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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00056
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: June 21, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00056

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Its a cry that has echoed throughout the years. It is the cry of pain, fear and suffering. In response to this call, a group of men and women have come armed with the tools and weapons of com passion. With badges, medicines and even with their own lives, they have fought to save the lives of oth ers. Wherever you find hospital corpsmen, the expression above and beyond the call of duty is heard. -from Years of Valor: The History of the Hospital Corps. The United States Naval Hospi tal, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, held a somber yet proud 104th-birthday celebration at the Windjammer on Friday evening. The event celebrated 104 years of selfless service, sacrifice and heroism of hospital corpsmen who returned from battle, and those whose self-sacrifice gave so many others the chance to greet their families at the front door once again. Sailors in crisp white uniforms marched down the center of the room, proudly carrying the colors and the Prisoner of War Flag. Heartfelt stares glazed the eyes of all in the room. Then a bell was rung as Chief Hospital Corpsman Joseph Engle recited the POW and MIA presentation. Standing at the podium, Engle explained the significance of an isolated table, set but empty, in the corner of the room. This table set for one is small, symbolizing the frailty of one pris oner alone against his oppressors. The tablecloth is white, symboliz ing the purity of their intentions to respond to our countrys call to arms. The single rose displayed in the vase reminds us of the families and loved ones of our comrade-inarms who keep the faith awaiting their return. The red ribbon tied so Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Running away with a GTMO 5K Page 15 SEABEES swarm all over base Page 8 Cuban karate master finds peace Page 6 Tools, weapons of compassion Friday, June 21, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 2 The Navys tradition of going overboard Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire See CORPS, page 5 A look inside... One Naval tradition is that when a member catches the ferry to the Leeward side to go home, his remaining shipmates celebrate his homeward trip by jumping into Guantanamo Bay as the ferry leaves. When Legalman 1st Class Jerry Connors and other servicemembers took the trip home recently, their JTF-160 shipmates jumped into the bay en masse. Operations Specialist 3rd Class Jennifer Heiligenman, one of the "jumpers," said it's probably a Navy-only custom. "I think it is a 'squid thing,'" she said, laughing. "The other services, like the Army and the Air Force, don't seem to like salt water too much." On their 104th birthday, GTMOs Hospital Corpsmen hold an event to remember Page 16 Friday, June 21, 2002 With Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson Q: Good morning, Petty Officer Tamika Richardson. This is your 15 min utes of fame. How are you doing today? A: I'm doing well, thanks. Q: Pharmacy busy today? A: The usual. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: Outgoing and sensitive. All bark with little bite. Q: How long have you been here at Guantanamo Bay? A: About eight months, so that leaves about another 22 months to go. Q: So, youre permanent party here. A: Yes. Q: In for the long haul. Do you like it here at GTMO? A: I love GTMO. The only thing I dont like is that sometimes I feel a little claustrophobic. Working, living, and par tying with the same people, there's no escape. Q: And the good points? A: The serenity, the Caribbean atmos phere, and the great opportunities for education they have here. Q: Youre taking classes here? A: Yes, I am taking Criminal Justice classes. Ultimately, Id like to get in to Forensic Science. I know it sounds strange but I love school. Q: Any advice for those just arriving? A: Everything here is not as it seems. People should take the time out to get to know people before they judge them. Q: Do you have a special spot of serenity here that you like to go to? A: My spot to go and relax -or to just get away, even for a minute -is the hos pital pier. Q: And when you're not working, or relaxing, what do you do for fun? A: Well, I play a lot of sports. Ive been involved in almost all the sports games so far. I just recently played in the Army-Navy basketball game. I'm really looking forward to football season, though I wish it was contact because I like getting down and dirty. Q: Why do you participate in all the sporting events? A: To stay busy and keep from going crazy. Oh, and to get back my girlish fig ure. I'm on my way. But if I'm not playing I'm definitely the loudest fan there. Q: Why are you always the loudest fan at a game? A: One word -pride. To keep my team and the fans motivated. Being loud helps! Q: And, what about friends, have you made any good friends here? A: Yeah, JoJo Stafford and Elaine Flo rence. They help me with my little boy Dominick, they're great to talk to, they really help me out. Id be lost without them. Q: How old is your little boy? A: He's five years old and adorable. He's growing up so fast. It's really funny to see him, this little boy talking like a lit tle grownup. Q: Do you have any pets here or back home? A: Funny you should mention that, I have a Chihuahua named Scoobie. Hes my other child. Q: How about the party scene? Are you one for the Windjammer or the Tiki Bar? A: Definitely the Tiki Bar. I love the island atmosphere. Q: Ahh, the Tiki Bar. I'm sure you've heard a lot of pick-up lines there. What's the worst one you've heard so far? A: The worst one I've heard was from this guy who just came out and said, I need a sugar mama, just someone that has a house I could lay up in and a car I could use. I told him he was really smooth. Q: Well, have you met anyone, are you seeing anyone at the moment? A: Actually, a certain Secret Under cover Lover, Army Pfc. Eric Brown, and I have been together for the last four months. He was last weeks 15 minutes of fame. Q: And how do you feel about him using that nickname in print? A: Take a guess. Q: Oh. Right. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson hard at work in the pharmacy. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire The prescription for success at GTMO

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Page 2 Friday, June 21, 2002 Help the JTF maintain Operational Security Do not discuss classified information over handheld radios, cell phones, unsecure phones, or unclassified computers (NIPRNet) Dispose of working papers and classified materials via Burn Bags The JTF will protect: Identities/location of detainees Detention Operations Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTP's) Security Measures implemented throughout the Joint Operations Area Detainee transfer times and routes Watch what you say. You could be jeopardizing the mission Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders A little something to put things in perspec tive An article in National Geographic several years ago provided a penetrating picture of Gods wings. After a forest fire in Yellowstone National Park, forest rangers began their trek up a mountain to assess the infernos damage. One ranger found a bird literally petrified in ashes, perched statuesquely on the ground at the base of a tree. Somewhat sickened by the eerie sight, he knocked over the bird with a stick. When he gently struck it, three tiny chicks scurried from under their dead mothers wings. The loving mother, keenly aware of impending disaster, had carried her offspring to the base of the tree and had gathered them under her wings, instinctively knowing that the toxic smoke would rise. She could have flown to safety but had refused to abandon her babies. Then the blaze had arrived and the heat had scorched her small body, the mother had remained steadfast. Because she had been willing to die, those under the cover of her wings would live. He will cover you with his feathers, and under his wings you will find refuge. (Psalm 91:4) Being loved this much should make a dif ference in your life. Remember the One who loves you, and then be different because of His love. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. In order to rent and operate watercraft at GTMO Bay, you must take the Small Boat Operator Course and be certified by the MWR Marina. When boating, you must file a float plan with Port Control. You must orient your self to visible reference points on the map prior to leaving the Marina, and keep adjusting your course while on the water. Always monitor your radio and keep it within easy listening distance. REMEMBER THAT THE NORTH ERN BOUNDARY LINE MARKS THE END OF THE U.S. ZONE. IF YOU CROSS INTO CUBAN WATERS, YOU WILL BE PROSECUTED. REMEMBER: Photographing or videotap ing any detainee facility, detainee movement, or detainee, unless authorized by the Com mander JTF-160, to include Camp X-Ray, Camp Delta and any future detention facility or Marine Observation Posts is strictly forbid den, and violators will be prosecuted. (From JTF-160 General Order #1, of 4/20/02, and COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G) ROAD RULES Remember, there is NO PASSING allowed in GTMO. You cannot cross the center line at any time. You can only pass a bus if it is in an off-road bus stop, then use caution. Also, due to the recent increase of heavy vehicle traffic, close calls and other safety issues dealing with protection of personnel, the speed limit on Kittery Beach Road was reduced to 25 mph effective June 18. Please help us protect you by slowing down and enjoying the Caribbean lifestyle. Dave Nelson, GTMO Safety Manager Gods Wings Page 15 Friday, June 21, 2002 At 6:30 on a warm June 15 morning, 216 runners took off from in front of the Main Gym on base for a 5K run that raised aware ness, money -and plenty of heart rates. The Juneteenth Celebration 2002 5k Run/Walk, sponsored by Morale, Welfare and Recreation and the African American Cultural Organization, was a part of a nationwide lob bying effort to make June 17, the anniversary of the end of slavery in the U.S., a national holiday. It was a chance for the ACCO to sell tick ets for the Bridging The Gap soul food tast ing night to be held Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m. at the community center. This event is raising money for scholarships for next years local senior class members. It was a chance for servicemembers from all branches and the Guantanamo Bay com munity to show their support and pound the pavement for a good cause. The race was open to all skill levels, from cutthroat competitor to fun-run jogger, and all were represented. Longtime runner Army Sgt. 1st Class Juan J. Colunga, 418th Transportation Co., JTF160, was the overall winner with a time of 17:32. It was a nice course because you could see your competition -and see if anyone was behind you, he said afterward. The other runners made me pick up my pace. Cookie Schatiranek, the womens overall winner, with a time of 21:57, is new to organ ized running -in fact, she only started running here at GTMO. Army Sgt 1st Class Digna Rosario, who placed first in her age group and 6th overall with a time of 25:59, talked like an old pro. Not only racing against others, but also racing against myself, is what brought me here today, said Rosario. The course was great and the temperature wasnt too hot. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, commander JTF-160, showed up and said a few words -It is great to see the servicemen and women from JTF-160 and the Navy base be here first thing in the morning, he said -and hit some top speeds himself, finishing second in his age group and 8th overall with a time of 21:19. Some ran for fitness; some ran for charity. Everybody who finished got something -awards were given to all who completed the 3.1 miles -and a workout besides. For this crowd, it wasnt about winning or losing -it was about getting in a good run before it got too hot. Said Rosario: It was a great day. 5K run raises money, awareness, heart rates Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt.Juan J.Colunga and Sgt 1st Class Digna Rosario grab an early lead at the races start. Navy SWCA Joe Axiotis, who finished first in his age group (16-19) with a time of 21:17. Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario, from the 160th MP Battalion, holds her first-in-her-age-group trophy. MALE DIVISION 5K RUN/WALK OVERALL STANDINGS 1. Juan J. Colunga 17:32 2. Jeffrey Johnson 19:23 3. Michael Fedeor 20:03 4. Patrich Barr 20:17 5. John Dawns 20:25 6. Joseph Vitale 20:36 FEMALE DIVISION 5K RUN/WALK OVERALL STANDINGS 1. Cookie Schatiranek 21:57 2. Autumn Bleinett 22:52 3. Kellie Goodwin 23:24 4. Kimberly Coleman 24:08 5. Andrea Petrovanie 25:43 6. Digna Rosario 25:59 Navy Federal Credit Union We serve where you serve. Did you know that servicemembers deployed or stationed in Guantanamo Bay are eligible to join Navy Federal? With more than 90 member service centers worldwide, we are the worlds largest credit union. For information on the many services Navy Federal has to offer come by or call our local branch. Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Phone #4333.

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Page 3 Friday, June 21, 2002 Men and women from both the Navy Harbor Defense and Coast Guard Port Security Unit 304 protect the shore line of Guan tanamo Bay. This team is responsible for law enforcement, search and rescue and guarding the seas that surround GTMO from any kind of terrorist activities. As 3rd Class Cadet William Houde, Coast Guard Academy puts it, Some days are long, but at the end of the day I feel proud to be contributing to the mission. Im proud to be keeping the coast clear. Pier Security & Harbor Defense Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris As a part of pier security, the USCG Vigorous heads out on a routine patrol of the harbor. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Dodd and Astor the dog I love my job, which is dealing with explosives. Im getting to know Astor, the newest member to the team. Together well protect the shore line. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Christian I live for the water. We have a lot of action out there. As a junior member, I have a lot of responsibilities and a great opportunity to excel. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class John A. Marshall I feel like we have a purpose here. The Coast Guard has a mission to do, and the Navy is glad to help pro tect the piers with them. Photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Now you see them, soon you wont: Coast guard reinforcements head off to back up their big-brother ship. Page 14 Friday, June 21, 2002 Sunday, June 16 was Father's Day at GTMO, and from the Windjammer to the paintball field the folks at Morale, Welfare and Recreation made sure it was one to remember. The day started with a "Happy Father's Day Special Brunch" at the Windjammer Club. Decorations hung on the wall and aro mas hung in the air as the menu matched the mood as a special array of food -from steamship round of beef, an array of seafood Newburg, honey cured ham and stuffed chicken breast -put the guests of honor and their families in a festive mood. By 9:30 a.m., the specially decorated tables were filled with groups of friends and family members, talking and reminiscing as they were enjoying the morning meal. In the midst of all the commotion, the most noticeable gathering was the Setzer family's table. Marine Gunnery Sgt. J. Setzer sat qui etly with his brood to enjoy his last Father's Day meal at GTMO after two years on base. Any fathers and families who stuffed themselves at brunch had a chance to work off the extra calories -and work out some aggression -with guns and paint pellets as a five-hour Fathers Day Special Paintball Tournament kicked off at 1 p.m. at the paint ball Range. There was a mixture of kids, dads and servicemembers young and old taking aim at each other. On a bright, hot and humid afternoon, the players, with protective gear and camouflage, went up and downhill, dodged, aimed and exploded paint balls at each other -all in the name of the fathers. Food, fun in the name of GTMOs fathers Story and photos by Army Pfc. JeanCarl Bertin The Wire REMINDER: The 5-on-5 Speed Ball Paintball Tournament is July 6th. Plan your strategy and provide me with team names by June 30th Capt. Gormly, x5249 Friday, June 21st HAIL & FAREWELL 455TH MP BDE, 5 p.m. RICKS OFFICERS CLUB WATER AEROBICS 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool EXTREME BOWLING 7-12 p.m., Marblehead Bowling Lanes Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Saturday, June 22nd DAWN FISHING TRIP, 7 a.m.-2 p.m., MWR Marina The GTMO XTREME ADVENTURE RACE, 7 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 23rd SPADES TOURNAMENT, 5 p.m., Liberty Recreation Center XTREME BOWLING, 1-6 p.m., Marblehead Bowling Lanes BINGO, Windjammer 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8PM Monday, June 24th WATER AEROBICS, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Marine Hill Gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 25th BINGO, 6PM Windjammer TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 PM Marine Hill Gym ALL DAY: TEACH A FRIEND A GAME AT LIB ERTY RECREATION CENTER Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 26th WATER AEROBICS, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Marine Hill Gym DOMINO TOURNAMENT, 7 p.m., Liberty Recreation Center Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley 8 p.m. Thursday, June 27th TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30pm Marine Hill Gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. One of the players at the Fathers Day Paintball game aims at his opponents as he maneuvers down-range. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Setzer enjoys his last Fathers Day Brunch with his wife and four children. Setzer left GTMO June 19 after being stationed here for two years. Friends and families eating together at the Fathers Day Brunch. Sidney Lindo, who works for the Windjammer, cuts the steamship round of beef for the Fathers Day brunch.

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Page 13 Friday, June 21, 2002 Amphibious Aquatic Backstroke Bait Bay Beach Bikini Canoe Conch Dive Dolphin Eel Fishing Goggles Jellyfish Kayak Lagoon Lake Lobster Mermaid Nautical Ocean Oxygen Pool Poseidon Raft Reel River Rod Sail Scales Scuba Sea Seahorse Shark Ship Snorkel Speedos Swim Waterski Word List Answers to last weeks puzzle Sea you soon! Friday, June 21 8 p.m. Clockstoppers (PG13) 94min 10 p.m. Changing Lanes (PG-13) 99min Saturday, June 22 8 p.m. High Crimes (PG-13) 115min 10 p.m. Jason X (R) 93min Sunday, June 23 8 p.m. The Sum of all Fears (PG-13) -124min Monday, June 24 8 p.m. Bad Company (PG-13) 117min Tuesday, June 25 8 p.m. Life or Something Like it (PG-13) -104min Wednesday, June 26 8 p.m. Changing Lanes (PG-13) 99min Thursday, June 27 8 p.m. Jason X (R) 93min Top Ten Ways to tell the Army is in Charge in GTMO (seen floating around GTMO) 10. There is no "r" in Hooah! 9. More sleeves are rolled correctly 8. Deck, hatch and head are floor, door and latrine 7. Kevlars begin to outnumber multi-pointed caps 6. Windward loop is quieter 5. Women and children are safe to go out at night with the Marine threat under control 4. Formations now held for no discernible reason 3. The Tiki Bar is out of alcohol 2. JTF-160 is now called "a classy group of guys" 1. Planning meetings are now held to plan planning meetings Page 4 Friday, June 21, 2002 A First-Class Frocking Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Casson, com mand administration officer with the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, pins Navy PN2 Christopher R. Allen without even looking during a Navy frocking that took place Tuesday morning at East Caravella. The frocking also included the promo tions of EW2 Christopher Yeung, BM3 Antonio Candelario and OS3 Christo pher Bush. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez This weeks question: How do you feel when you put on your uniform? Army Sgt. Walter Clark, 178th MP Company I am reborn. It is like my second skin. Its a little sweaty, but it makes me feel great. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Rowe, Naval Sta tion Brig It changes my life for the better. Wearing it makes me feel outstanding. Army Pfc. Brian Treeful, J3 ATFP I feel pride every time I put on this uni form. I am willing to give the ultimate sacrifice while wear ing it. Air Force Maj. Marvin Hill, USSOUTHCOM The uniform helps to instill pride in serving my country, but it doesnt change who I am. Marine Corps Cpl. Kevin Martinez, Bravo 123rd Secu rity Forces It feels good. I feel proud. It fulfills my desire to represent the Corps. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris

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prominently on the vase is remi niscent of the red ribbon worn upon the lapel and breasts of thousands who bear witness to their unyielding determination to demand a proper accounting for our missing. A slice of lemon is on the bread plate to remind us of their bitter fate. There is salt on the bread plate symbolic of the familys tears as they wait. The glass is inverted because they cannot toast with us this night. They are not here, and we remember. Remember, he continued, All of you who served with them and called them comrades, who depend upon their might and aid and relied upon them, for surely they have not forsaken you. The room fell silent, and those in attendance seemed to know that one day, any of them could be the corpsman absent from the table, a POW remembered by luckier comrades. Around the room, people rose to state the names of corpsman honor recipients. Then Navy Capt. A.J. Shimkus, Jr., Naval Commander, took center stage to offer words of inspiration and a heartfelt story. This is a phenomenal event. I am proud of all the work these sailors are doing. I am honored to be a part of the Joint Task Force, said Shimkus. Following Shimkus speech, Independent Duty Hospital Corpsman Chief Petty Officer (Surface Warfare) Clifford A. Moser, former senior medical department representative of the USS Cole, led the room in a moment of silence, and then spoke. Now, in honor of our fallen shipmates on the USS Cole, in the Pentagon, and all citizens who perished on September 11, 2001, we ask you to light this candle as we remember them tonight. It was a moving and inspira tional night whose sentiments were perhaps best expressed by a line from a poem recited by Hos pital Corpsman 3 Sherri Kennedy during the commemoration. On judgment day, God will probably say, Corpsman Up! Your place has been reserved. For all the deeds you did while on earth, your heavenly reward is well deserved. Page 5 Friday, June 21, 2002 CORPS, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 21, 2002 Bush Reaffirms Need for Homeland Defense WASHINGTON -President Bush reaffirmed in a June 19 speech that his most important jobs are to defend the homeland and protect Americans from terrorist killers. Bush, speaking to the United Broth erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America Conference, said terrorists are after America because we love freedom. He said the terrorist groups cannot stand that Americans allow people to worship freely. We love the idea of people being able to come to our country and realize dreams, he said. We love the idea of people being able to freely debate issues. We love freedom, and these cold-blooded killers hate freedom. And thats why they want to come and hurt America. And we are not going to let them. Rumsfeld: No Evidence of Al Qaeda in Kashmir MANAMA, Bahrain -"Scraps of intelligence" that Al Qaeda operatives may be in Kashmir are generally specu lative and not verifiable or actionable, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said in Pakistan Wednesday. "I do not have evidence and the United States does not have evidence of al Qaeda in Kashmir," he said. "We do have a good deal of scraps of intelli gence that come in from people saying that they believe al Qaeda are in Kash mir." However, the United States and Pakistan are working so closely to destroy al Qaeda in that country, there is no need to send U.S. troops into Kashmir. "The cooperation between the United States and Pakistan on the subject of al Qaeda is so close and so intimate and so cooperative," Rumsfeld said, "that if there were any actionable intelligence as to al Qaeda anywhere in this coun try, there isn't a doubt in my mind but that the Pakistan government would go find them and deal with them." WASHINGTON Three Americans died in the crash of an MC-130H Combat Talon II aircraft in Afghanistan, June 12. Seven other Americans survived and have been taken to medical facilities at Kandahar, said U.S. Central Command officials. Those killed were: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Sean M. Corlew, 37, of Thousand Oaks, Calif.; Air Force Staff Sgt. Anissa A. Shero, 31, of Grafton, W.Va.; and Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter P. Tycz II, 32, of Tonawanda, N.Y. Corlew and Shero were assigned to the Air Forces 16th Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Fla. Tycz was assigned to the Armys 3rd Special Forces Group, Fort Bragg, N.C. The special operations aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff near the Bande Sardeh Dam. The site is about 35 miles southwest of Gardez in Paktika province. Central Command officials said there is no evidence that the plane was shot down. The crash occurred at about 9:30 p.m. local Afghan time. Central Command officials would not comment on the mission of the plane. This is the second crash of the C-130 class of aircraft in Operation Enduring Freedom. A Marine Corps KC-130 refueler crashed Jan. 9, killing all seven crew members. The MC-130 Combat Talon II provides insertion, extraction and resupply of special operations forces and equipment. Other mis sions include psychological operations and helicopter air refueling. A total of 41 Americans have been killed in operations in and around Afghanistan, officials said. PA Flag Loaned to Pentagon WASHINGTON United We Stand, United We Sew today loaned the Pentagon a 21-by-31foot American flag made to honor the victims of the Sept. 11 tragedy. Thomas McBrien, a contractor from Bucks County, Pa., got the idea for the organization when he wanted to display a giant American flag imme diately after Sept. 11 but was unable to find one. He decided instead to piece together 4by-6-inch miniature flags. I thought why not get the community involved and create something very large that could include a wide variety of individuals, McBrien said. The organization brought together students, church groups, senior citizens, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. They sent interested groups and individuals 12 miniature flags and instructions for sewing them into panels for the giant flag, said McBriens wife, Janny. Volunteers RoseMary Gaibler, Louisa Wismer, Bernice Gilbert and Arlene Eichlin spent more than five months sewing the panels together to finish the project. I read about it in the local newspaper and got involved because I thought it would help the healing process, Wismer said. The flag is composed of 3,014 miniature flags representing each victim, 86 hand-painted flags representing countries that had victims involved in the tragedy and hand-painted flags rep resenting the service organizations that responded in the search for victims. In the blue field are four U.S. flags that flew over the U.S. Capitol, Pennsylvanias Capitol in Harrisburg, New Yorks Capitol in Albany, and the Bucks County Courthouse. Before delivery to the Pentagon, the flag hung first at the medical examiners site at Ground Zero in New York City from March 11 through May 20 and then the St. George Ferry termi nal on Staten Island, N.Y, until June 14. The flag will hang at the Pentagon from the third floor stairwell at the juncture of Corridors 3 and 4 until July 3. It will then be returned to Harrisburg for July 4. Ralph Newton, deputy director for real estate and facilities, Washington Headquarters Ser vices, accepted the flag on behalf of the Department of Defense. Events and gifts like this are truly a healing gesture and really have helped in the healing, and I think will ease the burden of those who remain and instill a determination for the work ahead, Newton said. By Megan P. Weaver Special to American Forces Press Service Photo by Jim Garamone. Dozens of handpainted flags and more than 3,000 miniature American flags were stitched together to create the 21-by-31-foot flag. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Honor guards, from left to right: HM2 Travis England, HM3 Brian Tremain and DT3 Vasquez Abdel. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The POW table, set up for all those who could not attend. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Masters of ceremonies Navy Petty Officer Tamika Richardson, and Maj. Scott E. Packard, USMC. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Hospital Corps celebrative 104th birthday cake. 3 Americans Die in Crash Hospital Corpsmans Pledge I solemnly pledge myself before God and these witnesses to prac tice faithfully all of my duties as a member of the Hospital Corps. I hold the care of the sick and injured to be a privilege and a sacred trust and will assist the Medical Department Officer with loyalty and honesty. I will not willingly permit harm to come to any patient. I will not partake of nor administer any unauthorized medication. I will hold all personal matters pertaining to the private lives of patients in strict confidence. I dedicate my heart, mind and strength to the work before me. I shall do all within my power to show in myself an example of all that is honorable and good throughout my Naval career.

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WASHINGTON Air Force Staff Sgt. Ernest Revell was in charge of keeping Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfelds plane safe at each of 10 stops on a whirlwind overseas tour. He cemented his own commitment to stay on the job by re-enlisting June 13 at 35,000 feet over Amman, Jor dan. Revell asked Rumsfelds senior military aide, Vice Adm. Ed Giambastiani, to administer the oath. He didnt know the admiral doesnt do anything small: Giambastiani invited several high-ranking people aboard the plane including Rumsfeld to attend the cere mony and congratulate Revell. I thought I was just going to reup and get a handshake, said an embarrassed-looking Revell after the ceremony. Revell is an aircraft security NCO with the 89th Security Services Squadron at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Hes been in the Air Force for seven years and re-enlisted for another five. Before administering the oath, Giambastiani said it was a new experience. As a career submariner, he said, hes more accustomed to re-enlisting peo ple well below sea level, not 35,000 feet above it. Giambastiani said he was honored Revell asked a sailor to do the honors, a tongue-incheek dig at several highrank ing Air Force officers aboard. Re-enlistment signifies his dedication to the nation and the U.S. Air Force, Giambastiani said of Revell. This young man has his sights set on about 50,000 feet. Airman re-ups on Rumsfelds airplane at 35,000 feet By Sgt. 1st Class Kath leen T. Rhem American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON President Bush signed The Public Health Security and Bioter rorism Act of 2002 Wednesday to enhance the nations ability to prevent, identify and respond to bioterrorism. As the world learned last Sept. 11, terrorists weapons of choice are unconven tional, Bush said. On that day, U.S. air planes became weapons of terror. In the days following the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the U.S. mail carried deadly microscopic spores. Bioterrorism is a real threat to our coun try, the president said. Terrorist groups seek biological weapons and some rogue states already have them, he said. Such weapons are potentially the most dangerous in the world. Last falls anthrax attacks were an incredible tragedy to a lot of people in Amer ica, Bush said. The attacks sent a warn ing we needed and have heeded. Its important that we confront these real threats to our country and prepare for future emergencies, Bush said. This bill I sign today is a part of the process of doing our duty to protect inno cent Americans from an enemy that hates America. The act will enhance Americas ability to prevent and detect bioterrorist acts. Under the law, U.S. authorities will be required to improve inspections of food entering U.S. ports. Officials will have bet ter tools to contain attacks on food sup plies. Well have the authority to track bio logical materials any where in the United States, Bush noted. The act will strengthen communi cations networks link ing health care providers with public health authorities. Since health care pro fessionals are likely to be the first to recog nize a biological attack, Bush said, the speed with which they detect and respond could be the difference between containment and catastrophe. The act will also strengthen the health care systems ability to speed treatment. It will provide local health authorities with tools and resources and fur ther develop the nations stockpiles of smallpox vaccines. It will help U.S. officials develop better medi cines and make new lifesaving drugs and therapies available more quickly. Protecting our citi zens against bioterror ism is an urgent duty of American govern ments, the president concluded. We must develop the learning, the technology and the health care delivery systems that will allow us to respond to attacks with state of the art medical care throughout our entire country. Bush signs Public Health Security, Bioterrorism Acts Page 11 Friday, June 21, 2002 Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kathleen T. Rhem, USA. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ernest Revell takes the oath from Vice Adm. Ed Giambastiani, senior military aide to Defense Secretary Donald Rums feld, at 35,000 feet over Jordan. CAMP DELTA RECEIVES MORE DETAINEES U.S. NAVAL BASE GUAN TANAMO BAY, CUBA Twentyeight additional suspected Al-Qaeda and Taliban detainees arrived here today under tight security, bringing the total num ber of detainees to 564. The detainees arrived via an Air Force C-141 military aircraft and were transported to Camp Delta for in-processing and detention. "This group of detainees brings our total to 564 in cus tody," said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, Joint Task Force 160 spokesperson. "We take our mission seriously. Today's mis sion ran smoothly due, in large part, to the training and profes sionalism of our citizen soldiers and active servicemembers. We're proud to be doing our part for the American public in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism," he said. After arriving at Camp Delta, the detainees were inprocessed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes show ers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. The camp was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees previously held at Camp X-Ray were transferred to Camp Delta. At any cost: finding freedom, and consolation, on GTMO soil Page 6 Friday, June 21, 2002 Dressed in an authentic karate uniform, 81-year-old Cuban native Ramon Baudin begins his day at 2 a.m., meditating in the backyard of his Calle Bargo home here with its view of Guantanamo Bay. After that, he does calisthenics and karate training -a ritual that he says symbolizes both his existence and struggle to break free and live among his American neighbors. Then, to finish his daily workout, a walk which he often spends contemplating how his new life began here over 40 years ago. I wanted to know what it was like to be an American, Baudin says. Born on the outskirts of present Guan tanamo Bay, Baudin was one of many Cubans who sought escape to the base as Fidel Castro ousted Fulgencio Batista y Zal divar in 1959 and introduced communism to Cuba. But it wasnt until 1961, when Castro assumed power, that Baudin made his move. Baudins exodus began with a tip from a friend who told him that Cuban authorities were looking for him and that he needed to get out. I was scared and confused on what would happen to me, so I took a bus heading toward the base, he said, hoping to seek a new home with the American military. I sneaked off the bus when I heard a captain was looking for me. When he left, I got back on the same bus and headed into the base without a struggle. Not, however, without cost. Baudins political convictions forced him to leave his family and fianc, Ediliza Sanquel, behind. I swore to her that we would get married, but I had to go, he said. It was the only way that I could find peace with myself. At first, Baudins family back in Cuba lashed out at him, ending all communication with him. Now it is Baudin who who tears up the letters his nephew sends him. Because I live here, they all fought with me, said Baudin. Now they want to be my friend, and I dont want any part of them. With his love left behind, Baudin began anew, working at Guantanamo Bay doing odd jobs on and around the base. After short stints hauling veg etables at a supply shed and packing ice, Baudin landed work as a laun derer, work which he would continue to do until he retired in 1999. This base was always familiar terri tory for Baudin, who used to play base ball on the fields as a child and interact with the Americans there. As a teenager, he worked on the base golf course as a caddy and had many American friends. Our town depended on the Americans, and we formed a close relationship with them, he said. In his second life at GTMO it was another American friend, a Marine sergeant, who would teach Baudin to find spiritual and physical solace in his new life -through the art of karate and the practice of selfdiscipline. Ten years later, Baudin earned his black belt and began taking on students of his own, teaching free of charge a unique style he developed from a mix of ancient Chi nese, Japanese, and Korean fighting tra ditions. At one point, he averaged about 30 students a week making time after his busy work schedule at the laundromat to instill the values of karate to the many service members at GTMO. While diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba were crumbling with the Cuban Missile crisis, Baudin was looking inward, honing his karate skills and eventu ally earning a 4th-degree black belt. For Baudin, karate forged an unending circle between spirit and strength, in which he found new purpose and rea son for staying at Guantanamo Bay. Karate was a healthy distraction that allowed me to practice selfdiscipline in dealing with the loss of my family, Baudin said. When I die, I want to be buried in my karate uniformit is a commitment that will never end. In 1969, he was awarded a certifi cate of appreciation by GTMO com mander J.V. Hildreth for his commitment in teaching service mem bers the art of karate. After retiring from the laundromat, Baudin contin ued this mission by teaching martial arts to whoever is interested, main taining the philosophy that he was taught so long ago. Over the years, his class sizes have gradually decreased, but his old students, many of whom have received their own black belts, stop by from time to time to see how their former sen sei is doing. Currently, he teaches HM-1 Julio Vazquez, who visits his house twice a week practicing pinansbasic karate movements similar to katas in his small backyard. Spiritually, he has made me a better per son, said Vazquez, who has been at Guan tanamo for more than three years working at the Naval hospital. I have become very con fident of myself and my abilities since I met Ramon. I consider him my family -he treats my son like a grandson and loves what we stand for, Vasquez added, happy to share his fam ily with the man who left his behind to come here. I have never looked at him any other way -for me there is no difference. For Baudin, GTMO is America, and for more than 40 years, America has been home. For all he left behind, he has a new world built around karate, self-discipline and free dom -and no regrets. I consider myself a child of America, Baudin said. I lived all my life with Ameri cans, and I will never leave this place. When asked why he didnt become a U.S. citizen, he replied, I dont need a piece of paper to tell me that I am American. By Spc. Paul Morando Special to The Wire Photo by Spc. Paul Morando Julio Vazquez watches his sensei, Ramon Baudin, demonstrate a pinan -a basic karate movement. I dont need a piece of paper to tell me that I am American. -Ramon Baudin

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Page 10 Friday, June 21 2002 For the 988th Military Police Company, the coming was tough but the going is sweet. After six months of serving Operation Enduring Freedom by guarding detainees at Camp X-Ray and Camp America here, it's time to say goodbye to Guantanamo Bay and the Caribbean sun and go home to Fort Benning, Ga. The company was only the second MP company to be deployed to GTMO, and when they arrived they certainly felt like pioneers. When we first came here, all the logistics were just overwhelmed. The food was terrible. There wasn't enough food to go around. We had dirt floors, and our tents had no power. The conditions were tough, said Army 1st Lt. Troy Brannon, executive officer of the company. But through the discomfort and the challenges of daily living, the soldiers stayed focused on their mission -and accomplished a lot dur ing their deployment here. And with the many activities available from Morale, Welfare and Recreation, they managed to find ways to keep their chins up. Morale stayed high because of that, Brannon said. We came out of here with 40 trophies for the company from MWR. We did every thing, from spades tournaments to softball, football and basketball. We did all the tournaments. Anything you can imagine. We tried to keep people actively engaged to get their mind off from being away from home. Staff Sgt. Robert Beasley, a medic for the company, concurred. In my free time, I represent the company on the field, said Beasley, who coached and led the softball and football teams to victory. Besides the fun of competition, there was also the age-old moralebooster of simply keeping busy. The soldiers of the 988th were deeply involved in the building of Camp America and Camp Delta -and the movement of detainees from Camp X-Ray. "When it comes to our mission, we provide maintenance and com munication support. We have MPs, cooks, mechanics and medics to provide medical support to the facility," said 1st Sgt. Joseph Vitale, the noncommissioned officer in charge of the company. I've been doing all types of jobs. I am a soldier first, then a medic, said Beasley. In addition to providing first aid to the soldiers and coach ing for sports events, he said, I've driven buses, filled a couple of sand bags, and everything else to keep the mission going. Preparation for that kind of do-anything attitude started right away Vitale said his soldiers left in a hurry. We were notified Tuesday, and the first group left early Friday morning, said Vitale. Within hours, I had to pack everything, say goodbye to my wife, get on a plane and leave, said Cpl. Joseph Nichols, whose job here was to escort detainees and provide security during interviews. In about three days, the first group of soldiers from the 988th was on the ground. Yet, when they arrived here, in addition to the field con ditions, they had to face another challenge -getting trained to escort and handle detainees, an operation that fell outside the training they had come with. "We normally do combat sup port, and security for core area, route reconnaissance, checkpoints and convoys. Nothing much with correction, Brannon said. We do deal with prisoners of war, but on a limited basis. Newly arrived in theater, the company went through additional training before it was ready for its two-fold mission, which was to guard a classified site, guard and escort the detainees to interviews and interrogations, then take them back to their cells. As it turned out, I think we got one of the most important jobs at Camp Delta, said Spc. Anthony Strickland, whose daily routine was to provide security and escort the detainees for interviews and in-pro cessing. Sgt. 1st Class John Lombard, operations NCOIC, said that the jun ior enlisted soldiers deserved the most recognition for job well done -they, he said, are the ones who have put in the most effort in sustaining the operation. Lombard hopes the 178th MP Company, which is replac ing the 988th, is fully trained to assume the mission his company is leaving behind -if only to make their transition to life at Camp Amer ica a little easier. But as the group worked their last duty day, Brannon was proud of how the mission had turned out. Everyone can feel some pride and some sort of accomplishment for what they've done, he said. The biggest accomplishment is that none of the soldiers or their civilian counterparts were injured, and the secu rity of the detainees was maintained on our companys watch. That was our mission, he said. Were pleased with the results. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Army 1st Lt. Troy Brannon, the execu tive officer of the 988th MP Company. Photo courtesy of 988th MP The 988th soldiers at a farewell-company run held June 7, 2002. Photo courtesy of 988th MP The senior and junior enlisted of 988th MP before leaving GTMO, compete against each other at a volleyball game June 7, 2002. Another one gone: 988th MPs head home By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 7 Friday, June 21, 2002 MIUWU makes GTMO harder to hit They're on guard 24 hours a day. Their job is seaward surveillance -to watch for and detect any dangerous threats, ranging from submarines to enemy scuba divers. They are the sailors of the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, reservists from Miami, Fl., and they guard the fourth fence line of Guan tanamo Bay. In GTMO, we are the fourth fence line, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Casson, command administration officer with the MIUWU 208. We're on a Naval base surrounded by hostile territory, with fence lines on the land but noth ing on the sea. We're charged with detecting and dealing with any threats on the entire south side of the bay. The MIUWU 208 operates out of several stations strategically located high in the hills of GTMO, where they have a tactically advan tageous view of the sea. With coast watchers on a continuous look out, the nerve center of the operation at every point is the Radar Sonar Surveillance Center. From the outside, it appears to be rather nondescript, but from within the RSSC is a glittering menagerie of hi-tech equipment, screens and panels that allow the sailors to search the underwater depths and communi cate with the other stations. This is the main platform for conducting the watch, said Casson. From here, we can communicate with all the reaction forces on the island, like Army or Coast Guard. We fill a void in the joint effort. Standing watch may seem simple, but it is challenging and exacting work. The value of such work is tremendous, and these sailors know their job and take it seriously. Let down the MIUWU, let down yourself, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Steve DeLisle, watch supervisor with the MIUWU 208. We have a very important mission, because there is no other surveillance like this here. Our mis sion is a big one. Always training for that big mis sion, 24 hours a day, the sailors of the MIUWU 208 have continually improved their mission readiness. When they started in January, they only had half the necessary people to successfully complete a mission of this duration. And to make mat ters a little more complicated, only half of those sailors were able to do the job. When we started, we were only 55 percent manned, and only half of them were trained to operate the equipment, said Casson. We had enough people to stand watch, but not for 24/7. This was the first time this type of unit has been recalled for this type of mission, he said. On a two-week AT we can get by on a skeleton crew. We were equipped for short-term, but not for this deployment. However, Casson has remained understanding about such obstacles with an optimistic view toward military circumstances. It's the nature of the beast, but it's a chal lenge any reservist's unit might encounter when called to duty. In answering that call and in order to reach operational status, the 208th had to pull peo ple from other MIUWUs still in the United States. Most of the needed people came in after the first month, but Casson said the unit wouldnt be at full manpower until halfway through the deployment. The hard part, he said, was making sure that every one was trained, learning the job as they went along. Everybody had a whole list to learn, while at the same time perform the mission, said Casson. We had to train from scratch, so it was a real learn on the job experience. One coast watcher, Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Larry Thomas, has had such a great experience on this mission that he has decided to remain on active duty when the deployment is over. On Sept. 12, I volunteered to go active duty, said Thomas. I've had a real great time on this deployment and now I have the oppor tunity to keep doing it. Scheduled to return home by the end of June, the highly motivated sailors of the MIUWU 208 have done everything necessary to get to where they are now. And Casson couldn't be more proud of them. These guys really work hard, said Cas son. Looking back, we've come leaps and bounds. It's really amazing to think back to the first time you do something that's hard to learn, but then you eventually get good at it and realize that it isn't so hard after all. After all, he said, the mission can be summed up pretty simply. We're just making GTMO harder to hit. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Casson supervises the work in the Radar Sonar Surveillance Center at one of the three surveillance points here. By Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Navy Lt. Cmdr Brian Casson, command administration officer with the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, stands watch. The sailors of the MIUWU 208 are on guard 24 hours a day looking out for seaward threats. Watching the sea all day and all night, if these sailors let down the MIUWU, they let down you

PAGE 8

Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 21, 2002 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini We may not be the pride, but without us, the pride dont ride. For the SEABEES, the Navys own go-anywhere, do-anything team of builders, mechanics, electricians and all-around construction types, that sign oustide their garage here might just say it all. They dont make the best photo sub jects at work -try getting a camera lens between a SEABEEs face and his blow torch -and they dont spout a lot of flowery quotes. They just work shifts starting at 0200 for three months when 105 SEAhuts needed to get built for the MPs living at Camp America. They build the guard towers for the detaineewatching next door at Camp Delta. They put new track light ing and plumbing at X-Ray. They move the earth and raise the walls for the force-protection bunkers along the road, build galleys and bus stops and temporary gyms. They crush gravel and pave roads. They even fix all their own equipment. This crew, the 63 members (including 11 reserve aug mentees) of the 7th Mobile Construction Battalion out of Gulfport, Miss., has been here since March. Theyre replac ing the 3rd and 133rd MCBs -the ones who built X-Ray in the first place -and like their predecessors, their job is to show up in their olive-green pickup trucks with the little yel low bees on the doors, wherever and whenever the JTF brass needs something done, and done yesterday. Like all SEABEES, theyre trained to fight but born to build -- construction workers in military uniforms, as AOIC D.D. Fowler puts it -and they love the pace of a con tingency deployment like this one, where the jobs come fast and furious and the planning is done mostly on the spot. As for the relentless GTMO sun, detail operations chief BU1 James D. Hix says the SEABEES here have one more creed: Work like hell, drink lots of water. BU3 Christopher Senn slices up a stack of 2 x 4s destined for the guts of a SEAhut near the new (and SEABEE-built) Seaside Galley at Camp America. SWCA (Steelworker) Joe M. Axiotis blows a hole in the corrugated steel wall of a soonto-be force-protection bunker near Camp America. EO3 (Equipment Operator) Shawn Thompson trims the posts of the finished force-protection bunker. These guys aint got time to pose CECN (Construction Engineer) Michael A. Garcia assembles a wall -to-be of the new SEAhut at Camp America. A six-man crew can erect a finished buliding in four days. Back at the shop, CM3 (Construction Mechanic) Justin Williams ponders the problem of a malfunctioning mobile light plant.

PAGE 9

Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 21, 2002 Story and photos by Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini We may not be the pride, but without us, the pride dont ride. For the SEABEES, the Navys own go-anywhere, do-anything team of builders, mechanics, electricians and all-around construction types, that sign oustide their garage here might just say it all. They dont make the best photo sub jects at work -try getting a camera lens between a SEABEEs face and his blow torch -and they dont spout a lot of flowery quotes. They just work shifts starting at 0200 for three months when 105 SEAhuts needed to get built for the MPs living at Camp America. They build the guard towers for the detaineewatching next door at Camp Delta. They put new track light ing and plumbing at X-Ray. They move the earth and raise the walls for the force-protection bunkers along the road, build galleys and bus stops and temporary gyms. They crush gravel and pave roads. They even fix all their own equipment. This crew, the 63 members (including 11 reserve aug mentees) of the 7th Mobile Construction Battalion out of Gulfport, Miss., has been here since March. Theyre replac ing the 3rd and 133rd MCBs -the ones who built X-Ray in the first place -and like their predecessors, their job is to show up in their olive-green pickup trucks with the little yel low bees on the doors, wherever and whenever the JTF brass needs something done, and done yesterday. Like all SEABEES, theyre trained to fight but born to build -- construction workers in military uniforms, as AOIC D.D. Fowler puts it -and they love the pace of a con tingency deployment like this one, where the jobs come fast and furious and the planning is done mostly on the spot. As for the relentless GTMO sun, detail operations chief BU1 James D. Hix says the SEABEES here have one more creed: Work like hell, drink lots of water. BU3 Christopher Senn slices up a stack of 2 x 4s destined for the guts of a SEAhut near the new (and SEABEE-built) Seaside Galley at Camp America. SWCA (Steelworker) Joe M. Axiotis blows a hole in the corrugated steel wall of a soonto-be force-protection bunker near Camp America. EO3 (Equipment Operator) Shawn Thompson trims the posts of the finished force-protection bunker. These guys aint got time to pose CECN (Construction Engineer) Michael A. Garcia assembles a wall -to-be of the new SEAhut at Camp America. A six-man crew can erect a finished buliding in four days. Back at the shop, CM3 (Construction Mechanic) Justin Williams ponders the problem of a malfunctioning mobile light plant.

PAGE 10

Page 10 Friday, June 21 2002 For the 988th Military Police Company, the coming was tough but the going is sweet. After six months of serving Operation Enduring Freedom by guarding detainees at Camp X-Ray and Camp America here, it's time to say goodbye to Guantanamo Bay and the Caribbean sun and go home to Fort Benning, Ga. The company was only the second MP company to be deployed to GTMO, and when they arrived they certainly felt like pioneers. When we first came here, all the logistics were just overwhelmed. The food was terrible. There wasn't enough food to go around. We had dirt floors, and our tents had no power. The conditions were tough, said Army 1st Lt. Troy Brannon, executive officer of the company. But through the discomfort and the challenges of daily living, the soldiers stayed focused on their mission -and accomplished a lot dur ing their deployment here. And with the many activities available from Morale, Welfare and Recreation, they managed to find ways to keep their chins up. Morale stayed high because of that, Brannon said. We came out of here with 40 trophies for the company from MWR. We did every thing, from spades tournaments to softball, football and basketball. We did all the tournaments. Anything you can imagine. We tried to keep people actively engaged to get their mind off from being away from home. Staff Sgt. Robert Beasley, a medic for the company, concurred. In my free time, I represent the company on the field, said Beasley, who coached and led the softball and football teams to victory. Besides the fun of competition, there was also the age-old moralebooster of simply keeping busy. The soldiers of the 988th were deeply involved in the building of Camp America and Camp Delta -and the movement of detainees from Camp X-Ray. "When it comes to our mission, we provide maintenance and com munication support. We have MPs, cooks, mechanics and medics to provide medical support to the facility," said 1st Sgt. Joseph Vitale, the noncommissioned officer in charge of the company. I've been doing all types of jobs. I am a soldier first, then a medic, said Beasley. In addition to providing first aid to the soldiers and coach ing for sports events, he said, I've driven buses, filled a couple of sand bags, and everything else to keep the mission going. Preparation for that kind of do-anything attitude started right away Vitale said his soldiers left in a hurry. We were notified Tuesday, and the first group left early Friday morning, said Vitale. Within hours, I had to pack everything, say goodbye to my wife, get on a plane and leave, said Cpl. Joseph Nichols, whose job here was to escort detainees and provide security during interviews. In about three days, the first group of soldiers from the 988th was on the ground. Yet, when they arrived here, in addition to the field con ditions, they had to face another challenge -getting trained to escort and handle detainees, an operation that fell outside the training they had come with. "We normally do combat sup port, and security for core area, route reconnaissance, checkpoints and convoys. Nothing much with correction, Brannon said. We do deal with prisoners of war, but on a limited basis. Newly arrived in theater, the company went through additional training before it was ready for its two-fold mission, which was to guard a classified site, guard and escort the detainees to interviews and interrogations, then take them back to their cells. As it turned out, I think we got one of the most important jobs at Camp Delta, said Spc. Anthony Strickland, whose daily routine was to provide security and escort the detainees for interviews and in-pro cessing. Sgt. 1st Class John Lombard, operations NCOIC, said that the jun ior enlisted soldiers deserved the most recognition for job well done -they, he said, are the ones who have put in the most effort in sustaining the operation. Lombard hopes the 178th MP Company, which is replac ing the 988th, is fully trained to assume the mission his company is leaving behind -if only to make their transition to life at Camp Amer ica a little easier. But as the group worked their last duty day, Brannon was proud of how the mission had turned out. Everyone can feel some pride and some sort of accomplishment for what they've done, he said. The biggest accomplishment is that none of the soldiers or their civilian counterparts were injured, and the secu rity of the detainees was maintained on our companys watch. That was our mission, he said. Were pleased with the results. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Army 1st Lt. Troy Brannon, the execu tive officer of the 988th MP Company. Photo courtesy of 988th MP The 988th soldiers at a farewell-company run held June 7, 2002. Photo courtesy of 988th MP The senior and junior enlisted of 988th MP before leaving GTMO, compete against each other at a volleyball game June 7, 2002. Another one gone: 988th MPs head home By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Page 7 Friday, June 21, 2002 MIUWU makes GTMO harder to hit They're on guard 24 hours a day. Their job is seaward surveillance -to watch for and detect any dangerous threats, ranging from submarines to enemy scuba divers. They are the sailors of the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, reservists from Miami, Fl., and they guard the fourth fence line of Guan tanamo Bay. In GTMO, we are the fourth fence line, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Casson, command administration officer with the MIUWU 208. We're on a Naval base surrounded by hostile territory, with fence lines on the land but noth ing on the sea. We're charged with detecting and dealing with any threats on the entire south side of the bay. The MIUWU 208 operates out of several stations strategically located high in the hills of GTMO, where they have a tactically advan tageous view of the sea. With coast watchers on a continuous look out, the nerve center of the operation at every point is the Radar Sonar Surveillance Center. From the outside, it appears to be rather nondescript, but from within the RSSC is a glittering menagerie of hi-tech equipment, screens and panels that allow the sailors to search the underwater depths and communi cate with the other stations. This is the main platform for conducting the watch, said Casson. From here, we can communicate with all the reaction forces on the island, like Army or Coast Guard. We fill a void in the joint effort. Standing watch may seem simple, but it is challenging and exacting work. The value of such work is tremendous, and these sailors know their job and take it seriously. Let down the MIUWU, let down yourself, said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Steve DeLisle, watch supervisor with the MIUWU 208. We have a very important mission, because there is no other surveillance like this here. Our mis sion is a big one. Always training for that big mis sion, 24 hours a day, the sailors of the MIUWU 208 have continually improved their mission readiness. When they started in January, they only had half the necessary people to successfully complete a mission of this duration. And to make mat ters a little more complicated, only half of those sailors were able to do the job. When we started, we were only 55 percent manned, and only half of them were trained to operate the equipment, said Casson. We had enough people to stand watch, but not for 24/7. This was the first time this type of unit has been recalled for this type of mission, he said. On a two-week AT we can get by on a skeleton crew. We were equipped for short-term, but not for this deployment. However, Casson has remained understanding about such obstacles with an optimistic view toward military circumstances. It's the nature of the beast, but it's a chal lenge any reservist's unit might encounter when called to duty. In answering that call and in order to reach operational status, the 208th had to pull peo ple from other MIUWUs still in the United States. Most of the needed people came in after the first month, but Casson said the unit wouldnt be at full manpower until halfway through the deployment. The hard part, he said, was making sure that every one was trained, learning the job as they went along. Everybody had a whole list to learn, while at the same time perform the mission, said Casson. We had to train from scratch, so it was a real learn on the job experience. One coast watcher, Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Larry Thomas, has had such a great experience on this mission that he has decided to remain on active duty when the deployment is over. On Sept. 12, I volunteered to go active duty, said Thomas. I've had a real great time on this deployment and now I have the oppor tunity to keep doing it. Scheduled to return home by the end of June, the highly motivated sailors of the MIUWU 208 have done everything necessary to get to where they are now. And Casson couldn't be more proud of them. These guys really work hard, said Cas son. Looking back, we've come leaps and bounds. It's really amazing to think back to the first time you do something that's hard to learn, but then you eventually get good at it and realize that it isn't so hard after all. After all, he said, the mission can be summed up pretty simply. We're just making GTMO harder to hit. Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Casson supervises the work in the Radar Sonar Surveillance Center at one of the three surveillance points here. By Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Chris S. Pisano Navy Lt. Cmdr Brian Casson, command administration officer with the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, stands watch. The sailors of the MIUWU 208 are on guard 24 hours a day looking out for seaward threats. Watching the sea all day and all night, if these sailors let down the MIUWU, they let down you

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WASHINGTON Air Force Staff Sgt. Ernest Revell was in charge of keeping Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfelds plane safe at each of 10 stops on a whirlwind overseas tour. He cemented his own commitment to stay on the job by re-enlisting June 13 at 35,000 feet over Amman, Jor dan. Revell asked Rumsfelds senior military aide, Vice Adm. Ed Giambastiani, to administer the oath. He didnt know the admiral doesnt do anything small: Giambastiani invited several high-ranking people aboard the plane including Rumsfeld to attend the cere mony and congratulate Revell. I thought I was just going to reup and get a handshake, said an embarrassed-looking Revell after the ceremony. Revell is an aircraft security NCO with the 89th Security Services Squadron at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Hes been in the Air Force for seven years and re-enlisted for another five. Before administering the oath, Giambastiani said it was a new experience. As a career submariner, he said, hes more accustomed to re-enlisting peo ple well below sea level, not 35,000 feet above it. Giambastiani said he was honored Revell asked a sailor to do the honors, a tongue-incheek dig at several highrank ing Air Force officers aboard. Re-enlistment signifies his dedication to the nation and the U.S. Air Force, Giambastiani said of Revell. This young man has his sights set on about 50,000 feet. Airman re-ups on Rumsfelds airplane at 35,000 feet By Sgt. 1st Class Kath leen T. Rhem American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON President Bush signed The Public Health Security and Bioter rorism Act of 2002 Wednesday to enhance the nations ability to prevent, identify and respond to bioterrorism. As the world learned last Sept. 11, terrorists weapons of choice are unconven tional, Bush said. On that day, U.S. air planes became weapons of terror. In the days following the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the U.S. mail carried deadly microscopic spores. Bioterrorism is a real threat to our coun try, the president said. Terrorist groups seek biological weapons and some rogue states already have them, he said. Such weapons are potentially the most dangerous in the world. Last falls anthrax attacks were an incredible tragedy to a lot of people in Amer ica, Bush said. The attacks sent a warn ing we needed and have heeded. Its important that we confront these real threats to our country and prepare for future emergencies, Bush said. This bill I sign today is a part of the process of doing our duty to protect inno cent Americans from an enemy that hates America. The act will enhance Americas ability to prevent and detect bioterrorist acts. Under the law, U.S. authorities will be required to improve inspections of food entering U.S. ports. Officials will have bet ter tools to contain attacks on food sup plies. Well have the authority to track bio logical materials any where in the United States, Bush noted. The act will strengthen communi cations networks link ing health care providers with public health authorities. Since health care pro fessionals are likely to be the first to recog nize a biological attack, Bush said, the speed with which they detect and respond could be the difference between containment and catastrophe. The act will also strengthen the health care systems ability to speed treatment. It will provide local health authorities with tools and resources and fur ther develop the nations stockpiles of smallpox vaccines. It will help U.S. officials develop better medi cines and make new lifesaving drugs and therapies available more quickly. Protecting our citi zens against bioterror ism is an urgent duty of American govern ments, the president concluded. We must develop the learning, the technology and the health care delivery systems that will allow us to respond to attacks with state of the art medical care throughout our entire country. Bush signs Public Health Security, Bioterrorism Acts Page 11 Friday, June 21, 2002 Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kathleen T. Rhem, USA. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ernest Revell takes the oath from Vice Adm. Ed Giambastiani, senior military aide to Defense Secretary Donald Rums feld, at 35,000 feet over Jordan. CAMP DELTA RECEIVES MORE DETAINEES U.S. NAVAL BASE GUAN TANAMO BAY, CUBA Twentyeight additional suspected Al-Qaeda and Taliban detainees arrived here today under tight security, bringing the total num ber of detainees to 564. The detainees arrived via an Air Force C-141 military aircraft and were transported to Camp Delta for in-processing and detention. "This group of detainees brings our total to 564 in cus tody," said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, Joint Task Force 160 spokesperson. "We take our mission seriously. Today's mis sion ran smoothly due, in large part, to the training and profes sionalism of our citizen soldiers and active servicemembers. We're proud to be doing our part for the American public in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism," he said. After arriving at Camp Delta, the detainees were inprocessed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes show ers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. The camp was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees previously held at Camp X-Ray were transferred to Camp Delta. At any cost: finding freedom, and consolation, on GTMO soil Page 6 Friday, June 21, 2002 Dressed in an authentic karate uniform, 81-year-old Cuban native Ramon Baudin begins his day at 2 a.m., meditating in the backyard of his Calle Bargo home here with its view of Guantanamo Bay. After that, he does calisthenics and karate training -a ritual that he says symbolizes both his existence and struggle to break free and live among his American neighbors. Then, to finish his daily workout, a walk which he often spends contemplating how his new life began here over 40 years ago. I wanted to know what it was like to be an American, Baudin says. Born on the outskirts of present Guan tanamo Bay, Baudin was one of many Cubans who sought escape to the base as Fidel Castro ousted Fulgencio Batista y Zal divar in 1959 and introduced communism to Cuba. But it wasnt until 1961, when Castro assumed power, that Baudin made his move. Baudins exodus began with a tip from a friend who told him that Cuban authorities were looking for him and that he needed to get out. I was scared and confused on what would happen to me, so I took a bus heading toward the base, he said, hoping to seek a new home with the American military. I sneaked off the bus when I heard a captain was looking for me. When he left, I got back on the same bus and headed into the base without a struggle. Not, however, without cost. Baudins political convictions forced him to leave his family and fianc, Ediliza Sanquel, behind. I swore to her that we would get married, but I had to go, he said. It was the only way that I could find peace with myself. At first, Baudins family back in Cuba lashed out at him, ending all communication with him. Now it is Baudin who who tears up the letters his nephew sends him. Because I live here, they all fought with me, said Baudin. Now they want to be my friend, and I dont want any part of them. With his love left behind, Baudin began anew, working at Guantanamo Bay doing odd jobs on and around the base. After short stints hauling veg etables at a supply shed and packing ice, Baudin landed work as a laun derer, work which he would continue to do until he retired in 1999. This base was always familiar terri tory for Baudin, who used to play base ball on the fields as a child and interact with the Americans there. As a teenager, he worked on the base golf course as a caddy and had many American friends. Our town depended on the Americans, and we formed a close relationship with them, he said. In his second life at GTMO it was another American friend, a Marine sergeant, who would teach Baudin to find spiritual and physical solace in his new life -through the art of karate and the practice of selfdiscipline. Ten years later, Baudin earned his black belt and began taking on students of his own, teaching free of charge a unique style he developed from a mix of ancient Chi nese, Japanese, and Korean fighting tra ditions. At one point, he averaged about 30 students a week making time after his busy work schedule at the laundromat to instill the values of karate to the many service members at GTMO. While diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba were crumbling with the Cuban Missile crisis, Baudin was looking inward, honing his karate skills and eventu ally earning a 4th-degree black belt. For Baudin, karate forged an unending circle between spirit and strength, in which he found new purpose and rea son for staying at Guantanamo Bay. Karate was a healthy distraction that allowed me to practice selfdiscipline in dealing with the loss of my family, Baudin said. When I die, I want to be buried in my karate uniformit is a commitment that will never end. In 1969, he was awarded a certifi cate of appreciation by GTMO com mander J.V. Hildreth for his commitment in teaching service mem bers the art of karate. After retiring from the laundromat, Baudin contin ued this mission by teaching martial arts to whoever is interested, main taining the philosophy that he was taught so long ago. Over the years, his class sizes have gradually decreased, but his old students, many of whom have received their own black belts, stop by from time to time to see how their former sen sei is doing. Currently, he teaches HM-1 Julio Vazquez, who visits his house twice a week practicing pinansbasic karate movements similar to katas in his small backyard. Spiritually, he has made me a better per son, said Vazquez, who has been at Guan tanamo for more than three years working at the Naval hospital. I have become very con fident of myself and my abilities since I met Ramon. I consider him my family -he treats my son like a grandson and loves what we stand for, Vasquez added, happy to share his fam ily with the man who left his behind to come here. I have never looked at him any other way -for me there is no difference. For Baudin, GTMO is America, and for more than 40 years, America has been home. For all he left behind, he has a new world built around karate, self-discipline and free dom -and no regrets. I consider myself a child of America, Baudin said. I lived all my life with Ameri cans, and I will never leave this place. When asked why he didnt become a U.S. citizen, he replied, I dont need a piece of paper to tell me that I am American. By Spc. Paul Morando Special to The Wire Photo by Spc. Paul Morando Julio Vazquez watches his sensei, Ramon Baudin, demonstrate a pinan -a basic karate movement. I dont need a piece of paper to tell me that I am American. -Ramon Baudin

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prominently on the vase is remi niscent of the red ribbon worn upon the lapel and breasts of thousands who bear witness to their unyielding determination to demand a proper accounting for our missing. A slice of lemon is on the bread plate to remind us of their bitter fate. There is salt on the bread plate symbolic of the familys tears as they wait. The glass is inverted because they cannot toast with us this night. They are not here, and we remember. Remember, he continued, All of you who served with them and called them comrades, who depend upon their might and aid and relied upon them, for surely they have not forsaken you. The room fell silent, and those in attendance seemed to know that one day, any of them could be the corpsman absent from the table, a POW remembered by luckier comrades. Around the room, people rose to state the names of corpsman honor recipients. Then Navy Capt. A.J. Shimkus, Jr., Naval Commander, took center stage to offer words of inspiration and a heartfelt story. This is a phenomenal event. I am proud of all the work these sailors are doing. I am honored to be a part of the Joint Task Force, said Shimkus. Following Shimkus speech, Independent Duty Hospital Corpsman Chief Petty Officer (Surface Warfare) Clifford A. Moser, former senior medical department representative of the USS Cole, led the room in a moment of silence, and then spoke. Now, in honor of our fallen shipmates on the USS Cole, in the Pentagon, and all citizens who perished on September 11, 2001, we ask you to light this candle as we remember them tonight. It was a moving and inspira tional night whose sentiments were perhaps best expressed by a line from a poem recited by Hos pital Corpsman 3 Sherri Kennedy during the commemoration. On judgment day, God will probably say, Corpsman Up! Your place has been reserved. For all the deeds you did while on earth, your heavenly reward is well deserved. Page 5 Friday, June 21, 2002 CORPS, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 21, 2002 Bush Reaffirms Need for Homeland Defense WASHINGTON -President Bush reaffirmed in a June 19 speech that his most important jobs are to defend the homeland and protect Americans from terrorist killers. Bush, speaking to the United Broth erhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America Conference, said terrorists are after America because we love freedom. He said the terrorist groups cannot stand that Americans allow people to worship freely. We love the idea of people being able to come to our country and realize dreams, he said. We love the idea of people being able to freely debate issues. We love freedom, and these cold-blooded killers hate freedom. And thats why they want to come and hurt America. And we are not going to let them. Rumsfeld: No Evidence of Al Qaeda in Kashmir MANAMA, Bahrain -"Scraps of intelligence" that Al Qaeda operatives may be in Kashmir are generally specu lative and not verifiable or actionable, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said in Pakistan Wednesday. "I do not have evidence and the United States does not have evidence of al Qaeda in Kashmir," he said. "We do have a good deal of scraps of intelli gence that come in from people saying that they believe al Qaeda are in Kash mir." However, the United States and Pakistan are working so closely to destroy al Qaeda in that country, there is no need to send U.S. troops into Kashmir. "The cooperation between the United States and Pakistan on the subject of al Qaeda is so close and so intimate and so cooperative," Rumsfeld said, "that if there were any actionable intelligence as to al Qaeda anywhere in this coun try, there isn't a doubt in my mind but that the Pakistan government would go find them and deal with them." WASHINGTON Three Americans died in the crash of an MC-130H Combat Talon II aircraft in Afghanistan, June 12. Seven other Americans survived and have been taken to medical facilities at Kandahar, said U.S. Central Command officials. Those killed were: Air Force Tech. Sgt. Sean M. Corlew, 37, of Thousand Oaks, Calif.; Air Force Staff Sgt. Anissa A. Shero, 31, of Grafton, W.Va.; and Army Sgt. 1st Class Peter P. Tycz II, 32, of Tonawanda, N.Y. Corlew and Shero were assigned to the Air Forces 16th Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Fla. Tycz was assigned to the Armys 3rd Special Forces Group, Fort Bragg, N.C. The special operations aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff near the Bande Sardeh Dam. The site is about 35 miles southwest of Gardez in Paktika province. Central Command officials said there is no evidence that the plane was shot down. The crash occurred at about 9:30 p.m. local Afghan time. Central Command officials would not comment on the mission of the plane. This is the second crash of the C-130 class of aircraft in Operation Enduring Freedom. A Marine Corps KC-130 refueler crashed Jan. 9, killing all seven crew members. The MC-130 Combat Talon II provides insertion, extraction and resupply of special operations forces and equipment. Other mis sions include psychological operations and helicopter air refueling. A total of 41 Americans have been killed in operations in and around Afghanistan, officials said. PA Flag Loaned to Pentagon WASHINGTON United We Stand, United We Sew today loaned the Pentagon a 21-by-31foot American flag made to honor the victims of the Sept. 11 tragedy. Thomas McBrien, a contractor from Bucks County, Pa., got the idea for the organization when he wanted to display a giant American flag imme diately after Sept. 11 but was unable to find one. He decided instead to piece together 4by-6-inch miniature flags. I thought why not get the community involved and create something very large that could include a wide variety of individuals, McBrien said. The organization brought together students, church groups, senior citizens, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. They sent interested groups and individuals 12 miniature flags and instructions for sewing them into panels for the giant flag, said McBriens wife, Janny. Volunteers RoseMary Gaibler, Louisa Wismer, Bernice Gilbert and Arlene Eichlin spent more than five months sewing the panels together to finish the project. I read about it in the local newspaper and got involved because I thought it would help the healing process, Wismer said. The flag is composed of 3,014 miniature flags representing each victim, 86 hand-painted flags representing countries that had victims involved in the tragedy and hand-painted flags rep resenting the service organizations that responded in the search for victims. In the blue field are four U.S. flags that flew over the U.S. Capitol, Pennsylvanias Capitol in Harrisburg, New Yorks Capitol in Albany, and the Bucks County Courthouse. Before delivery to the Pentagon, the flag hung first at the medical examiners site at Ground Zero in New York City from March 11 through May 20 and then the St. George Ferry termi nal on Staten Island, N.Y, until June 14. The flag will hang at the Pentagon from the third floor stairwell at the juncture of Corridors 3 and 4 until July 3. It will then be returned to Harrisburg for July 4. Ralph Newton, deputy director for real estate and facilities, Washington Headquarters Ser vices, accepted the flag on behalf of the Department of Defense. Events and gifts like this are truly a healing gesture and really have helped in the healing, and I think will ease the burden of those who remain and instill a determination for the work ahead, Newton said. By Megan P. Weaver Special to American Forces Press Service Photo by Jim Garamone. Dozens of handpainted flags and more than 3,000 miniature American flags were stitched together to create the 21-by-31-foot flag. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Honor guards, from left to right: HM2 Travis England, HM3 Brian Tremain and DT3 Vasquez Abdel. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The POW table, set up for all those who could not attend. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Masters of ceremonies Navy Petty Officer Tamika Richardson, and Maj. Scott E. Packard, USMC. Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa The Hospital Corps celebrative 104th birthday cake. 3 Americans Die in Crash Hospital Corpsmans Pledge I solemnly pledge myself before God and these witnesses to prac tice faithfully all of my duties as a member of the Hospital Corps. I hold the care of the sick and injured to be a privilege and a sacred trust and will assist the Medical Department Officer with loyalty and honesty. I will not willingly permit harm to come to any patient. I will not partake of nor administer any unauthorized medication. I will hold all personal matters pertaining to the private lives of patients in strict confidence. I dedicate my heart, mind and strength to the work before me. I shall do all within my power to show in myself an example of all that is honorable and good throughout my Naval career.

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Page 13 Friday, June 21, 2002 Amphibious Aquatic Backstroke Bait Bay Beach Bikini Canoe Conch Dive Dolphin Eel Fishing Goggles Jellyfish Kayak Lagoon Lake Lobster Mermaid Nautical Ocean Oxygen Pool Poseidon Raft Reel River Rod Sail Scales Scuba Sea Seahorse Shark Ship Snorkel Speedos Swim Waterski Word List Answers to last weeks puzzle Sea you soon! Friday, June 21 8 p.m. Clockstoppers (PG13) 94min 10 p.m. Changing Lanes (PG-13) 99min Saturday, June 22 8 p.m. High Crimes (PG-13) 115min 10 p.m. Jason X (R) 93min Sunday, June 23 8 p.m. The Sum of all Fears (PG-13) -124min Monday, June 24 8 p.m. Bad Company (PG-13) 117min Tuesday, June 25 8 p.m. Life or Something Like it (PG-13) -104min Wednesday, June 26 8 p.m. Changing Lanes (PG-13) 99min Thursday, June 27 8 p.m. Jason X (R) 93min Top Ten Ways to tell the Army is in Charge in GTMO (seen floating around GTMO) 10. There is no "r" in Hooah! 9. More sleeves are rolled correctly 8. Deck, hatch and head are floor, door and latrine 7. Kevlars begin to outnumber multi-pointed caps 6. Windward loop is quieter 5. Women and children are safe to go out at night with the Marine threat under control 4. Formations now held for no discernible reason 3. The Tiki Bar is out of alcohol 2. JTF-160 is now called "a classy group of guys" 1. Planning meetings are now held to plan planning meetings Page 4 Friday, June 21, 2002 A First-Class Frocking Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Casson, com mand administration officer with the Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 208, pins Navy PN2 Christopher R. Allen without even looking during a Navy frocking that took place Tuesday morning at East Caravella. The frocking also included the promo tions of EW2 Christopher Yeung, BM3 Antonio Candelario and OS3 Christo pher Bush. Photo by Spc. Jose A. Martinez This weeks question: How do you feel when you put on your uniform? Army Sgt. Walter Clark, 178th MP Company I am reborn. It is like my second skin. Its a little sweaty, but it makes me feel great. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Rowe, Naval Sta tion Brig It changes my life for the better. Wearing it makes me feel outstanding. Army Pfc. Brian Treeful, J3 ATFP I feel pride every time I put on this uni form. I am willing to give the ultimate sacrifice while wear ing it. Air Force Maj. Marvin Hill, USSOUTHCOM The uniform helps to instill pride in serving my country, but it doesnt change who I am. Marine Corps Cpl. Kevin Martinez, Bravo 123rd Secu rity Forces It feels good. I feel proud. It fulfills my desire to represent the Corps. Compiled by Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Spc. Joseph A. Morris

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Page 3 Friday, June 21, 2002 Men and women from both the Navy Harbor Defense and Coast Guard Port Security Unit 304 protect the shore line of Guan tanamo Bay. This team is responsible for law enforcement, search and rescue and guarding the seas that surround GTMO from any kind of terrorist activities. As 3rd Class Cadet William Houde, Coast Guard Academy puts it, Some days are long, but at the end of the day I feel proud to be contributing to the mission. Im proud to be keeping the coast clear. Pier Security & Harbor Defense Compiled by Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Spc. Joseph A. Morris As a part of pier security, the USCG Vigorous heads out on a routine patrol of the harbor. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Dodd and Astor the dog I love my job, which is dealing with explosives. Im getting to know Astor, the newest member to the team. Together well protect the shore line. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Christian I live for the water. We have a lot of action out there. As a junior member, I have a lot of responsibilities and a great opportunity to excel. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class John A. Marshall I feel like we have a purpose here. The Coast Guard has a mission to do, and the Navy is glad to help pro tect the piers with them. Photos by Spc. Joseph A. Morris Now you see them, soon you wont: Coast guard reinforcements head off to back up their big-brother ship. Page 14 Friday, June 21, 2002 Sunday, June 16 was Father's Day at GTMO, and from the Windjammer to the paintball field the folks at Morale, Welfare and Recreation made sure it was one to remember. The day started with a "Happy Father's Day Special Brunch" at the Windjammer Club. Decorations hung on the wall and aro mas hung in the air as the menu matched the mood as a special array of food -from steamship round of beef, an array of seafood Newburg, honey cured ham and stuffed chicken breast -put the guests of honor and their families in a festive mood. By 9:30 a.m., the specially decorated tables were filled with groups of friends and family members, talking and reminiscing as they were enjoying the morning meal. In the midst of all the commotion, the most noticeable gathering was the Setzer family's table. Marine Gunnery Sgt. J. Setzer sat qui etly with his brood to enjoy his last Father's Day meal at GTMO after two years on base. Any fathers and families who stuffed themselves at brunch had a chance to work off the extra calories -and work out some aggression -with guns and paint pellets as a five-hour Fathers Day Special Paintball Tournament kicked off at 1 p.m. at the paint ball Range. There was a mixture of kids, dads and servicemembers young and old taking aim at each other. On a bright, hot and humid afternoon, the players, with protective gear and camouflage, went up and downhill, dodged, aimed and exploded paint balls at each other -all in the name of the fathers. Food, fun in the name of GTMOs fathers Story and photos by Army Pfc. JeanCarl Bertin The Wire REMINDER: The 5-on-5 Speed Ball Paintball Tournament is July 6th. Plan your strategy and provide me with team names by June 30th Capt. Gormly, x5249 Friday, June 21st HAIL & FAREWELL 455TH MP BDE, 5 p.m. RICKS OFFICERS CLUB WATER AEROBICS 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool EXTREME BOWLING 7-12 p.m., Marblehead Bowling Lanes Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Saturday, June 22nd DAWN FISHING TRIP, 7 a.m.-2 p.m., MWR Marina The GTMO XTREME ADVENTURE RACE, 7 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 23rd SPADES TOURNAMENT, 5 p.m., Liberty Recreation Center XTREME BOWLING, 1-6 p.m., Marblehead Bowling Lanes BINGO, Windjammer 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8PM Monday, June 24th WATER AEROBICS, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Marine Hill Gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 25th BINGO, 6PM Windjammer TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 PM Marine Hill Gym ALL DAY: TEACH A FRIEND A GAME AT LIB ERTY RECREATION CENTER Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 26th WATER AEROBICS, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill Pool TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Marine Hill Gym DOMINO TOURNAMENT, 7 p.m., Liberty Recreation Center Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley 8 p.m. Thursday, June 27th TAE-KWON DO, 6:30-7:30pm Marine Hill Gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. One of the players at the Fathers Day Paintball game aims at his opponents as he maneuvers down-range. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Setzer enjoys his last Fathers Day Brunch with his wife and four children. Setzer left GTMO June 19 after being stationed here for two years. Friends and families eating together at the Fathers Day Brunch. Sidney Lindo, who works for the Windjammer, cuts the steamship round of beef for the Fathers Day brunch.

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Page 2 Friday, June 21, 2002 Help the JTF maintain Operational Security Do not discuss classified information over handheld radios, cell phones, unsecure phones, or unclassified computers (NIPRNet) Dispose of working papers and classified materials via Burn Bags The JTF will protect: Identities/location of detainees Detention Operations Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTP's) Security Measures implemented throughout the Joint Operations Area Detainee transfer times and routes Watch what you say. You could be jeopardizing the mission Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders A little something to put things in perspec tive An article in National Geographic several years ago provided a penetrating picture of Gods wings. After a forest fire in Yellowstone National Park, forest rangers began their trek up a mountain to assess the infernos damage. One ranger found a bird literally petrified in ashes, perched statuesquely on the ground at the base of a tree. Somewhat sickened by the eerie sight, he knocked over the bird with a stick. When he gently struck it, three tiny chicks scurried from under their dead mothers wings. The loving mother, keenly aware of impending disaster, had carried her offspring to the base of the tree and had gathered them under her wings, instinctively knowing that the toxic smoke would rise. She could have flown to safety but had refused to abandon her babies. Then the blaze had arrived and the heat had scorched her small body, the mother had remained steadfast. Because she had been willing to die, those under the cover of her wings would live. He will cover you with his feathers, and under his wings you will find refuge. (Psalm 91:4) Being loved this much should make a dif ference in your life. Remember the One who loves you, and then be different because of His love. Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Deputy JIB Director: Lt. Cmdr. William Breyfogle Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff NCOIC: Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor-in-Chief: Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa News Editor: Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Spc. Chris S. Pisano Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Spc. Joseph A. Morris Spc. Jose A. Martinez Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. In order to rent and operate watercraft at GTMO Bay, you must take the Small Boat Operator Course and be certified by the MWR Marina. When boating, you must file a float plan with Port Control. You must orient your self to visible reference points on the map prior to leaving the Marina, and keep adjusting your course while on the water. Always monitor your radio and keep it within easy listening distance. REMEMBER THAT THE NORTH ERN BOUNDARY LINE MARKS THE END OF THE U.S. ZONE. IF YOU CROSS INTO CUBAN WATERS, YOU WILL BE PROSECUTED. REMEMBER: Photographing or videotap ing any detainee facility, detainee movement, or detainee, unless authorized by the Com mander JTF-160, to include Camp X-Ray, Camp Delta and any future detention facility or Marine Observation Posts is strictly forbid den, and violators will be prosecuted. (From JTF-160 General Order #1, of 4/20/02, and COMNAVBASEGTMOINST 1710.10G) ROAD RULES Remember, there is NO PASSING allowed in GTMO. You cannot cross the center line at any time. You can only pass a bus if it is in an off-road bus stop, then use caution. Also, due to the recent increase of heavy vehicle traffic, close calls and other safety issues dealing with protection of personnel, the speed limit on Kittery Beach Road was reduced to 25 mph effective June 18. Please help us protect you by slowing down and enjoying the Caribbean lifestyle. Dave Nelson, GTMO Safety Manager Gods Wings Page 15 Friday, June 21, 2002 At 6:30 on a warm June 15 morning, 216 runners took off from in front of the Main Gym on base for a 5K run that raised aware ness, money -and plenty of heart rates. The Juneteenth Celebration 2002 5k Run/Walk, sponsored by Morale, Welfare and Recreation and the African American Cultural Organization, was a part of a nationwide lob bying effort to make June 17, the anniversary of the end of slavery in the U.S., a national holiday. It was a chance for the ACCO to sell tick ets for the Bridging The Gap soul food tast ing night to be held Saturday from 5 to 9 p.m. at the community center. This event is raising money for scholarships for next years local senior class members. It was a chance for servicemembers from all branches and the Guantanamo Bay com munity to show their support and pound the pavement for a good cause. The race was open to all skill levels, from cutthroat competitor to fun-run jogger, and all were represented. Longtime runner Army Sgt. 1st Class Juan J. Colunga, 418th Transportation Co., JTF160, was the overall winner with a time of 17:32. It was a nice course because you could see your competition -and see if anyone was behind you, he said afterward. The other runners made me pick up my pace. Cookie Schatiranek, the womens overall winner, with a time of 21:57, is new to organ ized running -in fact, she only started running here at GTMO. Army Sgt 1st Class Digna Rosario, who placed first in her age group and 6th overall with a time of 25:59, talked like an old pro. Not only racing against others, but also racing against myself, is what brought me here today, said Rosario. The course was great and the temperature wasnt too hot. Army Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus, commander JTF-160, showed up and said a few words -It is great to see the servicemen and women from JTF-160 and the Navy base be here first thing in the morning, he said -and hit some top speeds himself, finishing second in his age group and 8th overall with a time of 21:19. Some ran for fitness; some ran for charity. Everybody who finished got something -awards were given to all who completed the 3.1 miles -and a workout besides. For this crowd, it wasnt about winning or losing -it was about getting in a good run before it got too hot. Said Rosario: It was a great day. 5K run raises money, awareness, heart rates Story and photos by Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Army Staff Sgt.Juan J.Colunga and Sgt 1st Class Digna Rosario grab an early lead at the races start. Navy SWCA Joe Axiotis, who finished first in his age group (16-19) with a time of 21:17. Army Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario, from the 160th MP Battalion, holds her first-in-her-age-group trophy. MALE DIVISION 5K RUN/WALK OVERALL STANDINGS 1. Juan J. Colunga 17:32 2. Jeffrey Johnson 19:23 3. Michael Fedeor 20:03 4. Patrich Barr 20:17 5. John Dawns 20:25 6. Joseph Vitale 20:36 FEMALE DIVISION 5K RUN/WALK OVERALL STANDINGS 1. Cookie Schatiranek 21:57 2. Autumn Bleinett 22:52 3. Kellie Goodwin 23:24 4. Kimberly Coleman 24:08 5. Andrea Petrovanie 25:43 6. Digna Rosario 25:59 Navy Federal Credit Union We serve where you serve. Did you know that servicemembers deployed or stationed in Guantanamo Bay are eligible to join Navy Federal? With more than 90 member service centers worldwide, we are the worlds largest credit union. For information on the many services Navy Federal has to offer come by or call our local branch. Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Phone #4333.

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Its a cry that has echoed throughout the years. It is the cry of pain, fear and suffering. In response to this call, a group of men and women have come armed with the tools and weapons of com passion. With badges, medicines and even with their own lives, they have fought to save the lives of oth ers. Wherever you find hospital corpsmen, the expression above and beyond the call of duty is heard. -from Years of Valor: The History of the Hospital Corps. The United States Naval Hospi tal, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, held a somber yet proud 104th-birthday celebration at the Windjammer on Friday evening. The event celebrated 104 years of selfless service, sacrifice and heroism of hospital corpsmen who returned from battle, and those whose self-sacrifice gave so many others the chance to greet their families at the front door once again. Sailors in crisp white uniforms marched down the center of the room, proudly carrying the colors and the Prisoner of War Flag. Heartfelt stares glazed the eyes of all in the room. Then a bell was rung as Chief Hospital Corpsman Joseph Engle recited the POW and MIA presentation. Standing at the podium, Engle explained the significance of an isolated table, set but empty, in the corner of the room. This table set for one is small, symbolizing the frailty of one pris oner alone against his oppressors. The tablecloth is white, symboliz ing the purity of their intentions to respond to our countrys call to arms. The single rose displayed in the vase reminds us of the families and loved ones of our comrade-inarms who keep the faith awaiting their return. The red ribbon tied so Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Running away with a GTMO 5K Page 15 SEABEES swarm all over base Page 8 Cuban karate master finds peace Page 6 Tools, weapons of compassion Friday, June 21, 2002 Volume 2, Issue 2 The Navys tradition of going overboard Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy By Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire See CORPS, page 5 A look inside... One Naval tradition is that when a member catches the ferry to the Leeward side to go home, his remaining shipmates celebrate his homeward trip by jumping into Guantanamo Bay as the ferry leaves. When Legalman 1st Class Jerry Connors and other servicemembers took the trip home recently, their JTF-160 shipmates jumped into the bay en masse. Operations Specialist 3rd Class Jennifer Heiligenman, one of the "jumpers," said it's probably a Navy-only custom. "I think it is a 'squid thing,'" she said, laughing. "The other services, like the Army and the Air Force, don't seem to like salt water too much." On their 104th birthday, GTMOs Hospital Corpsmen hold an event to remember Page 16 Friday, June 21, 2002 With Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson Q: Good morning, Petty Officer Tamika Richardson. This is your 15 min utes of fame. How are you doing today? A: I'm doing well, thanks. Q: Pharmacy busy today? A: The usual. Q: How would you describe yourself? A: Outgoing and sensitive. All bark with little bite. Q: How long have you been here at Guantanamo Bay? A: About eight months, so that leaves about another 22 months to go. Q: So, youre permanent party here. A: Yes. Q: In for the long haul. Do you like it here at GTMO? A: I love GTMO. The only thing I dont like is that sometimes I feel a little claustrophobic. Working, living, and par tying with the same people, there's no escape. Q: And the good points? A: The serenity, the Caribbean atmos phere, and the great opportunities for education they have here. Q: Youre taking classes here? A: Yes, I am taking Criminal Justice classes. Ultimately, Id like to get in to Forensic Science. I know it sounds strange but I love school. Q: Any advice for those just arriving? A: Everything here is not as it seems. People should take the time out to get to know people before they judge them. Q: Do you have a special spot of serenity here that you like to go to? A: My spot to go and relax -or to just get away, even for a minute -is the hos pital pier. Q: And when you're not working, or relaxing, what do you do for fun? A: Well, I play a lot of sports. Ive been involved in almost all the sports games so far. I just recently played in the Army-Navy basketball game. I'm really looking forward to football season, though I wish it was contact because I like getting down and dirty. Q: Why do you participate in all the sporting events? A: To stay busy and keep from going crazy. Oh, and to get back my girlish fig ure. I'm on my way. But if I'm not playing I'm definitely the loudest fan there. Q: Why are you always the loudest fan at a game? A: One word -pride. To keep my team and the fans motivated. Being loud helps! Q: And, what about friends, have you made any good friends here? A: Yeah, JoJo Stafford and Elaine Flo rence. They help me with my little boy Dominick, they're great to talk to, they really help me out. Id be lost without them. Q: How old is your little boy? A: He's five years old and adorable. He's growing up so fast. It's really funny to see him, this little boy talking like a lit tle grownup. Q: Do you have any pets here or back home? A: Funny you should mention that, I have a Chihuahua named Scoobie. Hes my other child. Q: How about the party scene? Are you one for the Windjammer or the Tiki Bar? A: Definitely the Tiki Bar. I love the island atmosphere. Q: Ahh, the Tiki Bar. I'm sure you've heard a lot of pick-up lines there. What's the worst one you've heard so far? A: The worst one I've heard was from this guy who just came out and said, I need a sugar mama, just someone that has a house I could lay up in and a car I could use. I told him he was really smooth. Q: Well, have you met anyone, are you seeing anyone at the moment? A: Actually, a certain Secret Under cover Lover, Army Pfc. Eric Brown, and I have been together for the last four months. He was last weeks 15 minutes of fame. Q: And how do you feel about him using that nickname in print? A: Take a guess. Q: Oh. Right. Photo by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Tamika Richardson hard at work in the pharmacy. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire The prescription for success at GTMO