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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00058
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: July 5, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00058

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PAGE 1

Page 12 Friday, July 5, 2002 with Army Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton, 160th MPBN Q: Good morning, Com mand Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton, are you ready for your fifteen minutes of fame? A: Always ready. Q: Where are you from? A: I am from a small town that's about 50 miles away from Tallahassee. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: I am easy-going, friendly, and compassionate. It takes a lot to tick me off. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: I am a mental health pro gram analyst for Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee, Unit Three. Q: How do you feel about your mission here at Guan tanamo Bay? A: I feel very proud to be here and be a part of history. Q: How would you describe the soldiers that work under you? A: Professionals! They are always ready, willing, and able to perform their job. They take care of all their duties in a pro fessional manner and I com mend them for all their hard work. Q: Do you have any advice for soldiers planning to become a Top NCO, like yourself? A: Stay with it, stay in, set goals, and focus. Q: What do you do for fun here? A: PT! PT! PT, all the time! I'm either at the gym or the beach, or I'm biking or running. Q: I know how much ser geant majors love to sing cadences. Is there any particu lar one you like to sing while you run? A: Oh, I sing an old cadence that I learned in basic training. It goes a little something like this: The prettiest girl I ever saw was sipping bourbon through a straw. Q: What kind of music do you listen to? A: That all depends on my mood. Gospel music puts me in the right state of mind, jazz mellows me out, and R&B, well, I've got to be in a special kind of mood for that. Q: If you could be a charac ter in any war flick, who would you be and why? A: I would be the sergeant major in the movie We Were Soldiers, because his first concern was the soldiers. Q: If you could be any ani mal at GTMO, what animal would you be and why? A: I'd be an iguana, because they have a lot of privileges here at GTMO. Troops must slow down for them. They're free to roam where they want to. And they'll chase you, chase you down. I was chased off the beach by one just the other day. Besides, they are very unique creatures that everyone respects. Q: What's the strangest thing you've seen since you've been here at GTMO? A: I was sitting in my back yard after duty one day and all of a sudden this big turkey vul ture swoops down and attacks this dove. Feathers were flying every where, while my buddy and I just stood there in shock. It was like Wild Discovery up close and personal. Q: If you could have one thing from home here with you, what would it be and why? A: I would have to say my car, because transportation is just so darn difficult to come by around here. Q: What's one rule you live by? A: The golden rule, of course. Do unto others as you would like done to you. Q: In closing, what do you plan to do when you get home? A: I plan to reintegrate with society and basically, unwind and relax. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton: It takes a lot to tick me off. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Get in the mood with a PT-loving E-9 It's Friday afternoon. After a long business meeting with his staff and his company command ers, Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr., the new commander of the Joint Detention Operations Group (JDOG) puts aside his administra tive duties for the day and pays a visit to Camp Delta, where the detainees from the U.S. global war on terrorism are housed. Perrone proceeds to the main gate and waits patiently for the guards on duty to come and let him in. Before he enters, he looks around to make sure that every thing is in order. He then goes through all the gates, each securely manned by MPs, to get access to the detainees' units. As soon as the soldiers see him, they all assume the position of atten tion and wait for him to review the logs and examine the condi tions of the units. As the commander, my responsibility is to oversee the entire detention operation, includ ing all the MPs, the battalion, the companies, as well as infantry units that provide external secu rity, Perrone said. His job, he said, is mostly administrative -to oversee the detainee operations here on behalf of Commanding Gen. Rick Bac cus and the Joint Task Force 160 command, and make sure that all personnel work together toward the success of this operation that has captured the eyes of the world. But I also make it my goal to come out here to Camp Delta at least once a day and see how my soldiers are doing, he said. Perrone, who has been at GTMO for approximately a month, doesnt have to reinvent the wheel. He is replacing Army Lt. Col. Bill Cline from the 455th Military Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Volleyball fights that never quit Page 11 Strategy for getting down and dirty Page 8 Ordnance sailors that aim high Page 3 New top DOG takes command Friday, July 5, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 4 Secretary of Defenses Fourth of July message Composite photo by Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire See JDOG, page 5 A look inside... At a critical moment during the Revolutionary War, when his army was surrounded and in danger of being destroyed, General Washington issued this order: Put only Americans on guard tonight. Washington knew, at that moment of crisis, he could rely on those citizen-soldier volunteers who had left behind their families and farms to risk everything for the cause of free dom.Thanks to their service and sacrifice, America achieved her independ ence. And every July 4th since, Americans have come together to give thanks for our freedom and what our country has become: the freest, most creative and dynamic nation on earth. So today, as in General Washington's time, we take comfort in the knowl edge that Americans like you are on guard tonight: soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. Through your service and sacrifice, you help make every day Independence Day for the United States of America. Our people are free because your hearts are brave. And so on this Fourth of July, we stop to say to each of you: Thank you for what you do for our country. Donald H. Rumsfeld Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr. settles in as head of Joint Detainee Operations Group

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This week, JTF-160 Command ing Gen. Rick Baccus passes along this message from Army Maj. Gen. Gary D. Speer, ACINC, United States Southern Command. To the men and women of the United States Southern Command: This Independence Day, our nations 226th birthday, is an occasion for reflection as well as celebration. Throughout our proud history, U.S. military forces have played a key role in safeguarding the democracy and liberty that we, as Americans, hold so dear. Today, our nation recognizes a new threat, one that in coming years will test the courage, strength and determination of the U.S. armed forces, perhaps more than any other challenge in our history. In the war on terrorism, we fight as we have always fought: for a just peace that guarantees human rights and freedom from oppression. We wish for others what we have always wished for ourselves safety from violence as well as liberty and opportunity for our children. Your exemplary efforts and per sonal sacrifices help to ensure our nations freedom and independence, now and in the coming years. We honor you as well as the United States on this special day. Best wishes for a safe and happy Independence Day. RICK BACCUS Brigadier General, USNG Joint Task Force 160, Commander Page 2 Friday, July 5, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Two quick thoughts for this 4th of July weekend: 1. When the Founding Fathers wrote of a separation of church and state, they were emphasizing that our government was not authorized to establish an official state religion. They were not stating that God and/or the spiritual dimension did not exist and that the government couldn't deal with anything that was related to religion. God had a place and it was n't just in heaven. A review of U.S. law and court deci sions (until the 1960s) clearly shows this. 2. Individuals who have sworn to serve their nation in the armed forces are servants of the security and free dom of nations. If military personnel complete their duty honorably, they help in the forg ing of the nation's common good and the maintenance of peace. LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, U.S. Naval Reserve JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. The GTMO Morale Welfare and Recreation Marina offers a course of instruction for recreational small boat operators. Upon successful completion of a writ ten test and a practical test, candidates are issued the GTMO Small Boat Opera tors License. The license entitles you to rent and operate one of the recreational boats available through the Marina at Guantanamo Bay. Upon renting a boat, you will be issued the white map of the bay and a portable radio for communication with Port Control. It is extremely important that you ori ent yourself to visible reference points and then cross-reference those points on the map prior to leaving the marina, and THAT YOU keep cross-referencing your location on the map when you are in the bay. Not all the MWR boats have com passes, it is highly recommended that you bring your own. REMEMBER TO MONITOR THE RADIO AT ALL TIMES FOR PORT CONTROL. Do not violate restricted areas and above all: BE A SAFE BOATER! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 4 July = 1 Nation, Under God Page 11 Friday, July 5, 2002 Intense matches mark start of V-ball season The co-ed volleyball season began Friday, June 28, at G.J. Denich Gymnasium with two intense matches on the court: JTF-160 vs. Chat Bout and Hos pital vs. 178 MP Co. The mostly civilian-manned Chat Bout dominated the first set of its match 15 to 6, but JTF-160 fought back hard in the second set, making it a see-saw battle that finally tipped their way after Army Warrant Officer Pete J. Turner broke a late tie with a thunderous spike that switched the monentum of the game to his side. JTF-160 won the set 15 to 14. The third set was played as tough as the second. JTF-160 led most of the set, with Army 1st Lt. Tom C. Kim serving up points in bunches. But the squad seemed to break its own stride with a late time-out, and at games end Chat Bout was a 15-13 winner. Kim was hot, said Oswaldo Brooks. But when they called the time-out it messed up their rhythm and timing. We were able to take advantage, and come back and win the game. We are fighters and we never quit. Thats the Chat Bout atti tude, said Angel Lakeman, who scored the winning point. Even though it was a close game, we knew we would win, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahlee L. Brown. And we won even though we were playing short-handed. I feel we are going all the way this season, so look out for Chat Bout. The nights other match was considerably less suspenseful. The team from Naval Hospital opened its season with a dramatic W by blanking the 178th MP Co. in two straight sets 15-12, 15-11. We played strong and we took control of the match,said Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin S. Ross from Naval Hospital. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie E. Crumedy from the Naval Hospital credited strong communication -and determina tion -for the the victory. We did what ever it took to win the match, he said. That was the key to victory. MWRs summer volleyball season happens every Friday night for another seven weeks, with each team playing seven games before a tournament that decides the champion. And after their performance Friday, Naval Hospital was confident about their prospects. We played well tonight, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Aquiles P. Faustino, and well keep it up. Nothing is going to stand in our way this season. By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Warrant Officer Pete J. Turner from JTF-160 spikes the ball and lets his presents know over Oswaldo Brooks from Chat Bout. Summer Leagues are in full swing. Stop by MWR Office, Room #204 or Main Gym for schedule. There is still time to sign up for the July 6th Paintball Tournanament. For more info call CPT Gormly, #5249. Friday, 5 JUL 02 Non-Alcoholic Social Time, Main MWR Liberty Center 11a.m.12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Aerobics 6:30 7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Softball Leagues, Cooper Field 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Volleyball Leagues, D.J. Denich Gym Saturday, 6 JUL 02 8 a.m.12 p.m., Predictor Swim Meet, Windjammer Pool Movie Marathon, Main MWR Liberty Center 5 p.m., Paintball Tournament 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Softball Sunday, 7 JUL 02 10 a.m.8 p.m., Open Swim, Windjammer Pool Spades Tournament, Main MWR Liberty Center Monday, 8 JUL 02 6 a.m.7 a.m., Aerobics classes 11 a.m.-12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Aerobics 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Basketball 6 p.m.8 p.m., MW.R Soccer 6:30 7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Tuesday, 9 JUL 02 Puzzle Time, Main MWR Liberty Center 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Yoga Ultimate Stretch & Aerobics 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Bowling 6:30 -7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Wednesday, 10 JUL 02 6 a.m.7 a.m., Aerobics Class 11a.m.12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 6 p.m. 9 p.m., Basketball 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Soccer Leagues 7 p.m., 9-Ball Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center Thursday, 11 JUL 02 5:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m., Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class & Aerobics Classes 6:30 p.m.7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Classes 7 p.m., Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Naval Hospital 12 160 MP Bn 8 PSU 307 2 178th MP Co. 16 346th Hit Squad 9 346th Wildcats 18 Trop. Nightmare 11 GTMO Lite 7 342nd MP Co. 16 Reservist 18 Iguana 17 HQ JTF-160 4 346th MP Co. 7 239th MP Co. 10 JTF-170 12 178th MP Co. 0 Iguana 22 160th MP Bn. 4 346th Hit Squad 1 239th MP Co. 5 342nd MP Co. 9 Naval Hospital 16 Trop. Nightmare 19 Coscom 9 Iguana 2 0 Hospital 2 0 JTF-170 2 0 GTMO Bay 2 0 Blacksheep 2 0 Regulars 2 0 239 MP Co. 1 0 571 MP Co. 0 0 XO Staff 1 1 GTMO Lite 1 1 PSU 307 1 1 Wildcats 1 1 178 MP Co. 1 1 114 MP Co. A 0 1 HQ JTF-160 0 1 JTF-160 0 1 Hit Squad 0 2 114 MP Co. B 0 2 342 MP Co. 0 2 2/142 INF. Co. 0 2 160 MP Bn. 0 2 SOFTBALL SCORES STANDINGS Friday, July 5 8 p.m. Lilo & Stitch 10 p.m. Changing Lanes Saturday, July 6 8 p.m. Spiderman 10 p.m. The Scorpion King Sunday, July 7 8 p.m. Unfaithful Monday, July 8 8 p.m. Jason X Tuesday, July 9 8 p.m. Sum of All Fears Wednesday, July 10 8 p.m. Unfaithful Thursday, July 11 8 p.m. Life or Something Like It

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On the battlefield, the ability to control combat stress can be the deciding factor between victory and defeat. Off the battlefield, it can determine how well any mission is per formed. Stress is a factor of combat and deployment; military members must face it and learn to deal with it. Being deployed to Guantanamo Bay as part of Operation Enduring Freedom isnt combat. But servicemembers here are still deployed, far from home and near the detainees from the war on terror, and exposed to various levels of stress that could prove costly if not controlled. That's where the 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control team comes in. Our main mission is to keep military members able to perform their mission effi ciently and effectively, said Army Capt. Sharon M. Newton, the units occupational therapist, 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control Team. We give briefings and classes to inform leadership on the signs of stress to look for in their troops, and teach preventive measures to reduce the levels of stress on all individu als deployed. There are six major functions in the mis sion of the Combat Stress Control Team. The first three are consultation, in which the team offers advice and education to com mands; reconstitution support, in which teams offer assistance at field locations to battle-fatigued units which are withdrawn to rest, reorganize, and integrate replacements; and neuropsychiatric triage, which enables the team to sort out battle fatigue cases with temporary, stressinduced symptoms from true neuropsychi atrics with deeper problems. The fourth step is stabilization, an immedi ate, short-term evaluation of the severity of the battle-fatigue casualty. Next restoration begins, a oneto three-day rest for battle fatigue casualties. During the reconditioning phase, the Com bat Stress Control Team implements a fourto twenty-one-day intensive program of replen ishment, physical activity, work details, and military retraining for battle fatigue casualties. While stationed at GTMO, the Combat Stress Control has taken an active part in assessing the stress levels of troops. It is highly important for us to get out there and do our jobs, said Army Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge of the 85th. And were looking at troops from the entire JTF-160 staff, not just the camps, he said. There are many factors that play into the causes of stress while on deployment. Being deployed means being far away from family, friends, and comfort zones. This separation is often a cause of stress. Just being separated from loved ones is always hard. Although troops are far away from home, issues from home are kept close to their heart. Young children, ill relatives, and finances are always kept in their minds, said Army Maj. Marie C. Morency, Officer In Charge, 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control Team. Another factor involved is the reality that many deployed are Reserve and National Guard Components. Thus, they may not work in the field they are currently working in while on deployment. The change of jobs can increase stress. Also, some troops have taken pay cuts and may worry about their finances, said Newton. Members of a unit play a significant role in preventing and iden tifying stress in one another. They can be sure troops are physi cally, emotionally, and spiritually prepared prior to deployment and watch carefully for signs of combat stress during deployments. Some signs to look for are increased visits to sick call with vague physical complaints, loss of concentration, bad attitude, and sleepdeprivation symptoms, said Army Spc. Kathryn S. Hernandez, a member of the 85th. Controlled combat stress, when properly focused by training, unit cohesion, and leader ship, gives servicemembers the necessary alertness, strength, and endurance to accom plish the mission with loyalty, selflessness, even heroism. Left uncontrolled, though, combat stress can degrade the entire mission whether ser vicemembers figting the war on terror are under fire on the battlefield or just under the gun on a distant deployment, working hard far away from home. Page 10 Friday, July 5, 2002 Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The combat Stress Control Team, left to right: Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, Army Maj. Marie C. Morency, Capt. Sharon M. Newton, Spc. Robert M. Vincent, Sgt. Larry N. Clark, and Spc. Kathryn S. Hernandez. Combat stress, on and off the battlefield By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire SUICIDE PREVENTION TIPS: AID LIFE A: Ask! Dont be afraid to ask if someone is thinking about suicide. I: Intervene immediately! Take action and listen. D: Dont keep it a secret! L: Locate help! Seek out the offi cer on duty, Chaplain, or call the emergency room. I: Inform the Chain of Command! They can secure necessary resources. F: Find someome to stay with the person while you go get help. DO NOT leave the person alone! E: Expedite! Get professinal help immediately. Resources in Guantanamo Bay: Fleet and Family Support Center 4141 Chaplain 2323 Emergency Room 72690 Security 911 For more information on suicide prevention or combat stress call 81160 Although troops are far away from home, issues from home are kept close to their heart. Army Maj. Marie C. Morency Page 3 Friday, July 5, 2002 The ever-diligent sailors of the Naval Station Ordinance unit aim high to handle all the firepower on Guantanamo Bay. They support all personnel from JTF-160, the Marine Corps and all Navy and Coast Guard ships that make contact with this base. They order and supply ammo, maintain weapons, provide weapons training and run all the ranges here. If any units have to qualify with their weapons while here at GTMO, its these guys who will be supplying and guiding fire toward a successful day in the sun with a gun. So if youre in the prone and start to panic, take a deep breath, scan your lane, and just squeeze. Naval Station Ordnance Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Seaman Apprentice Bryan Burton practices the proper positioning of his M-4 while zeroing in on his target as Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik critiques his form. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason Doll A nice change of pace took place over the last few months. Ive been here for over two years. Since JTF arrived, the tempo has increased ten-fold, but Im having a lot of fun. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik I love this job. Its great, going to the range, sitting in the sun and shoot ing off rounds. I like helping people out there on the ranges by critiquing their technique and firing position. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class F. Robinson Its a very challenging job, mentally and physically. When we move ammo and are rolling down the road in white pick-ups with red flags, pull over to the side of the road for safety. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Evans Some times we face challenges, but I have great people to work with. Ive only been here for three months, but Ive been enjoying myself. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Evans breaks down an M-60 in a thoroughly highspeed fashion during a routine weapons cleaning.

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Page 4 Friday, July 5, 2002 The long road to hard stripes Army Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th MPBN pin the sergeants stripes on a gleeful former Spc. Luis Molina on Tuesday. Molina, who proudly wears his expert and combat infantry badges, has been a specialist for more than 10 years. He was a distinguished honor graduate of MP school in 2000. Ive always done my best to represent my battalion, said Molina. I am look ing forward to perform my NCO duties. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin This weeks question: What is your most memorable moment from basic training? Lance Cpl. Lance Barbera, J-6 When I got smoked for thirty minutes after dragging a buddy through the sand. Marines shouldnt drag each other unless theyre dead. Navy Chief Petty Officer Loretta Jackson, J-8 I used to always wind up in trouble. My company com mander thought I was a smart-ass, so I was always pushing. Spc. Robert Lovely, Joint Information Bureau I remember the first time my drill sergeant laid eyes on my name, he said, Whats so #$@%ing lovely about you? Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Cherry, MIUWU 204 I remember return ing to the barracks after a tornado struck. Drill instruc tors flipped the bunks and threw everything all over the place. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Tom Juzwaik, MIUWU 204 For the first time in my life, I got my head shaved. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris ments and logistics from his unit, the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force, 2nd Supply Bat talion, from Camp Lejune, N.C. Not long after, though, the unit was scattered, and as the rest of his fellow Marines were disseminated out to other missions around the world, Lopez would remain at GTMO. I got left behind because they needed an embarkation and logistics chief here, said Lopez. But we're all supposed to meet together after this mission. The funny thing is, before starting this mission, I was back home deploying Marines to come to Cuba, and then I had to come down here after them. And while here Lopez might appear to be a one-man show, he does receive invaluable assistance from the rest of the team working out of the strategic mobility office. Nobody knows about us until it's time to leave, but then they're camping out here to get their stuff done in time, said Air Force Capt. Thomas Ringlein, the strategic mobility offi cer and head of the unit. All of the guys here work hard. We also have three working over on the Leeward side for when we ship things over there. Tech Sgt. Dave Henley, Tech Sgt. Melissa Sisneros and Staff Sgt. Brian Violet all deserve recognition for their hard work. We have a big impact on the JTF mis sion, said Air Force Tech. Sgt. Daniel John son, who works out of the strategic mobility office. It's our mission to service the people here, especially the ones who have been here the longest. We've helped a lot of people go home. Once you see the end product, it is so sat isfying, said Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pfefferkorn, the strategic mobility office chief. But I've been lucky that I've been in such a great shop. That sense of camaraderie is what keeps these guys going. For Lopez, this is his first time working in a Joint Task Force, and he couldn't be more pleased with the purple environment. These guys are great, they really help me get things done and I really like being around them. I'm happy to be working with the Army, Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard. I'm a better person for it. Having great people to work with also helps in overcoming the volume of stress that comes in with all that cargo Lopez moves. We work countless hours, seven days a week, and I get stressed out sometimes, said Lopez. On weekends we will get to wear civilian clothing or PTs, but we're still work ing. Sometimes people see me sitting around in my PT gear and think I'm just chilling, but I'm working hard. To do this job you got to get down in there and get dirty. Getting down and dirty is what Lopez is all about. Luckily he takes his profession to heart; for him, doing the job is its own reward, and he doesn't mind overseeing every little aspect of it from start to finish. If I don't come in, I feel I'm not doing my job, said Lopez. I feel it's a part of me because if it doesn't get done I feel responsi ble. In the last three to four months, I've shipped out nearly half a million shore tons of cargo and equipment and maybe 50,000 lbs. of ammunition. It's crazy, man. The last barge was the biggest I ever had to work with. We're talking maybe half a dozen units and a quarter-million shore tons. That was a big load I had to move. But you know, when you plan something, you want it done right. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez gets down and dirty while performing an agricultural inspection on a humvee, ensuring that it is clean and safe so it can be shipped back to the United States. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Capt. Thomas Ringlein, the strategic mobility officer, knows every unit assigned to the JTF that comes through GTMO. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pfefferkorn, strategic mobility office chief, arranges for passenger manifests on outgoing flights from GTMO. for moving cargo here to there Page 9 Friday, July 5, 2002

PAGE 5

Getting down and dirty is strategy Somehow it gets done. Units come and go, and so do all of their equipment and vehicles. Some people might think this job gets done by itself, but there is a man who breathes hard and sweats heavy, drawing from an overflow ing well of motivation to get the gear from here to there and there to here. At GTMO, that man is Marine Corps Cpl. Christian J-Lo Lopez, embarkation chief of the strategic mobilization unit here. I want people to know what we do, said Lopez, who along with the other individuals of the strategic mobilization unit ensure that the incoming units attached to the Joint Task Force receive their cargo here, and the outgo ing ones have it safely shipped home. Units are always coming and going, said Lopez. They come through us and leave through us. It's a hectic job. There's so much volume with all the deployments and rede ployments always going on. And the only way to move hundreds of thousands of tons of cargo smoothly, safely and successfully is to plan, down to the last detail, every movement that cargo will make. You don't even know, said Lopez. It's a lot of tedious work, and most people don't under stand the amount of planning that goes into this job. It's a logisti cal nightmare. You see, there's a timeline I have to meet, he said. In order to ship cargo out, or get cargo here, it takes weeks' worth of planning. It can't get done all in one day, but I'm all over this island doing the best I can. The central point of those scattered opera tions is the quarantine lot, where units bring all of their cargo and vehi cles to be accounted for and inspected before they are to be shipped out. Before Lopez receives the goods, he must review a manifest for each of the units that will go through him, and then he will begin processing the most effective way to release the load. I get a heads-up with the unit. I sit down with them and inventory what they have, like how many shore tons they have, or if they will need boxes for shipping, said Lopez. Also, we have to weigh everything to make sure it all will fit prop erly. I do load plans on computers for ships and planes, so I know exactly what to put in and how it will fit evenly. One of Lopez's other duties is that of agricultural inspector. He must make sure that all equipment and vehicles meet health standards and are certified clean so they can be shipped back to the States without the unit getting fined. This is an important part of the process, said Lopez. It's a dirty job. Wherever you can stick your hand, you can pull out dirt. But I have fun at the wash rack where I pressure wash the vehicles. I really get dirty, but I like it. Sometimes I'd rather be there than any where else. In addition to his other duties, Lopez is also a hazardous material certifier, who must sign off on explosive material, ammunition and other such hazardous items to ensure that they are safely shipped. HAZMAT is another big deal, said Lopez. If I certify something wrong, there's going to betrouble. Once those hurdles are cleared and busi ness is finished at the quarantine lot, Lopez will either coordinate to put all the cargo on a ferry and send it to the Leeward side if it is to be flown out of GTMO, or he will usually lead a convoy down to the pier so the cargo can go on the barge. When going to the pier, Lopez must get in touch with the load manager who will ulti mately take charge of the cargo. All of the equipment and containers will then rest at a lot at the pier awaiting the next barge to come in. I bring it all to the load master at the pier to make sure it's not frustrated, like theres too much cargo or something is certified wrong, he said. If it doesn't meet the stan dards, it can't go. But once it's signed over to the load manager, I'm done. Almost done. Because as the loaded barge brings the cargo to Florida, and from there heads to wherever the unit calls home, Lopez is mak ing sure its journey goes as planned. I track all the shipments using a GPS tracking system, he said, and make sure everything is going smoothly. When I hear that a unit got their stuff back home, it's such a great feeling. And when I look down at my empty lot from the office and see all of my stuff gone, I feel so good. It's the best feeling in the world. Lopez has been having plenty of those topof-the-world feelings since he first arrived here in February. He originally started the job with 10 other Marines trained in cargo move By Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez, embarkation chief here, coordinates to lead a convoy down to the pier. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez double-checks a shipping manifest with Army Staff Sgt. Dennis White, who also works in the strategic mobilization unit. Page 8 Friday, July 5, 2002 Police Detachment, attached to the 800th MP Brigade in Union dale, N.Y. Cline went back home to New York last week after serv ing JDOG for six months. Like Cline, Perrone is a New Yorker. He is from Monroe County in Rochester, recently retired from his civilian job at the Monroe County Sheriff Department after spending the past 30 years of his life holding a multitude of different posi tions. I started on road patrol and worked through the ranks. I retired as a major and division commander of operations, he said. As the commanding offi cer, I oversaw patrol precincts along with special teams such as Swat, EOD, Scuba and Marine and canine units. I thrive on organization, structure and discipline, he said. That's why I got into law enforcement, and that's why I joined the Army. Perrone, who has been in the Army for more than 32 years, said that almost everything he did in civilian and military life was a preparation for the posi tion he now holds. Before he was called up for Operation Enduring Freedom, he served on active duty for a year as the chief of Force Pro tection and Anti-terrorism for the 2002 Olympic Games at Salt Lake City. A great deal of it was the interaction with local state and federal law enforcement agencies as well as providing force protection plans for the mil itary units, he said. There were 18,000 security and law enforcement people including 6,500 soldiers supporting that mission. Perrone has filled a wide variety of mili tary roles as well: S-4 in civil affairs, staff officer at the bat talion, brigade and division lev els, and provost marshal and commander of a transportation company. There wasn't really much in the way of opportunity that the Army has not afforded me, said Perrone. All that experience has led to this. He came highly recom mended for this job, said Army Lt. Col. Don Wedewer, JDOG's executive officer. We want to support his decisions and grab his experience and education. I've been in the Army for 23 years, and I still have a lot to learn from him. Col. Perrone has a tremen dous outgoing personality and he motivates all of us, said Wedewer, who recently started working for the commander. Col. Perrone is a charismatic and personable leader, said Army Capt. Keith Bowers, from JDOG S1, recalling his first meeting with the commander outside the office. On my second day here in Cuba, we went out fishing and I got a chance to talk and interact with him on a personal level, said Bowers. It was a very casual environment. Perrone made everybody feel at ease. He's really down-to-earth. Sur prisingly, after fishing he agreed to go with us to the Downtown Lyceum to catch a movie. Although he is away from his wife and his three children, Per rone said he is enjoying GTMO and hopes to play some golf and spend more time fishing when ever his busy schedule allows it. Before assuming the new position, Perrone had a chance to spend a couple of weeks working with Cline and his staff. He said he has had a good understanding of what they were doing and wants to build on their work. Perrone is very meticulous and thorough, said Bowers. But the man himself says hes no micro-manager. My leadership style is to be on top of as many issues as I can without being a mile deep in them. I have to look at the broad picture, said the new com mander. For Perrone, a good manager or leader has to be able to assess the strength and weaknesses of his command. Thats one of the reasons we have the weekly commanders meeting now, he said. All of the company commanders need to get up and brief their own operations and explain why theyre doing something or why theyre not doing something. If a company commander exhibits leadership, some issues will not have to go up to my level and to the level of Gen. Baccus. I don't need to know every thing, he said, but I do need to know those things that are important for me to deal with. So does Gen. Baccus. But with more than 1,000 ser vicemembers under JDOGs command, Perrone has to work to make sure his and Baccus orders make it down to the ground level. It's one thing to write down the standards, he said. It's another to actually sit down and train people to understand and enforce them. I believe that if you don't enforce them, they become a useless document. Perhaps we have to do a better job ourselves, making sure everyone understands the stan dards before enforcing them. He said he understands that GTMO is a high-stress envi ronment for a lot of the young soldiers. But we have to make sure they are properly trained and properly equipped to carry out their mission. This is a great mission, a once-in-a-life-time opportunity for a lot of the soldiers, he said. They should be proud to be part of this mission, and above all, proud to be Americans. Im just grateful for the opportunity to do my part. said Perrone. For the next half-year, Per rone will keep doing it -keep meeting with his company com manders on a regular basis, and keep getting out to Camp Delta and Camp America once a day to monitor the progress of his the operation he now oversees. I have a very simple vision, Perrone said. Be the best we can be, providing a level of excellence in everything we do. We are not there yet, but we're certainly heading that way. Page 5 Friday, July 5, 2002 JDOG, from page 1 Photo by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Col. Perrone explains the purpose of the weekly comman ders call to a group of company commanders. Photo by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The new commander of JDOG speaks to his staff and company comman ers Friday as Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes from the 160th MPBN takes notes.

PAGE 6

Page 6 Page 7 Friday, July 5, 2002 GTMOs famous barge is the lifeline for all the ser vicemembers and citizens of Guantanamo Bay, carrying almost anything imaginable from Banana Nesquik to toliet tissue to speedboats. The barge a.k.a. The Guantanamo Bay Express embarks from Jacksonville, Fla., on a four-and-a-half day journey carrying its mighty load at cruising speed for nearly a thousand watery miles. Dwarfed by the barge itself is its driving force: the TEN NER C., a small-yet-powerful tugboat which braves the oft-tumultuous seas to pull the barge to its ultimate desti nation. Unloading the barge can take up to five days of sweat and toil. But the strong-backed men who meet the barge at the pier and set its cargo ashore seem as eager for its twicemonthly arrival as the people of GTMO. Soon, the sweet fruit of the barge will be all over base. Living and dying by the barge Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The TENNER C. sails up to the shoreline after pulling its heavy load a long distance to keep the people here at GTMO living luxuriously. If its not here on the island, most people would say, Its on the Barge. Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Cargo is off-loaded from the barge onto flat-bed trucks, and then hauled away. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A barge unloader unfastens a safety latch from a cargo container before the boxes are removed. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The GUANTANAMO BAY EXPRESS, or The Barge, docks at the pier here on GTMO heavily loaded and tightly secured. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A heavy-duty crane is used to hoist all secured cargo from off the barge.

PAGE 7

Page 6 Page 7 Friday, July 5, 2002 GTMOs famous barge is the lifeline for all the ser vicemembers and citizens of Guantanamo Bay, carrying almost anything imaginable from Banana Nesquik to toliet tissue to speedboats. The barge a.k.a. The Guantanamo Bay Express embarks from Jacksonville, Fla., on a four-and-a-half day journey carrying its mighty load at cruising speed for nearly a thousand watery miles. Dwarfed by the barge itself is its driving force: the TEN NER C., a small-yet-powerful tugboat which braves the oft-tumultuous seas to pull the barge to its ultimate desti nation. Unloading the barge can take up to five days of sweat and toil. But the strong-backed men who meet the barge at the pier and set its cargo ashore seem as eager for its twicemonthly arrival as the people of GTMO. Soon, the sweet fruit of the barge will be all over base. Living and dying by the barge Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The TENNER C. sails up to the shoreline after pulling its heavy load a long distance to keep the people here at GTMO living luxuriously. If its not here on the island, most people would say, Its on the Barge. Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Cargo is off-loaded from the barge onto flat-bed trucks, and then hauled away. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A barge unloader unfastens a safety latch from a cargo container before the boxes are removed. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris The GUANTANAMO BAY EXPRESS, or The Barge, docks at the pier here on GTMO heavily loaded and tightly secured. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris A heavy-duty crane is used to hoist all secured cargo from off the barge.

PAGE 8

Getting down and dirty is strategy Somehow it gets done. Units come and go, and so do all of their equipment and vehicles. Some people might think this job gets done by itself, but there is a man who breathes hard and sweats heavy, drawing from an overflow ing well of motivation to get the gear from here to there and there to here. At GTMO, that man is Marine Corps Cpl. Christian J-Lo Lopez, embarkation chief of the strategic mobilization unit here. I want people to know what we do, said Lopez, who along with the other individuals of the strategic mobilization unit ensure that the incoming units attached to the Joint Task Force receive their cargo here, and the outgo ing ones have it safely shipped home. Units are always coming and going, said Lopez. They come through us and leave through us. It's a hectic job. There's so much volume with all the deployments and rede ployments always going on. And the only way to move hundreds of thousands of tons of cargo smoothly, safely and successfully is to plan, down to the last detail, every movement that cargo will make. You don't even know, said Lopez. It's a lot of tedious work, and most people don't under stand the amount of planning that goes into this job. It's a logisti cal nightmare. You see, there's a timeline I have to meet, he said. In order to ship cargo out, or get cargo here, it takes weeks' worth of planning. It can't get done all in one day, but I'm all over this island doing the best I can. The central point of those scattered opera tions is the quarantine lot, where units bring all of their cargo and vehi cles to be accounted for and inspected before they are to be shipped out. Before Lopez receives the goods, he must review a manifest for each of the units that will go through him, and then he will begin processing the most effective way to release the load. I get a heads-up with the unit. I sit down with them and inventory what they have, like how many shore tons they have, or if they will need boxes for shipping, said Lopez. Also, we have to weigh everything to make sure it all will fit prop erly. I do load plans on computers for ships and planes, so I know exactly what to put in and how it will fit evenly. One of Lopez's other duties is that of agricultural inspector. He must make sure that all equipment and vehicles meet health standards and are certified clean so they can be shipped back to the States without the unit getting fined. This is an important part of the process, said Lopez. It's a dirty job. Wherever you can stick your hand, you can pull out dirt. But I have fun at the wash rack where I pressure wash the vehicles. I really get dirty, but I like it. Sometimes I'd rather be there than any where else. In addition to his other duties, Lopez is also a hazardous material certifier, who must sign off on explosive material, ammunition and other such hazardous items to ensure that they are safely shipped. HAZMAT is another big deal, said Lopez. If I certify something wrong, there's going to betrouble. Once those hurdles are cleared and busi ness is finished at the quarantine lot, Lopez will either coordinate to put all the cargo on a ferry and send it to the Leeward side if it is to be flown out of GTMO, or he will usually lead a convoy down to the pier so the cargo can go on the barge. When going to the pier, Lopez must get in touch with the load manager who will ulti mately take charge of the cargo. All of the equipment and containers will then rest at a lot at the pier awaiting the next barge to come in. I bring it all to the load master at the pier to make sure it's not frustrated, like theres too much cargo or something is certified wrong, he said. If it doesn't meet the stan dards, it can't go. But once it's signed over to the load manager, I'm done. Almost done. Because as the loaded barge brings the cargo to Florida, and from there heads to wherever the unit calls home, Lopez is mak ing sure its journey goes as planned. I track all the shipments using a GPS tracking system, he said, and make sure everything is going smoothly. When I hear that a unit got their stuff back home, it's such a great feeling. And when I look down at my empty lot from the office and see all of my stuff gone, I feel so good. It's the best feeling in the world. Lopez has been having plenty of those topof-the-world feelings since he first arrived here in February. He originally started the job with 10 other Marines trained in cargo move By Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez, embarkation chief here, coordinates to lead a convoy down to the pier. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez double-checks a shipping manifest with Army Staff Sgt. Dennis White, who also works in the strategic mobilization unit. Page 8 Friday, July 5, 2002 Police Detachment, attached to the 800th MP Brigade in Union dale, N.Y. Cline went back home to New York last week after serv ing JDOG for six months. Like Cline, Perrone is a New Yorker. He is from Monroe County in Rochester, recently retired from his civilian job at the Monroe County Sheriff Department after spending the past 30 years of his life holding a multitude of different posi tions. I started on road patrol and worked through the ranks. I retired as a major and division commander of operations, he said. As the commanding offi cer, I oversaw patrol precincts along with special teams such as Swat, EOD, Scuba and Marine and canine units. I thrive on organization, structure and discipline, he said. That's why I got into law enforcement, and that's why I joined the Army. Perrone, who has been in the Army for more than 32 years, said that almost everything he did in civilian and military life was a preparation for the posi tion he now holds. Before he was called up for Operation Enduring Freedom, he served on active duty for a year as the chief of Force Pro tection and Anti-terrorism for the 2002 Olympic Games at Salt Lake City. A great deal of it was the interaction with local state and federal law enforcement agencies as well as providing force protection plans for the mil itary units, he said. There were 18,000 security and law enforcement people including 6,500 soldiers supporting that mission. Perrone has filled a wide variety of mili tary roles as well: S-4 in civil affairs, staff officer at the bat talion, brigade and division lev els, and provost marshal and commander of a transportation company. There wasn't really much in the way of opportunity that the Army has not afforded me, said Perrone. All that experience has led to this. He came highly recom mended for this job, said Army Lt. Col. Don Wedewer, JDOG's executive officer. We want to support his decisions and grab his experience and education. I've been in the Army for 23 years, and I still have a lot to learn from him. Col. Perrone has a tremen dous outgoing personality and he motivates all of us, said Wedewer, who recently started working for the commander. Col. Perrone is a charismatic and personable leader, said Army Capt. Keith Bowers, from JDOG S1, recalling his first meeting with the commander outside the office. On my second day here in Cuba, we went out fishing and I got a chance to talk and interact with him on a personal level, said Bowers. It was a very casual environment. Perrone made everybody feel at ease. He's really down-to-earth. Sur prisingly, after fishing he agreed to go with us to the Downtown Lyceum to catch a movie. Although he is away from his wife and his three children, Per rone said he is enjoying GTMO and hopes to play some golf and spend more time fishing when ever his busy schedule allows it. Before assuming the new position, Perrone had a chance to spend a couple of weeks working with Cline and his staff. He said he has had a good understanding of what they were doing and wants to build on their work. Perrone is very meticulous and thorough, said Bowers. But the man himself says hes no micro-manager. My leadership style is to be on top of as many issues as I can without being a mile deep in them. I have to look at the broad picture, said the new com mander. For Perrone, a good manager or leader has to be able to assess the strength and weaknesses of his command. Thats one of the reasons we have the weekly commanders meeting now, he said. All of the company commanders need to get up and brief their own operations and explain why theyre doing something or why theyre not doing something. If a company commander exhibits leadership, some issues will not have to go up to my level and to the level of Gen. Baccus. I don't need to know every thing, he said, but I do need to know those things that are important for me to deal with. So does Gen. Baccus. But with more than 1,000 ser vicemembers under JDOGs command, Perrone has to work to make sure his and Baccus orders make it down to the ground level. It's one thing to write down the standards, he said. It's another to actually sit down and train people to understand and enforce them. I believe that if you don't enforce them, they become a useless document. Perhaps we have to do a better job ourselves, making sure everyone understands the stan dards before enforcing them. He said he understands that GTMO is a high-stress envi ronment for a lot of the young soldiers. But we have to make sure they are properly trained and properly equipped to carry out their mission. This is a great mission, a once-in-a-life-time opportunity for a lot of the soldiers, he said. They should be proud to be part of this mission, and above all, proud to be Americans. Im just grateful for the opportunity to do my part. said Perrone. For the next half-year, Per rone will keep doing it -keep meeting with his company com manders on a regular basis, and keep getting out to Camp Delta and Camp America once a day to monitor the progress of his the operation he now oversees. I have a very simple vision, Perrone said. Be the best we can be, providing a level of excellence in everything we do. We are not there yet, but we're certainly heading that way. Page 5 Friday, July 5, 2002 JDOG, from page 1 Photo by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Col. Perrone explains the purpose of the weekly comman ders call to a group of company commanders. Photo by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The new commander of JDOG speaks to his staff and company comman ers Friday as Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes from the 160th MPBN takes notes.

PAGE 9

Page 4 Friday, July 5, 2002 The long road to hard stripes Army Lt. Col. Izzy Rommes, commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton of the 160th MPBN pin the sergeants stripes on a gleeful former Spc. Luis Molina on Tuesday. Molina, who proudly wears his expert and combat infantry badges, has been a specialist for more than 10 years. He was a distinguished honor graduate of MP school in 2000. Ive always done my best to represent my battalion, said Molina. I am look ing forward to perform my NCO duties. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin This weeks question: What is your most memorable moment from basic training? Lance Cpl. Lance Barbera, J-6 When I got smoked for thirty minutes after dragging a buddy through the sand. Marines shouldnt drag each other unless theyre dead. Navy Chief Petty Officer Loretta Jackson, J-8 I used to always wind up in trouble. My company com mander thought I was a smart-ass, so I was always pushing. Spc. Robert Lovely, Joint Information Bureau I remember the first time my drill sergeant laid eyes on my name, he said, Whats so #$@%ing lovely about you? Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Cherry, MIUWU 204 I remember return ing to the barracks after a tornado struck. Drill instruc tors flipped the bunks and threw everything all over the place. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Tom Juzwaik, MIUWU 204 For the first time in my life, I got my head shaved. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris ments and logistics from his unit, the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force, 2nd Supply Bat talion, from Camp Lejune, N.C. Not long after, though, the unit was scattered, and as the rest of his fellow Marines were disseminated out to other missions around the world, Lopez would remain at GTMO. I got left behind because they needed an embarkation and logistics chief here, said Lopez. But we're all supposed to meet together after this mission. The funny thing is, before starting this mission, I was back home deploying Marines to come to Cuba, and then I had to come down here after them. And while here Lopez might appear to be a one-man show, he does receive invaluable assistance from the rest of the team working out of the strategic mobility office. Nobody knows about us until it's time to leave, but then they're camping out here to get their stuff done in time, said Air Force Capt. Thomas Ringlein, the strategic mobility offi cer and head of the unit. All of the guys here work hard. We also have three working over on the Leeward side for when we ship things over there. Tech Sgt. Dave Henley, Tech Sgt. Melissa Sisneros and Staff Sgt. Brian Violet all deserve recognition for their hard work. We have a big impact on the JTF mis sion, said Air Force Tech. Sgt. Daniel John son, who works out of the strategic mobility office. It's our mission to service the people here, especially the ones who have been here the longest. We've helped a lot of people go home. Once you see the end product, it is so sat isfying, said Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pfefferkorn, the strategic mobility office chief. But I've been lucky that I've been in such a great shop. That sense of camaraderie is what keeps these guys going. For Lopez, this is his first time working in a Joint Task Force, and he couldn't be more pleased with the purple environment. These guys are great, they really help me get things done and I really like being around them. I'm happy to be working with the Army, Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard. I'm a better person for it. Having great people to work with also helps in overcoming the volume of stress that comes in with all that cargo Lopez moves. We work countless hours, seven days a week, and I get stressed out sometimes, said Lopez. On weekends we will get to wear civilian clothing or PTs, but we're still work ing. Sometimes people see me sitting around in my PT gear and think I'm just chilling, but I'm working hard. To do this job you got to get down in there and get dirty. Getting down and dirty is what Lopez is all about. Luckily he takes his profession to heart; for him, doing the job is its own reward, and he doesn't mind overseeing every little aspect of it from start to finish. If I don't come in, I feel I'm not doing my job, said Lopez. I feel it's a part of me because if it doesn't get done I feel responsi ble. In the last three to four months, I've shipped out nearly half a million shore tons of cargo and equipment and maybe 50,000 lbs. of ammunition. It's crazy, man. The last barge was the biggest I ever had to work with. We're talking maybe half a dozen units and a quarter-million shore tons. That was a big load I had to move. But you know, when you plan something, you want it done right. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Marine Corps Cpl. Christian Lopez gets down and dirty while performing an agricultural inspection on a humvee, ensuring that it is clean and safe so it can be shipped back to the United States. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Capt. Thomas Ringlein, the strategic mobility officer, knows every unit assigned to the JTF that comes through GTMO. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Pfefferkorn, strategic mobility office chief, arranges for passenger manifests on outgoing flights from GTMO. for moving cargo here to there Page 9 Friday, July 5, 2002

PAGE 10

On the battlefield, the ability to control combat stress can be the deciding factor between victory and defeat. Off the battlefield, it can determine how well any mission is per formed. Stress is a factor of combat and deployment; military members must face it and learn to deal with it. Being deployed to Guantanamo Bay as part of Operation Enduring Freedom isnt combat. But servicemembers here are still deployed, far from home and near the detainees from the war on terror, and exposed to various levels of stress that could prove costly if not controlled. That's where the 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control team comes in. Our main mission is to keep military members able to perform their mission effi ciently and effectively, said Army Capt. Sharon M. Newton, the units occupational therapist, 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control Team. We give briefings and classes to inform leadership on the signs of stress to look for in their troops, and teach preventive measures to reduce the levels of stress on all individu als deployed. There are six major functions in the mis sion of the Combat Stress Control Team. The first three are consultation, in which the team offers advice and education to com mands; reconstitution support, in which teams offer assistance at field locations to battle-fatigued units which are withdrawn to rest, reorganize, and integrate replacements; and neuropsychiatric triage, which enables the team to sort out battle fatigue cases with temporary, stressinduced symptoms from true neuropsychi atrics with deeper problems. The fourth step is stabilization, an immedi ate, short-term evaluation of the severity of the battle-fatigue casualty. Next restoration begins, a oneto three-day rest for battle fatigue casualties. During the reconditioning phase, the Com bat Stress Control Team implements a fourto twenty-one-day intensive program of replen ishment, physical activity, work details, and military retraining for battle fatigue casualties. While stationed at GTMO, the Combat Stress Control has taken an active part in assessing the stress levels of troops. It is highly important for us to get out there and do our jobs, said Army Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge of the 85th. And were looking at troops from the entire JTF-160 staff, not just the camps, he said. There are many factors that play into the causes of stress while on deployment. Being deployed means being far away from family, friends, and comfort zones. This separation is often a cause of stress. Just being separated from loved ones is always hard. Although troops are far away from home, issues from home are kept close to their heart. Young children, ill relatives, and finances are always kept in their minds, said Army Maj. Marie C. Morency, Officer In Charge, 85th Medical Detachment Combat Stress Control Team. Another factor involved is the reality that many deployed are Reserve and National Guard Components. Thus, they may not work in the field they are currently working in while on deployment. The change of jobs can increase stress. Also, some troops have taken pay cuts and may worry about their finances, said Newton. Members of a unit play a significant role in preventing and iden tifying stress in one another. They can be sure troops are physi cally, emotionally, and spiritually prepared prior to deployment and watch carefully for signs of combat stress during deployments. Some signs to look for are increased visits to sick call with vague physical complaints, loss of concentration, bad attitude, and sleepdeprivation symptoms, said Army Spc. Kathryn S. Hernandez, a member of the 85th. Controlled combat stress, when properly focused by training, unit cohesion, and leader ship, gives servicemembers the necessary alertness, strength, and endurance to accom plish the mission with loyalty, selflessness, even heroism. Left uncontrolled, though, combat stress can degrade the entire mission whether ser vicemembers figting the war on terror are under fire on the battlefield or just under the gun on a distant deployment, working hard far away from home. Page 10 Friday, July 5, 2002 Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The combat Stress Control Team, left to right: Staff Sgt. Richard B. Howard, Army Maj. Marie C. Morency, Capt. Sharon M. Newton, Spc. Robert M. Vincent, Sgt. Larry N. Clark, and Spc. Kathryn S. Hernandez. Combat stress, on and off the battlefield By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire SUICIDE PREVENTION TIPS: AID LIFE A: Ask! Dont be afraid to ask if someone is thinking about suicide. I: Intervene immediately! Take action and listen. D: Dont keep it a secret! L: Locate help! Seek out the offi cer on duty, Chaplain, or call the emergency room. I: Inform the Chain of Command! They can secure necessary resources. F: Find someome to stay with the person while you go get help. DO NOT leave the person alone! E: Expedite! Get professinal help immediately. Resources in Guantanamo Bay: Fleet and Family Support Center 4141 Chaplain 2323 Emergency Room 72690 Security 911 For more information on suicide prevention or combat stress call 81160 Although troops are far away from home, issues from home are kept close to their heart. Army Maj. Marie C. Morency Page 3 Friday, July 5, 2002 The ever-diligent sailors of the Naval Station Ordinance unit aim high to handle all the firepower on Guantanamo Bay. They support all personnel from JTF-160, the Marine Corps and all Navy and Coast Guard ships that make contact with this base. They order and supply ammo, maintain weapons, provide weapons training and run all the ranges here. If any units have to qualify with their weapons while here at GTMO, its these guys who will be supplying and guiding fire toward a successful day in the sun with a gun. So if youre in the prone and start to panic, take a deep breath, scan your lane, and just squeeze. Naval Station Ordnance Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Seaman Apprentice Bryan Burton practices the proper positioning of his M-4 while zeroing in on his target as Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik critiques his form. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jason Doll A nice change of pace took place over the last few months. Ive been here for over two years. Since JTF arrived, the tempo has increased ten-fold, but Im having a lot of fun. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Jay S. Wojcik I love this job. Its great, going to the range, sitting in the sun and shoot ing off rounds. I like helping people out there on the ranges by critiquing their technique and firing position. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class F. Robinson Its a very challenging job, mentally and physically. When we move ammo and are rolling down the road in white pick-ups with red flags, pull over to the side of the road for safety. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Evans Some times we face challenges, but I have great people to work with. Ive only been here for three months, but Ive been enjoying myself. Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Robert Evans breaks down an M-60 in a thoroughly highspeed fashion during a routine weapons cleaning.

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This week, JTF-160 Command ing Gen. Rick Baccus passes along this message from Army Maj. Gen. Gary D. Speer, ACINC, United States Southern Command. To the men and women of the United States Southern Command: This Independence Day, our nations 226th birthday, is an occasion for reflection as well as celebration. Throughout our proud history, U.S. military forces have played a key role in safeguarding the democracy and liberty that we, as Americans, hold so dear. Today, our nation recognizes a new threat, one that in coming years will test the courage, strength and determination of the U.S. armed forces, perhaps more than any other challenge in our history. In the war on terrorism, we fight as we have always fought: for a just peace that guarantees human rights and freedom from oppression. We wish for others what we have always wished for ourselves safety from violence as well as liberty and opportunity for our children. Your exemplary efforts and per sonal sacrifices help to ensure our nations freedom and independence, now and in the coming years. We honor you as well as the United States on this special day. Best wishes for a safe and happy Independence Day. RICK BACCUS Brigadier General, USNG Joint Task Force 160, Commander Page 2 Friday, July 5, 2002 Chaplains Corner Provost Marshals Office Two quick thoughts for this 4th of July weekend: 1. When the Founding Fathers wrote of a separation of church and state, they were emphasizing that our government was not authorized to establish an official state religion. They were not stating that God and/or the spiritual dimension did not exist and that the government couldn't deal with anything that was related to religion. God had a place and it was n't just in heaven. A review of U.S. law and court deci sions (until the 1960s) clearly shows this. 2. Individuals who have sworn to serve their nation in the armed forces are servants of the security and free dom of nations. If military personnel complete their duty honorably, they help in the forg ing of the nation's common good and the maintenance of peace. LCDR Vincent A. Salamoni, CHC, U.S. Naval Reserve JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. The GTMO Morale Welfare and Recreation Marina offers a course of instruction for recreational small boat operators. Upon successful completion of a writ ten test and a practical test, candidates are issued the GTMO Small Boat Opera tors License. The license entitles you to rent and operate one of the recreational boats available through the Marina at Guantanamo Bay. Upon renting a boat, you will be issued the white map of the bay and a portable radio for communication with Port Control. It is extremely important that you ori ent yourself to visible reference points and then cross-reference those points on the map prior to leaving the marina, and THAT YOU keep cross-referencing your location on the map when you are in the bay. Not all the MWR boats have com passes, it is highly recommended that you bring your own. REMEMBER TO MONITOR THE RADIO AT ALL TIMES FOR PORT CONTROL. Do not violate restricted areas and above all: BE A SAFE BOATER! Maj. Gary J. Cipolletta, Deputy Provost Marshal, JTF-160 4 July = 1 Nation, Under God Page 11 Friday, July 5, 2002 Intense matches mark start of V-ball season The co-ed volleyball season began Friday, June 28, at G.J. Denich Gymnasium with two intense matches on the court: JTF-160 vs. Chat Bout and Hos pital vs. 178 MP Co. The mostly civilian-manned Chat Bout dominated the first set of its match 15 to 6, but JTF-160 fought back hard in the second set, making it a see-saw battle that finally tipped their way after Army Warrant Officer Pete J. Turner broke a late tie with a thunderous spike that switched the monentum of the game to his side. JTF-160 won the set 15 to 14. The third set was played as tough as the second. JTF-160 led most of the set, with Army 1st Lt. Tom C. Kim serving up points in bunches. But the squad seemed to break its own stride with a late time-out, and at games end Chat Bout was a 15-13 winner. Kim was hot, said Oswaldo Brooks. But when they called the time-out it messed up their rhythm and timing. We were able to take advantage, and come back and win the game. We are fighters and we never quit. Thats the Chat Bout atti tude, said Angel Lakeman, who scored the winning point. Even though it was a close game, we knew we would win, said Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jahlee L. Brown. And we won even though we were playing short-handed. I feel we are going all the way this season, so look out for Chat Bout. The nights other match was considerably less suspenseful. The team from Naval Hospital opened its season with a dramatic W by blanking the 178th MP Co. in two straight sets 15-12, 15-11. We played strong and we took control of the match,said Petty Officer 3rd Class Dustin S. Ross from Naval Hospital. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Tommie E. Crumedy from the Naval Hospital credited strong communication -and determina tion -for the the victory. We did what ever it took to win the match, he said. That was the key to victory. MWRs summer volleyball season happens every Friday night for another seven weeks, with each team playing seven games before a tournament that decides the champion. And after their performance Friday, Naval Hospital was confident about their prospects. We played well tonight, said Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Aquiles P. Faustino, and well keep it up. Nothing is going to stand in our way this season. By Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Warrant Officer Pete J. Turner from JTF-160 spikes the ball and lets his presents know over Oswaldo Brooks from Chat Bout. Summer Leagues are in full swing. Stop by MWR Office, Room #204 or Main Gym for schedule. There is still time to sign up for the July 6th Paintball Tournanament. For more info call CPT Gormly, #5249. Friday, 5 JUL 02 Non-Alcoholic Social Time, Main MWR Liberty Center 11a.m.12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Aerobics 6:30 7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Softball Leagues, Cooper Field 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Volleyball Leagues, D.J. Denich Gym Saturday, 6 JUL 02 8 a.m.12 p.m., Predictor Swim Meet, Windjammer Pool Movie Marathon, Main MWR Liberty Center 5 p.m., Paintball Tournament 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Softball Sunday, 7 JUL 02 10 a.m.8 p.m., Open Swim, Windjammer Pool Spades Tournament, Main MWR Liberty Center Monday, 8 JUL 02 6 a.m.7 a.m., Aerobics classes 11 a.m.-12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Aerobics 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Basketball 6 p.m.8 p.m., MW.R Soccer 6:30 7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Tuesday, 9 JUL 02 Puzzle Time, Main MWR Liberty Center 5:15 p.m.6:15 p.m., Yoga Ultimate Stretch & Aerobics 6 p.m.9 p.m., MWR Bowling 6:30 -7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Wednesday, 10 JUL 02 6 a.m.7 a.m., Aerobics Class 11a.m.12 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do 6 p.m. 9 p.m., Basketball 6 p.m.-8 p.m., Soccer Leagues 7 p.m., 9-Ball Tournament, Main M.W.R. Liberty Center Thursday, 11 JUL 02 5:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m., Yoga Ultimate Stretch Class & Aerobics Classes 6:30 p.m.7:30 p.m., Tae-Kwon Do Classes 7 p.m., Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Naval Hospital 12 160 MP Bn 8 PSU 307 2 178th MP Co. 16 346th Hit Squad 9 346th Wildcats 18 Trop. Nightmare 11 GTMO Lite 7 342nd MP Co. 16 Reservist 18 Iguana 17 HQ JTF-160 4 346th MP Co. 7 239th MP Co. 10 JTF-170 12 178th MP Co. 0 Iguana 22 160th MP Bn. 4 346th Hit Squad 1 239th MP Co. 5 342nd MP Co. 9 Naval Hospital 16 Trop. Nightmare 19 Coscom 9 Iguana 2 0 Hospital 2 0 JTF-170 2 0 GTMO Bay 2 0 Blacksheep 2 0 Regulars 2 0 239 MP Co. 1 0 571 MP Co. 0 0 XO Staff 1 1 GTMO Lite 1 1 PSU 307 1 1 Wildcats 1 1 178 MP Co. 1 1 114 MP Co. A 0 1 HQ JTF-160 0 1 JTF-160 0 1 Hit Squad 0 2 114 MP Co. B 0 2 342 MP Co. 0 2 2/142 INF. Co. 0 2 160 MP Bn. 0 2 SOFTBALL SCORES STANDINGS Friday, July 5 8 p.m. Lilo & Stitch 10 p.m. Changing Lanes Saturday, July 6 8 p.m. Spiderman 10 p.m. The Scorpion King Sunday, July 7 8 p.m. Unfaithful Monday, July 8 8 p.m. Jason X Tuesday, July 9 8 p.m. Sum of All Fears Wednesday, July 10 8 p.m. Unfaithful Thursday, July 11 8 p.m. Life or Something Like It

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Page 12 Friday, July 5, 2002 with Army Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton, 160th MPBN Q: Good morning, Com mand Sgt. Maj. Anthony D. Clayton, are you ready for your fifteen minutes of fame? A: Always ready. Q: Where are you from? A: I am from a small town that's about 50 miles away from Tallahassee. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: I am easy-going, friendly, and compassionate. It takes a lot to tick me off. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: I am a mental health pro gram analyst for Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee, Unit Three. Q: How do you feel about your mission here at Guan tanamo Bay? A: I feel very proud to be here and be a part of history. Q: How would you describe the soldiers that work under you? A: Professionals! They are always ready, willing, and able to perform their job. They take care of all their duties in a pro fessional manner and I com mend them for all their hard work. Q: Do you have any advice for soldiers planning to become a Top NCO, like yourself? A: Stay with it, stay in, set goals, and focus. Q: What do you do for fun here? A: PT! PT! PT, all the time! I'm either at the gym or the beach, or I'm biking or running. Q: I know how much ser geant majors love to sing cadences. Is there any particu lar one you like to sing while you run? A: Oh, I sing an old cadence that I learned in basic training. It goes a little something like this: The prettiest girl I ever saw was sipping bourbon through a straw. Q: What kind of music do you listen to? A: That all depends on my mood. Gospel music puts me in the right state of mind, jazz mellows me out, and R&B, well, I've got to be in a special kind of mood for that. Q: If you could be a charac ter in any war flick, who would you be and why? A: I would be the sergeant major in the movie We Were Soldiers, because his first concern was the soldiers. Q: If you could be any ani mal at GTMO, what animal would you be and why? A: I'd be an iguana, because they have a lot of privileges here at GTMO. Troops must slow down for them. They're free to roam where they want to. And they'll chase you, chase you down. I was chased off the beach by one just the other day. Besides, they are very unique creatures that everyone respects. Q: What's the strangest thing you've seen since you've been here at GTMO? A: I was sitting in my back yard after duty one day and all of a sudden this big turkey vul ture swoops down and attacks this dove. Feathers were flying every where, while my buddy and I just stood there in shock. It was like Wild Discovery up close and personal. Q: If you could have one thing from home here with you, what would it be and why? A: I would have to say my car, because transportation is just so darn difficult to come by around here. Q: What's one rule you live by? A: The golden rule, of course. Do unto others as you would like done to you. Q: In closing, what do you plan to do when you get home? A: I plan to reintegrate with society and basically, unwind and relax. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony B. Clayton: It takes a lot to tick me off. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Get in the mood with a PT-loving E-9 It's Friday afternoon. After a long business meeting with his staff and his company command ers, Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr., the new commander of the Joint Detention Operations Group (JDOG) puts aside his administra tive duties for the day and pays a visit to Camp Delta, where the detainees from the U.S. global war on terrorism are housed. Perrone proceeds to the main gate and waits patiently for the guards on duty to come and let him in. Before he enters, he looks around to make sure that every thing is in order. He then goes through all the gates, each securely manned by MPs, to get access to the detainees' units. As soon as the soldiers see him, they all assume the position of atten tion and wait for him to review the logs and examine the condi tions of the units. As the commander, my responsibility is to oversee the entire detention operation, includ ing all the MPs, the battalion, the companies, as well as infantry units that provide external secu rity, Perrone said. His job, he said, is mostly administrative -to oversee the detainee operations here on behalf of Commanding Gen. Rick Bac cus and the Joint Task Force 160 command, and make sure that all personnel work together toward the success of this operation that has captured the eyes of the world. But I also make it my goal to come out here to Camp Delta at least once a day and see how my soldiers are doing, he said. Perrone, who has been at GTMO for approximately a month, doesnt have to reinvent the wheel. He is replacing Army Lt. Col. Bill Cline from the 455th Military Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Volleyball fights that never quit Page 11 Strategy for getting down and dirty Page 8 Ordnance sailors that aim high Page 3 New top DOG takes command Friday, July 5, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 4 Secretary of Defenses Fourth of July message Composite photo by Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire See JDOG, page 5 A look inside... At a critical moment during the Revolutionary War, when his army was surrounded and in danger of being destroyed, General Washington issued this order: Put only Americans on guard tonight. Washington knew, at that moment of crisis, he could rely on those citizen-soldier volunteers who had left behind their families and farms to risk everything for the cause of free dom.Thanks to their service and sacrifice, America achieved her independ ence. And every July 4th since, Americans have come together to give thanks for our freedom and what our country has become: the freest, most creative and dynamic nation on earth. So today, as in General Washington's time, we take comfort in the knowl edge that Americans like you are on guard tonight: soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. Through your service and sacrifice, you help make every day Independence Day for the United States of America. Our people are free because your hearts are brave. And so on this Fourth of July, we stop to say to each of you: Thank you for what you do for our country. Donald H. Rumsfeld Army Col. John J. Perrone Jr. settles in as head of Joint Detainee Operations Group