-day routine. He asked me about the female perspective of day to day work with the detainees, said Sgt. Gabriel E. Graham. He was interested in finding out what happens with the detainees when they misbehave or if they are caught with contraband, said Sgt. Bernard Buehler. He also wanted to know if I ever feel sympathetic toward them. After spend ing a day in GTMO with the opportunity to converse with the Com manding Gen eral and troops, OReilly offered his own opinion on the mission here. It looks to me like every thing is very well organized and that there isnt anything left to uncer tainty. This is a very methodi cal operation, he said. These peo ple put them selves in this position, and theyre being treated humanely. Basically, thats all we owe them at this point. Were at war, and if youre going to mess with our country youre going to have to pay the price. After sitting in the hot seat with OReilly, Baccus was satis fied with the visit. I thought the interview with OReilly was very positive, he really sounded like he supported the mission and what were doing down here, said Baccus. This coverage will clearly tell the families exactly what kind of mission were doing and how important what were doing is. I think it will give Americans a better picture in terms of how serious a mission this is and cer tainly that all the servicemem bers take the mission very seriously, he said. OReilly expected that media like him would be coming back to GTMO and covering the war on terror for a long time to come. With the way I see the War on Terror is being handled here, a year from now it will still be front-page news, he said. Except with a lot less terrorists around that includes Saddam Hussein. As for his visit, OReilly had but one disappointment. I was hoping to see Fidel, but I guess hes not in today, said OReilly. Although I did see an iguana. He was probably a communist. The segment will air at 8 p.m. July 15 and 16 in the states, and is scheduled to be on AFN News (Ch. 97) on July 16 and 17 at 2 a.m. Page 5 Friday, July 12, 2002 OReilly, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano While at the Seaside Galley at Camp America, Bill OReilly takes the time out to sign a few books for admirers. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Bill OReilly strolls around the perimeter of Camp Delta while conducting a portion of his interview with Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano OReilly may have had enough of pic tures as he gets ready to feast on some Seaside Galley chow. Page 12 Friday, July 12, 2002 The hotter the food, the better they like it. But Navy mess spe cialist Chief Petty Officer Colleen M. Schonhoff said preparing tasty, nutritious, spicy hot food for the Muslim detainees here at Camp Delta isnt her major concern. We have to make sure that the food is halal approved, said Schonhoff, overseer of the galleys at Guantanamo Bay that feed the detainees and U.S. service mem bers. Meats for the detainees have to be handled a certain way under Muslim requirements. When I order meat for military people, I just say I want 50 pounds of chicken, and it doesnt matter how that chicken has been handled as long as its USDA approved. For the Muslims, I have to have a cer tificate from the company that says its halal approved. Im required to keep the certificate on file in case Im ever questioned. For instance, a certificate of Islamic slaughter must accompany every shipment of meat for the detainees. The Islamic Services of America must certify that the meat is halal beef that was handled according to all Islamic slaughter procedures and guidelines. The 564 detainees at Camp Delta represent 39 countries, mostly where Islam is the main religion. Joint Task Force 160 is responsible for their security and care at the camp. Muslims use two terms to describe food halal and haram. Halal is an Arabic word, which means lawful or allowed, but it is sometimes translated as acceptable or not forbidden. Haram means the opposite unlawful or prohibited. Halal foods are foods that are per mitted for consumption under Islamic law. It is sinful for a Mus lim to consume haram foods. Haram foods include pig, dog, donkey, and ani mals having fangs, such as monkeys, cats and lions. It also includes amphibians such as frogs, croco diles and turtles. Alcohol, harm ful substances, poisonous and intoxicating plants or drinks are also haram. You have to have halal cer tificates on chicken and beef, but there are no strict requirements on fish, she noted. My galley prepares two meals a day for the detainees break fast and the evening meal, she noted. They eat a vegetarian meal ready to eat, or MRE, for lunch. The menu that the dietitian pre pared for us is about 2,300 calo ries. Add the MRE and they get about 2,600 calories per day. I like to believe theyre eating a lot better here than they were wherever they were before they got here, she said. We take pretty good care of them. Bob Barkley, the building manager of the Seaside Galley, where food is prepared for the detainees, said naval hospital dieti tian Lt. Donna M. Sporrer created the menu. We were furnished with basic recipes that give general guide lines as to how to season the food, Barkley said. We just follow those and they seem to be happy. My main goal was to make sure they got all the nutrition requirements they need pro teins, vitamins, minerals and car bohydrates, Sporrer said. I had to look at the budget, too, so its primarily a vegetarian diet, rice, beans, fruit and vegetables. Theyre getting almost everything they need from two meals a day. A typical breakfast consists of pita bread, rice, curried eggs and peas, milk and fresh fruit, or hash browns, pita bread, a boiled egg, milk and fresh fruit. A typical din ner consists of rice, pita bread, meat and veg etable curry, milk, fresh fruit and margarine. A variant is rice, baked fish, stew sauce, spinach, orange or orange juice, milk and bread and mar garine. JTF-160 provides the lunch vegetarian MREs. We serve them two special meals per year, Schonhoff noted. For example, we served them lamb stew, rice, loaf bread, baklava and tea at the end of Ramadan in April. The Joint Task Force tells us when to serve the special meals. Sporrer said before the detainees started arriving last Janu ary, she gave Schonhoff guidelines about acceptable ingredients for Muslim diets. She also provided recipes that follow halal guide lines. The previous Muslim chap lain helped by giving Sporrer a Muslim cookbook. She said purchasing meat for the detainees is much like buying kosher meat, except youre buy ing halal-approved meat thats blessed by a Muslim chaplain before its slaughtered. Schonhoff said the cooks didnt have to have any special training to prepare food for the detainees. They just follow the recipes and use different spices to season the food. In their culture, they like food a little more spicy than we tradi tionally cook for our troops, Schonhoff said about the detainees. We usually put hot sauce on the table and let the troops add their own. For the detainee meals, we use curries and a couple of other spices we bought for them. Schonhoff said when she arrived at GTMO about three years ago, it was a quiet little duty station with one galley. That ended with the detainees arrival. Before the enclosed Seaside Galley opened on June 14, the only galley, other than the one in the hospital facility, was the Quick Hall Galley in the Marine section of the base. Before the big influx of detainees and troops, we fed about 300 meals a day, she noted. Then we went to more than 3,800 meals a day and were still doing it out of Quick Hall. We shipped containers of food all around the base. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Jermaine Turner, a contract cook at the Guantanamo Bay Seaside Galley, prepares a container of string beans for detainees at the Camp Delta detention center. Photo by Rudi Williams Navy mess specialist Chief Petty Offi cer Colleen M. Schonhoff said the detainees at the Camp Delta deten tion center at Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba, "are getting a variety of food." Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin A large vat of curry rice is one of the dishes contract cooks at the Guan tanamo Bay Seaside Galley prepare for detainees at the Camp Delta detention center. The detainees diet is mostly vegetarian. By Rudi Williams American Forces Press Service Detainees eat well, get healthy on Deltas carefully prepared Muslim meal plan

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Page 6 Friday, July 12, 2002 I arrive at the main gate just after midnight. It is now July 4, 2002. In honor of the day and all it means to Americas ene mies, the entire base will be bumped up a letter to Force Pro tection Condition Charlie, and in honor of that Ive come to spend 24 straight hours at Camp America, the suburb of the place that makes GTMO a tar get this year. This is the camp where the MPs and infantrymen who are this detention operation hang their Kevlars. The place where there can be no holidays. Ive come to look for Camp America on the Fourth of July, and Im not leaving until its over. 0005 hrs Spc. Jose A. Orozco and Sgt. Juan Villarreal, Texas National Guard infantry men attached here to B Com pany, 2/142, are on the graveyard shift, manning the front gate in their reflec tive gear. Orozco checks my ID and offers a few words on what its like to start this potentially eventful Indepen dence Day on the job. I think about it a little bit, Orozco says. I wish I was out spending some time with my friends. But weve got a job to do. Were keeping an eye out so that everybody else is OK. I make the turn down the main road, passing the reason Orozco and Villareal are up tonight: Camp Delta. A team of guards stand silently at the gate. The place is quiet but for the hum of the generators. I drive on past, into America, and park for the day. 0035 hrs. On the road in front of the command hooches, Pfc. Karrie Sutton of the 342nd MP company and Sgt. Isaac Comer of the 342nd MP Co. are walking back from the bus stop after taking in the July 3 fire works show at the Tiki Bar. Sut ton has the day off, but Comer is due at Delta at 1400. A police officer in civilian life, he is not fazed. Ive done some sort of duty on the Fourth for as long as I can remember, he says. Its good to see other people out having a good time and make sure theyre all right. 0215 hrs. The camp is com pletely quiet, so I go for a walk and find Pfc. Mickel Garrigus, Pfc. Keith West and Pfc. Michael Rowe, swing-shifters with the 571st MP company, in the laundry room, playing Mad den 2002 on an X-Box while the washers run. They have all drawn the Fourth off, and are none too pleased that the celebrations were all the night before, while they were at work. Now, West grumbles, Were off and theres nothing to do. Just the usual: Go into town. Go swimming. Call my wife. West and I linger outside, smoking, talking about here and home. His wife is expecting; hes worried about getting leave approved by the command. Hes worried about the last time he called; she was emo tional and he well, he was here. E-mail can be easier, we agree. After a while, we shake hands and part ways in the dark. 0515 hrs. Members of the 571st form up outside the Sea side Galley for the 9/11 5K Lib erty Run. It is late in the evening for this crew, and the starting line at the G.J. Denich Gym is itself a long bus ride away. But there is the patriotic element, and the units com mander, Capt. Krista Watts, has offered participants the follow ing night off from PT. Turnout is good. 0530 hrs. The runners have boarded their bus and left; I am alone on the wooden footbridge that in a few more hours will be the point at which soldiers will be required to don or carry their full battle gear. I lean over the edge. A procession of shambling banana rats at least a dozen, maybe more wend their way through the dry gully below, coming one by one out of the dark into the glare of a lone spotlight at the corner of the fence line. For some reason I think of the mountain trek from Lord of the Rings. 0620 hrs. The sunrise is nearly complete now as some members of the 114th MP Co. trickle home from work. I ask Sgt. Tarance Spann where hes headed. To bed, he says. Spc. Brian C. Carroll allows some anxiety about the coming day. One of our soldiers said he had a bad feeling, he said. Said the last time he had a bad feeling he got into a car wreck. He shrugs, and heads off to breakfast. 0645 hrs. I catch Staff Sgt. Robert W. Reese, with the 2/142 infantry, in some postStaff Sgt. John C. Worthington, a platoon sergeant with the 2/142 infantry, passes underneath Camp Americas flag in full FPCON Charlie battle gear. Looking for (Camp) America Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire To find the soul of the SEAhut suburb that never sleeps, this military journalist didnt either Spc. Barry Barrett (l) Spc. Tim Connelly (c) and Spc. Clay Leon (r) hump gear and show spirit on their way out of camp. The Camp America flag, round midnight. Page 11 Friday, July 12, 2002 Without communication amongst people, societies could not exist. And without com munication among servicemembers particu larly those in a joint service environment missions cannot succeed. Luckily, there is one team that forms the driving force of military communications at Guantanamo Bay the team known as J6. The mission of the J6 is to ensure 100% availability of secure and non-secure voice and data communications systems. They are responsible for all of our communications needs networking and operating computer systems, installing telephones, maintaining radios and cell phones, and keeping up com munications security (COMSEC) for Joint Task Force 160. In addition, they maintain the JTF-160 web page, manage the help desk, and take care of any problems in their area of operation. Ultimately, their goal is to ensure the com manding general can perform all parts of the vast spectrum of his mission from intelli gence and operations to Morale, Welfare and Recreation activities. People take communications for granted. Its not just one-on-one or face-to-face, said Air Force Staff Sgt. Joel W. Culbreth, the non commissioned officer in charge of the J6 help desk. There is a whole lot more to it. We monitor all network traffic, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael C. Forde, the J6 superintendent and the top ranking enlisted Air Force mem ber here on base. We have established a joint operations center (JOC) for command and con trol capabilities to allow us to improve force pro tection, security aware ness and early threat warning. With personnel standing watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week, waiting for prob lems to arise problems that range from network failures to telephone out ages to communication security issues to loss of cable television J6 has the resources to get the job done. As time passes on, however, communica tions operations continue to expand and are constantly being improved. This is a constant challenge for the people of J6, who must run parallel with modern advances in the commu nications realm. We are constantly bringing up our systems to state of the art, said Forde. We are continually learning updated pro cedures of command and control from repre sentatives of the Global Command and Control Center, said Air Force Capt. Roberta L. Nicholson, Deputy J6. However, according to Air Force Lt. Col. Teresa M. McGonagill, one of the biggest challenges facing the J6 is keeping good com munications open on what their customers need. That entails finding out what the user needs, for what purpose, and at what time. If I know those things, I can work to support them, she said. But the one facet of J6s job that probably strikes a chord with the most people here at GTMO is the computer. Now more than ever, people are using computers and the Internet to accomplish their mission. This can be accom plished only if the computers work properly, however, and J6 is here to ensure that they do. Were fixing computers old and new, said Culbreth. This is a very important job for us. In this day and age, computers and Internet access have become necessities for the successful completion of a mission. But maintaining communications isnt the only job that J6 has. They also play a critical role in keeping the off-duty morale of every servicemember here as high as the profes sional standards that they set on the job. Being able to keep in touch with family and friends back home via e-mail keeps a troops morale high, said Culbreth. So when there is a problem with the Internet, it is very important for us to jump right on it. And while members of J6 work hard to make sure the morale of the troops is strong, they have done likewise for themselves by creating an enjoyable working environment conducive to teamwork. We have members from the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy working together here on this team, said McGonagill. But I dont see service, I see capabilities. J6 has been putting out quality work. Everyone has pulled together well and communication between the different services has been great. Working with all the different branches is challenging but also valuable, said Lance Cpl. Jason W. Vest, J6 phone representative. You can learn from others while you teach them what you know. We have super guys who can come together from different bases with different backgrounds to form super teams in this field, said Forde. We had members from six different units of the Air Force Air National Guard come together here at GTMO to lay down 15 miles of fiber-optic cables throughout the whole base in around two short months. With motivation to spare, the members of J6 are looking to the future of JTF and look ing forward to more milestones in their his tory of communications achievements for the military. When I am finished here, I want to have a sound communication infrastructure to take JTF not only through tomorrow but two years from now including data, local networks, radio communication, secured telephone communication and sound frequency man agement, said McGonagill. But in the end, the talented members of J6 are crystal clear on what they must do and how they must do it. Things have really come together here, but this mission is far from being completed, said Forde. There is still a lot to get done, and I want everyone out there to know that J6 will always take care of all of your communica tions needs. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Senior Airman Steven J. Bradford, system administrator, troubleshoots a com puter tower for a problem that has been bedazzling him for days. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Paula A. Zapata, system administrator, deli cately toils away at wires on an Internet server. J6 communicates with nothing but success By Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire

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Page 10 Friday, July 12, 2002 racks in Camp Delta, and get a view of the facility from one of the guard towers. I see nothing, of course, and remember less. 2000 hrs. With FP CON Charlie now 12 hours old, I head out on another infantry patrol, this time for a mounted run in a humvee tricked out with a .50-cal. gun turret, with Staff Sgt. Earl W. Diggs, Jr., and Cpl. Jose A. Rivas, Jr. We climb in and rum ble off into the hills. Rivas, like a drunk on a limo ride, is stick ing through the roof on the .50cal; all I can see are his legs. 2045 hrs. All right, boys, this is where the fun starts, yells Diggs over the roar of the motor. The patrol has come to the place known locally as Lovers Lane (and some less delicate names), and Diggs and Rivas are expecting to catch some misbehaving soldiers. They go tactical lights off, night-vision goggles on and creep up on the isolated shacks. Diggs gets out and makes the rounds, throwing each door open while Rivas swivels the turret. Nothing there, Diggs says, sounding disappointed. But someone lit out of here without their shoes. At the next checkpoint, the pair turns serious: the guards there have spotted an unidenti fied light out on the water, visi ble only with their goggles. Diggs calls it in. I never learn what, if anything, comes of the incident. A half-hour later we are on a hill overlooking the brightly glowing center of it all: Camp Delta. Diggs and Rivas check in with the guard post; I wander out for a better view. From the edge Delta looks like the moon excavation site from : A Space Odyssey. And it sounds it sounds like theres some trouble down there. I hear metallic banging, chanting, yelling. Now, aside from a half-hour nap between 7:30 and 8 this morning, Ive been up since mid night, after just two hours sleep Wednesday evening. Im sure the hills have me hearing it wrong anything serious would obviously be on the radios but when I rejoin the others I cant resist a report. We drive down to check it out theyre clearly humoring me and of course all is well. The guards are on guard, the detainees are presumably in bed, and if there was ever any ruckus its quiet again. Diggs and Rivas resist giving me a hard time until later, when we swing around to Camp Bucke ley and hear the sound again. You know what you heard? says Rivas. The movie. I try to laugh it off Im certainly in no condition to argue. It is now 9:35 p.m.; less than three hours to go. I am now tired in that desperate, lost-inthe-desert-with-no-Camelback kind of way. Anxious to talk to some more MPs before mid night, I have Diggs and Rivas drop me off at their 10 p.m. checkpoint stop. After all, they will be at it for another 10 hours, and hey Im on a timetable here. Later, I find out the movie was Lilo and Stitch. Interest ing. 2145 hrs. Idle until the next group of MPs comes up the road from Delta, I wander over to the guard post at the far edge of camp, where the road falls off toward the beach. Spc. Ruben Cantu and Staff Sgt. Billy Bryley, two more of the 2/142 infantrymen I have been running across all day and all night, are man ning the post until midnight, at which point they have eight hours to rest before rising again to man another post or patrol or radio somewhere else in or around the camp. Eight on, eight off. Infantry hours. The pair does admit to being a little hyped up by the move to Charlie, the holiday and all the media hand-wringing back in the U.S. Were ready for it if it comes, says Cantu. But so far, nothing, not even the usual trickle of evening beach traffic. I am the first person to come by in a long while. 2230 hrs. Members of the 342nd MPs are heading back from Delta. They are kind enough to gather at the bench where I am slumped. Pfc. Rhonda Reed, who had the day off but is meeting her friends, is disappointed in her fellow Americans. I played Lee Greenwood (Proud to Be an American) about 20 times this morning to get everybody in the mood. But nobody was into it because they had to work. I tell her Im shocked. Pfc. Johnathan Sweatfield, just off his shift, gives me an informal rundown of the last shift of this Fourth. No explosions. No chemical attack. Nobody tried to sneak any weapons past the gate, he says. And we had more ice than we needed. In other words, as good as it gets here. I hear someone call out, Is it 24 hours yet? I focus, with effort, and it is West, back from town. No, I tell him. Not quite yet. 2300 hrs. I head back to Sea side Galley for night-shift chow, and scan the mostlyempty benches for a familiar face. I spot Sgt. Jaramillo, from the mornings patrol. He is back on out front at midnight. Thats why you didnt see me at dinner, he says. I was sleeping, and airing out my tootsies. 0015 hrs. By my watch, it is over. Terror has not struck. I can leave at any time. Spc. Paul Morando, a broadcaster with my unit who has been keeping nearly my hours following the 2/142, is waiting on me for a ride back home. But now I do not want to go, not yet. So I wander over to the newly-built smoke shack and philoso phize a while with Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin S. Hewitt, with the 114th MPs. Shifts come on, shifts come off, 24 hours a day, always the same. A place like this runs itself. He sighs. Its the first Fourth of July that was very uneventful for me. But today, I guess that was good. 0040 hrs. At the front gate, we stop, say goodnight to the recurring Sgt. Jaramillo, and drive out. Its over. Ive lived a day at Camp America that perhaps no one here has before. Ive met people in some cases, sev eral times who might go months without meeting each other. Ive seen the whole, the sum of the parts. But I guess Ill never really know what its like to be one, day in and day out. Down the road, we come to a Navy checkpoint, and show ID. Getting off shift? the guard asks me. I think it over. Sort of. Staff Sgt. Valde Gonzalez, 2/142 infantry, tucks into dinner at Seaside Galley. At sunset, our flag was still there. 24-hour Fourth, from page 7 Sgt. Robert S. Jones, 114th MP Co., in a 9/11 fundraiser Tshirt from home in Mississippi. Page 7 Friday, July 12, 2002 chow dental hygiene at one of the camps stand-alone banks of sinks and mirrors. He is on at 8:00, and counting last weeks rehearsal, this is the second offday FP CON Charlie has ruined for him. I strongly believe nothing will hap pen, he says. But you have to be vigilant. Some one has to do it. 0800 hrs. Its Charlie time. The camp officially moves into its heightened state of awareness full battle gear five minutes away if youre in the camp, on your per son if you want to leave. I hook up with some soldiers who, if terror is to strike, will see it coming first: more mem bers of the 2/142 infantry. These are the soldiers who guard the guards, and now, three of them Sgt. Jose Jaramillo, Spc. John Martinez and Spc. Juan Reyes are off on a dismounted counter-reconnaissance patrol around the camp, which in lay mans terms is a very long walk in some very hot sun. I hope they do not have to carry me back. Along for the patrol is the home battalions XO, Army Maj. Robert Wait. Nothing beats having a guy walk the ground as opposed to looking at it from a mile or two away, he tells me. Its tougher on the troops. But I think we get increased security this way. These are really the only sol diers here whose schedules change when the camp tenses up; are any of Waits men feel ing the pressure? This is the real deal this is the Super Bowl, he allows. Theres a much greater level of personal awareness. But were not fearful because of the plan we have and the measures weve put in place. If something does happen, its a bythe-numbers drill. We can execute it just like that. 1000 hrs. Maj. Wait and I peel off and head back to camp. Jaramillo, Martinez and Reyes keep going. They will be out here another six hours. 1130 hrs. There is a special Fourth of July lunch at the Sea side Galley: BBQ chicken and fried chicken, burgers, franks, and some very decent baked beans. The hall is decked with American flags and red-whiteand-blue bunting. Battle gear is everywhere. On the way out, I hear some body exclaiming what a won derful Fourth of July it is to be in the military. And 1st Sgt. Larry Wilbanks, of the 178th MPs, is indeed sincere his daughter is expecting a boy this very day. Ive been doing this for 31 years, so its not the first Fourth Ive missed and it wont be the last, he says. But Im here I guess so my grandson wont have to be. 1405 hrs. I drop in on Camp Americas administrators, the 160th MP Battalion. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton gives me his usual hearty hello. The 4th of July is just like any other work day around here, he says. Were all six on, off one if it was your off day today, youre off. If youre working, youre still working. Such, he says, is the nature of the Camp America beast. Its just like any hospital or police station or prison in the outside world here, the detainees are in Delta no matter what the cal endar says. Ive worked shift work for a lot of years, Clay ton says. Of course, even if I worked on the Fourth I could always get off at some point and catch some festivities. Now, there are none left. As for FP CON Charlie, Clayton says that nothings hit the radar screen yet. Just a lot of soldiers walking around with a lot of gear. 1430 hrs. One of those sol diers, Spc. C. Scott Belgard with the 239th MPs, is off work and hoofing it up the hill back to the hooches, rucksack on his chest. His face is streaked with sweat, but he stops to talk about celebrating this Fourth. Every day seems like the same day here today, weve got extra things to carry, he says. Its good were taking extra precautions, I guess. But its a heck of a load. 1550 hrs. More heavy lifting in the afternoon heat: Staff Sgt. Matthew Kauffman, with the 160th, is directing the forklift ing and installation of a vintagelooking 5K generator for some additional backup power. If theres an emergency, well have power to run the emer gency broadcast system. I pon der that for a minute, and move on. 1635 hrs. I bump into my old laundry-room buddy West, walking away from the phone bank outside hooch A4106 after trying unsuccessfully to get through to his wife. He has a new plan for the rest of the day. Im going straight to the CBQ, he says. TV, movies, pool, ping pong everythings free. Its all air-conditioned. And its not here. 1700 hrs. Back at the 160th offices, their commander, Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, is knocking off at 5 sharp for a change and headed home to Windward Loop after 10 hours on the job. On the way out, he tells me that this terror-shadowed Fourth has not been uneventful every where. There was a shooter at the El Al terminal at LAX. Palestinians, I guess. Just underscores the need to do what were doing here. 1715 hrs. I head over to Sea side Galley for my third chow of the day. Crossing the foot bridge, I realize I am not carry ing my Charlie gear. I consider cheating, but there is a beefy sergeant-looking type, bent under his own Charlie load, eyeing me through mirrored shades. I sigh, and turn back for my duffel. 1800 hrs. I head over to the Bear Store and the big-screen TV to check out the FBI press conference about the shooting. Inside, I find about a dozen sol diers watching Nicolas Cage and Angelina Jolie make out in Gone in 60 Seconds. Next door, the Internet room is filled, with two waiting. Only e-mail browsers are visible. Which is fine I am too tired for news anyway. 1915 hrs. I go on a tour of the Quick Response Force bar Even the guard stations were decked out for the day. Between the SEAhuts and Seaside Galley was checkpoint Charlie. Sgt. Jose Jaramillo and Maj. Robert Wait talk tactics on the trail. See 24-hou r Fourth, page 10

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, July 12, 2002 Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus gives an overview of JTF-160 to his distinguished guests. Rhode Island VIPs at GTMO Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa, Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin, Spc. Chris S. Pisano, Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Jose A. Martinez A delegation made up of VIPs and civilian media from Rhode Island, the home state of JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus, came to GTMO Monday to visit the soldiers of the 43rd Military Police Brigade currently serving JTF-160. The dignitaries included Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty, Chief Justice Frank Williams of the R.I. Supreme Court, and Com manding Maj. Gen. Reginald Centracchio and Command Sgt. Maj. John Ryan of the Rhode Island National Guard. Baccus and his staff met the visitors Monday at Leeward Airfield and briefed them on JTF-160s mission. Tuesday, a group of JTF-160s Rhode Islanders convened at the MacCalla Hangar to meet their distinguished visitors. Fogarty presented a gubernatorial citation to Baccus, and Centracchio gave out Army medals and coins to the soldiers. Then the DVs and the media had a chance to see the sights of GTMO, taking a guided tour of Camp X-ray, Camp Delta, Camp America, the Northeast Gate and GTMOs historic sites that ended with a reception at Ricks. After expressing their gratitude for their fellow Rhode Islanders service here, the del egation returned home Wednesday morning. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Maj. Gen. Reginald Centracchio, commanding gen eral of the R.I. National Guard, speaks to his troops at the MacCalla Hangar Tuesday. Centracchio, who is visiting GTMO for the first time, said he came here to bring moral support to the R.I. soldiers deployed here and wants to bring back good news for their families. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Rhode Island delegation walks to the Leeward Airfield Hangar after getting off a C-130 aircraft Monday afternoon. The distinguished visitors, who came here to support the soldiers of the 43rd Military Police Brigade, are escorted by the members of the JTF-160 public affairs office. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Marine Maj. Scott Packard points out the location of the Battle of Cuzco, a famous GTMO battlefield near the Marine Hill Cemetery. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Lt. Gov. Fogarty presents a gubernatorial citation to Gen. Baccus Tuesday. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Paula Zapata, the youngest member of the 43rd MPBDE, proudly holds in her hand a coin she received Tuesday from the adjutant general of R.I. National Guard. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro receives a medal from Command Sgt. Maj John Ryan of R.I. National Guard at the Tuesday presentation at Mac Calla Hill. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The R.I. visitors together with servicemembers from JTF-160 walk toward GTMO Northeast Gate Tuesday during the special tour.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, July 12, 2002 Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus gives an overview of JTF-160 to his distinguished guests. Rhode Island VIPs at GTMO Compiled by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa, Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin, Spc. Chris S. Pisano, Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Jose A. Martinez A delegation made up of VIPs and civilian media from Rhode Island, the home state of JTF-160 Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus, came to GTMO Monday to visit the soldiers of the 43rd Military Police Brigade currently serving JTF-160. The dignitaries included Lt. Gov. Charles Fogarty, Chief Justice Frank Williams of the R.I. Supreme Court, and Com manding Maj. Gen. Reginald Centracchio and Command Sgt. Maj. John Ryan of the Rhode Island National Guard. Baccus and his staff met the visitors Monday at Leeward Airfield and briefed them on JTF-160s mission. Tuesday, a group of JTF-160s Rhode Islanders convened at the MacCalla Hangar to meet their distinguished visitors. Fogarty presented a gubernatorial citation to Baccus, and Centracchio gave out Army medals and coins to the soldiers. Then the DVs and the media had a chance to see the sights of GTMO, taking a guided tour of Camp X-ray, Camp Delta, Camp America, the Northeast Gate and GTMOs historic sites that ended with a reception at Ricks. After expressing their gratitude for their fellow Rhode Islanders service here, the del egation returned home Wednesday morning. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Maj. Gen. Reginald Centracchio, commanding gen eral of the R.I. National Guard, speaks to his troops at the MacCalla Hangar Tuesday. Centracchio, who is visiting GTMO for the first time, said he came here to bring moral support to the R.I. soldiers deployed here and wants to bring back good news for their families. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Rhode Island delegation walks to the Leeward Airfield Hangar after getting off a C-130 aircraft Monday afternoon. The distinguished visitors, who came here to support the soldiers of the 43rd Military Police Brigade, are escorted by the members of the JTF-160 public affairs office. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Marine Maj. Scott Packard points out the location of the Battle of Cuzco, a famous GTMO battlefield near the Marine Hill Cemetery. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Lt. Gov. Fogarty presents a gubernatorial citation to Gen. Baccus Tuesday. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Paula Zapata, the youngest member of the 43rd MPBDE, proudly holds in her hand a coin she received Tuesday from the adjutant general of R.I. National Guard. Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Command Sgt. Maj. Funaro receives a medal from Command Sgt. Maj John Ryan of R.I. National Guard at the Tuesday presentation at Mac Calla Hill. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The R.I. visitors together with servicemembers from JTF-160 walk toward GTMO Northeast Gate Tuesday during the special tour.

PAGE 10

Page 10 Friday, July 12, 2002 racks in Camp Delta, and get a view of the facility from one of the guard towers. I see nothing, of course, and remember less. 2000 hrs. With FP CON Charlie now 12 hours old, I head out on another infantry patrol, this time for a mounted run in a humvee tricked out with a .50-cal. gun turret, with Staff Sgt. Earl W. Diggs, Jr., and Cpl. Jose A. Rivas, Jr. We climb in and rum ble off into the hills. Rivas, like a drunk on a limo ride, is stick ing through the roof on the .50cal; all I can see are his legs. 2045 hrs. All right, boys, this is where the fun starts, yells Diggs over the roar of the motor. The patrol has come to the place known locally as Lovers Lane (and some less delicate names), and Diggs and Rivas are expecting to catch some misbehaving soldiers. They go tactical lights off, night-vision goggles on and creep up on the isolated shacks. Diggs gets out and makes the rounds, throwing each door open while Rivas swivels the turret. Nothing there, Diggs says, sounding disappointed. But someone lit out of here without their shoes. At the next checkpoint, the pair turns serious: the guards there have spotted an unidenti fied light out on the water, visi ble only with their goggles. Diggs calls it in. I never learn what, if anything, comes of the incident. A half-hour later we are on a hill overlooking the brightly glowing center of it all: Camp Delta. Diggs and Rivas check in with the guard post; I wander out for a better view. From the edge Delta looks like the moon excavation site from : A Space Odyssey. And it sounds it sounds like theres some trouble down there. I hear metallic banging, chanting, yelling. Now, aside from a half-hour nap between 7:30 and 8 this morning, Ive been up since mid night, after just two hours sleep Wednesday evening. Im sure the hills have me hearing it wrong anything serious would obviously be on the radios but when I rejoin the others I cant resist a report. We drive down to check it out theyre clearly humoring me and of course all is well. The guards are on guard, the detainees are presumably in bed, and if there was ever any ruckus its quiet again. Diggs and Rivas resist giving me a hard time until later, when we swing around to Camp Bucke ley and hear the sound again. You know what you heard? says Rivas. The movie. I try to laugh it off Im certainly in no condition to argue. It is now 9:35 p.m.; less than three hours to go. I am now tired in that desperate, lost-inthe-desert-with-no-Camelback kind of way. Anxious to talk to some more MPs before mid night, I have Diggs and Rivas drop me off at their 10 p.m. checkpoint stop. After all, they will be at it for another 10 hours, and hey Im on a timetable here. Later, I find out the movie was Lilo and Stitch. Interest ing. 2145 hrs. Idle until the next group of MPs comes up the road from Delta, I wander over to the guard post at the far edge of camp, where the road falls off toward the beach. Spc. Ruben Cantu and Staff Sgt. Billy Bryley, two more of the 2/142 infantrymen I have been running across all day and all night, are man ning the post until midnight, at which point they have eight hours to rest before rising again to man another post or patrol or radio somewhere else in or around the camp. Eight on, eight off. Infantry hours. The pair does admit to being a little hyped up by the move to Charlie, the holiday and all the media hand-wringing back in the U.S. Were ready for it if it comes, says Cantu. But so far, nothing, not even the usual trickle of evening beach traffic. I am the first person to come by in a long while. 2230 hrs. Members of the 342nd MPs are heading back from Delta. They are kind enough to gather at the bench where I am slumped. Pfc. Rhonda Reed, who had the day off but is meeting her friends, is disappointed in her fellow Americans. I played Lee Greenwood (Proud to Be an American) about 20 times this morning to get everybody in the mood. But nobody was into it because they had to work. I tell her Im shocked. Pfc. Johnathan Sweatfield, just off his shift, gives me an informal rundown of the last shift of this Fourth. No explosions. No chemical attack. Nobody tried to sneak any weapons past the gate, he says. And we had more ice than we needed. In other words, as good as it gets here. I hear someone call out, Is it 24 hours yet? I focus, with effort, and it is West, back from town. No, I tell him. Not quite yet. 2300 hrs. I head back to Sea side Galley for night-shift chow, and scan the mostlyempty benches for a familiar face. I spot Sgt. Jaramillo, from the mornings patrol. He is back on out front at midnight. Thats why you didnt see me at dinner, he says. I was sleeping, and airing out my tootsies. 0015 hrs. By my watch, it is over. Terror has not struck. I can leave at any time. Spc. Paul Morando, a broadcaster with my unit who has been keeping nearly my hours following the 2/142, is waiting on me for a ride back home. But now I do not want to go, not yet. So I wander over to the newly-built smoke shack and philoso phize a while with Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin S. Hewitt, with the 114th MPs. Shifts come on, shifts come off, 24 hours a day, always the same. A place like this runs itself. He sighs. Its the first Fourth of July that was very uneventful for me. But today, I guess that was good. 0040 hrs. At the front gate, we stop, say goodnight to the recurring Sgt. Jaramillo, and drive out. Its over. Ive lived a day at Camp America that perhaps no one here has before. Ive met people in some cases, sev eral times who might go months without meeting each other. Ive seen the whole, the sum of the parts. But I guess Ill never really know what its like to be one, day in and day out. Down the road, we come to a Navy checkpoint, and show ID. Getting off shift? the guard asks me. I think it over. Sort of. Staff Sgt. Valde Gonzalez, 2/142 infantry, tucks into dinner at Seaside Galley. At sunset, our flag was still there. 24-hour Fourth, from page 7 Sgt. Robert S. Jones, 114th MP Co., in a 9/11 fundraiser Tshirt from home in Mississippi. Page 7 Friday, July 12, 2002 chow dental hygiene at one of the camps stand-alone banks of sinks and mirrors. He is on at 8:00, and counting last weeks rehearsal, this is the second offday FP CON Charlie has ruined for him. I strongly believe nothing will hap pen, he says. But you have to be vigilant. Some one has to do it. 0800 hrs. Its Charlie time. The camp officially moves into its heightened state of awareness full battle gear five minutes away if youre in the camp, on your per son if you want to leave. I hook up with some soldiers who, if terror is to strike, will see it coming first: more mem bers of the 2/142 infantry. These are the soldiers who guard the guards, and now, three of them Sgt. Jose Jaramillo, Spc. John Martinez and Spc. Juan Reyes are off on a dismounted counter-reconnaissance patrol around the camp, which in lay mans terms is a very long walk in some very hot sun. I hope they do not have to carry me back. Along for the patrol is the home battalions XO, Army Maj. Robert Wait. Nothing beats having a guy walk the ground as opposed to looking at it from a mile or two away, he tells me. Its tougher on the troops. But I think we get increased security this way. These are really the only sol diers here whose schedules change when the camp tenses up; are any of Waits men feel ing the pressure? This is the real deal this is the Super Bowl, he allows. Theres a much greater level of personal awareness. But were not fearful because of the plan we have and the measures weve put in place. If something does happen, its a bythe-numbers drill. We can execute it just like that. 1000 hrs. Maj. Wait and I peel off and head back to camp. Jaramillo, Martinez and Reyes keep going. They will be out here another six hours. 1130 hrs. There is a special Fourth of July lunch at the Sea side Galley: BBQ chicken and fried chicken, burgers, franks, and some very decent baked beans. The hall is decked with American flags and red-whiteand-blue bunting. Battle gear is everywhere. On the way out, I hear some body exclaiming what a won derful Fourth of July it is to be in the military. And 1st Sgt. Larry Wilbanks, of the 178th MPs, is indeed sincere his daughter is expecting a boy this very day. Ive been doing this for 31 years, so its not the first Fourth Ive missed and it wont be the last, he says. But Im here I guess so my grandson wont have to be. 1405 hrs. I drop in on Camp Americas administrators, the 160th MP Battalion. Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton gives me his usual hearty hello. The 4th of July is just like any other work day around here, he says. Were all six on, off one if it was your off day today, youre off. If youre working, youre still working. Such, he says, is the nature of the Camp America beast. Its just like any hospital or police station or prison in the outside world here, the detainees are in Delta no matter what the cal endar says. Ive worked shift work for a lot of years, Clay ton says. Of course, even if I worked on the Fourth I could always get off at some point and catch some festivities. Now, there are none left. As for FP CON Charlie, Clayton says that nothings hit the radar screen yet. Just a lot of soldiers walking around with a lot of gear. 1430 hrs. One of those sol diers, Spc. C. Scott Belgard with the 239th MPs, is off work and hoofing it up the hill back to the hooches, rucksack on his chest. His face is streaked with sweat, but he stops to talk about celebrating this Fourth. Every day seems like the same day here today, weve got extra things to carry, he says. Its good were taking extra precautions, I guess. But its a heck of a load. 1550 hrs. More heavy lifting in the afternoon heat: Staff Sgt. Matthew Kauffman, with the 160th, is directing the forklift ing and installation of a vintagelooking 5K generator for some additional backup power. If theres an emergency, well have power to run the emer gency broadcast system. I pon der that for a minute, and move on. 1635 hrs. I bump into my old laundry-room buddy West, walking away from the phone bank outside hooch A4106 after trying unsuccessfully to get through to his wife. He has a new plan for the rest of the day. Im going straight to the CBQ, he says. TV, movies, pool, ping pong everythings free. Its all air-conditioned. And its not here. 1700 hrs. Back at the 160th offices, their commander, Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, is knocking off at 5 sharp for a change and headed home to Windward Loop after 10 hours on the job. On the way out, he tells me that this terror-shadowed Fourth has not been uneventful every where. There was a shooter at the El Al terminal at LAX. Palestinians, I guess. Just underscores the need to do what were doing here. 1715 hrs. I head over to Sea side Galley for my third chow of the day. Crossing the foot bridge, I realize I am not carry ing my Charlie gear. I consider cheating, but there is a beefy sergeant-looking type, bent under his own Charlie load, eyeing me through mirrored shades. I sigh, and turn back for my duffel. 1800 hrs. I head over to the Bear Store and the big-screen TV to check out the FBI press conference about the shooting. Inside, I find about a dozen sol diers watching Nicolas Cage and Angelina Jolie make out in Gone in 60 Seconds. Next door, the Internet room is filled, with two waiting. Only e-mail browsers are visible. Which is fine I am too tired for news anyway. 1915 hrs. I go on a tour of the Quick Response Force bar Even the guard stations were decked out for the day. Between the SEAhuts and Seaside Galley was checkpoint Charlie. Sgt. Jose Jaramillo and Maj. Robert Wait talk tactics on the trail. See 24-hou r Fourth, page 10

PAGE 11

Page 6 Friday, July 12, 2002 I arrive at the main gate just after midnight. It is now July 4, 2002. In honor of the day and all it means to Americas ene mies, the entire base will be bumped up a letter to Force Pro tection Condition Charlie, and in honor of that Ive come to spend 24 straight hours at Camp America, the suburb of the place that makes GTMO a tar get this year. This is the camp where the MPs and infantrymen who are this detention operation hang their Kevlars. The place where there can be no holidays. Ive come to look for Camp America on the Fourth of July, and Im not leaving until its over. 0005 hrs Spc. Jose A. Orozco and Sgt. Juan Villarreal, Texas National Guard infantry men attached here to B Com pany, 2/142, are on the graveyard shift, manning the front gate in their reflec tive gear. Orozco checks my ID and offers a few words on what its like to start this potentially eventful Indepen dence Day on the job. I think about it a little bit, Orozco says. I wish I was out spending some time with my friends. But weve got a job to do. Were keeping an eye out so that everybody else is OK. I make the turn down the main road, passing the reason Orozco and Villareal are up tonight: Camp Delta. A team of guards stand silently at the gate. The place is quiet but for the hum of the generators. I drive on past, into America, and park for the day. 0035 hrs. On the road in front of the command hooches, Pfc. Karrie Sutton of the 342nd MP company and Sgt. Isaac Comer of the 342nd MP Co. are walking back from the bus stop after taking in the July 3 fire works show at the Tiki Bar. Sut ton has the day off, but Comer is due at Delta at 1400. A police officer in civilian life, he is not fazed. Ive done some sort of duty on the Fourth for as long as I can remember, he says. Its good to see other people out having a good time and make sure theyre all right. 0215 hrs. The camp is com pletely quiet, so I go for a walk and find Pfc. Mickel Garrigus, Pfc. Keith West and Pfc. Michael Rowe, swing-shifters with the 571st MP company, in the laundry room, playing Mad den 2002 on an X-Box while the washers run. They have all drawn the Fourth off, and are none too pleased that the celebrations were all the night before, while they were at work. Now, West grumbles, Were off and theres nothing to do. Just the usual: Go into town. Go swimming. Call my wife. West and I linger outside, smoking, talking about here and home. His wife is expecting; hes worried about getting leave approved by the command. Hes worried about the last time he called; she was emo tional and he well, he was here. E-mail can be easier, we agree. After a while, we shake hands and part ways in the dark. 0515 hrs. Members of the 571st form up outside the Sea side Galley for the 9/11 5K Lib erty Run. It is late in the evening for this crew, and the starting line at the G.J. Denich Gym is itself a long bus ride away. But there is the patriotic element, and the units com mander, Capt. Krista Watts, has offered participants the follow ing night off from PT. Turnout is good. 0530 hrs. The runners have boarded their bus and left; I am alone on the wooden footbridge that in a few more hours will be the point at which soldiers will be required to don or carry their full battle gear. I lean over the edge. A procession of shambling banana rats at least a dozen, maybe more wend their way through the dry gully below, coming one by one out of the dark into the glare of a lone spotlight at the corner of the fence line. For some reason I think of the mountain trek from Lord of the Rings. 0620 hrs. The sunrise is nearly complete now as some members of the 114th MP Co. trickle home from work. I ask Sgt. Tarance Spann where hes headed. To bed, he says. Spc. Brian C. Carroll allows some anxiety about the coming day. One of our soldiers said he had a bad feeling, he said. Said the last time he had a bad feeling he got into a car wreck. He shrugs, and heads off to breakfast. 0645 hrs. I catch Staff Sgt. Robert W. Reese, with the 2/142 infantry, in some postStaff Sgt. John C. Worthington, a platoon sergeant with the 2/142 infantry, passes underneath Camp Americas flag in full FPCON Charlie battle gear. Looking for (Camp) America Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire To find the soul of the SEAhut suburb that never sleeps, this military journalist didnt either Spc. Barry Barrett (l) Spc. Tim Connelly (c) and Spc. Clay Leon (r) hump gear and show spirit on their way out of camp. The Camp America flag, round midnight. Page 11 Friday, July 12, 2002 Without communication amongst people, societies could not exist. And without com munication among servicemembers particu larly those in a joint service environment missions cannot succeed. Luckily, there is one team that forms the driving force of military communications at Guantanamo Bay the team known as J6. The mission of the J6 is to ensure 100% availability of secure and non-secure voice and data communications systems. They are responsible for all of our communications needs networking and operating computer systems, installing telephones, maintaining radios and cell phones, and keeping up com munications security (COMSEC) for Joint Task Force 160. In addition, they maintain the JTF-160 web page, manage the help desk, and take care of any problems in their area of operation. Ultimately, their goal is to ensure the com manding general can perform all parts of the vast spectrum of his mission from intelli gence and operations to Morale, Welfare and Recreation activities. People take communications for granted. Its not just one-on-one or face-to-face, said Air Force Staff Sgt. Joel W. Culbreth, the non commissioned officer in charge of the J6 help desk. There is a whole lot more to it. We monitor all network traffic, said Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael C. Forde, the J6 superintendent and the top ranking enlisted Air Force mem ber here on base. We have established a joint operations center (JOC) for command and con trol capabilities to allow us to improve force pro tection, security aware ness and early threat warning. With personnel standing watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week, waiting for prob lems to arise problems that range from network failures to telephone out ages to communication security issues to loss of cable television J6 has the resources to get the job done. As time passes on, however, communica tions operations continue to expand and are constantly being improved. This is a constant challenge for the people of J6, who must run parallel with modern advances in the commu nications realm. We are constantly bringing up our systems to state of the art, said Forde. We are continually learning updated pro cedures of command and control from repre sentatives of the Global Command and Control Center, said Air Force Capt. Roberta L. Nicholson, Deputy J6. However, according to Air Force Lt. Col. Teresa M. McGonagill, one of the biggest challenges facing the J6 is keeping good com munications open on what their customers need. That entails finding out what the user needs, for what purpose, and at what time. If I know those things, I can work to support them, she said. But the one facet of J6s job that probably strikes a chord with the most people here at GTMO is the computer. Now more than ever, people are using computers and the Internet to accomplish their mission. This can be accom plished only if the computers work properly, however, and J6 is here to ensure that they do. Were fixing computers old and new, said Culbreth. This is a very important job for us. In this day and age, computers and Internet access have become necessities for the successful completion of a mission. But maintaining communications isnt the only job that J6 has. They also play a critical role in keeping the off-duty morale of every servicemember here as high as the profes sional standards that they set on the job. Being able to keep in touch with family and friends back home via e-mail keeps a troops morale high, said Culbreth. So when there is a problem with the Internet, it is very important for us to jump right on it. And while members of J6 work hard to make sure the morale of the troops is strong, they have done likewise for themselves by creating an enjoyable working environment conducive to teamwork. We have members from the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy working together here on this team, said McGonagill. But I dont see service, I see capabilities. J6 has been putting out quality work. Everyone has pulled together well and communication between the different services has been great. Working with all the different branches is challenging but also valuable, said Lance Cpl. Jason W. Vest, J6 phone representative. You can learn from others while you teach them what you know. We have super guys who can come together from different bases with different backgrounds to form super teams in this field, said Forde. We had members from six different units of the Air Force Air National Guard come together here at GTMO to lay down 15 miles of fiber-optic cables throughout the whole base in around two short months. With motivation to spare, the members of J6 are looking to the future of JTF and look ing forward to more milestones in their his tory of communications achievements for the military. When I am finished here, I want to have a sound communication infrastructure to take JTF not only through tomorrow but two years from now including data, local networks, radio communication, secured telephone communication and sound frequency man agement, said McGonagill. But in the end, the talented members of J6 are crystal clear on what they must do and how they must do it. Things have really come together here, but this mission is far from being completed, said Forde. There is still a lot to get done, and I want everyone out there to know that J6 will always take care of all of your communica tions needs. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Senior Airman Steven J. Bradford, system administrator, troubleshoots a com puter tower for a problem that has been bedazzling him for days. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Paula A. Zapata, system administrator, deli cately toils away at wires on an Internet server. J6 communicates with nothing but success By Spc. Joseph A. Morris The Wire

PAGE 12

ing from their posts, Baccus and OReilly strolled for the cameras along what has been GTMOs defining feature for decades: the chain-link, concertina wiretopped fence line dividing the U.S. militarys Cuba and Fidel Castros. After taping OReillys inter view with the commanding gen eral and collecting some background footage of the area, the entourage proceeded to Guantanamo Bays new hotspot of media attention and occa sional political controversy: Camp Delta and Camp America, where the detention operation is located. That operation the soldiers who run it and the detainees who are its mission was what brought OReilly to GTMO. I am here to do a day-in-thelife-of story on the detainees, said OReilly. The American people are curious about what the detainees do all day long, and thats why Im here. I want to find out what their routine is, and what their day is like. During his visit to Camp America, OReilly made a stop for chow at the Seaside Galley, which afforded him the opportu nity to speak with some of the men and women who make the detention facility run. Living up to his image as a working class hero, OReilly could have been one of the troops, chowing down and chatting amiably with hardworking GIs. Im very happy to be here. I think everybody knows that 90 percent of the country is behind the military, the War on Terror, and what these troops are doing here, said OReilly. Theres an enormous amount of people in America that support this cause, and you usually never get this kind of support for a war. The troops should know that were all behind them and want them to stay safe. After signing a few copies of his book, The No-Spin Zone, and taking pictures with eager soldiers, OReilly selected two sergeants to come back to Head quarters with him to be inter viewed along with the Commanding General. The interviewees said OReilly focused on many different aspects of working with the detainees, as well as their dayto-day routine. He asked me about the female perspective of day to day work with the detainees, said Sgt. Gabriel E. Graham. He was interested in finding out what happens with the detainees when they misbehave or if they are caught with contraband, said Sgt. Bernard Buehler. He also wanted to know if I ever feel sympathetic toward them. After spend ing a day in GTMO with the opportunity to converse with the Com manding Gen eral and troops, OReilly offered his own opinion on the mission here. It looks to me like every thing is very well organized and that there isnt anything left to uncer tainty. This is a very methodi cal operation, he said. These peo ple put them selves in this position, and theyre being treated humanely. Basically, thats all we owe them at this point. Were at war, and if youre going to mess with our country youre going to have to pay the price. After sitting in the hot seat with OReilly, Baccus was satis fied with the visit. I thought the interview with OReilly was very positive, he really sounded like he supported the mission and what were doing down here, said Baccus. This coverage will clearly tell the families exactly what kind of mission were doing and how important what were doing is. I think it will give Americans a better picture in terms of how serious a mission this is and cer tainly that all the servicemem bers take the mission very seriously, he said. OReilly expected that media like him would be coming back to GTMO and covering the war on terror for a long time to come. With the way I see the War on Terror is being handled here, a year from now it will still be front-page news, he said. Except with a lot less terrorists around that includes Saddam Hussein. As for his visit, OReilly had but one disappointment. I was hoping to see Fidel, but I guess hes not in today, said OReilly. Although I did see an iguana. He was probably a communist. The segment will air at 8 p.m. July 15 and 16 in the states, and is scheduled to be on AFN News (Ch. 97) on July 16 and 17 at 2 a.m. Page 5 Friday, July 12, 2002 OReilly, from page 1 Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano While at the Seaside Galley at Camp America, Bill OReilly takes the time out to sign a few books for admirers. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Bill OReilly strolls around the perimeter of Camp Delta while conducting a portion of his interview with Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano OReilly may have had enough of pic tures as he gets ready to feast on some Seaside Galley chow. Page 12 Friday, July 12, 2002 The hotter the food, the better they like it. But Navy mess spe cialist Chief Petty Officer Colleen M. Schonhoff said preparing tasty, nutritious, spicy hot food for the Muslim detainees here at Camp Delta isnt her major concern. We have to make sure that the food is halal approved, said Schonhoff, overseer of the galleys at Guantanamo Bay that feed the detainees and U.S. service mem bers. Meats for the detainees have to be handled a certain way under Muslim requirements. When I order meat for military people, I just say I want 50 pounds of chicken, and it doesnt matter how that chicken has been handled as long as its USDA approved. For the Muslims, I have to have a cer tificate from the company that says its halal approved. Im required to keep the certificate on file in case Im ever questioned. For instance, a certificate of Islamic slaughter must accompany every shipment of meat for the detainees. The Islamic Services of America must certify that the meat is halal beef that was handled according to all Islamic slaughter procedures and guidelines. The 564 detainees at Camp Delta represent 39 countries, mostly where Islam is the main religion. Joint Task Force 160 is responsible for their security and care at the camp. Muslims use two terms to describe food halal and haram. Halal is an Arabic word, which means lawful or allowed, but it is sometimes translated as acceptable or not forbidden. Haram means the opposite unlawful or prohibited. Halal foods are foods that are per mitted for consumption under Islamic law. It is sinful for a Mus lim to consume haram foods. Haram foods include pig, dog, donkey, and ani mals having fangs, such as monkeys, cats and lions. It also includes amphibians such as frogs, croco diles and turtles. Alcohol, harm ful substances, poisonous and intoxicating plants or drinks are also haram. You have to have halal cer tificates on chicken and beef, but there are no strict requirements on fish, she noted. My galley prepares two meals a day for the detainees break fast and the evening meal, she noted. They eat a vegetarian meal ready to eat, or MRE, for lunch. The menu that the dietitian pre pared for us is about 2,300 calo ries. Add the MRE and they get about 2,600 calories per day. I like to believe theyre eating a lot better here than they were wherever they were before they got here, she said. We take pretty good care of them. Bob Barkley, the building manager of the Seaside Galley, where food is prepared for the detainees, said naval hospital dieti tian Lt. Donna M. Sporrer created the menu. We were furnished with basic recipes that give general guide lines as to how to season the food, Barkley said. We just follow those and they seem to be happy. My main goal was to make sure they got all the nutrition requirements they need pro teins, vitamins, minerals and car bohydrates, Sporrer said. I had to look at the budget, too, so its primarily a vegetarian diet, rice, beans, fruit and vegetables. Theyre getting almost everything they need from two meals a day. A typical breakfast consists of pita bread, rice, curried eggs and peas, milk and fresh fruit, or hash browns, pita bread, a boiled egg, milk and fresh fruit. A typical din ner consists of rice, pita bread, meat and veg etable curry, milk, fresh fruit and margarine. A variant is rice, baked fish, stew sauce, spinach, orange or orange juice, milk and bread and mar garine. JTF-160 provides the lunch vegetarian MREs. We serve them two special meals per year, Schonhoff noted. For example, we served them lamb stew, rice, loaf bread, baklava and tea at the end of Ramadan in April. The Joint Task Force tells us when to serve the special meals. Sporrer said before the detainees started arriving last Janu ary, she gave Schonhoff guidelines about acceptable ingredients for Muslim diets. She also provided recipes that follow halal guide lines. The previous Muslim chap lain helped by giving Sporrer a Muslim cookbook. She said purchasing meat for the detainees is much like buying kosher meat, except youre buy ing halal-approved meat thats blessed by a Muslim chaplain before its slaughtered. Schonhoff said the cooks didnt have to have any special training to prepare food for the detainees. They just follow the recipes and use different spices to season the food. In their culture, they like food a little more spicy than we tradi tionally cook for our troops, Schonhoff said about the detainees. We usually put hot sauce on the table and let the troops add their own. For the detainee meals, we use curries and a couple of other spices we bought for them. Schonhoff said when she arrived at GTMO about three years ago, it was a quiet little duty station with one galley. That ended with the detainees arrival. Before the enclosed Seaside Galley opened on June 14, the only galley, other than the one in the hospital facility, was the Quick Hall Galley in the Marine section of the base. Before the big influx of detainees and troops, we fed about 300 meals a day, she noted. Then we went to more than 3,800 meals a day and were still doing it out of Quick Hall. We shipped containers of food all around the base. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Jermaine Turner, a contract cook at the Guantanamo Bay Seaside Galley, prepares a container of string beans for detainees at the Camp Delta detention center. Photo by Rudi Williams Navy mess specialist Chief Petty Offi cer Colleen M. Schonhoff said the detainees at the Camp Delta deten tion center at Naval Station Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba, "are getting a variety of food." Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin A large vat of curry rice is one of the dishes contract cooks at the Guan tanamo Bay Seaside Galley prepare for detainees at the Camp Delta detention center. The detainees diet is mostly vegetarian. By Rudi Williams American Forces Press Service Detainees eat well, get healthy on Deltas carefully prepared Muslim meal plan

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Page 4 Friday, July 12, 2002 Halfway down but still flying high Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano This weeks question: Is there any place you would rather be than here? Navy Chief Petty Officer Craig Schlesinger, JTF160 J3 Out on the rough seas in an Aegis Class Cruiser filled with missiles. Doing what a sailor should be doing. Navy Seaman Alexis Brown, Naval Media Cen ter (Radio Station) Back home for the birth of my brother and sister-in-laws baby girl. But, Im stuck here doing my thing. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class, Michael Laroche, PSU307 Puerto Rico with my wife and kids. Maybe rent a house on the beach in SanJuan and just get away. Army Spc. Alan LaMar, 418th Transportation Company Back home with the family. Taking the boy to baseball games and going out fishing works for me. Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Walker, 418th Transporta tion Company Back on the block at Fort Hood, my home station. Thats where I drink my juice and get my game on. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris Flags across GTMO flew at half-mast Tues day in honor of Air Force Gen. Benjamin O. Davis, leader of the famed all-black Tuskegee Airmen of World War II. Davis, who began his military career in the era of segregation and ended it as the Air Forces first black gen eral, died Saturday after a long bout with Alzheimers disease. Across 1 Sports channel 5 Chilled 9 Halite 13 Popular stadium 14 Scat! 15 Hungry __ (childrens game) 16 Entrap 17 Relative 18 Concerning 19 Skin care product 21 Writer Bombeck 23 Compass point 24 Talk 25 Emigrant 29 Morse code T 30 Mantle 32 Bolted 33 Dead language 36 Priest 37 That (possessive) 38 Adams garden 39 Mean 40 Type of cheese 41 Container 42 Aries the Ram 43 Heartbeat 44 To the right! 45 Join metal 46 Vase 47 Ban 49 Self 50 Visualize 53 __ Major (Big Dipper) 55 Nut popular in cooking 57 Devil 60 Christs gift bringer 62 Horses walk 63 Records 64 Doing nothing 65 Diet 66 Prosperous 67 One who gets things done 68 Otherwise Down 1 Painter Richard 2 Plant 3 Serenity 4 Neck 5 Old Testament prophet 6 Lump 7 Billion years 8 Pamper 9 Moses mountain 10 Gorilla 11 Licensed practical nurse 12 Kid 15 Gavel 20 Baseballs Nolan 22 Refund 26 Barbecue 27 Tempos 28 Turn out 29 Sound 30 Given a ticket 31 Deeds 33 Drop (2 wds.) 34 Bye 35 Lore 36 Famous ski resort 39 Groups of workers 40 Hamburger holder 42 Tokens of honor 43 Cotillion 46 More unattractive 48 Midday meal 49 National emblem 50 Escargot 51 Blue-pencils 52 Sugar-free brand 54 Among 56 Leer at 57 Popular presidents initials 58 Caesars three 59 Escudo 61 Hoopla Page 13 Friday, July 12, 2002 Unclear visions, Undecided decisions And hectic conditions Has a soldier on a mission, Wishin For a better day Or an easier way. Unwilling to let My mind go astray, Ill remain strong. Keeping my mind on the goal, Ill refuse to do wrong This is my life, And this is where I belong. Frustrated Poetry Corner by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Answers to the June 28 puzzle Friday, July 12 8 p.m. Mr. Deeds (PG-13) 10 p.m. About a Boy (PG-13) Saturday, July 13 8 p.m. Lilo & Stitch (PG) 10 p.m. Unfaithful (R) Sunday, July 14 8 p.m. Minority Report (PG-13) Monday, July 15 8 p.m. Bad Company (PG-13) Tuesday, July 16 8 p.m. About a Boy (PG-13) Wednesday, July 17 8 p.m. The New Guy (R) Thursday, July 18 8 p.m. Minority Report (PG-13)

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Page 3 Friday, July 12, 2002 The Army broadcast journalists of the mighty 361st Press Camp Headquarters, reservists from Fort Totten, N.Y., are tasked with telling servicemembers stories here at GTMO. They are in charge of disseminating command information by using a vast array of top quality digital cameras and digital video editing systems. With assignments ranging from filming morale videos to press conferences to field exercises, these broadcasters are versatile and willing to work hard to get your story out there. They do so by marketing their products internally and to U.S. and overseas television stations. Whether the situation is gory or filled with glory, this group of highly-trained soldiers is ready to shoot your story. Broadcast Journalists Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Hector Peralta hot-wires a digital video editing system before editing raw footage. Spc. Christian Farrell Ive had the great opportunity to tell my fellow soldiers stories by having gone into the Army as a broadcaster. Any time I could go out covering your story Ill be all over it. Spc. Paul Morando This job allows me to capture the essence and spirit of servicemem bers through the lens of my camera. Everyone has a story to tell, and its my job to make sure its told. Spc. Hector Peralta I get to go out in the field and cover things that people with other profes sions could only dream of. Ive got ten down and dirty with generals and many other important people. Spc. Ivy Hodges My job #$@%ing rocks. I get to take an everyday occurence and by putting it on video, make it immortal. My work is smooth like butter when I get on a roll. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Christian Farrell conducts an on-the-spot interview as part of a video that he is producing. Page 14 Friday, July 12, 2002 To remember the victims of the Sept. 11 tragedy, GTMO Morale, Welfare and Recre ation organized a 5K run for the Fourth of July on Thursday. The race, which started at 6:30 a.m., drew a mixed crowd of GTMO residents. More than 350 people, including civilians and servicemembers from all of the military branches, came to show their support. Before the race began, Paul McDonald, one of the organiz ers from MWR, said a few words of motivation to the crowd massed in front of the G.J. Denich Gym. Running brings people together, said McDonald. We organized this run to remember the people who died on Sept. 11. We want to show that MWR and GTMO resi dents care. He also said, We want all of the servicemembers who are supporting the detainee opera tion here to feel close to home on this Independence Day. The crowd applauded with thunderous satisfaction after hearing McDonalds words. All of the participants, even the children in attendance with their parents, looked happy and eager to be part of an event that was held to remember the policemen, firemen and the other people who lost their lives in the 9/11 tragedy that shook all Americans and the whole world. The run was mostly for fun a chance for everyone to dis play their patriotism through their hearts and legs. There was a timekeeper, but the organizers didnt set formal rules for the race. Almost all of the runners stayed in formation for the first mile before the slow runners spread out to continue at their own pace. Although a first place win ner was not officially declared, Spc. Chris Pearce from the 571st Military Police Company was the first one to complete the race. I was happy to run in this race and finish first, said Pearce. The 571st MP Co. was filled with all-stars as Reggie Gokey finished second. Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, the commanding general of JTF160, came to support the event and was among the first 10 people who crossed the finish line. Most of the runners pushed hard to finish the race, but some people just walked the course with their children. And since it was Indepen dence Day, some of the runners proudly wore costumes dis playing the colors of the U.S. flag. MWR gave out trophies to recognize the best costumes for the day. In the adult category, first place went to Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham from JTF-160 headquarters; second place was Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg of the JTF160 Joint Information Bureau. Winning the youth category for best costume was Army Pvt. Ebony Blane. At the end of the race, MWR gave out T-shirts to all of the participants. GTMO remembers Sept. 11 victims Story and photos by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Racquetball Tournament begins at 10AM this Saturday, July 13th; the Tennis Tournament begins at 10AM the following Saturday, July 20th. Sign up through your Chain of Command POC at G.J. Denich Gym. For more information call CPT Gormly at #5249. Today, Friday, July 12th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes All classes at Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7:00PM, 9-Pin No-Tap Tournament/Bowling Party, Mar blehead Lanes Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Saturday, July 13th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 7AM to 2PM, Dawn Fishing Trip, Main Liberty Recre ation Center Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Sunday, July 14th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5PM, Spades Tournament Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Monday, July 15th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes All Classes at Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Free Movie, Downtown or Camp Buckley Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Tuesday, July 16th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Classes, G.J. Denich Gymnasium 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Cricket Classic X Dart Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Recreation Center Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Wednesday, July 17th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina All Day Scrabble Time, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Aerobics Class, Marine Hill Gym 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina Thursday, July 18th Free Morning Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina 5:15PM to 6:15PM, Yoga Ultimate Stretch Classes 6:30PM to 7:30PM, Tae-Kwon Do Classes, Marine Hill Aerobics Room 7PM, Free Movie, Lyceum or 8PM Camp Bulkeley Free Evening Lessons for Sailing, Kayaking, and Motor Boating, Pelican Petes Marina GTMO civilians and servicemembers from all of the military branches came to show their support to the "911 Liberty 5K Race" in front of the G.J. Denich Gymnasium July 4. The purpose of the run was to remember the Sept. 11th victims and their families. Spc. Chris Pearce, who finished first, displays his t-shirt. Navy Chief Petty Officer Marcia Cunningham displays her hat. Army Maj. Sandra Steinberg and Pvt. Ebony Blane display their tro phies for best costumes.

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Safety Gram: JTF-160 Bicyclists 1. Bicycling is a fun way to achieve and maintain physical fitness. However, there are risks and dangers associated with this excellent form of car diovascular exercise. Rough terrain, rainy weather, banana rats and iguanas are just a few conditions and obstacles that pose risk and danger. 2. Recently, while riding on a bike trail, a soldier hit a patch of rough terrain. He was thrown over the handlebars and landed on his head. His helmet cracked. The soldier suffered several chipped vertebrae in the neck. Treatment was three days in quarters and wearing a soft collar. The outcome could have been much worse if this soldier had not been wearing a helmet. 3. Helmets prevent and/or mini mize injury from unanticipated risks and dangers. Helmets are a required safety measure when bicycle riding. 4. Safety concerns and incidents are reported to your chain of command and section J1 at ext. 5082. RICK BACCUS Brigadier General, USNG Joint Task Force 160, Commander Page 2 Friday, July 12, 2002 Chaplains Corner SJA Blotter Provost Marshalls Office God is a spirit, but He has made us in His image, and in the Bible He often uses the imagery of the human body to describe His actions. His eyes see, His mouth speaks, and His hands reach out to us. Get to know God better by learning mor eabout His anatomy: Know that God wants you to get close to Him. Even though He is infinite, He uses the human body to help us better understand vari ous aspects of His nature because He wants us to be able to relate to Him. Decide to actively pursue God. Confess any sins that are blocking your intimacy with Him, then make Him the top priority in your life. Seek Gods face by seriously studying the details of his nature. Dont pursue a shallow relationship with God out of mere curiosity. Be willing to look at his face by seeking a deep rela tionship in which He is full of compassion. Know that Gods nose delights in the fra grance of your worship. If you make bad deci sions, He isnt above blowing His nose at you to help you learn to grow. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Notice of Article 15 Adjudication A NCO was found guilty after a closed hearing conducted under Article 15, UCMJ, for two violations of Article 92. The non-judicial punishment authority found beyond a rea sonable doubt that the NCO had exhibited public drunkenness and had visitors in her quarters after 2400. The NCO received extra duty for 7 days, restriction for 14 days and an oral reprimand. Submitted by the JTF-160 SJA Discover Gods Anatomy Page 15 Friday, July 12, 2002 Summer softball, v-ball get hotter Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin S. Ross from Naval Hospital goes aggres sively for the volleyball as he spikes it on his opponents for a point. The JTF-160 volleyball team improved to 2-0 with a closefought victory over Naval Hospital in Friday-night volleyball action at G.J. Denich Gym. It was a really close match and I thought we had a chance to win, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Frank P. Jama, a player for the Naval Hospital, after JTF-160s two-set victory. We made careless mistakes that cost us the game. But this is just one match, he said. Im confident our team will recover. The Naval Hospital team looked at the game as a learning experience, and is eager to show its skill in future matches. The JTF-160 was a better team on the court this evening, and I am looking forward to the rematch. I am sure it will be not only fun but highly competitive, said Jama. JTF-160 said their win came from simple desire. We played hard and we wanted the win more tonight than the Naval Hospital, said Air Force Maj. Dawn Roberson. The score from the first set was 15 to 10, and the score from the second set was 15 to 14. Naval Hospital fought hard and this was not an easy victory. Our strategy for the game was to have fun and keep the ball off the floor, said Roberson. Cooper Field was busy Friday night as four teams battled it out for supremacy on the diamond in the softball seasons second week. To start the evening off, Team GTMO Lite squared off against a team from the 178th Military Police Company. The game was neck-and-neck during the first three-innings with both teams tied at one run each. In the top of the fourth, GTMO Lite came out swinging with a four-run hitting spree. During the fifth inning they increased their lead even more by bringing two more runs in. The 178th Military Police Company tried to mount a come back in the bottom of the fifth, but the one run they scored barely put a dent in GTMO Lites lead. In the sixth inning, Team GTMO Lite turned it up a notch and finished the 178th off with a 12-run rally to win the game by a final score of 19-2. We turned it up in the sixth inning by working together. This team played as one and that is what counts, said Rob Loop, team member from GTMO Lite, who scored two runs during the game. GTMO Lite attributed their success to their long playing rela tionship and some new power house hitters recently added to their line up. About 75 percent of our team has been playing together for the last six months. We know each others strengths and weaknesses. Also, we added a few new players to the team this season. They add power to our lineup, said Navy Lt. Matt D. Lowe. This season we are a more competitive, stronger team, he said. We are a relaxed on the field and have tons of fun playing the game, he said. As a result of their triumph, GTMO Lite bumped their record up to 3-1. But before the dust could settle on the field, the GTMO Bay Reservists were behind the plate and ready to set it off. And that they did, scoring nine runs in the first inning. We are smoking right now, the team is doing great, said Navy Chief Antonio G. Parris who scored three runs and hit two dou bles and a single for the GTMO Bay Reservists. And what allowed the Reservists to take such a tremen dous lead so early on? Some com mented that it wasnt just the skill level demonstrated by the Reservists, but the lack of concen tration on the field displayed by the 346th MP Co. If it wasnt for the 346th MP Co. helping us out tonight, making so many errors in the field, this could have been a close game, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Napier. In the end, the Reservists lead was too great to overcome, win ning the game 19 to 2, upping their record to 3-1. This win put us in a good posi tion in the standings. We are hold ing our own in the league, said Napier. Although everybody likes to win, Napier said he doesnt just play to win. Its not just about winning. It is good to see everyone come out and compete in this summer league, he said. We have a great time, whether we win or lose. Softball Standings Iguanas 4-0 Blacksheep 4-0 JTF-170 4-0 Hospital 3-0 GTMO Bay 3-1 GTMO Lite 3-1 Regulars 2-1 239 MP Co. 2-1 XO Staff 2-1 571 MP Co. 0-1 JTF-160 0-1 160 MP Bn. 1-2 PSU 307 1-2 Wildcats 1-3 178 MP Co. 1-3 2/142 INF. Co. 0-2 HQ JTF-160 0-2 114 MP Co. A 0-3 Hit Squad 0-3 114 MP Co. B 0-3 342 MP Co. 0-3 By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Volleyball Standings Navsta 2-0 Chat Bout 2-0 JTF-160 Hosp. 2-0 Naval Hospital 1-1 JTF-160 0-1 Fire Dept. 0-1 571st MP Co. 0-1 178th MP Co. 0-2 Photo By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Staff Sgt.Lane Johnson from the 178th MP Co. doubles to deep right against GTMO Lite. Hospitals duel on the court The GTMO Motor Vehicle Code establishes the following: All POVs must be registered at the motor vehicle registration office (Tel. #3730), located next to the NAVBASE Police building. Documents required to register a POV are: (1) proof of ownership, (2) a valid drivers license, and (3) proof of liability insurance. The vehicle will be required to pass a safety and mechanical inspection that includes: lights, turn signals, tires, brakes, mirrors, windshield, horn, exhaust sys tem and safety belts. Seats installed in the cargo area of a truck must have lap belts, be securely fastened to the chassis of the vehicle, and the truck must have a tailgate. REMEMBER that the same motor vehicle rules that apply in the states also apply here at GTMO. Violators will be stopped by NAVBASE Police and receive traffic citations. HEADS UP! In the near future the JTF-160 Motor Maintenance section in coordination with NAVBASE Police will be conducting unannounced motor vehicle checkpoint stops for govern ment vehicles. They will check that operators are performing basic operator maintenance on the vehicles and recording their actions in the vehicle maintenance logs. BUCKLE UP AND DRIVE SAFELY

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Page 16 Friday, July 12, 2002 With Senior Airman Mia D. Delgado Q: So, Senior Airman Mia Delgado, do you think 15 minutes of fame is enough for you? A: I think it might be a little too much. Q: Well start out easy, then. Where are you from? A: I am from Orlando, Fla. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: Im a fun-loving person. I love to joke around and laugh. I would describe myself as an allaround nice person. Q: What do you do for fun here? A: I like to hang out, go danc ing, snorkeling, and do yoga. Q: What kind of music do you like to dance to? A: Any kind of music with a beat, but if I had to pick one, Id pick techno. Q: And if you had to pick a song to go on a GTMO sound track? What would it be and why? A: Margaritaville because Jimmy Buffet rules, and it would put people in the right frame of mind for here: just kick back and have a good time. Q: So do you enjoy the nightlife much? A: If you can call it that, sure. Q: What is the wildest, craziest or most bizarre thing youve seen or done since youve been here? A: Well, I got a chance to go snorkeling for the first time and I saw a lot of cool things. I know thats not really wild or strange but I thought it was pretty cool. Q: Hmm. What was the biggest adjustment you had to make when you got down to GTMO? A: The heat. No, the humidity. Q: If you could design your own Battle Dress Uniform espe cially made for GTMO, what would it look like? A: A short-sleeved shirt, pair of shorts and a tank top, forget these t-shirts. Q: If you could talk to some one who was about to deploy to GTMO what would you tell them? A: Bring your summer clothes and your snorkel gear. And if youre not over 21, have your orders changed. Q: If you could change one rule or policy here what would it be? A: Actually, I think weve got it pretty good. Theres no curfew, we can drink, and basically do what we want. Q: Where do you live and how would you describe it? A: I live in Windward Loop, with an awesome bunch of girls. Q: What do you think of the hood as a whole? A: Windward Loop should be called the Party Loop; you know theres always something going on over there. Q: How did the move to FP Con Charlie Thursday and Friday level affect you and the party scene? A: Well, obviously we had to lug around all our gear, and there was no drinking, so that was it for the party scene. But better safe than sorry. Q: Where do you go to relax? A: I go to the pool. Its nice and quiet there. Or Ill do yoga meditation is good for the soul. Q: If you could go anywhere in the world right now, where would you go and why? A: Ireland! Theyve got a really interesting history, and everyone Ive ever met from Ire land was kick$@*! Need I state the obvious and say the BEER? Q: How long have you been in the military, and how do you feel about it? A: Ive been in the military for about five-and-a-half years. Per sonally, I love it. Its a guaranteed paycheck, and you dont have to worry about what youre going to wear in the morning. Q: Prior to your mission here, have you ever worked in a Joint environment before? How would you describe each branch of service? A: No, this is my first exposure to a JTF. Id say the Army is dedicated, the Marines are proud, the Coast Guard is laid back, and the Navy is versatile. Oh, and I think everybody knows the Air Force rules! Q: Where are you stationed in the States and how does it com pare to here? A: Im stationed in Utah, so this is much better for me. Q: If you could be a superhero, who would you be and why? A: I would be Wonder Woman because she got to fly a really cool invisible plane. Q: Any advice in closing? A: Be true to yourself. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Senior Airman Mia Delgado, from J4, makes the Air Force look easy. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Shes wasting away again in GTMO-ville Guantanamo Bay was a No-Spin Zone for a day Saturday as Bill OReilly, host of The OReilly Factor on Fox News Chan nel, brought his camera crew here to inter view the military men and women who make Camp Deltas detention operation run. OReilly, greeted at the plane by a pha lanx of public-affairs officers and media escorts, said he had no problem with the security restrictions placed on him and other media for the protection of our troops. He wasnt here for a scoop, or a controversy just a story. Im not here to do a political story like Newsweek, said OReilly. Theres no con troversy surrounding this mission to me. I agree with exactly what the Department of Defense is doing. That, he said, is because of the nature of this war. Obviously, it is harder for the media to cover a war like this because we have to be patriots as well as journalists. We cant break stories that might put peoples lives in dan ger for the better of our own careers. Its not like Vietnam or the Gulf War, where we could hunt our own stories up. We just cant do that; we play it the way the Defense Department wants it to be played. The war is now in the country, and weve got to be very cognizant of that, he said. OReilly and his supporting staff hit the ground running, moving purposefully as they exited their private jet to meet with their media escorts for the day. Mr. OReilly, we welcome you to Guan tanamo Bay, Cuba. Following a brief overview of the itinerary and the groundrules, well be ready to get this mission started, said Army Maj. F. Lee Reynolds, officer in charge of the Media Support Cen ter. After receiving a warm welcome from the rest of a public affairs staff clearly pleased to meet him, OReilly and his team were mission-ready and Windward bound. First stop, JTF-160 Headquarters. Once there, Commanding Gen. Rick Bac cus walked out and introduced himself to OReilly and his staff as they approached. Introductions were brief, however, as the crew quickly departed and headed for their first location for taping: The Northeast Gate. With a handful of Marine guards watch Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 9/11 run for freedom and fun Page 8 24 hours in Camp America Page 6 What the heck is this guy doing? Page 3 GTMO a No-Spin Zone for day Friday, July 12, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 5 By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire See OReilly, page 5 A look inside... Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Master Sgt. Warren Byrd, Media Support Center NCOIC, greets OReilly and his crew on the tarmac. Bill OReilly of Fox News pays base a friendly visit