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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00055
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: June 14, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00055

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Although the detainees of the U.S. war on terrorism are not considered prisoners of war, they are provided here at Camp Delta with some of the privileges afforded POWs. One of those is to send and receive mail. Upon arrival here, they are given the option to fill out a short postcard confirming where they are and that they are safe. Provided with pencils and other writing accessories, the detainees are allowed to send four postcards and two letters each month. And Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart, of the 160th Military Police Battalion S1 shop, might be called their postmaster. Tart is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the detainees mail operation, and every piece of detainee mail has to go through her. "My primary mission here is to handle all aspects of detainee mail operations. I must track each piece of incoming and outgoing mail individually, she said. I must be able to say where in the process that mail is upon request," she added But before the outgoing mail reaches Tart's shop, they have to be screened by S2, which has the mission to prevent the dissemi nation of information that could be detrimental to camp function, force protection, or ongoing intelligence operations, said Spc. John B. Kane, who works for the 160th MP BN S2 counter intelli gence section. "We read every single piece of mail that comes in or goes out of this camp. We're looking for indicators: location of the camp, obviously; guard shifts, threats to U.S. personnel or anything else. If there's anything of intelli gence value, we make sure we take care of that," he added. Most correspondence has to be translated first. Some of the most common languages that detainees use in their letters are Arabic, Farsi (Persian), Pashtu Page 16 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Friday, June 14, 2002 With Army Pfc. Eric J. Brown Q: Who is the man behind the wheel of the shuttle bus at GTMO? A: Pfc. Eric J. Brown, A.K.A. The Secret Undercover Lover. Q: What kind of clearance is that, and where did you get it? A: You've got to be born with it. Q: Ever have your 15 minutes of fame? A: In my own my mind. But seriously, not until Im rich. Q: Where are you from? A: I'm stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, but I'm originally from New York City. Q: How long have you been here? A: I've been here since February. Q: And how's GTMO been treating you? A: Not so bad, at first I did a lot of partying, but that got old. Now, just relax and play ball. Q: Basketball? A: Yeah, I love ball. I always wanted to play in the NBA. Q: Driving the bus, you must meet a lot of different people? A: That's one of the bonuses to my job. I've met a lot of different people, people from different branches and backgrounds. Q: Notice any differences between the personalities of the members of the services? A: All I'll say is some branches, which I wont name, never walk. They'll take the bus to go down the block. Q: Anything out of the ordinary ever take place on the bus? A: Besides the occasional person throwing up, it always amazes me how lost people can be here. They walk around looking so con fused. I don't get how that's possible. Q: So, when you're not being entertained or disgusted by your passengers, what do you do to get you through the day? A: I like to listen to music, mainly R&B and rap. Too bad the radio rarely plays any. Q: What do you do when you want to relax? A: I like going to the beach. It's really peaceful there. Q: Well, you must have come up with some interesting theories and philosophies, with all the time you've had to think. Care to share any? A: I think that people should pray for what they need and work for what they want. I think it's important to have faith in God. Q: What have you been praying and working for lately. A: I've been praying for the United States and its troops that everything will be all right, and I've been working to make money. Q: Trying to save any? A: Yeah, and I've been doing pretty well. Getting a lot use out of my meal card. Q: So what are you looking forward to upon leaving GTMO? A: Travel! I miss being mobile. There are only so many places to go here. Q: Guess you would know. Thank you for your time. Is there any thing you'd like to say before we wrap up? A: I'd like to say to everyone here that there is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldn't know about it. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko There is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldnt know about it. Army has its hoops revenge Page 15 Cardboard boats hit the high seas Page 8 First MPs to show get to go Page 3 Letters from the detainee camp Friday, June 14, 2002 Volume 1, Issue 1 Workin on a building, a Camp America building Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The WIre Need a lift? Hop on board the Love Bus By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The WIre See MAIL, page 5 A look inside... Navy Seabees, the hammer-wielding sailors responsible for the construction of Camp X-Ray, throw up a new hooch in the ever-growing living area at Camp America.

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Page 2 Friday, June 14, 2002 Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders Some circumstances in your life such as financial problems, marital difficulties or serious illness might leave you feeling trapped. But no matter how hopeless your situation might seem, God can and will lead you out of it if you trust Him. Here are some principles to keep in mind when you feel trapped: "Realize that God means for you to be where you are." "Be more concerned for God's glory than for your relief." "Acknowledge your enemy, but keep your eyes on the Lord" "Pray!" "Stay calm and confident, and give God time to work." "When unsure, take the next logical step by faith." "Envision God's enveloping presence." "Trust God to deliver in His own unique way." "View your current crisis as a faith builder for the future." "Don't forget to praise Him." Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publishers: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Page 15 Friday, June 14, 2002 The Army had its revenge in the final Battle of the Branches match-up, a pair of basketball games June 8 at the Main Gym. After last week's defeats to the Navy on the football field, the Army was determined to win the battle on the hardwood. Game one featured the females in a well-played defensive first half where the Navy held the lead 10 to 6. Both teams came out strong in the second half and battled back and forth down the court. With tightly matched offensive and defensive play, the Army went up by two points with under a minute left in the game. With only seconds left on the clock, Navy desperately tried to come back and sink a shot, but the Army's defense held on for a 2523 victory. It was a tough defensive game. It came down to the wire, but the Army came out on top, said Sgt 1st Class Franklin M. Blache, coach of the Army's female team. I am glad that we won. My shots were not falling in the bas ket, so I had to come inside and score some points, said Maj. Sharon D. Green, from JTF 160, who led the Army's team to victory scoring 17 points. In the second game the males came out determined to put more points on the board. In a close first half, the Army held just a two-point lead when the buzzer sounded. But the team came out and played, as Blache had predicted at halftime, Army basketball -I guarantee the second half will not even be close. And after halftime, the Army turned up the heat and outplayed the Navy. With solid play in the second half, Army came out victorious winning 51 to 39. It felt good to beat the Navy on their home court," said Army Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, of the military police brigade who scored 9 points in the victory. There are always strong battles between the Army and Navy, said Bishop. "The Army outplayed us tonight, but next time we'll give them a better game." It was a good game," said Staff Sgt. Harry G. Darden, the Army's loudest fan in the crowd. We played basic basketball starting out slow and then turning it up in the second half. We were able to win, just like we knew we would. With the softball game planned for June 15 recently canceled, Saturdays game was the last matchup of this Battle of the Branches season. This was the revenge game, said Blanche. And now well have the last word. Redemption: Army sinks Navy on hardwood By Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Wascar Vizcaino of the Army squad goes strong to the hoop in the first half. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army comes out victorious in the seasons final Battle of the Branches matchup. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy HM3 Kizzy H. Duncan tries to make her way around the Army's defense. The use of government vehicles and gov ernment contract vehicles during off-duty hours will be limited to establishments providing goods and services to the servicemember. If a government vehicle or government con tract vehicle is used to transport personnel to establishments that serve alcohol, the driver is considered on duty as described in Policy Letter #1; Alcohol Consumption. At no time will any JTF-160 personnel operate a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. (From Policy Letter #20; JTF-160 Vehicle Use Regulations.) Remember: If you drink, dont drive. You will fined, subject to UCMJ, lose your privileges, and your state DMV will be notified. Visiting hours for JTF-160 personnel in BEQ, BOQ and CBQ housing, including Gold Hill Towers, are as follows: Sunday-Thursday and holidays before a duty day, 1100-2200 hours; Friday, Saturday and the day before a legal holiday, 1000-2400 hours. As a common courtesy, permission should be obtained from roommates for all visiting, particularly for group guests. Sponsors must accompany guests at all times. Unescorted guests are not permitted in quarters. (From Policy Letter #11; JTF-160 Visiting Hours in Quarters.) -from the JTF-160 Provost Marshal's Office Happy Birthday, U.S. Army As we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the United States Army, we can all reflect on why we are here. For 227 years it has been the citizen soldier who has been called upon to defend our way of life. Our freedoms are being ques tioned again. We have left the comforts of home once again to show the world that we are willing to defend what we have. As I walk among our service members and talk with them, I find a renewed sense of determination to take care of business and show the world not to mess with us. Our young men and women in uniform today are the best that America can produce, and I am proud of the pro fessionalism I find among you. Each and every person at GTMO is making a contribution to the success of this mission.. Do not take what you do for granted, because I surely do not. We follow in the steps of our forefathers and continue to say "Don't Tread on Us." Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 CSM R.W. Funaro Trust God to lead you out of tough circumstances

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Page 14 Friday, June 14, 2002 The way the people at Morale, Welfare and Recreation see it, if you're not mentally and phys ically fit you can't do your job. The job of MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel and his 13 staff members at the G. T. Denich gym here, is to give you -the soldiers, sailors, Marines and coast guardsmen of Joint Task Force 160 at Guantanamo Bay -plenty of opportunities to get fit for work and stay that way. That's our goal," said Daniel. We are here to improve the quality of life. Fitness is a way of life; it can change your lifestyle. We try to put together a variety of programs that are good not only for the JTF-160 people, but for the Guantanamo Bay community at large. Daniel says he could not do it without his staff. The people on staff are great here, and I would not trade them for any in the world. It has been really great working here. Certainly Daniel has been a lot busier since January, with the influx of servicemembers arriving as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. His goal is to continue to meet that increased demand with increased supply. When the JTF-160 personnel started coming to the base, we became more proactive with the programs available," he said. "We want them to feel comfortable here. JTF-160 now has its own MWR representative, so we can work closely together to create more programs. There are three exercise facilities currently open on base: the main G.J. Denich gym in town, the Body Shop gym on Marine Hill and the gym at Camp America. All these facilities have free-weights, weightmachines and cardiovascular exercise equipment. Denich gym has yoga, tae-kwon-do and spinning classes, a multi-purpose cardio room, indoor racquetball and basketball courts, and a sauna room. Daniel tries to come up with plenty of incentives -from mugs to jackets to Bench Press Club t-shirts -to use them. We try to make things competitive, he said. Competition makes the programs more fun. MWR is also sponsoring a 5K run this Satur day, a Fourth of July "Liberty Run and a com memorative /11 Run to be held July 20th. There are also plenty of team sports -summer leagues in basketball, softball, soccer and bowl ing -including the popular Battle of the Branches contests between Army and Navy. But for Daniel, it's not important whether youre Army or Navy, whether you hit the gym, join a team, or work out on your own -as long as you're getting fit somehow. The quality of life is what is important, he said. We want to keep you active. An active per son is a happy person. For those looking to make exercise a bigger part of their lives, Daniel says he has a great way to start: the MicroFit machine in the Main Gym. The Micro-Fit machine records the fitness level of the individual," he said. Then, after the test, we can design a personal workout program. We will teach them flexibility and teach them how to work out with weights. Soon, Daniel plans to increase the MWR staff, add another MicroFit machine, and bring more classes and organized pro grams out to remote Camp America so that people dont have to ride the buses to find MWR -hell bring MWR to them. For now, though, Daniel invites all servicemembers to come to the Main Gym and set up an appointment for the fitness test -free of charge. We do about 40-50 fitness tests a week, he said. The process is relatively quick and painless -one minute of push-up and sit-ups, five minutes riding a bike. There is a heart monitor we hook up on you while you do the exercises. The results come in and the MWR will set up a fitness program, he said. It's as simple as that. Too easy: MWR staff wants you fit Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Donnell Daniel, Athletic Director at MWR. By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Daniel with the man he calls the third hardest-working man in the world, MWR staffer Paul MacDonald. Summer leagues start soon. Sign up now through your chain of command to play soft ball, soccer, basketball or bowling (fee involved). Leagues start at the end of the month. Schedules run on different days so you can sign up for more than one league. If anyone is interested in a volleyball league pass it up to JTF-160 J5 through your chain of command. For more info call CPT Gormly, X5249 Today, Friday, June 14th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Xtreme bowling, 7-12 p.m., Bowling Center All day social, Liberty Center, CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15th Army vs. Navy 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Denich Gym GTMO flea market, community center, Marina Point 104th Philippine Independence Day celebration 7 pm, Windjammer Club Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Northeast Gate Bus Tour, Marine Hill 7:30 a.m. Sunday, June 16th Xtreme bowling, 1 to 6 p.m. Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Sign-up for swimming lessons x2193 Fathers Day Paintball, 1 to 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Monday, June 17th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, 7 p.m. CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 18th Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 19th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Dart tournament, 7p.m., Liberty Center, CBQ Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 20th Final sports league rosters are due to J5 by noon. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Page 3 Friday, June 14, 2002 Before the first detainee arrived, before Camp X-Ray was even a camp, before they even knew exactly what their part in Operation Enduring Freedom would be, the soldiers of the 401st Military Police Company -motto Always First -were here. And now they're going home. When we got here January 6, we didn't know what to expect, said 2nd Lt. Roscoe E. Woods. There was nothing here for us. XRay wasnt finished being built yet. It certainly wasnt a typical deployment in terms of what weve been trained for. But the soldiers and NCOs adjusted well, and did what needed to be done." For the first few weeks, that meant a life in Guantanamo Bay that, while better perhaps than normal field conditions, was one that few arrivals here since have known: twelve-hour shifts, dirt floors, no running water. The rest of Guantanamo Bay was right down the road -the movie theater, the NEX, the McDonalds. But if the troops werent working, they were sleeping. And if they were awake, and had the time, the companys round-the-clock shifts often freed soldiers long after the shops of GTMO had closed their doors. And then there was the matter of the mission. Normally, the skills of the 401st center on law enforcement in a war zone: battlefield circulation control, checkpoints and encampment security. But at Camp XRay, and later at Camp Delta, there was no war. There were only the leftovers of one -the detainees that began arriving only days after the 401st did -and suddenly this unit of military policemen found itself having to retrain on the ground and learn the business of corrections. The Marines gave us some additional cor rections training, said Staff Sgt. Corey J. Cor win, a squad leader in the company. Wed had some previous training for maintaining security in a prisoner of war camp during wartime, but that wasnt too applicable either. It was a very different challenge. But the companys commander, Capt. Luis R. Hernandez, said that through it all -getting called up on a Friday and going wheels up on a Sunday, starting off with little in the way of preparation and less in the way of accom modations, and landing in the middle of a mission they hadnt really been previously trained to do -his soldiers came through. It was pretty rough for a while. It was hard to adjust, he said. But I never heard a com plaint out of them. Theyve been great. Tuesday, the soldiers of the 401st celebrated a mission well done with a barbecue at Windmill Beach. With 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips on grill and filling bellies with hamburgers paid for by MWR -whose varied sports program Phillips credited with keeping his soldiers healthy and sane for six months -everyone had a chance to sit amid the sun and sand and look back on their time here. People say this job is easy, that any soldier or sailor could do it, said Corwin. And in terms of what the actual day-to-day tasks are, the corrections work, maybe thats true. But in normal corrections-type work there isn't a large international political influence, and all the pressures that come with it. In addition to that, theres the nature of who the detainees are, why theyre here, he said. You have to be so careful because of all the personal feelings that are involved in this. Youve got to remain professional at all times, and keeping up that professionalism every day for six months is tough, he said. But we all did it. I'm proud. It was also time for the 401st to look for ward -to going home. They call GTMO the least worst place, said Hernandez. Fort Hood, where were from -we call that the great place to be. Were looking forward to rediscovering the difference. How do we feel? We're all very -how can I say it? -happy to get home and see our wives, said Corwin. Spc. Mark Schaffer, a driver with the com pany, was due to get out of the military May 20; the mission here -and the Army stop-loss policy that came with it -prevented that. His hair at regulation-stretching length in his final days, Shaffer said he was looking forward to getting on with a planned career in corrections in the civilian world. But, he said, he didn't mind the extra month if it meant being a part of this mission. After all, he said, it ought to help me on my resume. Changing of the guards: 401st leaves By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Capt. Luis R. Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips man the grill. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini From left to right: Pvt. Brandon T. Schaefer, Pvt. Sara M. Felix, and Pvt. Gary D. Fish, detainee guards with the 401st, reminisce at the companys farewell barbecue. First MP company on ground heads home

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Page 4 Friday, June 14, 2002 Page 13 Friday, June 14, 2002 Across 3. Physical exercise 6. Quadriceps (plural) 7. Burly 9. Slow running 12. Beat of heart per minute 14. Hoisting weights 15. Front leaning rest 16. With oxygen 17. Chin lifts Down 1. A bodily excretion 2. Side straddle hop 4. Robust 5. Supple 8. Physical training 10. Bench ____. 11. Bring weights to chest 13. Lifting weights repeatedly Work It Out! Outgoing Wire editor gets inaugural Commanders Coin for a JTF job well done Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first JTF-160 Commander's Coin of Excellence to Army Spc. James Strine, June 7, 2002. Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year for 2001, designed the coin himself while serving as editor of the weekly JTF160 field newspaper The Wire from January to June. "It meant a lot to me to receive the first awarded coin, because it took me a lot of time to develop it," said Strine. Strine thanked the JTF-160 staff for the coin and said he was glad he was able to see it before he and the rest of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment left Guantanamo Bay to return to the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Man on the street This weeks question: What keeps you motivated? Army Staff Sgt. Robert Lofton 114th MP Co. Physical training and good Army chow motivate me. Im 21 years in, so this deployment is a drop in the bucket. Navy YNSN Chrystal Huff MEPS, Dallas Loving my job, which is processing clearances. Competitive sports and beating the Army motivates me. Army Sgt. Roger Rettkowski 339th MP Co. Keeping busy in this military life motivates me. Reuniting with my family keeps me driving on. Army 1st Lt. Cedric Sherard 418th Trans. Co. My soldiers. If Im not motivated, theyre not. Now, 17 days and a wake-up has my motivation high. Coast Guard AMT2 Jake Proesch CG Air Station Representing the Coast Guard. Getting the job done while having a good time motivates me. Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Friday, June 14 8 P.M. Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (G) 10 P.M. Scorpion King (PG-13) Saturday, June 15 8 P.M. The Rookie (G) 10 P.M. Van Wilder (PG-13) Sunday, June 16 8 P.M. Murder By Numbers (R) Monday, June 17 8 P.M. Enough (PG-13) Tuesday, June 18 8 P.M. Star Wars Episode II (PG-13) Wednesday, June 19 8 P.M. Monsters Ball (R) Thursday, June 20 8 P.M. The Sweetest Thing (R) Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Meeting the Press Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus fields reporters questions at the JTF-160 weekly press brief ing. Whats it like being on the other side of the table? Covering the operations here has its ups and downs, said Matt Dolan, a full-time military reporter for The Virginian-Pilot in Virginia Beach, Va. Phrases like operational security can drive us crazy sometimes. But working for a paper so near the huge naval base in Norfolk, Va., gives Dolan some relief when it comes to finding an angle. So many of our readers have been stationed here, so theres a story just in how life at GTMO has been changed by the detainee operation. The short answer: quite a bit.

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and Hindi. If the language or regional dialect used is not easily recognizable, the translators put their resources together to interpret the content of the text before it is sent to JTF160 J2 or to the Defense Language Insti tute, Monterey, California, said Capt. Quinn Henderson, the officer in charge of the S2 shop of 160th MPBN out of Talla hassee, Fl., now attached to JTF-160. The more educated detainees simplify the process by writing their own correspondence in English, said Master Sgt. Pat Tet rick, who is also from the S2 shop. After the outgoing mail has been screened by S2, Tart then lists them on a record sheet and forwards them to the post office for delivery. Handling mail is not her primary mili tary occupational specialty, but she takes her job seriously. She works six days a week and comes to work for a seventh day if there is a lot of mail that needs to be processed. She said she tried her best to ensure that mail flows in and out without long delays. "Mail has to be sent in a specified time," she added. "I can't stress enough the importance of a detainee's mail. As a person, it's important for me to get my mail," she said as she was going through a stack of detainees' outgoing mail. In addition to outgoing mail, Tart is also involved in the detainees incoming mail. The incoming mail process is somewhat similar to the outgoing process. Tarts S1 shop receives mail from either the post office or the International Commit tee of the Red Cross. But before the letters or postcards reach the detainees, Tart has to sort each one of them and sends them to the S2 shop for screening and interpretation. At this stage, the workload increases for the S2 shop. Kane, who is heavily involved in the operation, said that mail becomes the biggest part of his day. Getting mail to the detainees is not an easy process, especially when there is a lot of mail that has to go through all the established channels. It takes about five working days for the incoming and outgoing mail to be thoroughly processed. In the past two weeks, more than 100 pieces of mail have been processed. But the people who participate in the daily detainees' mail operations strive every day to respect and preserve the detainees' right to communicate. Tart, who is on her first overseas deployment, has been an Army reservist since 1979. She doesnt complain about her job at GTMO Camp Delta. Before she came here, she used to work as a social worker for the public defender's office in Tallahas see. When asked about her present job with the military, she said, "I don't get much sun, but I like my job here. It's very detailed, and it keeps me busy." From screening mail to watching detainees, Kane is busy too. But like Tart, he wouldnt have it any other way. I love my job, he said. This kind of operation is the best for a CI agent. It's not every day that a reservist gets to do an intel ligence mission of this magnitude. Every day, if I pick up just one piece of intelligence, I feel like I'm adding to the larger mission. Page 5 Friday, June 14, 2002 MAIL, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 14, 2002 Rumsfeld Praises India for Steps Forward ISLAMABAD -Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld wrapped up his visit to India earlier today by praising Indian leaders for their concern and interest in resolving the Kashmir dispute with Pakistan "in an appropriate way." A senior defense official who was in the meetings said an overriding tone throughout was the desire to get beyond the cur rent crisis with Pakistan and to further develop U.S.Indian ties. Intelligence First Priority With Padilla NEW DELHI -The United States is more interested in extracting intelligence information than in prosecuting Jose Padilla, said Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Padilla, a U.S. citizen also known as Abdullah al Mujahir, was captured May 8 when he flew into Chicago's O'Hare International Airport from Pakistan. The Justice Department transferred him June 10 to DoD custody. He's being held in a Navy brig in Charleston, S.C. "Our interest, really, in this case, is not law enforcement. It is not punishment," Rumsfeld said. "Because he was a terrorist or working with the terrorists, our interest at the moment is to try to find out everything he knows so hopefully we can stop other terrorist acts." Designs Sought for Pentagon Memorial WASHINGTON -DoD officials announced a competition today to choose a design for a memorial to honor those killed in the Pentagon terror attack of Sept. 11. The competition is open to anyone. Rules will be on the Web at http://pen tagonmemorial.nab.usace.army.mil. Entrants can also receive the rules by writing: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District, Public Affairs Office, P.O. Box 1715, Baltimore, MD 21203. Deadline for submission is Sept. 11, 2002, at 5 p.m. EDT. The jury will consist of six sculptors, architects and landscape architects; a representative from the vic tims' families; and two prominent citizens from the Washington, D.C., area. WASHINGTON -New perspectives, new ideas and new energy are needed to combat global terrorism, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice said here Wednesday during commencement ceremonies at the National Defense University. Today, our nation and the cause of freedom need all that you have to offer -your ideas, your learning and your dedication, Rice told the graduating class of nearly 500 students. Wars are decided as much by the supremacy of the mind as by the supremacy of the military technology that we often think of as winning wars. And, of course, wars are won by people. Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, NDU president, presented Rice with an honorary doctorate in national security affairs. As President Bush's national security adviser, she stands at his right hand during one of our nation's most stressful periods, he said. Rice noted that NDU takes the best and the brightest from the armed forces, the executive branch and allied nations. You have operated here in an open, creative environment where intellectual ferment is supported and diversity of thought is rewarded, she said. You have understood that shifts in strategic paradigms require boldness in thought as well as in action. "When you leave this place, try not to lose that spirit, she said. It will not be easy. Wolfowitz: Dirty Bomb Plot Highlights WMD Dangers WASHINGTON-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today the capture of an al Qaeda terrorist highlights the dangers posed by the whole range of weapons of mass destruction. Speaking on the CBS Early Show and NBC Today Show, Wolfowitz said law enforcement officials cap tured Abdullah al Muhajir, also known as Jose Padilla, in the early stages of plotting to plant a radiological dirty bomb in an American city. A dirty bomb is conventional explosives surrounded by radioactive material. When the bomb explodes, it spews that material over a wide area in smoke and other particulate matter. The bomb's destructive power depends on the amount, type and size of conventional explosives and radioactive material used. Wolfowitz said the administration has said many times that the greatest danger fac ing the United States is countries that have weapons of mass destruction who work with terrorists. The State Department lists seven such countries: Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Syria and Sudan. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has said that the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by his organization is a religious duty. U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan found evi dence that al Qaeda was aggressively pursuing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear information and material. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said many times that if terror groups get these types of material and launch an attack, the casualty toll would dwarf Sept. 11s. Wolfowitz said Muhajir started out in Brooklyn and Chicago as a petty criminal. "Somewhere along the way he got converted to being something else. And out in Pakistan and Afghanistan he was working on plots to do the most hor rendous kinds of things in this country, he said. Wolfowitz said the terror ist has been classified as an enemy combatant. The military can hold him until the end of the conflict, he said. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Linda D. Kozryn Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, president of the National Defense University in Washington, presents National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice with honorary doctorate in national security. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart sorts and logs the detainees' mail as Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario takes a phone message. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Capt. Quinn Henderson, reviewing the status of the mail translation process. POSTAL PRICE INCREASE NOTICE Effective June 30, 2002, the rate for a single piece of First Class Mail will increase from $0.34 to $0.37. The singlepiece card rate will increase from $0.21 to $0.23. Rice Calls on Military Grads to Energize National Security

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When Army reservist Jacqueline Gordon learned late last year that she was being called to duty, the divorced mother of two had to quickly decide what to do with her children, Augustus, 10, and Kerrianne, 13. In the end, I sent them to two different friends, said Gordon, 37, a guidance counselor at the Western Suffolk BOCES in Dix Hills and Copiague resident now serv ing as an operations officer at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where nearly 400 detainees from Afghanistan are being held for interrogation. It was not an ideal situation but Gordon thought her problems were solved. Yet after she started active duty in January, more trouble surfaced. She had returned her leased car before activation, but the paperwork went awry, causing her to continue receiving monthly bills, then a repossession notice and, finally, a warning that her credit record would be marred if she didnt pay. The situation would have been resolved if I could handle it personally, Gordon, a major, said in a recent phone interview from Cuba. But that's impossible from here. Housing issues also burdened Frank DiDomenico, a New York City police officer and Air Force reservist who has been on active duty since Sept. 23 at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. The trouble began in March, when DiDomenico's wife of 18 months, Tyra, received a notice informing her that the year-long lease on their one-bedroom Coram apartment -also home, by then, to 7-month-old Juliet -would not be renewed after its May 31 expiration because the property was to be renovated, upgraded and sold. So here we are, about to lose our apartment, while my wife has to care for our child and I'm stuck in New Jersey on active duty, DiDomenico, 29, said last week before heading to the Middle East, where, as a sergeant, he will superbase. There is no way we can look for another place. More than 83,000 military reservists and national guard troops -approximately 20,000 of them from New York State -were activated for varying durations by federal authorities after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. Like hundreds of their counterparts from about two dozen units on Long Island, Gordon and DiDomenico knew they might have to serve their country in a time of peril. Nevertheless, as the two reservists have learned, such service often carries a personal price. My earnings have dropped, but the bills haven't, said Marine Corps reservist Anthony Dixon, who said his $36,000 annual salary as a corporal is about half of what he made as a self-employed potato chips salesman. A West Islip resident and new father, Dixon, 30, was activated in December and sent to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, where he is one of 65 Long Islanders with the Second Battalion, 225th Marines. ments, credit card payments and car and truck payments, he said. And other basic costs, like electricity and water, haven't gone down because I'm away. Although Nassau and Suffolk counties pay civil servants on active duty the difference between their military and civilian salaries, only a handful of personnel -mostly law enforcement officers -qualify. Moreover, federal laws, which guarantee returning reservists a job with undiminished pay and benefits, often do not soften financial hardships they face while in uniform. A small number of private employers, usually prosperous corporations spurred by a mix of patriotism and public relations, give activated employees extended salaries and benefits. But for many reservists, military duty brings some measure of personal hardship. Sure, I'm losing money, said John Schulz, 36, a Sayville resi dent whose approximately $100,000 annual income as a copilot for American Airlines was trimmed to more than $84,000 in February when he was activated with the Air National Guard's 106th Rescue Wing in Westhamp ton Beach. But I'm not going into poverty, added Schulz, who was to go to Turkey this week as com mander of a rescue helicopter supporting U.S. Air Force patrols in Iraq. The main thing is the loss of time spent with my wife and two children. You can't put a price on that. However, activation does not always bring trouble. Bill Cline relishes the responsibility of heading JDOG (an acronym for Joint Detention Operations Group), which was established earlier this year at the Guantanamo base. This job means the world to me, said Cline, 52, a longtime Bayport resident who, in civilian life, is a deputy Suffolk County sheriff. I feel I'm not only helping my country, but myself as well, he said. Such feelings spurred Cline, who fought in Vietnam as a Marine and subsequently became an Army reservist, to volunteer for duty in Bosnia, where with the rank of major he oversaw safety conditions for U.S. peacekeepers in 1999. As a lieutenant-colonel in charge of about 700 American soldiers and 400 detainees, Cline doubled his $50,000 sheriff's salary. Nevertheless, he stressed that doing meaningful work, not making money, is what motivates me. Gordon's savior was Eric Outcalt, finance director for Ami tyville Toyota. After being told about the reservist's car troubles, Outcalt tracked the errant paperwork, called the parent corporation and corrected the problem. She did nothing wrong, and she's serving her country, he said. I'm delighted to help her. Also helpful was Jules Reich, managing partner of Coram Isle LLC, owner of apartments rented by DiDomenico and several hundred other tenants. When told of the airman's housing problem, Reich called the sergeant and offered to give him an identical apartment in the same complex, at the same rent, for another year. It's the least we can do for someone in your situation, the executive said. Serving their country without reserve By Arnold Williams Page 6 Friday, June 14, 2002 Proudly serving in a Navy of one The Army-led detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has a Navy Heli copter Pilot as second in command of the Joint Detention Operations Group. The JDOG staff is comprised of the Army 455th MP Brigade Liaison Detach ment. The BLD oversees one battalion staff, several MP Companies and one Mechanized Infantry unit. Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur is the only Navy officer attached to the JDOG. As the executive officer of the JDOG staff, LeBrasseur has the responsibility of overseeing the physical care, feeding, housing and security, inside and outside the detention camp. The XO billet for JDOG was originally intended for an Army officer; and was manned by an Army officer for one month before LeBrasseur assumed the responsi bility. Back in his hometown of Lakeville, MN, LeBrasseur is a Federal Agent/Deportation Officer for the Department of Jus tice-Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). He tracks down, arrests, then deports the criminals, fugitives and illegal aliens to their home countries. LeBrasseur has been in on high-profile operations before -he was involved in the detention of Zacarias Moussaoui, who is suspected of being involved in the plan ning of the 11 Sept attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. His efforts supported the FBI's investigation by keep ing Moussaoui in INS custody on immi gration violations until the FBI could formally charge Moussaoui. Because of LeBrasseur's civilian record, his active and reserve history and his atten tion to detail in his previous position as the Future Plans Officer for operations in GTMO, he was recommended for the XO position by the commanding officer of detainee operations for Operation Endur ing Freedom here. Recognizing the experience and qualifi cations of LeBrasseur, the Army extended the executive officers position to him. I have complete confidence and trust in his abilities. He is loyal beyond reproach. I have no concerns, said Lt. Col. Cline, commander of JDOG. The Army contin gent at GTMO has been more than recep tive in having him as their second in command. If I was sent here to be XO, it might have been different, said LeBrasseur. But being asked by the CO to fill this position is the biggest compliment I could have had, and I think they respect that. The arrival of new MP Companies recently here at GTMO has presented a new challenge; LeBrassuer must go through the normal adjustment period with the new soldiers. Prior to the new MP Companies arrival everyone knew me. It's different now, he said. For me, adjusting to new faces. For them it's adjusting to a Navy LCDR. He gets along with everyone. He's fair regardless of what service or rank, said Cline. When Paul left Lakeville he left behind his family, friends and his 17-year-old Miniature Pinscher. Even though he misses them beyond measure, he has no regrets. LeBrasseur said he is proud to serve his country in this capacity. He not only has the responsibility of overseeing the detainees, but he has the occasional duty of escorting VIPs through Camp Delta to observe detainee operations. As I walk through the camp with gen erals and VIPs, we have to talk over the yelling, heckling and chatter of the detainees. I can see in their eyes the hate and disdain that they have for Americans. It makes him think about what Al-Qaeda has done--and potentially will do. By Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher Sherwood Special to The Wire Photo by Army Pfc. Jean -Carl Bertin Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur, the sole Navy servicemember on the Joint Detention Operations Group staff, poses in front of his favorite flag. Page 11 Friday, June 14, 2002 (Newsday Photo / Nelson Ching) Air Force reservist Frank DiDomenico and his wife, Tyra, were notified that the lease on their apartment would not be renewed. They later received an offer of another apartment. When duty called, these part-timers gave their all, despite the personal cost I have the same mortgage payvise the guarding of planes at an air

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Page 10 Page 7 Friday, June 14, 2002 Friday, June 14, 2002 Get quick, quality care at Aid Station Troops at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of falling casualty to bullets and bombs. Its the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Thats where the Aid Station comes in. The good guys on the troops side, said Coast Guard Health Services Senior Chief Mark H. O'Neal. Set up as a triage to treat all sick call but capable of saving servicemembers lives, its equipped with the life-pack 12, which enables the staff to resus citate patients if necessary. However, most patients who walk up to the little red medical cross at the MWR build ing on Windward Loop and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The majority of patients come in for treatment of common cold symp toms -the sniffles and stomach aches. Lately a lot of people have come in complaining of headaches, said O'Neal. The aid station is responsible for treating all sick-call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar. Their hours of operation are 0700-1630 Monday through Friday. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. In comparison to the hospital, the aid station is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily. More than 1,385 patients have been cared for since January. During our time here, we are evolving. We are taking advantages of lessons learned and improving the quality for troops, said Hospi tal Coreman 2 Greg Redgate. The Aid Station, primarily composed of Coast Guard servicemembers, also benefits from the joint task environment on GTMO by having servicemembers of all stripes working with them side by side. This was a great mission. Working with Navy and Army has made this the most diverse situation I've taken part in my last 25 years of my service, said O'Neal. So if you need aid, don't be afraid. Just come on down to the Aid Station at the bottom of the loop. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin P. Wiles checks the blood pressure of Coast Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson. Surrounded by an extensive array of security measures by land, sea and air, 34 suspected terrorists arrived here Wednes day. They represent the latest of 84 detainees who have arrived here for in processing and detention at Camp Delta in the past week. Camp Delta now has 468 detainees. Our primary mission here is to receive and hold detainees in support of the War on Terrorism. Today was a good day for us. We helped get 34 suspected terrorists off the battlefield and out of the fight, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, a military spokesman for Joint Task Force 160, the multi-service command in charge of detention operations here. As long as we've got these suspected terrorists here, we'll treat them humanely, because we're a nation of laws, but you can also rest assured they won't be planning or participating in the murder of thousands of innocent victims, said Hoey. After arriving at the 612-unit facility, the detainees were in-processed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes showers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. Camp Delta was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees, first held at Camp X-Ray, were moved to the newer facility. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scepko Wiles continues his medical checkup with a quick look into Paxsons ears. WASHINGTON -If the Pentagon was a person, it might just be smiling right now as it wears a spanking new coat of bright limestone across its western wall. A terrorist-hijacked airliner slammed into that wall nine months ago, killing 184 people. Today, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz participated in a Pentagon ceremony to install a special dedication capsule into that once ruined west wall. Wolfowitz said local commuters passing by the Pentagon have witnessed a truly remarkable transformation since the terrorist attack. Today, we'll finish one important part of that remarkable transformation," he continued, "We will restore to its rightful place a block of Indiana limestone that builders first placed here six decades ago. A discolored block of stone taken from the ruins of the west wall after the attack was used to cap the niche where the dedication capsule would be placed. The stone is inscribed with the date of the attack. Pentagon renovation program manager Walker Lee Evey, with Wolfowitz at his side, placed the capsule into the niche. Then, with the help of construction workers, the capstone was inserted into the opening. The capsule contains items such as a signed photograph of President Bush with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld standing outside the Pentagon, handmade cards and letters of condolences from school children, medallions from Rumsfeld and Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff, Arlington County firefighter and police patches, a Defense Protective Services patch, a plaque listing the 184 victims, and more. Items to be placed inside the capsule were displayed to the news media yesterday at a Pentagon briefing hosted by Charles S. Abell, assistant secretary of defense for force management policy. The dedication capsule, Abell said, is our way of remembering and memorializing the victims and the events of Sept. 11 and to recognize the good works of the many dedicated people on the construction crews who've helped us reconstruct the Pentagon so quickly and so well. The capsule isn't meant to be opened like a time capsule, he said. We don't intend to dig this out at any specific date in the future and have it available for historians and the curi ous, he added. We just expect it to be there to commemorate the victims and the rebuild ing effort and the war on terrorism. Wolfowitz then read aloud a letter from a California schoolgirl named Amanda: Dear Pentagon, I believe we can all pull together and show what America means. To me, following the attacks last September, America means wisdom, strength, endurance and freedom. Amanda, you've got it exactly right, Wolfowitz said to the audience, noting that the qualities outlined in the girl's letter do define America. He praised the construction workers, noting they have worked hard armed with hammers and saws to reconstruct the damaged Penta gon. With your hearts and hands you have rebuilt this symbol of American values and strength, stone by stone and we thank you, he added. Wolfowitz noted that the Pentagon reconstruction crew, in adopting the battle cry, Let's Roll, honors Sept. 11 hero Todd Beamer. A passenger aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, Beamer said to fellow passengers, Let's roll! before rushing their hijackers. The plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field, killing all aboard. Beamer and his fellow passengers have been credited with sacrificing themselves to save countless others. The 184 men and women who died at the Pentagon were patriots, he noted, representing values alien to the terrorists. Quoting Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz said: Those Americans died because of how they lived, as free men and women, proud of their freedom, proud of their country, and proud of their country's cause, the cause of human freedom. 34 detainees enter Camp Delta Photo by Gerry J. Gilmore Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz speaks at the June 11, 2002, ceremony marking the installation of the last limestone block in the repaired outer wall of the Pentagon damaged by terrorists on September 11. Pentagon wears new face at dedication By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Lets go surfing... sooner or later Three would-be wave-catchers wait on shore for some peaks on a sunny Tuesday afternoon at Windmill Beach. By Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 14, 2002 Cardboard boats hit blue seas to keep morale above water Its amazing what you can do with a little duct tape, cardboard, paint and some motivation. Good times set sail last Saturday at the Sailing Center here when the second annual MWRs Great Cardboard Boat Regatta was held. A fleet of creatively designed boats arrived with stylish names in tow like The Tiki Barge, The Blitz Crew, M & T Express, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, USS Jason, Sweet and Its on the Barge. The rules were simple: All boats had to be constructed of recycled cardboard painted, of course with no cellular, fiberglass, plastic, wood or flotation materials allowed in the construction. The boats, to be propelled only by oars, paddles or parts of the body, had to race out to a turning point marked by a red buoy around 200 ft. and then return to dock. When the contest began, Sweet took off like a lightening bolt from Mt. Olympus, with the majestic Tiki Barge in a very close second. Its on the Barge had a tough time on the high seas, while Rub-a-dub dub its a Gitmo Tub, way out of course, zigzagged its way where no cardboard boat has gone before. The waves of excitement were high just before the turning point, when the harsh wind of poor luck blew in on The Blitz Crew, which floundering from the start, dramatically sank. However, the crew was quickly rescued by life guards, and their ravaged vessel brought back to shore. As the race came to a close, the unassuming Sweet, driven by Nolan Butler and Nick Basel, took a sweet and victorious first place. Right behind it, was The Tiki Barge at second place. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, after obtaining some fast determination, zigzagged its way back on course to seal a well earned third place. Coming in last was the patriotic USS Jason, captained by elementary school student Meagan Heitman, who made a show for herself as she epically struggled to make it in. With a life guard at the ready, the near sunken vessel returned to port, and Meagan was greeted by a thunderous crowd. After everyone settled down from the excitement, Craig Basel, the MWR director, announced the winners and gave out the awards. In the Youth category, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub took first place, with M & T Express coming in second and USS Jason taking third. For the Open cate gory, Sweet took first, The Tiki Barge took second, and Its on the Barge placed third. Then there were special categories. For Best Boat Name, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, for Best Theme, USS Jason, for Best Titantic sinking, The Blitz Crew, and for Best Looking, The Tiki Barge. The Tiki Barge, constructed from a myriad amount of beer boxes and manned by a five-person crew from the 115th Military Police Battalion, by far raised the bar in cardboard boat construction. The man who designed it, Army Sgt. Robert Kaiser, said they were too many beer boxes floating around Windward Loop and thought they could be put to better use. A mechanical engineer specializing in nautical engineering, Kaiser designed the pirate ship-like vessel to hold 1000 lbs. of crew, and if it sprung a leak, it could hold an additional 1000 lbs. of water. It took him and his team a month to build. Such effort paid off, and the event overall was a grand success. It went really great. This is the second year we have done it, and its just a lot of fun, said Basel, who organized the event. They put a lot of work into those boats, and they paddle their butts off. It really brings the community together. It wasnt about being competitive, just having fun. By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Victory wont be delivered this day as Its on the Barge struggles to bring its valiant cargo back to shore. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Hard work pays off as Meagan basks in the adoration of the crowd. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Unsure if her boat, the USS Jason, will stay afloat, Meagan Heitman drives on. Photo by Army Spc. Joeseph A. Morris The crew of the Tiki Barge races to shore, where cold ones are on ice awaiting their arrival. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris With his hand on the award for Best Looking boat and his mind on those beers, Tiki Barge designer Sgt. Robert Kaiser, 115th Military Police Battalion, proudly accepts his prize. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris The race is on and the boats are gone as Sweet takes an early lead, with The Tiki Barge in a close second. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub takes the wrong tack, leaving the crowd wondering if its crew would ever come back.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 14, 2002 Cardboard boats hit blue seas to keep morale above water Its amazing what you can do with a little duct tape, cardboard, paint and some motivation. Good times set sail last Saturday at the Sailing Center here when the second annual MWRs Great Cardboard Boat Regatta was held. A fleet of creatively designed boats arrived with stylish names in tow like The Tiki Barge, The Blitz Crew, M & T Express, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, USS Jason, Sweet and Its on the Barge. The rules were simple: All boats had to be constructed of recycled cardboard painted, of course with no cellular, fiberglass, plastic, wood or flotation materials allowed in the construction. The boats, to be propelled only by oars, paddles or parts of the body, had to race out to a turning point marked by a red buoy around 200 ft. and then return to dock. When the contest began, Sweet took off like a lightening bolt from Mt. Olympus, with the majestic Tiki Barge in a very close second. Its on the Barge had a tough time on the high seas, while Rub-a-dub dub its a Gitmo Tub, way out of course, zigzagged its way where no cardboard boat has gone before. The waves of excitement were high just before the turning point, when the harsh wind of poor luck blew in on The Blitz Crew, which floundering from the start, dramatically sank. However, the crew was quickly rescued by life guards, and their ravaged vessel brought back to shore. As the race came to a close, the unassuming Sweet, driven by Nolan Butler and Nick Basel, took a sweet and victorious first place. Right behind it, was The Tiki Barge at second place. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, after obtaining some fast determination, zigzagged its way back on course to seal a well earned third place. Coming in last was the patriotic USS Jason, captained by elementary school student Meagan Heitman, who made a show for herself as she epically struggled to make it in. With a life guard at the ready, the near sunken vessel returned to port, and Meagan was greeted by a thunderous crowd. After everyone settled down from the excitement, Craig Basel, the MWR director, announced the winners and gave out the awards. In the Youth category, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub took first place, with M & T Express coming in second and USS Jason taking third. For the Open cate gory, Sweet took first, The Tiki Barge took second, and Its on the Barge placed third. Then there were special categories. For Best Boat Name, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, for Best Theme, USS Jason, for Best Titantic sinking, The Blitz Crew, and for Best Looking, The Tiki Barge. The Tiki Barge, constructed from a myriad amount of beer boxes and manned by a five-person crew from the 115th Military Police Battalion, by far raised the bar in cardboard boat construction. The man who designed it, Army Sgt. Robert Kaiser, said they were too many beer boxes floating around Windward Loop and thought they could be put to better use. A mechanical engineer specializing in nautical engineering, Kaiser designed the pirate ship-like vessel to hold 1000 lbs. of crew, and if it sprung a leak, it could hold an additional 1000 lbs. of water. It took him and his team a month to build. Such effort paid off, and the event overall was a grand success. It went really great. This is the second year we have done it, and its just a lot of fun, said Basel, who organized the event. They put a lot of work into those boats, and they paddle their butts off. It really brings the community together. It wasnt about being competitive, just having fun. By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Victory wont be delivered this day as Its on the Barge struggles to bring its valiant cargo back to shore. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Hard work pays off as Meagan basks in the adoration of the crowd. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Unsure if her boat, the USS Jason, will stay afloat, Meagan Heitman drives on. Photo by Army Spc. Joeseph A. Morris The crew of the Tiki Barge races to shore, where cold ones are on ice awaiting their arrival. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris With his hand on the award for Best Looking boat and his mind on those beers, Tiki Barge designer Sgt. Robert Kaiser, 115th Military Police Battalion, proudly accepts his prize. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris The race is on and the boats are gone as Sweet takes an early lead, with The Tiki Barge in a close second. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub takes the wrong tack, leaving the crowd wondering if its crew would ever come back.

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Page 10 Page 7 Friday, June 14, 2002 Friday, June 14, 2002 Get quick, quality care at Aid Station Troops at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of falling casualty to bullets and bombs. Its the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Thats where the Aid Station comes in. The good guys on the troops side, said Coast Guard Health Services Senior Chief Mark H. O'Neal. Set up as a triage to treat all sick call but capable of saving servicemembers lives, its equipped with the life-pack 12, which enables the staff to resus citate patients if necessary. However, most patients who walk up to the little red medical cross at the MWR build ing on Windward Loop and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The majority of patients come in for treatment of common cold symp toms -the sniffles and stomach aches. Lately a lot of people have come in complaining of headaches, said O'Neal. The aid station is responsible for treating all sick-call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar. Their hours of operation are 0700-1630 Monday through Friday. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. In comparison to the hospital, the aid station is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily. More than 1,385 patients have been cared for since January. During our time here, we are evolving. We are taking advantages of lessons learned and improving the quality for troops, said Hospi tal Coreman 2 Greg Redgate. The Aid Station, primarily composed of Coast Guard servicemembers, also benefits from the joint task environment on GTMO by having servicemembers of all stripes working with them side by side. This was a great mission. Working with Navy and Army has made this the most diverse situation I've taken part in my last 25 years of my service, said O'Neal. So if you need aid, don't be afraid. Just come on down to the Aid Station at the bottom of the loop. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin P. Wiles checks the blood pressure of Coast Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson. Surrounded by an extensive array of security measures by land, sea and air, 34 suspected terrorists arrived here Wednes day. They represent the latest of 84 detainees who have arrived here for in processing and detention at Camp Delta in the past week. Camp Delta now has 468 detainees. Our primary mission here is to receive and hold detainees in support of the War on Terrorism. Today was a good day for us. We helped get 34 suspected terrorists off the battlefield and out of the fight, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, a military spokesman for Joint Task Force 160, the multi-service command in charge of detention operations here. As long as we've got these suspected terrorists here, we'll treat them humanely, because we're a nation of laws, but you can also rest assured they won't be planning or participating in the murder of thousands of innocent victims, said Hoey. After arriving at the 612-unit facility, the detainees were in-processed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes showers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. Camp Delta was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees, first held at Camp X-Ray, were moved to the newer facility. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scepko Wiles continues his medical checkup with a quick look into Paxsons ears. WASHINGTON -If the Pentagon was a person, it might just be smiling right now as it wears a spanking new coat of bright limestone across its western wall. A terrorist-hijacked airliner slammed into that wall nine months ago, killing 184 people. Today, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz participated in a Pentagon ceremony to install a special dedication capsule into that once ruined west wall. Wolfowitz said local commuters passing by the Pentagon have witnessed a truly remarkable transformation since the terrorist attack. Today, we'll finish one important part of that remarkable transformation," he continued, "We will restore to its rightful place a block of Indiana limestone that builders first placed here six decades ago. A discolored block of stone taken from the ruins of the west wall after the attack was used to cap the niche where the dedication capsule would be placed. The stone is inscribed with the date of the attack. Pentagon renovation program manager Walker Lee Evey, with Wolfowitz at his side, placed the capsule into the niche. Then, with the help of construction workers, the capstone was inserted into the opening. The capsule contains items such as a signed photograph of President Bush with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld standing outside the Pentagon, handmade cards and letters of condolences from school children, medallions from Rumsfeld and Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff, Arlington County firefighter and police patches, a Defense Protective Services patch, a plaque listing the 184 victims, and more. Items to be placed inside the capsule were displayed to the news media yesterday at a Pentagon briefing hosted by Charles S. Abell, assistant secretary of defense for force management policy. The dedication capsule, Abell said, is our way of remembering and memorializing the victims and the events of Sept. 11 and to recognize the good works of the many dedicated people on the construction crews who've helped us reconstruct the Pentagon so quickly and so well. The capsule isn't meant to be opened like a time capsule, he said. We don't intend to dig this out at any specific date in the future and have it available for historians and the curi ous, he added. We just expect it to be there to commemorate the victims and the rebuild ing effort and the war on terrorism. Wolfowitz then read aloud a letter from a California schoolgirl named Amanda: Dear Pentagon, I believe we can all pull together and show what America means. To me, following the attacks last September, America means wisdom, strength, endurance and freedom. Amanda, you've got it exactly right, Wolfowitz said to the audience, noting that the qualities outlined in the girl's letter do define America. He praised the construction workers, noting they have worked hard armed with hammers and saws to reconstruct the damaged Penta gon. With your hearts and hands you have rebuilt this symbol of American values and strength, stone by stone and we thank you, he added. Wolfowitz noted that the Pentagon reconstruction crew, in adopting the battle cry, Let's Roll, honors Sept. 11 hero Todd Beamer. A passenger aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, Beamer said to fellow passengers, Let's roll! before rushing their hijackers. The plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field, killing all aboard. Beamer and his fellow passengers have been credited with sacrificing themselves to save countless others. The 184 men and women who died at the Pentagon were patriots, he noted, representing values alien to the terrorists. Quoting Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz said: Those Americans died because of how they lived, as free men and women, proud of their freedom, proud of their country, and proud of their country's cause, the cause of human freedom. 34 detainees enter Camp Delta Photo by Gerry J. Gilmore Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz speaks at the June 11, 2002, ceremony marking the installation of the last limestone block in the repaired outer wall of the Pentagon damaged by terrorists on September 11. Pentagon wears new face at dedication By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Lets go surfing... sooner or later Three would-be wave-catchers wait on shore for some peaks on a sunny Tuesday afternoon at Windmill Beach. By Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini

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When Army reservist Jacqueline Gordon learned late last year that she was being called to duty, the divorced mother of two had to quickly decide what to do with her children, Augustus, 10, and Kerrianne, 13. In the end, I sent them to two different friends, said Gordon, 37, a guidance counselor at the Western Suffolk BOCES in Dix Hills and Copiague resident now serv ing as an operations officer at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where nearly 400 detainees from Afghanistan are being held for interrogation. It was not an ideal situation but Gordon thought her problems were solved. Yet after she started active duty in January, more trouble surfaced. She had returned her leased car before activation, but the paperwork went awry, causing her to continue receiving monthly bills, then a repossession notice and, finally, a warning that her credit record would be marred if she didnt pay. The situation would have been resolved if I could handle it personally, Gordon, a major, said in a recent phone interview from Cuba. But that's impossible from here. Housing issues also burdened Frank DiDomenico, a New York City police officer and Air Force reservist who has been on active duty since Sept. 23 at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. The trouble began in March, when DiDomenico's wife of 18 months, Tyra, received a notice informing her that the year-long lease on their one-bedroom Coram apartment -also home, by then, to 7-month-old Juliet -would not be renewed after its May 31 expiration because the property was to be renovated, upgraded and sold. So here we are, about to lose our apartment, while my wife has to care for our child and I'm stuck in New Jersey on active duty, DiDomenico, 29, said last week before heading to the Middle East, where, as a sergeant, he will superbase. There is no way we can look for another place. More than 83,000 military reservists and national guard troops -approximately 20,000 of them from New York State -were activated for varying durations by federal authorities after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. Like hundreds of their counterparts from about two dozen units on Long Island, Gordon and DiDomenico knew they might have to serve their country in a time of peril. Nevertheless, as the two reservists have learned, such service often carries a personal price. My earnings have dropped, but the bills haven't, said Marine Corps reservist Anthony Dixon, who said his $36,000 annual salary as a corporal is about half of what he made as a self-employed potato chips salesman. A West Islip resident and new father, Dixon, 30, was activated in December and sent to Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, where he is one of 65 Long Islanders with the Second Battalion, 225th Marines. ments, credit card payments and car and truck payments, he said. And other basic costs, like electricity and water, haven't gone down because I'm away. Although Nassau and Suffolk counties pay civil servants on active duty the difference between their military and civilian salaries, only a handful of personnel -mostly law enforcement officers -qualify. Moreover, federal laws, which guarantee returning reservists a job with undiminished pay and benefits, often do not soften financial hardships they face while in uniform. A small number of private employers, usually prosperous corporations spurred by a mix of patriotism and public relations, give activated employees extended salaries and benefits. But for many reservists, military duty brings some measure of personal hardship. Sure, I'm losing money, said John Schulz, 36, a Sayville resi dent whose approximately $100,000 annual income as a copilot for American Airlines was trimmed to more than $84,000 in February when he was activated with the Air National Guard's 106th Rescue Wing in Westhamp ton Beach. But I'm not going into poverty, added Schulz, who was to go to Turkey this week as com mander of a rescue helicopter supporting U.S. Air Force patrols in Iraq. The main thing is the loss of time spent with my wife and two children. You can't put a price on that. However, activation does not always bring trouble. Bill Cline relishes the responsibility of heading JDOG (an acronym for Joint Detention Operations Group), which was established earlier this year at the Guantanamo base. This job means the world to me, said Cline, 52, a longtime Bayport resident who, in civilian life, is a deputy Suffolk County sheriff. I feel I'm not only helping my country, but myself as well, he said. Such feelings spurred Cline, who fought in Vietnam as a Marine and subsequently became an Army reservist, to volunteer for duty in Bosnia, where with the rank of major he oversaw safety conditions for U.S. peacekeepers in 1999. As a lieutenant-colonel in charge of about 700 American soldiers and 400 detainees, Cline doubled his $50,000 sheriff's salary. Nevertheless, he stressed that doing meaningful work, not making money, is what motivates me. Gordon's savior was Eric Outcalt, finance director for Ami tyville Toyota. After being told about the reservist's car troubles, Outcalt tracked the errant paperwork, called the parent corporation and corrected the problem. She did nothing wrong, and she's serving her country, he said. I'm delighted to help her. Also helpful was Jules Reich, managing partner of Coram Isle LLC, owner of apartments rented by DiDomenico and several hundred other tenants. When told of the airman's housing problem, Reich called the sergeant and offered to give him an identical apartment in the same complex, at the same rent, for another year. It's the least we can do for someone in your situation, the executive said. Serving their country without reserve By Arnold Williams Page 6 Friday, June 14, 2002 Proudly serving in a Navy of one The Army-led detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has a Navy Heli copter Pilot as second in command of the Joint Detention Operations Group. The JDOG staff is comprised of the Army 455th MP Brigade Liaison Detach ment. The BLD oversees one battalion staff, several MP Companies and one Mechanized Infantry unit. Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur is the only Navy officer attached to the JDOG. As the executive officer of the JDOG staff, LeBrasseur has the responsibility of overseeing the physical care, feeding, housing and security, inside and outside the detention camp. The XO billet for JDOG was originally intended for an Army officer; and was manned by an Army officer for one month before LeBrasseur assumed the responsi bility. Back in his hometown of Lakeville, MN, LeBrasseur is a Federal Agent/Deportation Officer for the Department of Jus tice-Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). He tracks down, arrests, then deports the criminals, fugitives and illegal aliens to their home countries. LeBrasseur has been in on high-profile operations before -he was involved in the detention of Zacarias Moussaoui, who is suspected of being involved in the plan ning of the 11 Sept attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. His efforts supported the FBI's investigation by keep ing Moussaoui in INS custody on immi gration violations until the FBI could formally charge Moussaoui. Because of LeBrasseur's civilian record, his active and reserve history and his atten tion to detail in his previous position as the Future Plans Officer for operations in GTMO, he was recommended for the XO position by the commanding officer of detainee operations for Operation Endur ing Freedom here. Recognizing the experience and qualifi cations of LeBrasseur, the Army extended the executive officers position to him. I have complete confidence and trust in his abilities. He is loyal beyond reproach. I have no concerns, said Lt. Col. Cline, commander of JDOG. The Army contin gent at GTMO has been more than recep tive in having him as their second in command. If I was sent here to be XO, it might have been different, said LeBrasseur. But being asked by the CO to fill this position is the biggest compliment I could have had, and I think they respect that. The arrival of new MP Companies recently here at GTMO has presented a new challenge; LeBrassuer must go through the normal adjustment period with the new soldiers. Prior to the new MP Companies arrival everyone knew me. It's different now, he said. For me, adjusting to new faces. For them it's adjusting to a Navy LCDR. He gets along with everyone. He's fair regardless of what service or rank, said Cline. When Paul left Lakeville he left behind his family, friends and his 17-year-old Miniature Pinscher. Even though he misses them beyond measure, he has no regrets. LeBrasseur said he is proud to serve his country in this capacity. He not only has the responsibility of overseeing the detainees, but he has the occasional duty of escorting VIPs through Camp Delta to observe detainee operations. As I walk through the camp with gen erals and VIPs, we have to talk over the yelling, heckling and chatter of the detainees. I can see in their eyes the hate and disdain that they have for Americans. It makes him think about what Al-Qaeda has done--and potentially will do. By Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher Sherwood Special to The Wire Photo by Army Pfc. Jean -Carl Bertin Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur, the sole Navy servicemember on the Joint Detention Operations Group staff, poses in front of his favorite flag. Page 11 Friday, June 14, 2002 (Newsday Photo / Nelson Ching) Air Force reservist Frank DiDomenico and his wife, Tyra, were notified that the lease on their apartment would not be renewed. They later received an offer of another apartment. When duty called, these part-timers gave their all, despite the personal cost I have the same mortgage payvise the guarding of planes at an air

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and Hindi. If the language or regional dialect used is not easily recognizable, the translators put their resources together to interpret the content of the text before it is sent to JTF160 J2 or to the Defense Language Insti tute, Monterey, California, said Capt. Quinn Henderson, the officer in charge of the S2 shop of 160th MPBN out of Talla hassee, Fl., now attached to JTF-160. The more educated detainees simplify the process by writing their own correspondence in English, said Master Sgt. Pat Tet rick, who is also from the S2 shop. After the outgoing mail has been screened by S2, Tart then lists them on a record sheet and forwards them to the post office for delivery. Handling mail is not her primary mili tary occupational specialty, but she takes her job seriously. She works six days a week and comes to work for a seventh day if there is a lot of mail that needs to be processed. She said she tried her best to ensure that mail flows in and out without long delays. "Mail has to be sent in a specified time," she added. "I can't stress enough the importance of a detainee's mail. As a person, it's important for me to get my mail," she said as she was going through a stack of detainees' outgoing mail. In addition to outgoing mail, Tart is also involved in the detainees incoming mail. The incoming mail process is somewhat similar to the outgoing process. Tarts S1 shop receives mail from either the post office or the International Commit tee of the Red Cross. But before the letters or postcards reach the detainees, Tart has to sort each one of them and sends them to the S2 shop for screening and interpretation. At this stage, the workload increases for the S2 shop. Kane, who is heavily involved in the operation, said that mail becomes the biggest part of his day. Getting mail to the detainees is not an easy process, especially when there is a lot of mail that has to go through all the established channels. It takes about five working days for the incoming and outgoing mail to be thoroughly processed. In the past two weeks, more than 100 pieces of mail have been processed. But the people who participate in the daily detainees' mail operations strive every day to respect and preserve the detainees' right to communicate. Tart, who is on her first overseas deployment, has been an Army reservist since 1979. She doesnt complain about her job at GTMO Camp Delta. Before she came here, she used to work as a social worker for the public defender's office in Tallahas see. When asked about her present job with the military, she said, "I don't get much sun, but I like my job here. It's very detailed, and it keeps me busy." From screening mail to watching detainees, Kane is busy too. But like Tart, he wouldnt have it any other way. I love my job, he said. This kind of operation is the best for a CI agent. It's not every day that a reservist gets to do an intel ligence mission of this magnitude. Every day, if I pick up just one piece of intelligence, I feel like I'm adding to the larger mission. Page 5 Friday, June 14, 2002 MAIL, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 14, 2002 Rumsfeld Praises India for Steps Forward ISLAMABAD -Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld wrapped up his visit to India earlier today by praising Indian leaders for their concern and interest in resolving the Kashmir dispute with Pakistan "in an appropriate way." A senior defense official who was in the meetings said an overriding tone throughout was the desire to get beyond the cur rent crisis with Pakistan and to further develop U.S.Indian ties. Intelligence First Priority With Padilla NEW DELHI -The United States is more interested in extracting intelligence information than in prosecuting Jose Padilla, said Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Padilla, a U.S. citizen also known as Abdullah al Mujahir, was captured May 8 when he flew into Chicago's O'Hare International Airport from Pakistan. The Justice Department transferred him June 10 to DoD custody. He's being held in a Navy brig in Charleston, S.C. "Our interest, really, in this case, is not law enforcement. It is not punishment," Rumsfeld said. "Because he was a terrorist or working with the terrorists, our interest at the moment is to try to find out everything he knows so hopefully we can stop other terrorist acts." Designs Sought for Pentagon Memorial WASHINGTON -DoD officials announced a competition today to choose a design for a memorial to honor those killed in the Pentagon terror attack of Sept. 11. The competition is open to anyone. Rules will be on the Web at http://pen tagonmemorial.nab.usace.army.mil. Entrants can also receive the rules by writing: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District, Public Affairs Office, P.O. Box 1715, Baltimore, MD 21203. Deadline for submission is Sept. 11, 2002, at 5 p.m. EDT. The jury will consist of six sculptors, architects and landscape architects; a representative from the vic tims' families; and two prominent citizens from the Washington, D.C., area. WASHINGTON -New perspectives, new ideas and new energy are needed to combat global terrorism, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice said here Wednesday during commencement ceremonies at the National Defense University. Today, our nation and the cause of freedom need all that you have to offer -your ideas, your learning and your dedication, Rice told the graduating class of nearly 500 students. Wars are decided as much by the supremacy of the mind as by the supremacy of the military technology that we often think of as winning wars. And, of course, wars are won by people. Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, NDU president, presented Rice with an honorary doctorate in national security affairs. As President Bush's national security adviser, she stands at his right hand during one of our nation's most stressful periods, he said. Rice noted that NDU takes the best and the brightest from the armed forces, the executive branch and allied nations. You have operated here in an open, creative environment where intellectual ferment is supported and diversity of thought is rewarded, she said. You have understood that shifts in strategic paradigms require boldness in thought as well as in action. "When you leave this place, try not to lose that spirit, she said. It will not be easy. Wolfowitz: Dirty Bomb Plot Highlights WMD Dangers WASHINGTON-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today the capture of an al Qaeda terrorist highlights the dangers posed by the whole range of weapons of mass destruction. Speaking on the CBS Early Show and NBC Today Show, Wolfowitz said law enforcement officials cap tured Abdullah al Muhajir, also known as Jose Padilla, in the early stages of plotting to plant a radiological dirty bomb in an American city. A dirty bomb is conventional explosives surrounded by radioactive material. When the bomb explodes, it spews that material over a wide area in smoke and other particulate matter. The bomb's destructive power depends on the amount, type and size of conventional explosives and radioactive material used. Wolfowitz said the administration has said many times that the greatest danger fac ing the United States is countries that have weapons of mass destruction who work with terrorists. The State Department lists seven such countries: Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Syria and Sudan. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has said that the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by his organization is a religious duty. U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan found evi dence that al Qaeda was aggressively pursuing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear information and material. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said many times that if terror groups get these types of material and launch an attack, the casualty toll would dwarf Sept. 11s. Wolfowitz said Muhajir started out in Brooklyn and Chicago as a petty criminal. "Somewhere along the way he got converted to being something else. And out in Pakistan and Afghanistan he was working on plots to do the most hor rendous kinds of things in this country, he said. Wolfowitz said the terror ist has been classified as an enemy combatant. The military can hold him until the end of the conflict, he said. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Linda D. Kozryn Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, president of the National Defense University in Washington, presents National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice with honorary doctorate in national security. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart sorts and logs the detainees' mail as Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario takes a phone message. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Capt. Quinn Henderson, reviewing the status of the mail translation process. POSTAL PRICE INCREASE NOTICE Effective June 30, 2002, the rate for a single piece of First Class Mail will increase from $0.34 to $0.37. The singlepiece card rate will increase from $0.21 to $0.23. Rice Calls on Military Grads to Energize National Security

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Page 4 Friday, June 14, 2002 Page 13 Friday, June 14, 2002 Across 3. Physical exercise 6. Quadriceps (plural) 7. Burly 9. Slow running 12. Beat of heart per minute 14. Hoisting weights 15. Front leaning rest 16. With oxygen 17. Chin lifts Down 1. A bodily excretion 2. Side straddle hop 4. Robust 5. Supple 8. Physical training 10. Bench ____. 11. Bring weights to chest 13. Lifting weights repeatedly Work It Out! Outgoing Wire editor gets inaugural Commanders Coin for a JTF job well done Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first JTF-160 Commander's Coin of Excellence to Army Spc. James Strine, June 7, 2002. Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year for 2001, designed the coin himself while serving as editor of the weekly JTF160 field newspaper The Wire from January to June. "It meant a lot to me to receive the first awarded coin, because it took me a lot of time to develop it," said Strine. Strine thanked the JTF-160 staff for the coin and said he was glad he was able to see it before he and the rest of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment left Guantanamo Bay to return to the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Man on the street This weeks question: What keeps you motivated? Army Staff Sgt. Robert Lofton 114th MP Co. Physical training and good Army chow motivate me. Im 21 years in, so this deployment is a drop in the bucket. Navy YNSN Chrystal Huff MEPS, Dallas Loving my job, which is processing clearances. Competitive sports and beating the Army motivates me. Army Sgt. Roger Rettkowski 339th MP Co. Keeping busy in this military life motivates me. Reuniting with my family keeps me driving on. Army 1st Lt. Cedric Sherard 418th Trans. Co. My soldiers. If Im not motivated, theyre not. Now, 17 days and a wake-up has my motivation high. Coast Guard AMT2 Jake Proesch CG Air Station Representing the Coast Guard. Getting the job done while having a good time motivates me. Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Friday, June 14 8 P.M. Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (G) 10 P.M. Scorpion King (PG-13) Saturday, June 15 8 P.M. The Rookie (G) 10 P.M. Van Wilder (PG-13) Sunday, June 16 8 P.M. Murder By Numbers (R) Monday, June 17 8 P.M. Enough (PG-13) Tuesday, June 18 8 P.M. Star Wars Episode II (PG-13) Wednesday, June 19 8 P.M. Monsters Ball (R) Thursday, June 20 8 P.M. The Sweetest Thing (R) Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Meeting the Press Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus fields reporters questions at the JTF-160 weekly press brief ing. Whats it like being on the other side of the table? Covering the operations here has its ups and downs, said Matt Dolan, a full-time military reporter for The Virginian-Pilot in Virginia Beach, Va. Phrases like operational security can drive us crazy sometimes. But working for a paper so near the huge naval base in Norfolk, Va., gives Dolan some relief when it comes to finding an angle. So many of our readers have been stationed here, so theres a story just in how life at GTMO has been changed by the detainee operation. The short answer: quite a bit.

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Page 14 Friday, June 14, 2002 The way the people at Morale, Welfare and Recreation see it, if you're not mentally and phys ically fit you can't do your job. The job of MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel and his 13 staff members at the G. T. Denich gym here, is to give you -the soldiers, sailors, Marines and coast guardsmen of Joint Task Force 160 at Guantanamo Bay -plenty of opportunities to get fit for work and stay that way. That's our goal," said Daniel. We are here to improve the quality of life. Fitness is a way of life; it can change your lifestyle. We try to put together a variety of programs that are good not only for the JTF-160 people, but for the Guantanamo Bay community at large. Daniel says he could not do it without his staff. The people on staff are great here, and I would not trade them for any in the world. It has been really great working here. Certainly Daniel has been a lot busier since January, with the influx of servicemembers arriving as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. His goal is to continue to meet that increased demand with increased supply. When the JTF-160 personnel started coming to the base, we became more proactive with the programs available," he said. "We want them to feel comfortable here. JTF-160 now has its own MWR representative, so we can work closely together to create more programs. There are three exercise facilities currently open on base: the main G.J. Denich gym in town, the Body Shop gym on Marine Hill and the gym at Camp America. All these facilities have free-weights, weightmachines and cardiovascular exercise equipment. Denich gym has yoga, tae-kwon-do and spinning classes, a multi-purpose cardio room, indoor racquetball and basketball courts, and a sauna room. Daniel tries to come up with plenty of incentives -from mugs to jackets to Bench Press Club t-shirts -to use them. We try to make things competitive, he said. Competition makes the programs more fun. MWR is also sponsoring a 5K run this Satur day, a Fourth of July "Liberty Run and a com memorative /11 Run to be held July 20th. There are also plenty of team sports -summer leagues in basketball, softball, soccer and bowl ing -including the popular Battle of the Branches contests between Army and Navy. But for Daniel, it's not important whether youre Army or Navy, whether you hit the gym, join a team, or work out on your own -as long as you're getting fit somehow. The quality of life is what is important, he said. We want to keep you active. An active per son is a happy person. For those looking to make exercise a bigger part of their lives, Daniel says he has a great way to start: the MicroFit machine in the Main Gym. The Micro-Fit machine records the fitness level of the individual," he said. Then, after the test, we can design a personal workout program. We will teach them flexibility and teach them how to work out with weights. Soon, Daniel plans to increase the MWR staff, add another MicroFit machine, and bring more classes and organized pro grams out to remote Camp America so that people dont have to ride the buses to find MWR -hell bring MWR to them. For now, though, Daniel invites all servicemembers to come to the Main Gym and set up an appointment for the fitness test -free of charge. We do about 40-50 fitness tests a week, he said. The process is relatively quick and painless -one minute of push-up and sit-ups, five minutes riding a bike. There is a heart monitor we hook up on you while you do the exercises. The results come in and the MWR will set up a fitness program, he said. It's as simple as that. Too easy: MWR staff wants you fit Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Donnell Daniel, Athletic Director at MWR. By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Daniel with the man he calls the third hardest-working man in the world, MWR staffer Paul MacDonald. Summer leagues start soon. Sign up now through your chain of command to play soft ball, soccer, basketball or bowling (fee involved). Leagues start at the end of the month. Schedules run on different days so you can sign up for more than one league. If anyone is interested in a volleyball league pass it up to JTF-160 J5 through your chain of command. For more info call CPT Gormly, X5249 Today, Friday, June 14th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Xtreme bowling, 7-12 p.m., Bowling Center All day social, Liberty Center, CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15th Army vs. Navy 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Denich Gym GTMO flea market, community center, Marina Point 104th Philippine Independence Day celebration 7 pm, Windjammer Club Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Northeast Gate Bus Tour, Marine Hill 7:30 a.m. Sunday, June 16th Xtreme bowling, 1 to 6 p.m. Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Sign-up for swimming lessons x2193 Fathers Day Paintball, 1 to 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Monday, June 17th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, 7 p.m. CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 18th Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 19th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Dart tournament, 7p.m., Liberty Center, CBQ Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 20th Final sports league rosters are due to J5 by noon. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Page 3 Friday, June 14, 2002 Before the first detainee arrived, before Camp X-Ray was even a camp, before they even knew exactly what their part in Operation Enduring Freedom would be, the soldiers of the 401st Military Police Company -motto Always First -were here. And now they're going home. When we got here January 6, we didn't know what to expect, said 2nd Lt. Roscoe E. Woods. There was nothing here for us. XRay wasnt finished being built yet. It certainly wasnt a typical deployment in terms of what weve been trained for. But the soldiers and NCOs adjusted well, and did what needed to be done." For the first few weeks, that meant a life in Guantanamo Bay that, while better perhaps than normal field conditions, was one that few arrivals here since have known: twelve-hour shifts, dirt floors, no running water. The rest of Guantanamo Bay was right down the road -the movie theater, the NEX, the McDonalds. But if the troops werent working, they were sleeping. And if they were awake, and had the time, the companys round-the-clock shifts often freed soldiers long after the shops of GTMO had closed their doors. And then there was the matter of the mission. Normally, the skills of the 401st center on law enforcement in a war zone: battlefield circulation control, checkpoints and encampment security. But at Camp XRay, and later at Camp Delta, there was no war. There were only the leftovers of one -the detainees that began arriving only days after the 401st did -and suddenly this unit of military policemen found itself having to retrain on the ground and learn the business of corrections. The Marines gave us some additional cor rections training, said Staff Sgt. Corey J. Cor win, a squad leader in the company. Wed had some previous training for maintaining security in a prisoner of war camp during wartime, but that wasnt too applicable either. It was a very different challenge. But the companys commander, Capt. Luis R. Hernandez, said that through it all -getting called up on a Friday and going wheels up on a Sunday, starting off with little in the way of preparation and less in the way of accom modations, and landing in the middle of a mission they hadnt really been previously trained to do -his soldiers came through. It was pretty rough for a while. It was hard to adjust, he said. But I never heard a com plaint out of them. Theyve been great. Tuesday, the soldiers of the 401st celebrated a mission well done with a barbecue at Windmill Beach. With 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips on grill and filling bellies with hamburgers paid for by MWR -whose varied sports program Phillips credited with keeping his soldiers healthy and sane for six months -everyone had a chance to sit amid the sun and sand and look back on their time here. People say this job is easy, that any soldier or sailor could do it, said Corwin. And in terms of what the actual day-to-day tasks are, the corrections work, maybe thats true. But in normal corrections-type work there isn't a large international political influence, and all the pressures that come with it. In addition to that, theres the nature of who the detainees are, why theyre here, he said. You have to be so careful because of all the personal feelings that are involved in this. Youve got to remain professional at all times, and keeping up that professionalism every day for six months is tough, he said. But we all did it. I'm proud. It was also time for the 401st to look for ward -to going home. They call GTMO the least worst place, said Hernandez. Fort Hood, where were from -we call that the great place to be. Were looking forward to rediscovering the difference. How do we feel? We're all very -how can I say it? -happy to get home and see our wives, said Corwin. Spc. Mark Schaffer, a driver with the com pany, was due to get out of the military May 20; the mission here -and the Army stop-loss policy that came with it -prevented that. His hair at regulation-stretching length in his final days, Shaffer said he was looking forward to getting on with a planned career in corrections in the civilian world. But, he said, he didn't mind the extra month if it meant being a part of this mission. After all, he said, it ought to help me on my resume. Changing of the guards: 401st leaves By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Capt. Luis R. Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips man the grill. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini From left to right: Pvt. Brandon T. Schaefer, Pvt. Sara M. Felix, and Pvt. Gary D. Fish, detainee guards with the 401st, reminisce at the companys farewell barbecue. First MP company on ground heads home

PAGE 15

Page 2 Friday, June 14, 2002 Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders Some circumstances in your life such as financial problems, marital difficulties or serious illness might leave you feeling trapped. But no matter how hopeless your situation might seem, God can and will lead you out of it if you trust Him. Here are some principles to keep in mind when you feel trapped: "Realize that God means for you to be where you are." "Be more concerned for God's glory than for your relief." "Acknowledge your enemy, but keep your eyes on the Lord" "Pray!" "Stay calm and confident, and give God time to work." "When unsure, take the next logical step by faith." "Envision God's enveloping presence." "Trust God to deliver in His own unique way." "View your current crisis as a faith builder for the future." "Don't forget to praise Him." Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publishers: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detachment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Page 15 Friday, June 14, 2002 The Army had its revenge in the final Battle of the Branches match-up, a pair of basketball games June 8 at the Main Gym. After last week's defeats to the Navy on the football field, the Army was determined to win the battle on the hardwood. Game one featured the females in a well-played defensive first half where the Navy held the lead 10 to 6. Both teams came out strong in the second half and battled back and forth down the court. With tightly matched offensive and defensive play, the Army went up by two points with under a minute left in the game. With only seconds left on the clock, Navy desperately tried to come back and sink a shot, but the Army's defense held on for a 2523 victory. It was a tough defensive game. It came down to the wire, but the Army came out on top, said Sgt 1st Class Franklin M. Blache, coach of the Army's female team. I am glad that we won. My shots were not falling in the bas ket, so I had to come inside and score some points, said Maj. Sharon D. Green, from JTF 160, who led the Army's team to victory scoring 17 points. In the second game the males came out determined to put more points on the board. In a close first half, the Army held just a two-point lead when the buzzer sounded. But the team came out and played, as Blache had predicted at halftime, Army basketball -I guarantee the second half will not even be close. And after halftime, the Army turned up the heat and outplayed the Navy. With solid play in the second half, Army came out victorious winning 51 to 39. It felt good to beat the Navy on their home court," said Army Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, of the military police brigade who scored 9 points in the victory. There are always strong battles between the Army and Navy, said Bishop. "The Army outplayed us tonight, but next time we'll give them a better game." It was a good game," said Staff Sgt. Harry G. Darden, the Army's loudest fan in the crowd. We played basic basketball starting out slow and then turning it up in the second half. We were able to win, just like we knew we would. With the softball game planned for June 15 recently canceled, Saturdays game was the last matchup of this Battle of the Branches season. This was the revenge game, said Blanche. And now well have the last word. Redemption: Army sinks Navy on hardwood By Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Wascar Vizcaino of the Army squad goes strong to the hoop in the first half. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army comes out victorious in the seasons final Battle of the Branches matchup. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy HM3 Kizzy H. Duncan tries to make her way around the Army's defense. The use of government vehicles and gov ernment contract vehicles during off-duty hours will be limited to establishments providing goods and services to the servicemember. If a government vehicle or government con tract vehicle is used to transport personnel to establishments that serve alcohol, the driver is considered on duty as described in Policy Letter #1; Alcohol Consumption. At no time will any JTF-160 personnel operate a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. (From Policy Letter #20; JTF-160 Vehicle Use Regulations.) Remember: If you drink, dont drive. You will fined, subject to UCMJ, lose your privileges, and your state DMV will be notified. Visiting hours for JTF-160 personnel in BEQ, BOQ and CBQ housing, including Gold Hill Towers, are as follows: Sunday-Thursday and holidays before a duty day, 1100-2200 hours; Friday, Saturday and the day before a legal holiday, 1000-2400 hours. As a common courtesy, permission should be obtained from roommates for all visiting, particularly for group guests. Sponsors must accompany guests at all times. Unescorted guests are not permitted in quarters. (From Policy Letter #11; JTF-160 Visiting Hours in Quarters.) -from the JTF-160 Provost Marshal's Office Happy Birthday, U.S. Army As we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the United States Army, we can all reflect on why we are here. For 227 years it has been the citizen soldier who has been called upon to defend our way of life. Our freedoms are being ques tioned again. We have left the comforts of home once again to show the world that we are willing to defend what we have. As I walk among our service members and talk with them, I find a renewed sense of determination to take care of business and show the world not to mess with us. Our young men and women in uniform today are the best that America can produce, and I am proud of the pro fessionalism I find among you. Each and every person at GTMO is making a contribution to the success of this mission.. Do not take what you do for granted, because I surely do not. We follow in the steps of our forefathers and continue to say "Don't Tread on Us." Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 CSM R.W. Funaro Trust God to lead you out of tough circumstances

PAGE 16

Although the detainees of the U.S. war on terrorism are not considered prisoners of war, they are provided here at Camp Delta with some of the privileges afforded POWs. One of those is to send and receive mail. Upon arrival here, they are given the option to fill out a short postcard confirming where they are and that they are safe. Provided with pencils and other writing accessories, the detainees are allowed to send four postcards and two letters each month. And Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart, of the 160th Military Police Battalion S1 shop, might be called their postmaster. Tart is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the detainees mail operation, and every piece of detainee mail has to go through her. "My primary mission here is to handle all aspects of detainee mail operations. I must track each piece of incoming and outgoing mail individually, she said. I must be able to say where in the process that mail is upon request," she added But before the outgoing mail reaches Tart's shop, they have to be screened by S2, which has the mission to prevent the dissemi nation of information that could be detrimental to camp function, force protection, or ongoing intelligence operations, said Spc. John B. Kane, who works for the 160th MP BN S2 counter intelli gence section. "We read every single piece of mail that comes in or goes out of this camp. We're looking for indicators: location of the camp, obviously; guard shifts, threats to U.S. personnel or anything else. If there's anything of intelli gence value, we make sure we take care of that," he added. Most correspondence has to be translated first. Some of the most common languages that detainees use in their letters are Arabic, Farsi (Persian), Pashtu Page 16 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Friday, June 14, 2002 With Army Pfc. Eric J. Brown Q: Who is the man behind the wheel of the shuttle bus at GTMO? A: Pfc. Eric J. Brown, A.K.A. The Secret Undercover Lover. Q: What kind of clearance is that, and where did you get it? A: You've got to be born with it. Q: Ever have your 15 minutes of fame? A: In my own my mind. But seriously, not until Im rich. Q: Where are you from? A: I'm stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, but I'm originally from New York City. Q: How long have you been here? A: I've been here since February. Q: And how's GTMO been treating you? A: Not so bad, at first I did a lot of partying, but that got old. Now, just relax and play ball. Q: Basketball? A: Yeah, I love ball. I always wanted to play in the NBA. Q: Driving the bus, you must meet a lot of different people? A: That's one of the bonuses to my job. I've met a lot of different people, people from different branches and backgrounds. Q: Notice any differences between the personalities of the members of the services? A: All I'll say is some branches, which I wont name, never walk. They'll take the bus to go down the block. Q: Anything out of the ordinary ever take place on the bus? A: Besides the occasional person throwing up, it always amazes me how lost people can be here. They walk around looking so con fused. I don't get how that's possible. Q: So, when you're not being entertained or disgusted by your passengers, what do you do to get you through the day? A: I like to listen to music, mainly R&B and rap. Too bad the radio rarely plays any. Q: What do you do when you want to relax? A: I like going to the beach. It's really peaceful there. Q: Well, you must have come up with some interesting theories and philosophies, with all the time you've had to think. Care to share any? A: I think that people should pray for what they need and work for what they want. I think it's important to have faith in God. Q: What have you been praying and working for lately. A: I've been praying for the United States and its troops that everything will be all right, and I've been working to make money. Q: Trying to save any? A: Yeah, and I've been doing pretty well. Getting a lot use out of my meal card. Q: So what are you looking forward to upon leaving GTMO? A: Travel! I miss being mobile. There are only so many places to go here. Q: Guess you would know. Thank you for your time. Is there any thing you'd like to say before we wrap up? A: I'd like to say to everyone here that there is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldn't know about it. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko There is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldnt know about it. Army has its hoops revenge Page 15 Cardboard boats hit the high seas Page 8 First MPs to show get to go Page 3 Letters from the detainee camp Friday, June 14, 2002 Volume 1, Issue 1 Workin on a building, a Camp America building Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The WIre Need a lift? Hop on board the Love Bus By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The WIre See MAIL, page 5 A look inside... Navy Seabees, the hammer-wielding sailors responsible for the construction of Camp X-Ray, throw up a new hooch in the ever-growing living area at Camp America.



PAGE 1

Although the detainees of the U.S. war on terrorism are not considered prisoners of war, they are provided here at Camp Delta with some of the privileges afforded POWs. One of those is to send and receive mail. Upon arrival here, they are given the option to fill out a short postcard confirming where they are and that they are safe. Provided with pencils and other writing accessories, the detainees are allowed to send four postcards and two letters each month. And Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart, of the 160th Military Police Battalion S1 shop, might be called their postmaster. Tart is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the detainees mail operation, and every piece of detainee mail has to go through her. "My primary mission here is to handle all aspects of detainee mail operations. I must track each piece of incoming and outgoing mail individually, she said. I must be able to say where in the process that mail is upon request," she added But before the outgoing mail reaches Tart's shop, they have to be screened by S2, which has the mission to prevent the dissemi nation of information that could be detrimental to camp function, force protection, or ongoing intelligence operations, said Spc. John B. Kane, who works for the 160th MP BN S2 counter intelli gence section. "We read every single piece of mail that comes in or goes out of this camp. We're looking for indicators: location of the camp, obviously; guard shifts, threats to U.S. personnel or anything else. If there's anything of intelli gence value, we make sure we take care of that," he added. Most correspondence has to be translated first. Some of the most common languages that detainees use in their letters are Arabic, Farsi (Persian), Pashtu Page 16 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Friday, June 14, 2002 With Army Pfc. Eric J. Brown Q: Who is the man behind the wheel of the shuttle bus at GTMO? A: Pfc. Eric J. Brown, A.K.A. The Secret Undercover Lover. Q: What kind of clearance is that, and where did you get it? A: You've got to be born with it. Q: Ever have your 15 minutes of fame? A: In my own my mind. But seriously, not until Im rich. Q: Where are you from? A: I'm stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, but I'm originally from New York City. Q: How long have you been here? A: I've been here since February. Q: And how's GTMO been treating you? A: Not so bad, at first I did a lot of party ing, but that got old. Now, just relax and play ball. Q: Basketball? A: Yeah, I love ball. I always wanted to play in the NBA. Q: Driving the bus, you must meet a lot of different people? A: That's one of the bonuses to my job. I've met a lot of different people, people from dif ferent branches and backgrounds. Q: Notice any differences between the per sonalities of the members of the services? A: All I'll say is some branches, which I wont name, never walk. They'll take the bus to go down the block. Q: Anything out of the ordinary ever take place on the bus? A: Besides the occasional person throwing up, it always amazes me how lost people can be here. They walk around looking so con fused. I don't get how that's possible. Q: So, when you're not being entertained or disgusted by your passengers, what do you do to get you through the day? A: I like to listen to music, mainly R&B and rap. Too bad the radio rarely plays any. Q: What do you do when you want to relax? A: I like going to the beach. It's really peaceful there. Q: Well, you must have come up with some interesting theories and philosophies, with all the time you've had to think. Care to share any? A: I think that people should pray for what they need and work for what they want. I think it's important to have faith in God. Q: What have you been praying and work ing for lately. A: I've been praying for the United States and its troops that everything will be all right, and I've been working to make money. Q: Trying to save any? A: Yeah, and I've been doing pretty well. Getting a lot use out of my meal card. Q: So what are you looking forward to upon leaving GTMO? A: Travel! I miss being mobile. There are only so many places to go here. Q: Guess you would know. Thank you for your time. Is there any thing you'd like to say before we wrap up? A: I'd like to say to everyone here that there is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldn't know about it. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko There is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldnt know about it. Army has its hoops revenge Page 15 Cardboard boats hit the high seas Page 8 First MPs to show get to go Page 3 Letters from the detainee camp Friday, June 14, 2002 Volume 1, Issue 1 Workin on a building, a Camp America building Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The WIre Need a lift? Hop on board the Love Bus By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The WIre See MAIL, page 5 A look inside... Navy Seabees, the hammer-wielding sailors responsible for the construction of Camp X-Ray, throw up a new hooch in the ever-growing living area at Camp America.

PAGE 2

Page 2 Friday, June 14, 2002 Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders Some circumstances in your life such as financial problems, marital difficulties or seri ous illness might leave you feeling trapped. But no matter how hopeless your situation might seem, God can and will lead you out of it if you trust Him. Here are some principles to keep in mind when you feel trapped: "Realize that God means for you to be where you are." "Be more concerned for God's glory than for your relief." "Acknowledge your enemy, but keep your eyes on the Lord" "Pray!" "Stay calm and confident, and give God time to work." "When unsure, take the next logical step by faith." "Envision God's enveloping presence." "Trust God to deliver in His own unique way." "View your current crisis as a faith builder for the future." "Don't forget to praise Him." Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publishers: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Page 15 Friday, June 14, 2002 The Army had its revenge in the final Battle of the Branches match-up, a pair of basketball games June 8 at the Main Gym. After last week's defeats to the Navy on the football field, the Army was determined to win the battle on the hardwood. Game one featured the females in a well-played defensive first half where the Navy held the lead 10 to 6. Both teams came out strong in the second half and bat tled back and forth down the court. With tightly matched offensive and defensive play, the Army went up by two points with under a minute left in the game. With only seconds left on the clock, Navy desperately tried to come back and sink a shot, but the Army's defense held on for a 2523 victory. It was a tough defensive game. It came down to the wire, but the Army came out on top, said Sgt 1st Class Franklin M. Blache, coach of the Army's female team. I am glad that we won. My shots were not falling in the bas ket, so I had to come inside and score some points, said Maj. Sharon D. Green, from JTF 160, who led the Army's team to vic tory scoring 17 points. In the second game the males came out determined to put more points on the board. In a close first half, the Army held just a two-point lead when the buzzer sounded. But the team came out and played, as Blache had predicted at halftime, Army basketball -I guarantee the second half will not even be close. And after halftime, the Army turned up the heat and outplayed the Navy. With solid play in the second half, Army came out vic torious winning 51 to 39. It felt good to beat the Navy on their home court," said Army Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, of the mil itary police brigade who scored 9 points in the victory. There are always strong bat tles between the Army and Navy, said Bishop. "The Army outplayed us tonight, but next time we'll give them a better game." It was a good game," said Staff Sgt. Harry G. Darden, the Army's loudest fan in the crowd. We played basic basketball start ing out slow and then turning it up in the second half. We were able to win, just like we knew we would. With the softball game planned for June 15 recently can celed, Saturdays game was the last matchup of this Battle of the Branches season. This was the revenge game, said Blanche. And now well have the last word. Redemption: Army sinks Navy on hardwood By Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Wascar Vizcaino of the Army squad goes strong to the hoop in the first half. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army comes out victorious in the seasons final Battle of the Branches matchup. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy HM3 Kizzy H. Duncan tries to make her way around the Army's defense. The use of government vehicles and gov ernment contract vehicles during off-duty hours will be limited to establishments provid ing goods and services to the servicemember. If a government vehicle or government con tract vehicle is used to transport personnel to establishments that serve alcohol, the driver is considered on duty as described in Policy Let ter #1; Alcohol Consumption. At no time will any JTF-160 personnel operate a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. (From Policy Letter #20; JTF-160 Vehicle Use Regulations.) Remember: If you drink, dont drive. You will fined, subject to UCMJ, lose your privi leges, and your state DMV will be notified. Visiting hours for JTF-160 personnel in BEQ, BOQ and CBQ housing, including Gold Hill Towers, are as follows: Sunday-Thursday and holidays before a duty day, 1100-2200 hours; Friday, Saturday and the day before a legal holiday, 1000-2400 hours. As a common courtesy, permission should be obtained from roommates for all visiting, particularly for group guests. Sponsors must accompany guests at all times. Unescorted guests are not permitted in quarters. (From Policy Letter #11; JTF-160 Visiting Hours in Quarters.) -from the JTF-160 Provost Marshal's Office Happy Birthday, U.S. Army As we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the United States Army, we can all reflect on why we are here. For 227 years it has been the citizen soldier who has been called upon to defend our way of life. Our freedoms are being ques tioned again. We have left the com forts of home once again to show the world that we are willing to defend what we have. As I walk among our service members and talk with them, I find a renewed sense of determination to take care of business and show the world not to mess with us. Our young men and women in uniform today are the best that America can produce, and I am proud of the pro fessionalism I find among you. Each and every person at GTMO is making a contribution to the suc cess of this mission.. Do not take what you do for granted, because I surely do not. We follow in the steps of our fore fathers and continue to say "Don't Tread on Us." Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 CSM R.W. Funaro Trust God to lead you out of tough circumstances

PAGE 3

Page 14 Friday, June 14, 2002 The way the people at Morale, Welfare and Recreation see it, if you're not mentally and phys ically fit you can't do your job. The job of MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel and his 13 staff members at the G. T. Denich gym here, is to give you -the soldiers, sailors, Marines and coast guardsmen of Joint Task Force 160 at Guantanamo Bay -plenty of opportunities to get fit for work and stay that way. That's our goal," said Daniel. We are here to improve the quality of life. Fitness is a way of life; it can change your lifestyle. We try to put together a variety of programs that are good not only for the JTF-160 people, but for the Guantanamo Bay community at large. Daniel says he could not do it without his staff. The people on staff are great here, and I would not trade them for any in the world. It has been really great working here. Certainly Daniel has been a lot busier since January, with the influx of servicemembers arriv ing as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. His goal is to continue to meet that increased demand with increased supply. When the JTF-160 personnel started coming to the base, we became more proactive with the programs available," he said. "We want them to feel comfortable here. JTF-160 now has its own MWR representa tive, so we can work closely together to create more programs. There are three exercise facilities currently open on base: the main G.J. Denich gym in town, the Body Shop gym on Marine Hill and the gym at Camp America. All these facilities have free-weights, weightmachines and cardiovascular exercise equipment. Denich gym has yoga, tae-kwon-do and spin ning classes, a multi-purpose cardio room, indoor racquetball and basketball courts, and a sauna room. Daniel tries to come up with plenty of incentives -from mugs to jackets to Bench Press Club t-shirts -to use them. We try to make things competitive, he said. Competition makes the programs more fun. MWR is also sponsoring a 5K run this Satur day, a Fourth of July "Liberty Run and a com memorative /11 Run to be held July 20th. There are also plenty of team sports -summer leagues in basketball, softball, soccer and bowl ing -including the popular Battle of the Branches contests between Army and Navy. But for Daniel, it's not important whether youre Army or Navy, whether you hit the gym, join a team, or work out on your own -as long as you're getting fit somehow. The quality of life is what is important, he said. We want to keep you active. An active per son is a happy person. For those looking to make exercise a bigger part of their lives, Daniel says he has a great way to start: the MicroFit machine in the Main Gym. The Micro-Fit machine records the fitness level of the individual," he said. Then, after the test, we can design a personal workout program. We will teach them flexibility and teach them how to work out with weights. Soon, Daniel plans to increase the MWR staff, add another MicroFit machine, and bring more classes and organized pro grams out to remote Camp America so that people dont have to ride the buses to find MWR -hell bring MWR to them. For now, though, Daniel invites all servicemembers to come to the Main Gym and set up an appointment for the fitness test -free of charge. We do about 40-50 fitness tests a week, he said. The process is rela tively quick and painless -one minute of push-up and sit-ups, five minutes riding a bike. There is a heart monitor we hook up on you while you do the exercises. The results come in and the MWR will set up a fitness program, he said. It's as simple as that. Too easy: MWR staff wants you fit Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Donnell Daniel, Athletic Director at MWR. By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Daniel with the man he calls the third hardest-working man in the world, MWR staffer Paul MacDonald. Summer leagues start soon. Sign up now through your chain of command to play soft ball, soccer, basketball or bowling (fee involved). Leagues start at the end of the month. Schedules run on different days so you can sign up for more than one league. If any one is interested in a volleyball league pass it up to JTF-160 J5 through your chain of com mand. For more info call CPT Gormly, X5249 Today, Friday, June 14th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Xtreme bowling, 7-12 p.m., Bowling Center All day social, Liberty Center, CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15th Army vs. Navy 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Denich Gym GTMO flea market, community center, Marina Point 104th Philippine Independence Day celebra tion 7 pm, Windjammer Club Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Northeast Gate Bus Tour, Marine Hill 7:30 a.m. Sunday, June 16th Xtreme bowling, 1 to 6 p.m. Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Sign-up for swimming lessons x2193 Fathers Day Paintball, 1 to 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Monday, June 17th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, 7 p.m. CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 18th Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 19th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Dart tournament, 7p.m., Liberty Center, CBQ Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 20th Final sports league rosters are due to J5 by noon. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Page 3 Friday, June 14, 2002 Before the first detainee arrived, before Camp X-Ray was even a camp, before they even knew exactly what their part in Opera tion Enduring Freedom would be, the soldiers of the 401st Military Police Company -motto Always First -were here. And now they're going home. When we got here January 6, we didn't know what to expect, said 2nd Lt. Roscoe E. Woods. There was nothing here for us. XRay wasnt finished being built yet. It cer tainly wasnt a typical deployment in terms of what weve been trained for. But the soldiers and NCOs adjusted well, and did what needed to be done." For the first few weeks, that meant a life in Guantanamo Bay that, while better perhaps than normal field conditions, was one that few arrivals here since have known: twelve-hour shifts, dirt floors, no running water. The rest of Guantanamo Bay was right down the road -the movie theater, the NEX, the McDonalds. But if the troops werent working, they were sleeping. And if they were awake, and had the time, the companys round-the-clock shifts often freed soldiers long after the shops of GTMO had closed their doors. And then there was the matter of the mission. Nor mally, the skills of the 401st center on law enforcement in a war zone: battle field circulation control, checkpoints and encampment security. But at Camp XRay, and later at Camp Delta, there was no war. There were only the leftovers of one -the detainees that began arriving only days after the 401st did -and suddenly this unit of military policemen found itself having to retrain on the ground and learn the business of corrections. The Marines gave us some additional cor rections training, said Staff Sgt. Corey J. Cor win, a squad leader in the company. Wed had some previous training for maintain ing security in a pris oner of war camp during wartime, but that wasnt too applica ble either. It was a very different challenge. But the companys commander, Capt. Luis R. Hernandez, said that through it all -getting called up on a Friday and going wheels up on a Sunday, starting off with little in the way of preparation and less in the way of accom modations, and landing in the middle of a mis sion they hadnt really been previously trained to do -his soldiers came through. It was pretty rough for a while. It was hard to adjust, he said. But I never heard a com plaint out of them. Theyve been great. Tuesday, the sol diers of the 401st cele brated a mission well done with a barbecue at Windmill Beach. With 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips on grill and filling bellies with ham burgers paid for by MWR -whose varied sports program Phillips credited with keeping his soldiers healthy and sane for six months -everyone had a chance to sit amid the sun and sand and look back on their time here. People say this job is easy, that any soldier or sailor could do it, said Corwin. And in terms of what the actual day-to-day tasks are, the corrections work, maybe thats true. But in normal corrections-type work there isn't a large international political influence, and all the pressures that come with it. In addition to that, theres the nature of who the detainees are, why theyre here, he said. You have to be so careful because of all the personal feelings that are involved in this. Youve got to remain professional at all times, and keeping up that professionalism every day for six months is tough, he said. But we all did it. I'm proud. It was also time for the 401st to look for ward -to going home. They call GTMO the least worst place, said Hernandez. Fort Hood, where were from -we call that the great place to be. Were looking forward to rediscovering the difference. How do we feel? We're all very -how can I say it? -happy to get home and see our wives, said Corwin. Spc. Mark Schaffer, a driver with the com pany, was due to get out of the military May 20; the mission here -and the Army stop-loss policy that came with it -prevented that. His hair at regulation-stretching length in his final days, Shaffer said he was looking forward to getting on with a planned career in corrections in the civilian world. But, he said, he didn't mind the extra month if it meant being a part of this mission. After all, he said, it ought to help me on my resume. Changing of the guards: 401st leaves By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Capt. Luis R. Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips man the grill. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini From left to right: Pvt. Brandon T. Schaefer, Pvt. Sara M. Felix, and Pvt. Gary D. Fish, detainee guards with the 401st, reminisce at the companys farewell barbecue. First MP company on ground heads home

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Page 4 Friday, June 14, 2002 Page 13 Friday, June 14, 2002 Across 3. Physical exercise 6. Quadriceps (plural) 7. Burly 9. Slow running 12. Beat of heart per minute 14. Hoisting weights 15. Front leaning rest 16. With oxygen 17. Chin lifts Down 1. A bodily excretion 2. Side straddle hop 4. Robust 5. Supple 8. Physical training 10. Bench ____. 11. Bring weights to chest 13. Lifting weights repeatedly Work It Out! Outgoing Wire editor gets inaugural Commanders Coin for a JTF job well done Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first JTF-160 Commander's Coin of Excellence to Army Spc. James Strine, June 7, 2002. Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year for 2001, designed the coin himself while serving as editor of the weekly JTF160 field newspaper The Wire from Janu ary to June. "It meant a lot to me to receive the first awarded coin, because it took me a lot of time to develop it," said Strine. Strine thanked the JTF-160 staff for the coin and said he was glad he was able to see it before he and the rest of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment left Guan tanamo Bay to return to the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Man on the street This weeks question: What keeps you motivated? Army Staff Sgt. Robert Lofton 114th MP Co. Physical training and good Army chow motivate me. Im 21 years in, so this deployment is a drop in the bucket. Navy YNSN Chrystal Huff MEPS, Dallas Loving my job, which is processing clearances. Com petitive sports and beating the Army motivates me. Army Sgt. Roger Rettkowski 339th MP Co. Keeping busy in this military life motivates me. Reuniting with my family keeps me driving on. Army 1st Lt. Cedric Sherard 418th Trans. Co. My soldiers. If Im not motivated, theyre not. Now, 17 days and a wake-up has my motivation high. Coast Guard AMT2 Jake Proesch CG Air Station Representing the Coast Guard. Get ting the job done while having a good time motivates me. Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Friday, June 14 8 P.M. Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (G) 10 P.M. Scorpion King (PG-13) Saturday, June 15 8 P.M. The Rookie (G) 10 P.M. Van Wilder (PG-13) Sunday, June 16 8 P.M. Murder By Numbers (R) Monday, June 17 8 P.M. Enough (PG-13) Tuesday, June 18 8 P.M. Star Wars Episode II (PG-13) Wednesday, June 19 8 P.M. Monsters Ball (R) Thursday, June 20 8 P.M. The Sweetest Thing (R) Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Meeting the Press Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus fields reporters questions at the JTF-160 weekly press brief ing. Whats it like being on the other side of the table? Covering the operations here has its ups and downs, said Matt Dolan, a full-time military reporter for The Virginian-Pilot in Virginia Beach, Va. Phrases like operational security can drive us crazy sometimes. But working for a paper so near the huge naval base in Norfolk, Va., gives Dolan some relief when it comes to finding an angle. So many of our readers have been stationed here, so theres a story just in how life at GTMO has been changed by the detainee operation. The short answer: quite a bit.

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and Hindi. If the language or regional dialect used is not easily recognizable, the translators put their resources together to interpret the content of the text before it is sent to JTF160 J2 or to the Defense Language Insti tute, Monterey, California, said Capt. Quinn Henderson, the officer in charge of the S2 shop of 160th MPBN out of Talla hassee, Fl., now attached to JTF-160. The more educated detainees simplify the process by writing their own correspon dence in English, said Master Sgt. Pat Tet rick, who is also from the S2 shop. After the outgoing mail has been screened by S2, Tart then lists them on a record sheet and forwards them to the post office for delivery. Handling mail is not her primary mili tary occupational specialty, but she takes her job seriously. She works six days a week and comes to work for a seventh day if there is a lot of mail that needs to be processed. She said she tried her best to ensure that mail flows in and out without long delays. "Mail has to be sent in a specified time," she added. "I can't stress enough the impor tance of a detainee's mail. As a person, it's important for me to get my mail," she said as she was going through a stack of detainees' outgoing mail. In addition to outgoing mail, Tart is also involved in the detainees incoming mail. The incoming mail process is somewhat similar to the outgoing process. Tarts S1 shop receives mail from either the post office or the International Commit tee of the Red Cross. But before the letters or postcards reach the detainees, Tart has to sort each one of them and sends them to the S2 shop for screening and interpretation. At this stage, the workload increases for the S2 shop. Kane, who is heavily involved in the operation, said that mail becomes the biggest part of his day. Getting mail to the detainees is not an easy process, especially when there is a lot of mail that has to go through all the estab lished channels. It takes about five working days for the incoming and outgoing mail to be thor oughly processed. In the past two weeks, more than 100 pieces of mail have been processed. But the people who participate in the daily detainees' mail operations strive every day to respect and preserve the detainees' right to communicate. Tart, who is on her first overseas deploy ment, has been an Army reservist since 1979. She doesnt complain about her job at GTMO Camp Delta. Before she came here, she used to work as a social worker for the public defender's office in Tallahas see. When asked about her present job with the military, she said, "I don't get much sun, but I like my job here. It's very detailed, and it keeps me busy." From screening mail to watching detainees, Kane is busy too. But like Tart, he wouldnt have it any other way. I love my job, he said. This kind of operation is the best for a CI agent. It's not every day that a reservist gets to do an intel ligence mission of this magnitude. Every day, if I pick up just one piece of intelligence, I feel like I'm adding to the larger mission. Page 5 Friday, June 14, 2002 MAIL, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 14, 2002 Rumsfeld Praises India for Steps Forward ISLAMABAD -Defense Secretary Don ald Rumsfeld wrapped up his visit to India earlier today by praising Indian leaders for their concern and interest in resolving the Kashmir dispute with Pakistan "in an appropriate way." A senior defense official who was in the meetings said an overriding tone through out was the desire to get beyond the cur rent crisis with Pakistan and to further develop U.S.Indian ties. Intelligence First Priority With Padilla NEW DELHI -The United States is more interested in extracting intelligence information than in prosecuting Jose Padilla, said Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Padilla, a U.S. citizen also known as Abdullah al Mujahir, was captured May 8 when he flew into Chicago's O'Hare Inter national Airport from Pakistan. The Justice Department transferred him June 10 to DoD custody. He's being held in a Navy brig in Charleston, S.C. "Our interest, really, in this case, is not law enforcement. It is not punishment," Rumsfeld said. "Because he was a terrorist or working with the terrorists, our interest at the moment is to try to find out everything he knows so hopefully we can stop other terrorist acts." Designs Sought for Pentagon Memorial WASHINGTON -DoD officials announced a competition today to choose a design for a memorial to honor those killed in the Pentagon terror attack of Sept. 11. The competition is open to anyone. Rules will be on the Web at http://pen tagonmemorial.nab.usace.army.mil. Entrants can also receive the rules by writing: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Bal timore District, Public Affairs Office, P.O. Box 1715, Baltimore, MD 21203. Deadline for submission is Sept. 11, 2002, at 5 p.m. EDT. The jury will consist of six sculptors, architects and landscape architects; a representative from the vic tims' families; and two prominent citizens from the Washington, D.C., area. WASHINGTON -New perspectives, new ideas and new energy are needed to combat global terrorism, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice said here Wednesday during commencement cere monies at the National Defense University. Today, our nation and the cause of free dom need all that you have to offer -your ideas, your learning and your dedication, Rice told the graduating class of nearly 500 students. Wars are decided as much by the supremacy of the mind as by the supremacy of the military technology that we often think of as winning wars. And, of course, wars are won by people. Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, NDU pres ident, presented Rice with an honorary doc torate in national security affairs. As President Bush's national security adviser, she stands at his right hand during one of our nation's most stressful periods, he said. Rice noted that NDU takes the best and the brightest from the armed forces, the exec utive branch and allied nations. You have operated here in an open, cre ative environment where intellectual ferment is supported and diversity of thought is rewarded, she said. You have understood that shifts in strategic paradigms require boldness in thought as well as in action. "When you leave this place, try not to lose that spirit, she said. It will not be easy. Wolfowitz: Dirty Bomb Plot Highlights WMD Dangers WASHINGTON-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today the capture of an al Qaeda ter rorist highlights the dangers posed by the whole range of weapons of mass destruction. Speaking on the CBS Early Show and NBC Today Show, Wolfowitz said law enforcement officials cap tured Abdullah al Muhajir, also known as Jose Padilla, in the early stages of plotting to plant a radiological dirty bomb in an American city. A dirty bomb is conven tional explosives surrounded by radioactive material. When the bomb explodes, it spews that material over a wide area in smoke and other particulate matter. The bomb's destructive power depends on the amount, type and size of conventional explosives and radioactive material used. Wolfowitz said the admin istration has said many times that the greatest danger fac ing the United States is countries that have weapons of mass destruction who work with terrorists. The State Department lists seven such countries: Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Syria and Sudan. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has said that the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by his organization is a religious duty. U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan found evi dence that al Qaeda was aggressively pursuing chemi cal, biological, radiological and nuclear information and material. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said many times that if terror groups get these types of material and launch an attack, the casualty toll would dwarf Sept. 11s. Wolfowitz said Muhajir started out in Brooklyn and Chicago as a petty criminal. "Somewhere along the way he got converted to being something else. And out in Pakistan and Afghanistan he was working on plots to do the most hor rendous kinds of things in this country, he said. Wolfowitz said the terror ist has been classified as an enemy combatant. The military can hold him until the end of the conflict, he said. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Linda D. Kozryn Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, president of the National Defense University in Washington, presents National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice with honorary doctorate in national security. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart sorts and logs the detainees' mail as Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario takes a phone message. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Capt. Quinn Henderson, reviewing the status of the mail translation process. POSTAL PRICE INCREASE NOTICE Effective June 30, 2002, the rate for a single piece of First Class Mail will increase from $0.34 to $0.37. The singlepiece card rate will increase from $0.21 to $0.23. Rice Calls on Military Grads to Energize National Security

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When Army reservist Jacque line Gordon learned late last year that she was being called to duty, the divorced mother of two had to quickly decide what to do with her children, Augustus, 10, and Kerri anne, 13. In the end, I sent them to two different friends, said Gordon, 37, a guidance counselor at the West ern Suffolk BOCES in Dix Hills and Copiague resident now serv ing as an operations officer at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where nearly 400 detainees from Afghanistan are being held for interrogation. It was not an ideal situation but Gordon thought her problems were solved. Yet after she started active duty in January, more trou ble surfaced. She had returned her leased car before activation, but the paper work went awry, causing her to continue receiving monthly bills, then a repossession notice and, finally, a warning that her credit record would be marred if she did nt pay. The situation would have been resolved if I could handle it per sonally, Gordon, a major, said in a recent phone interview from Cuba. But that's impossible from here. Housing issues also burdened Frank DiDomenico, a New York City police officer and Air Force reservist who has been on active duty since Sept. 23 at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. The trouble began in March, when DiDomenico's wife of 18 months, Tyra, received a notice informing her that the year-long lease on their one-bedroom Coram apartment -also home, by then, to 7-month-old Juliet -would not be renewed after its May 31 expira tion because the property was to be renovated, upgraded and sold. So here we are, about to lose our apartment, while my wife has to care for our child and I'm stuck in New Jersey on active duty, DiDomenico, 29, said last week before heading to the Middle East, where, as a sergeant, he will superbase. There is no way we can look for another place. More than 83,000 military reservists and national guard troops -approximately 20,000 of them from New York State -were activated for varying durations by federal authorities after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. Like hun dreds of their counterparts from about two dozen units on Long Island, Gordon and DiDomenico knew they might have to serve their country in a time of peril. Nevertheless, as the two reservists have learned, such serv ice often carries a personal price. My earnings have dropped, but the bills haven't, said Marine Corps reservist Anthony Dixon, who said his $36,000 annual salary as a corporal is about half of what he made as a self-employed potato chips salesman. A West Islip resident and new father, Dixon, 30, was activated in December and sent to Camp Leje une in North Carolina, where he is one of 65 Long Islanders with the Second Battalion, 225th Marines. ments, credit card payments and car and truck payments, he said. And other basic costs, like elec tricity and water, haven't gone down because I'm away. Although Nassau and Suffolk counties pay civil servants on active duty the difference between their military and civilian salaries, only a handful of personnel -mostly law enforcement officers -qualify. Moreover, federal laws, which guarantee returning reservists a job with undiminished pay and benefits, often do not soften financial hardships they face while in uniform. A small number of private employers, usually prosperous corporations spurred by a mix of patriotism and public relations, give activated employees extended salaries and benefits. But for many reservists, military duty brings some measure of personal hardship. Sure, I'm losing money, said John Schulz, 36, a Sayville resi dent whose approximately $100,000 annual income as a copilot for American Airlines was trimmed to more than $84,000 in February when he was activated with the Air National Guard's 106th Rescue Wing in Westhamp ton Beach. But I'm not going into poverty, added Schulz, who was to go to Turkey this week as com mander of a rescue helicopter sup porting U.S. Air Force patrols in Iraq. The main thing is the loss of time spent with my wife and two children. You can't put a price on that. However, activation does not always bring trouble. Bill Cline relishes the responsibility of head ing JDOG (an acronym for Joint Detention Operations Group), which was established earlier this year at the Guantanamo base. This job means the world to me, said Cline, 52, a longtime Bayport resident who, in civilian life, is a deputy Suffolk County sheriff. I feel I'm not only helping my country, but myself as well, he said. Such feelings spurred Cline, who fought in Vietnam as a Marine and subsequently became an Army reservist, to volunteer for duty in Bosnia, where with the rank of major he oversaw safety conditions for U.S. peacekeepers in 1999. As a lieutenant-colonel in charge of about 700 American sol diers and 400 detainees, Cline doubled his $50,000 sheriff's salary. Nevertheless, he stressed that doing meaningful work, not making money, is what motivates me. Gordon's savior was Eric Out calt, finance director for Ami tyville Toyota. After being told about the reservist's car troubles, Outcalt tracked the errant paper work, called the parent corporation and corrected the problem. She did nothing wrong, and she's serving her country, he said. I'm delighted to help her. Also helpful was Jules Reich, managing partner of Coram Isle LLC, owner of apartments rented by DiDomenico and several hun dred other tenants. When told of the airman's hous ing problem, Reich called the ser geant and offered to give him an identical apartment in the same complex, at the same rent, for another year. It's the least we can do for someone in your situation, the executive said. Serving their country without reserve By Arnold Williams Page 6 Friday, June 14, 2002 Proudly serving in a Navy of one The Army-led detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has a Navy Heli copter Pilot as second in command of the Joint Detention Operations Group. The JDOG staff is comprised of the Army 455th MP Brigade Liaison Detach ment. The BLD oversees one battalion staff, several MP Companies and one Mechanized Infantry unit. Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur is the only Navy officer attached to the JDOG. As the executive officer of the JDOG staff, LeBrasseur has the responsibility of over seeing the physical care, feeding, housing and security, inside and outside the deten tion camp. The XO billet for JDOG was originally intended for an Army officer; and was manned by an Army officer for one month before LeBrasseur assumed the responsi bility. Back in his hometown of Lakeville, MN, LeBrasseur is a Federal Agent/Depor tation Officer for the Department of Jus tice-Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). He tracks down, arrests, then deports the criminals, fugitives and illegal aliens to their home countries. LeBrasseur has been in on high-profile operations before -he was involved in the detention of Zacarias Moussaoui, who is suspected of being involved in the plan ning of the 11 Sept attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. His efforts supported the FBI's investigation by keep ing Moussaoui in INS custody on immi gration violations until the FBI could formally charge Moussaoui. Because of LeBrasseur's civilian record, his active and reserve history and his atten tion to detail in his previous position as the Future Plans Officer for operations in GTMO, he was recommended for the XO position by the commanding officer of detainee operations for Operation Endur ing Freedom here. Recognizing the experience and qualifi cations of LeBrasseur, the Army extended the executive officers position to him. I have complete confidence and trust in his abilities. He is loyal beyond reproach. I have no concerns, said Lt. Col. Cline, commander of JDOG. The Army contin gent at GTMO has been more than recep tive in having him as their second in command. If I was sent here to be XO, it might have been different, said LeBrasseur. But being asked by the CO to fill this position is the biggest compliment I could have had, and I think they respect that. The arrival of new MP Companies recently here at GTMO has presented a new challenge; LeBrassuer must go through the normal adjustment period with the new soldiers. Prior to the new MP Companies arrival everyone knew me. It's different now, he said. For me, adjusting to new faces. For them it's adjusting to a Navy LCDR. He gets along with everyone. He's fair regardless of what service or rank, said Cline. When Paul left Lakeville he left behind his family, friends and his 17-year-old Miniature Pinscher. Even though he misses them beyond measure, he has no regrets. LeBrasseur said he is proud to serve his country in this capacity. He not only has the responsibility of overseeing the detainees, but he has the occasional duty of escorting VIPs through Camp Delta to observe detainee operations. As I walk through the camp with gen erals and VIPs, we have to talk over the yelling, heckling and chatter of the detainees. I can see in their eyes the hate and disdain that they have for Americans. It makes him think about what Al-Qaeda has done--and potentially will do. By Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher Sherwood Special to The Wire Photo by Army Pfc. Jean -Carl Bertin Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur, the sole Navy servicemember on the Joint Detention Operations Group staff, poses in front of his favorite flag. Page 11 Friday, June 14, 2002 (Newsday Photo / Nelson Ching) Air Force reservist Frank DiDomenico and his wife, Tyra, were notified that the lease on their apartment would not be renewed. They later received an offer of another apartment. When duty called, these part-timers gave their all, despite the personal cost I have the same mortgage payvise the guarding of planes at an air

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Page 10 Page 7 Friday, June 14, 2002 Friday, June 14, 2002 Get quick, quality care at Aid Station Troops at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of falling casualty to bullets and bombs. Its the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Thats where the Aid Station comes in. The good guys on the troops side, said Coast Guard Health Services Senior Chief Mark H. O'Neal. Set up as a triage to treat all sick call but capable of saving servicemembers lives, its equipped with the life-pack 12, which enables the staff to resus citate patients if necessary. However, most patients who walk up to the little red medical cross at the MWR build ing on Windward Loop and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The majority of patients come in for treatment of common cold symp toms -the sniffles and stomach aches. Lately a lot of people have come in complaining of headaches, said O'Neal. The aid station is responsible for treating all sick-call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar. Their hours of opera tion are 0700-1630 Monday through Friday. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. In comparison to the hospital, the aid sta tion is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily. More than 1,385 patients have been cared for since January. During our time here, we are evolving. We are taking advantages of lessons learned and improving the quality for troops, said Hospi tal Coreman 2 Greg Redgate. The Aid Station, primarily composed of Coast Guard servicemembers, also benefits from the joint task environment on GTMO by having servicemembers of all stripes working with them side by side. This was a great mission. Working with Navy and Army has made this the most diverse situation I've taken part in my last 25 years of my service, said O'Neal. So if you need aid, don't be afraid. Just come on down to the Aid Station at the bottom of the loop. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin P. Wiles checks the blood pressure of Coast Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson. Surrounded by an extensive array of security measures by land, sea and air, 34 suspected terrorists arrived here Wednes day. They represent the latest of 84 detainees who have arrived here for in pro cessing and detention at Camp Delta in the past week. Camp Delta now has 468 detainees. Our primary mission here is to receive and hold detainees in support of the War on Terrorism. Today was a good day for us. We helped get 34 suspected terrorists off the battlefield and out of the fight, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, a military spokesman for Joint Task Force 160, the multi-service command in charge of detention operations here. As long as we've got these suspected terrorists here, we'll treat them humanely, because we're a nation of laws, but you can also rest assured they won't be planning or participating in the murder of thousands of innocent victims, said Hoey. After arriving at the 612-unit facility, the detainees were in-processed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes showers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. Camp Delta was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees, first held at Camp X-Ray, were moved to the newer facility. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scepko Wiles continues his medical checkup with a quick look into Paxsons ears. WASHINGTON -If the Pentagon was a person, it might just be smiling right now as it wears a spanking new coat of bright limestone across its western wall. A terrorist-hijacked airliner slammed into that wall nine months ago, killing 184 people. Today, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wol fowitz participated in a Pentagon ceremony to install a special dedication capsule into that once ruined west wall. Wolfowitz said local commuters passing by the Pentagon have witnessed a truly remarkable transformation since the terrorist attack. Today, we'll finish one important part of that remarkable transformation," he contin ued, "We will restore to its rightful place a block of Indiana limestone that builders first placed here six decades ago. A discolored block of stone taken from the ruins of the west wall after the attack was used to cap the niche where the dedication capsule would be placed. The stone is inscribed with the date of the attack. Pentagon renovation program manager Walker Lee Evey, with Wolfowitz at his side, placed the capsule into the niche. Then, with the help of construction workers, the capstone was inserted into the opening. The capsule contains items such as a signed photograph of President Bush with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld standing out side the Pentagon, handmade cards and letters of condolences from school children, medal lions from Rumsfeld and Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff, Arlington County firefighter and police patches, a Defense Protective Ser vices patch, a plaque listing the 184 victims, and more. Items to be placed inside the capsule were displayed to the news media yesterday at a Pentagon briefing hosted by Charles S. Abell, assistant secretary of defense for force man agement policy. The dedication capsule, Abell said, is our way of remembering and memorializing the victims and the events of Sept. 11 and to rec ognize the good works of the many dedicated people on the construction crews who've helped us reconstruct the Pentagon so quickly and so well. The capsule isn't meant to be opened like a time capsule, he said. We don't intend to dig this out at any specific date in the future and have it available for historians and the curi ous, he added. We just expect it to be there to commemorate the victims and the rebuild ing effort and the war on terrorism. Wolfowitz then read aloud a letter from a California schoolgirl named Amanda: Dear Pentagon, I believe we can all pull together and show what America means. To me, following the attacks last September, America means wisdom, strength, endurance and freedom. Amanda, you've got it exactly right, Wol fowitz said to the audience, noting that the qualities outlined in the girl's letter do define America. He praised the construction workers, noting they have worked hard armed with hammers and saws to reconstruct the damaged Penta gon. With your hearts and hands you have rebuilt this symbol of American values and strength, stone by stone and we thank you, he added. Wolfowitz noted that the Pentagon recon struction crew, in adopting the battle cry, Let's Roll, honors Sept. 11 hero Todd Beamer. A passenger aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, Beamer said to fellow passengers, Let's roll! before rushing their hijackers. The plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field, killing all aboard. Beamer and his fellow passengers have been credited with sacrificing themselves to save countless others. The 184 men and women who died at the Pentagon were patriots, he noted, representing values alien to the terrorists. Quoting Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz said: Those Americans died because of how they lived, as free men and women, proud of their freedom, proud of their country, and proud of their country's cause, the cause of human freedom. 34 detainees enter Camp Delta Photo by Gerry J. Gilmore Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz speaks at the June 11, 2002, ceremony marking the installation of the last limestone block in the repaired outer wall of the Pentagon damaged by terrorists on September 11. Pentagon wears new face at dedication By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Lets go surfing... sooner or later Three would-be wave-catchers wait on shore for some peaks on a sunny Tuesday afternoon at Windmill Beach. By Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 14, 2002 Cardboard boats hit blue seas to keep morale above water Its amazing what you can do with a little duct tape, card board, paint and some motivation. Good times set sail last Saturday at the Sailing Center here when the second annual MWRs Great Cardboard Boat Regatta was held. A fleet of creatively designed boats arrived with stylish names in tow like The Tiki Barge, The Blitz Crew, M & T Express, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, USS Jason, Sweet and Its on the Barge. The rules were simple: All boats had to be constructed of recycled cardboard painted, of course with no cellular, fiberglass, plastic, wood or flotation materials allowed in the construction. The boats, to be propelled only by oars, paddles or parts of the body, had to race out to a turning point marked by a red buoy around 200 ft. and then return to dock. When the contest began, Sweet took off like a light ening bolt from Mt. Olympus, with the majestic Tiki Barge in a very close second. Its on the Barge had a tough time on the high seas, while Rub-a-dub dub its a Gitmo Tub, way out of course, zigzagged its way where no cardboard boat has gone before. The waves of excitement were high just before the turn ing point, when the harsh wind of poor luck blew in on The Blitz Crew, which floundering from the start, dra matically sank. However, the crew was quickly rescued by life guards, and their ravaged vessel brought back to shore. As the race came to a close, the unassuming Sweet, driven by Nolan Butler and Nick Basel, took a sweet and victorious first place. Right behind it, was The Tiki Barge at second place. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, after obtaining some fast determination, zigzagged its way back on course to seal a well earned third place. Coming in last was the patriotic USS Jason, captained by elementary school student Meagan Heitman, who made a show for herself as she epically struggled to make it in. With a life guard at the ready, the near sunken vessel returned to port, and Meagan was greeted by a thunderous crowd. After everyone settled down from the excitement, Craig Basel, the MWR director, announced the winners and gave out the awards. In the Youth category, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub took first place, with M & T Express coming in second and USS Jason taking third. For the Open cate gory, Sweet took first, The Tiki Barge took second, and Its on the Barge placed third. Then there were special categories. For Best Boat Name, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, for Best Theme, USS Jason, for Best Titantic sinking, The Blitz Crew, and for Best Looking, The Tiki Barge. The Tiki Barge, constructed from a myriad amount of beer boxes and manned by a five-person crew from the 115th Military Police Battalion, by far raised the bar in card board boat construction. The man who designed it, Army Sgt. Robert Kaiser, said they were too many beer boxes floating around Windward Loop and thought they could be put to better use. A mechanical engineer specializing in nautical engineering, Kaiser designed the pirate ship-like vessel to hold 1000 lbs. of crew, and if it sprung a leak, it could hold an additional 1000 lbs. of water. It took him and his team a month to build. Such effort paid off, and the event overall was a grand success. It went really great. This is the second year we have done it, and its just a lot of fun, said Basel, who organized the event. They put a lot of work into those boats, and they paddle their butts off. It really brings the community together. It wasnt about being competitive, just having fun. By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Victory wont be delivered this day as Its on the Barge struggles to bring its valiant cargo back to shore. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Hard work pays off as Meagan basks in the adoration of the crowd. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Unsure if her boat, the USS Jason, will stay afloat, Meagan Heitman drives on. Photo by Army Spc. Joeseph A. Morris The crew of the Tiki Barge races to shore, where cold ones are on ice awaiting their arrival. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris With his hand on the award for Best Looking boat and his mind on those beers, Tiki Barge designer Sgt. Robert Kaiser, 115th Military Police Battalion, proudly accepts his prize. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris The race is on and the boats are gone as Sweet takes an early lead, with The Tiki Barge in a close second. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub takes the wrong tack, leaving the crowd wondering if its crew would ever come back.

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Page 8 Page 9 Friday, June 14, 2002 Cardboard boats hit blue seas to keep morale above water Its amazing what you can do with a little duct tape, card board, paint and some motivation. Good times set sail last Saturday at the Sailing Center here when the second annual MWRs Great Cardboard Boat Regatta was held. A fleet of creatively designed boats arrived with stylish names in tow like The Tiki Barge, The Blitz Crew, M & T Express, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, USS Jason, Sweet and Its on the Barge. The rules were simple: All boats had to be constructed of recycled cardboard painted, of course with no cellular, fiberglass, plastic, wood or flotation materials allowed in the construction. The boats, to be propelled only by oars, paddles or parts of the body, had to race out to a turning point marked by a red buoy around 200 ft. and then return to dock. When the contest began, Sweet took off like a light ening bolt from Mt. Olympus, with the majestic Tiki Barge in a very close second. Its on the Barge had a tough time on the high seas, while Rub-a-dub dub its a Gitmo Tub, way out of course, zigzagged its way where no cardboard boat has gone before. The waves of excitement were high just before the turn ing point, when the harsh wind of poor luck blew in on The Blitz Crew, which floundering from the start, dra matically sank. However, the crew was quickly rescued by life guards, and their ravaged vessel brought back to shore. As the race came to a close, the unassuming Sweet, driven by Nolan Butler and Nick Basel, took a sweet and victorious first place. Right behind it, was The Tiki Barge at second place. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, after obtaining some fast determination, zigzagged its way back on course to seal a well earned third place. Coming in last was the patriotic USS Jason, captained by elementary school student Meagan Heitman, who made a show for herself as she epically struggled to make it in. With a life guard at the ready, the near sunken vessel returned to port, and Meagan was greeted by a thunderous crowd. After everyone settled down from the excitement, Craig Basel, the MWR director, announced the winners and gave out the awards. In the Youth category, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub took first place, with M & T Express coming in second and USS Jason taking third. For the Open cate gory, Sweet took first, The Tiki Barge took second, and Its on the Barge placed third. Then there were special categories. For Best Boat Name, Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub, for Best Theme, USS Jason, for Best Titantic sinking, The Blitz Crew, and for Best Looking, The Tiki Barge. The Tiki Barge, constructed from a myriad amount of beer boxes and manned by a five-person crew from the 115th Military Police Battalion, by far raised the bar in card board boat construction. The man who designed it, Army Sgt. Robert Kaiser, said they were too many beer boxes floating around Windward Loop and thought they could be put to better use. A mechanical engineer specializing in nautical engineering, Kaiser designed the pirate ship-like vessel to hold 1000 lbs. of crew, and if it sprung a leak, it could hold an additional 1000 lbs. of water. It took him and his team a month to build. Such effort paid off, and the event overall was a grand success. It went really great. This is the second year we have done it, and its just a lot of fun, said Basel, who organized the event. They put a lot of work into those boats, and they paddle their butts off. It really brings the community together. It wasnt about being competitive, just having fun. By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Victory wont be delivered this day as Its on the Barge struggles to bring its valiant cargo back to shore. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Hard work pays off as Meagan basks in the adoration of the crowd. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Unsure if her boat, the USS Jason, will stay afloat, Meagan Heitman drives on. Photo by Army Spc. Joeseph A. Morris The crew of the Tiki Barge races to shore, where cold ones are on ice awaiting their arrival. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris With his hand on the award for Best Looking boat and his mind on those beers, Tiki Barge designer Sgt. Robert Kaiser, 115th Military Police Battalion, proudly accepts his prize. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris The race is on and the boats are gone as Sweet takes an early lead, with The Tiki Barge in a close second. Rub-a-dub dub in a Gitmo Tub takes the wrong tack, leaving the crowd wondering if its crew would ever come back.

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Page 10 Page 7 Friday, June 14, 2002 Friday, June 14, 2002 Get quick, quality care at Aid Station Troops at Guantanamo Bay have little fear of falling casualty to bullets and bombs. Its the smaller things that can put a soldier out of commission and impede mission capabilities here. Thats where the Aid Station comes in. The good guys on the troops side, said Coast Guard Health Services Senior Chief Mark H. O'Neal. Set up as a triage to treat all sick call but capable of saving servicemembers lives, its equipped with the life-pack 12, which enables the staff to resus citate patients if necessary. However, most patients who walk up to the little red medical cross at the MWR build ing on Windward Loop and enter the Aid Station are simply in need of fast, efficient medical assistance to get their bodies back to full mission capability. The majority of patients come in for treatment of common cold symp toms -the sniffles and stomach aches. Lately a lot of people have come in complaining of headaches, said O'Neal. The aid station is responsible for treating all sick-call patients from Windward Loop, East Caravella, and Villamar. Their hours of opera tion are 0700-1630 Monday through Friday. Patients having any emergencies after those hours must call 911 and will be taken to the hospital. In comparison to the hospital, the aid sta tion is much smaller in size and manpower. However, their efficient work and skill enable them to treat an average of 15-20 patients daily. More than 1,385 patients have been cared for since January. During our time here, we are evolving. We are taking advantages of lessons learned and improving the quality for troops, said Hospi tal Coreman 2 Greg Redgate. The Aid Station, primarily composed of Coast Guard servicemembers, also benefits from the joint task environment on GTMO by having servicemembers of all stripes working with them side by side. This was a great mission. Working with Navy and Army has made this the most diverse situation I've taken part in my last 25 years of my service, said O'Neal. So if you need aid, don't be afraid. Just come on down to the Aid Station at the bottom of the loop. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin P. Wiles checks the blood pressure of Coast Petty Officer 3rd Class Gary N. Paxson. Surrounded by an extensive array of security measures by land, sea and air, 34 suspected terrorists arrived here Wednes day. They represent the latest of 84 detainees who have arrived here for in pro cessing and detention at Camp Delta in the past week. Camp Delta now has 468 detainees. Our primary mission here is to receive and hold detainees in support of the War on Terrorism. Today was a good day for us. We helped get 34 suspected terrorists off the battlefield and out of the fight, said Army Lt. Col. Joe Hoey, a military spokesman for Joint Task Force 160, the multi-service command in charge of detention operations here. As long as we've got these suspected terrorists here, we'll treat them humanely, because we're a nation of laws, but you can also rest assured they won't be planning or participating in the murder of thousands of innocent victims, said Hoey. After arriving at the 612-unit facility, the detainees were in-processed and screened by medical personnel. In-processing includes showers; issuance of comfort items such as a Koran and toiletries; and writing an optional letter that will be mailed to whomever they choose. Camp Delta was first occupied on April 28 when 300 detainees, first held at Camp X-Ray, were moved to the newer facility. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scepko Wiles continues his medical checkup with a quick look into Paxsons ears. WASHINGTON -If the Pentagon was a person, it might just be smiling right now as it wears a spanking new coat of bright limestone across its western wall. A terrorist-hijacked airliner slammed into that wall nine months ago, killing 184 people. Today, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wol fowitz participated in a Pentagon ceremony to install a special dedication capsule into that once ruined west wall. Wolfowitz said local commuters passing by the Pentagon have witnessed a truly remarkable transformation since the terrorist attack. Today, we'll finish one important part of that remarkable transformation," he contin ued, "We will restore to its rightful place a block of Indiana limestone that builders first placed here six decades ago. A discolored block of stone taken from the ruins of the west wall after the attack was used to cap the niche where the dedication capsule would be placed. The stone is inscribed with the date of the attack. Pentagon renovation program manager Walker Lee Evey, with Wolfowitz at his side, placed the capsule into the niche. Then, with the help of construction workers, the capstone was inserted into the opening. The capsule contains items such as a signed photograph of President Bush with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld standing out side the Pentagon, handmade cards and letters of condolences from school children, medal lions from Rumsfeld and Air Force Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff, Arlington County firefighter and police patches, a Defense Protective Ser vices patch, a plaque listing the 184 victims, and more. Items to be placed inside the capsule were displayed to the news media yesterday at a Pentagon briefing hosted by Charles S. Abell, assistant secretary of defense for force man agement policy. The dedication capsule, Abell said, is our way of remembering and memorializing the victims and the events of Sept. 11 and to rec ognize the good works of the many dedicated people on the construction crews who've helped us reconstruct the Pentagon so quickly and so well. The capsule isn't meant to be opened like a time capsule, he said. We don't intend to dig this out at any specific date in the future and have it available for historians and the curi ous, he added. We just expect it to be there to commemorate the victims and the rebuild ing effort and the war on terrorism. Wolfowitz then read aloud a letter from a California schoolgirl named Amanda: Dear Pentagon, I believe we can all pull together and show what America means. To me, following the attacks last September, America means wisdom, strength, endurance and freedom. Amanda, you've got it exactly right, Wol fowitz said to the audience, noting that the qualities outlined in the girl's letter do define America. He praised the construction workers, noting they have worked hard armed with hammers and saws to reconstruct the damaged Penta gon. With your hearts and hands you have rebuilt this symbol of American values and strength, stone by stone and we thank you, he added. Wolfowitz noted that the Pentagon recon struction crew, in adopting the battle cry, Let's Roll, honors Sept. 11 hero Todd Beamer. A passenger aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, Beamer said to fellow passengers, Let's roll! before rushing their hijackers. The plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field, killing all aboard. Beamer and his fellow passengers have been credited with sacrificing themselves to save countless others. The 184 men and women who died at the Pentagon were patriots, he noted, representing values alien to the terrorists. Quoting Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz said: Those Americans died because of how they lived, as free men and women, proud of their freedom, proud of their country, and proud of their country's cause, the cause of human freedom. 34 detainees enter Camp Delta Photo by Gerry J. Gilmore Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz speaks at the June 11, 2002, ceremony marking the installation of the last limestone block in the repaired outer wall of the Pentagon damaged by terrorists on September 11. Pentagon wears new face at dedication By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Lets go surfing... sooner or later Three would-be wave-catchers wait on shore for some peaks on a sunny Tuesday afternoon at Windmill Beach. By Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini

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When Army reservist Jacque line Gordon learned late last year that she was being called to duty, the divorced mother of two had to quickly decide what to do with her children, Augustus, 10, and Kerri anne, 13. In the end, I sent them to two different friends, said Gordon, 37, a guidance counselor at the West ern Suffolk BOCES in Dix Hills and Copiague resident now serv ing as an operations officer at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where nearly 400 detainees from Afghanistan are being held for interrogation. It was not an ideal situation but Gordon thought her problems were solved. Yet after she started active duty in January, more trou ble surfaced. She had returned her leased car before activation, but the paper work went awry, causing her to continue receiving monthly bills, then a repossession notice and, finally, a warning that her credit record would be marred if she did nt pay. The situation would have been resolved if I could handle it per sonally, Gordon, a major, said in a recent phone interview from Cuba. But that's impossible from here. Housing issues also burdened Frank DiDomenico, a New York City police officer and Air Force reservist who has been on active duty since Sept. 23 at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. The trouble began in March, when DiDomenico's wife of 18 months, Tyra, received a notice informing her that the year-long lease on their one-bedroom Coram apartment -also home, by then, to 7-month-old Juliet -would not be renewed after its May 31 expira tion because the property was to be renovated, upgraded and sold. So here we are, about to lose our apartment, while my wife has to care for our child and I'm stuck in New Jersey on active duty, DiDomenico, 29, said last week before heading to the Middle East, where, as a sergeant, he will superbase. There is no way we can look for another place. More than 83,000 military reservists and national guard troops -approximately 20,000 of them from New York State -were activated for varying durations by federal authorities after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. Like hun dreds of their counterparts from about two dozen units on Long Island, Gordon and DiDomenico knew they might have to serve their country in a time of peril. Nevertheless, as the two reservists have learned, such serv ice often carries a personal price. My earnings have dropped, but the bills haven't, said Marine Corps reservist Anthony Dixon, who said his $36,000 annual salary as a corporal is about half of what he made as a self-employed potato chips salesman. A West Islip resident and new father, Dixon, 30, was activated in December and sent to Camp Leje une in North Carolina, where he is one of 65 Long Islanders with the Second Battalion, 225th Marines. ments, credit card payments and car and truck payments, he said. And other basic costs, like elec tricity and water, haven't gone down because I'm away. Although Nassau and Suffolk counties pay civil servants on active duty the difference between their military and civilian salaries, only a handful of personnel -mostly law enforcement officers -qualify. Moreover, federal laws, which guarantee returning reservists a job with undiminished pay and benefits, often do not soften financial hardships they face while in uniform. A small number of private employers, usually prosperous corporations spurred by a mix of patriotism and public relations, give activated employees extended salaries and benefits. But for many reservists, military duty brings some measure of personal hardship. Sure, I'm losing money, said John Schulz, 36, a Sayville resi dent whose approximately $100,000 annual income as a copilot for American Airlines was trimmed to more than $84,000 in February when he was activated with the Air National Guard's 106th Rescue Wing in Westhamp ton Beach. But I'm not going into poverty, added Schulz, who was to go to Turkey this week as com mander of a rescue helicopter sup porting U.S. Air Force patrols in Iraq. The main thing is the loss of time spent with my wife and two children. You can't put a price on that. However, activation does not always bring trouble. Bill Cline relishes the responsibility of head ing JDOG (an acronym for Joint Detention Operations Group), which was established earlier this year at the Guantanamo base. This job means the world to me, said Cline, 52, a longtime Bayport resident who, in civilian life, is a deputy Suffolk County sheriff. I feel I'm not only helping my country, but myself as well, he said. Such feelings spurred Cline, who fought in Vietnam as a Marine and subsequently became an Army reservist, to volunteer for duty in Bosnia, where with the rank of major he oversaw safety conditions for U.S. peacekeepers in 1999. As a lieutenant-colonel in charge of about 700 American sol diers and 400 detainees, Cline doubled his $50,000 sheriff's salary. Nevertheless, he stressed that doing meaningful work, not making money, is what motivates me. Gordon's savior was Eric Out calt, finance director for Ami tyville Toyota. After being told about the reservist's car troubles, Outcalt tracked the errant paper work, called the parent corporation and corrected the problem. She did nothing wrong, and she's serving her country, he said. I'm delighted to help her. Also helpful was Jules Reich, managing partner of Coram Isle LLC, owner of apartments rented by DiDomenico and several hun dred other tenants. When told of the airman's hous ing problem, Reich called the ser geant and offered to give him an identical apartment in the same complex, at the same rent, for another year. It's the least we can do for someone in your situation, the executive said. Serving their country without reserve By Arnold Williams Page 6 Friday, June 14, 2002 Proudly serving in a Navy of one The Army-led detainee operations in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba has a Navy Heli copter Pilot as second in command of the Joint Detention Operations Group. The JDOG staff is comprised of the Army 455th MP Brigade Liaison Detach ment. The BLD oversees one battalion staff, several MP Companies and one Mechanized Infantry unit. Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur is the only Navy officer attached to the JDOG. As the executive officer of the JDOG staff, LeBrasseur has the responsibility of over seeing the physical care, feeding, housing and security, inside and outside the deten tion camp. The XO billet for JDOG was originally intended for an Army officer; and was manned by an Army officer for one month before LeBrasseur assumed the responsi bility. Back in his hometown of Lakeville, MN, LeBrasseur is a Federal Agent/Depor tation Officer for the Department of Jus tice-Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS). He tracks down, arrests, then deports the criminals, fugitives and illegal aliens to their home countries. LeBrasseur has been in on high-profile operations before -he was involved in the detention of Zacarias Moussaoui, who is suspected of being involved in the plan ning of the 11 Sept attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. His efforts supported the FBI's investigation by keep ing Moussaoui in INS custody on immi gration violations until the FBI could formally charge Moussaoui. Because of LeBrasseur's civilian record, his active and reserve history and his atten tion to detail in his previous position as the Future Plans Officer for operations in GTMO, he was recommended for the XO position by the commanding officer of detainee operations for Operation Endur ing Freedom here. Recognizing the experience and qualifi cations of LeBrasseur, the Army extended the executive officers position to him. I have complete confidence and trust in his abilities. He is loyal beyond reproach. I have no concerns, said Lt. Col. Cline, commander of JDOG. The Army contin gent at GTMO has been more than recep tive in having him as their second in command. If I was sent here to be XO, it might have been different, said LeBrasseur. But being asked by the CO to fill this position is the biggest compliment I could have had, and I think they respect that. The arrival of new MP Companies recently here at GTMO has presented a new challenge; LeBrassuer must go through the normal adjustment period with the new soldiers. Prior to the new MP Companies arrival everyone knew me. It's different now, he said. For me, adjusting to new faces. For them it's adjusting to a Navy LCDR. He gets along with everyone. He's fair regardless of what service or rank, said Cline. When Paul left Lakeville he left behind his family, friends and his 17-year-old Miniature Pinscher. Even though he misses them beyond measure, he has no regrets. LeBrasseur said he is proud to serve his country in this capacity. He not only has the responsibility of overseeing the detainees, but he has the occasional duty of escorting VIPs through Camp Delta to observe detainee operations. As I walk through the camp with gen erals and VIPs, we have to talk over the yelling, heckling and chatter of the detainees. I can see in their eyes the hate and disdain that they have for Americans. It makes him think about what Al-Qaeda has done--and potentially will do. By Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher Sherwood Special to The Wire Photo by Army Pfc. Jean -Carl Bertin Navy Lt. Cmdr. Paul LeBrasseur, the sole Navy servicemember on the Joint Detention Operations Group staff, poses in front of his favorite flag. Page 11 Friday, June 14, 2002 (Newsday Photo / Nelson Ching) Air Force reservist Frank DiDomenico and his wife, Tyra, were notified that the lease on their apartment would not be renewed. They later received an offer of another apartment. When duty called, these part-timers gave their all, despite the personal cost I have the same mortgage payvise the guarding of planes at an air

PAGE 12

and Hindi. If the language or regional dialect used is not easily recognizable, the translators put their resources together to interpret the content of the text before it is sent to JTF160 J2 or to the Defense Language Insti tute, Monterey, California, said Capt. Quinn Henderson, the officer in charge of the S2 shop of 160th MPBN out of Talla hassee, Fl., now attached to JTF-160. The more educated detainees simplify the process by writing their own correspon dence in English, said Master Sgt. Pat Tet rick, who is also from the S2 shop. After the outgoing mail has been screened by S2, Tart then lists them on a record sheet and forwards them to the post office for delivery. Handling mail is not her primary mili tary occupational specialty, but she takes her job seriously. She works six days a week and comes to work for a seventh day if there is a lot of mail that needs to be processed. She said she tried her best to ensure that mail flows in and out without long delays. "Mail has to be sent in a specified time," she added. "I can't stress enough the impor tance of a detainee's mail. As a person, it's important for me to get my mail," she said as she was going through a stack of detainees' outgoing mail. In addition to outgoing mail, Tart is also involved in the detainees incoming mail. The incoming mail process is somewhat similar to the outgoing process. Tarts S1 shop receives mail from either the post office or the International Commit tee of the Red Cross. But before the letters or postcards reach the detainees, Tart has to sort each one of them and sends them to the S2 shop for screening and interpretation. At this stage, the workload increases for the S2 shop. Kane, who is heavily involved in the operation, said that mail becomes the biggest part of his day. Getting mail to the detainees is not an easy process, especially when there is a lot of mail that has to go through all the estab lished channels. It takes about five working days for the incoming and outgoing mail to be thor oughly processed. In the past two weeks, more than 100 pieces of mail have been processed. But the people who participate in the daily detainees' mail operations strive every day to respect and preserve the detainees' right to communicate. Tart, who is on her first overseas deploy ment, has been an Army reservist since 1979. She doesnt complain about her job at GTMO Camp Delta. Before she came here, she used to work as a social worker for the public defender's office in Tallahas see. When asked about her present job with the military, she said, "I don't get much sun, but I like my job here. It's very detailed, and it keeps me busy." From screening mail to watching detainees, Kane is busy too. But like Tart, he wouldnt have it any other way. I love my job, he said. This kind of operation is the best for a CI agent. It's not every day that a reservist gets to do an intel ligence mission of this magnitude. Every day, if I pick up just one piece of intelligence, I feel like I'm adding to the larger mission. Page 5 Friday, June 14, 2002 MAIL, from page 1 Page 12 Friday, June 14, 2002 Rumsfeld Praises India for Steps Forward ISLAMABAD -Defense Secretary Don ald Rumsfeld wrapped up his visit to India earlier today by praising Indian leaders for their concern and interest in resolving the Kashmir dispute with Pakistan "in an appropriate way." A senior defense official who was in the meetings said an overriding tone through out was the desire to get beyond the cur rent crisis with Pakistan and to further develop U.S.Indian ties. Intelligence First Priority With Padilla NEW DELHI -The United States is more interested in extracting intelligence information than in prosecuting Jose Padilla, said Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Padilla, a U.S. citizen also known as Abdullah al Mujahir, was captured May 8 when he flew into Chicago's O'Hare Inter national Airport from Pakistan. The Justice Department transferred him June 10 to DoD custody. He's being held in a Navy brig in Charleston, S.C. "Our interest, really, in this case, is not law enforcement. It is not punishment," Rumsfeld said. "Because he was a terrorist or working with the terrorists, our interest at the moment is to try to find out everything he knows so hopefully we can stop other terrorist acts." Designs Sought for Pentagon Memorial WASHINGTON -DoD officials announced a competition today to choose a design for a memorial to honor those killed in the Pentagon terror attack of Sept. 11. The competition is open to anyone. Rules will be on the Web at http://pen tagonmemorial.nab.usace.army.mil. Entrants can also receive the rules by writing: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Bal timore District, Public Affairs Office, P.O. Box 1715, Baltimore, MD 21203. Deadline for submission is Sept. 11, 2002, at 5 p.m. EDT. The jury will consist of six sculptors, architects and landscape architects; a representative from the vic tims' families; and two prominent citizens from the Washington, D.C., area. WASHINGTON -New perspectives, new ideas and new energy are needed to combat global terrorism, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice said here Wednesday during commencement cere monies at the National Defense University. Today, our nation and the cause of free dom need all that you have to offer -your ideas, your learning and your dedication, Rice told the graduating class of nearly 500 students. Wars are decided as much by the supremacy of the mind as by the supremacy of the military technology that we often think of as winning wars. And, of course, wars are won by people. Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, NDU pres ident, presented Rice with an honorary doc torate in national security affairs. As President Bush's national security adviser, she stands at his right hand during one of our nation's most stressful periods, he said. Rice noted that NDU takes the best and the brightest from the armed forces, the exec utive branch and allied nations. You have operated here in an open, cre ative environment where intellectual ferment is supported and diversity of thought is rewarded, she said. You have understood that shifts in strategic paradigms require boldness in thought as well as in action. "When you leave this place, try not to lose that spirit, she said. It will not be easy. Wolfowitz: Dirty Bomb Plot Highlights WMD Dangers WASHINGTON-Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today the capture of an al Qaeda ter rorist highlights the dangers posed by the whole range of weapons of mass destruction. Speaking on the CBS Early Show and NBC Today Show, Wolfowitz said law enforcement officials cap tured Abdullah al Muhajir, also known as Jose Padilla, in the early stages of plotting to plant a radiological dirty bomb in an American city. A dirty bomb is conven tional explosives surrounded by radioactive material. When the bomb explodes, it spews that material over a wide area in smoke and other particulate matter. The bomb's destructive power depends on the amount, type and size of conventional explosives and radioactive material used. Wolfowitz said the admin istration has said many times that the greatest danger fac ing the United States is countries that have weapons of mass destruction who work with terrorists. The State Department lists seven such countries: Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North Korea, Syria and Sudan. Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has said that the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by his organization is a religious duty. U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan found evi dence that al Qaeda was aggressively pursuing chemi cal, biological, radiological and nuclear information and material. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said many times that if terror groups get these types of material and launch an attack, the casualty toll would dwarf Sept. 11s. Wolfowitz said Muhajir started out in Brooklyn and Chicago as a petty criminal. "Somewhere along the way he got converted to being something else. And out in Pakistan and Afghanistan he was working on plots to do the most hor rendous kinds of things in this country, he said. Wolfowitz said the terror ist has been classified as an enemy combatant. The military can hold him until the end of the conflict, he said. By Jim Garramone American Forces Press Service Photo by Linda D. Kozryn Vice Adm. Paul G. Gaffney II, president of the National Defense University in Washington, presents National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice with honorary doctorate in national security. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service Photo by Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart sorts and logs the detainees' mail as Sgt. 1st Class Digna Rosario takes a phone message. Photo by Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Capt. Quinn Henderson, reviewing the status of the mail translation process. POSTAL PRICE INCREASE NOTICE Effective June 30, 2002, the rate for a single piece of First Class Mail will increase from $0.34 to $0.37. The singlepiece card rate will increase from $0.21 to $0.23. Rice Calls on Military Grads to Energize National Security

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Page 4 Friday, June 14, 2002 Page 13 Friday, June 14, 2002 Across 3. Physical exercise 6. Quadriceps (plural) 7. Burly 9. Slow running 12. Beat of heart per minute 14. Hoisting weights 15. Front leaning rest 16. With oxygen 17. Chin lifts Down 1. A bodily excretion 2. Side straddle hop 4. Robust 5. Supple 8. Physical training 10. Bench ____. 11. Bring weights to chest 13. Lifting weights repeatedly Work It Out! Outgoing Wire editor gets inaugural Commanders Coin for a JTF job well done Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus presents the first JTF-160 Commander's Coin of Excellence to Army Spc. James Strine, June 7, 2002. Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year for 2001, designed the coin himself while serving as editor of the weekly JTF160 field newspaper The Wire from Janu ary to June. "It meant a lot to me to receive the first awarded coin, because it took me a lot of time to develop it," said Strine. Strine thanked the JTF-160 staff for the coin and said he was glad he was able to see it before he and the rest of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment left Guan tanamo Bay to return to the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, New York. Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Man on the street This weeks question: What keeps you motivated? Army Staff Sgt. Robert Lofton 114th MP Co. Physical training and good Army chow motivate me. Im 21 years in, so this deployment is a drop in the bucket. Navy YNSN Chrystal Huff MEPS, Dallas Loving my job, which is processing clearances. Com petitive sports and beating the Army motivates me. Army Sgt. Roger Rettkowski 339th MP Co. Keeping busy in this military life motivates me. Reuniting with my family keeps me driving on. Army 1st Lt. Cedric Sherard 418th Trans. Co. My soldiers. If Im not motivated, theyre not. Now, 17 days and a wake-up has my motivation high. Coast Guard AMT2 Jake Proesch CG Air Station Representing the Coast Guard. Get ting the job done while having a good time motivates me. Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano and Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Friday, June 14 8 P.M. Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron (G) 10 P.M. Scorpion King (PG-13) Saturday, June 15 8 P.M. The Rookie (G) 10 P.M. Van Wilder (PG-13) Sunday, June 16 8 P.M. Murder By Numbers (R) Monday, June 17 8 P.M. Enough (PG-13) Tuesday, June 18 8 P.M. Star Wars Episode II (PG-13) Wednesday, June 19 8 P.M. Monsters Ball (R) Thursday, June 20 8 P.M. The Sweetest Thing (R) Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Meeting the Press Army Commanding Gen. Rick Baccus fields reporters questions at the JTF-160 weekly press brief ing. Whats it like being on the other side of the table? Covering the operations here has its ups and downs, said Matt Dolan, a full-time military reporter for The Virginian-Pilot in Virginia Beach, Va. Phrases like operational security can drive us crazy sometimes. But working for a paper so near the huge naval base in Norfolk, Va., gives Dolan some relief when it comes to finding an angle. So many of our readers have been stationed here, so theres a story just in how life at GTMO has been changed by the detainee operation. The short answer: quite a bit.

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Page 14 Friday, June 14, 2002 The way the people at Morale, Welfare and Recreation see it, if you're not mentally and phys ically fit you can't do your job. The job of MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel and his 13 staff members at the G. T. Denich gym here, is to give you -the soldiers, sailors, Marines and coast guardsmen of Joint Task Force 160 at Guantanamo Bay -plenty of opportunities to get fit for work and stay that way. That's our goal," said Daniel. We are here to improve the quality of life. Fitness is a way of life; it can change your lifestyle. We try to put together a variety of programs that are good not only for the JTF-160 people, but for the Guantanamo Bay community at large. Daniel says he could not do it without his staff. The people on staff are great here, and I would not trade them for any in the world. It has been really great working here. Certainly Daniel has been a lot busier since January, with the influx of servicemembers arriv ing as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. His goal is to continue to meet that increased demand with increased supply. When the JTF-160 personnel started coming to the base, we became more proactive with the programs available," he said. "We want them to feel comfortable here. JTF-160 now has its own MWR representa tive, so we can work closely together to create more programs. There are three exercise facilities currently open on base: the main G.J. Denich gym in town, the Body Shop gym on Marine Hill and the gym at Camp America. All these facilities have free-weights, weightmachines and cardiovascular exercise equipment. Denich gym has yoga, tae-kwon-do and spin ning classes, a multi-purpose cardio room, indoor racquetball and basketball courts, and a sauna room. Daniel tries to come up with plenty of incentives -from mugs to jackets to Bench Press Club t-shirts -to use them. We try to make things competitive, he said. Competition makes the programs more fun. MWR is also sponsoring a 5K run this Satur day, a Fourth of July "Liberty Run and a com memorative /11 Run to be held July 20th. There are also plenty of team sports -summer leagues in basketball, softball, soccer and bowl ing -including the popular Battle of the Branches contests between Army and Navy. But for Daniel, it's not important whether youre Army or Navy, whether you hit the gym, join a team, or work out on your own -as long as you're getting fit somehow. The quality of life is what is important, he said. We want to keep you active. An active per son is a happy person. For those looking to make exercise a bigger part of their lives, Daniel says he has a great way to start: the MicroFit machine in the Main Gym. The Micro-Fit machine records the fitness level of the individual," he said. Then, after the test, we can design a personal workout program. We will teach them flexibility and teach them how to work out with weights. Soon, Daniel plans to increase the MWR staff, add another MicroFit machine, and bring more classes and organized pro grams out to remote Camp America so that people dont have to ride the buses to find MWR -hell bring MWR to them. For now, though, Daniel invites all servicemembers to come to the Main Gym and set up an appointment for the fitness test -free of charge. We do about 40-50 fitness tests a week, he said. The process is rela tively quick and painless -one minute of push-up and sit-ups, five minutes riding a bike. There is a heart monitor we hook up on you while you do the exercises. The results come in and the MWR will set up a fitness program, he said. It's as simple as that. Too easy: MWR staff wants you fit Photo by Spc. Jose Martinez Donnell Daniel, Athletic Director at MWR. By Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Daniel with the man he calls the third hardest-working man in the world, MWR staffer Paul MacDonald. Summer leagues start soon. Sign up now through your chain of command to play soft ball, soccer, basketball or bowling (fee involved). Leagues start at the end of the month. Schedules run on different days so you can sign up for more than one league. If any one is interested in a volleyball league pass it up to JTF-160 J5 through your chain of com mand. For more info call CPT Gormly, X5249 Today, Friday, June 14th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Xtreme bowling, 7-12 p.m., Bowling Center All day social, Liberty Center, CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 15th Army vs. Navy 5K run, 6:30 a.m. Denich Gym GTMO flea market, community center, Marina Point 104th Philippine Independence Day celebra tion 7 pm, Windjammer Club Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Northeast Gate Bus Tour, Marine Hill 7:30 a.m. Sunday, June 16th Xtreme bowling, 1 to 6 p.m. Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Sign-up for swimming lessons x2193 Fathers Day Paintball, 1 to 6 p.m. Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Monday, June 17th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, 7 p.m. CBQ Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 18th Bingo, Windjammer, 6 p.m. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 19th Water aerobics, 6-7 p.m., Marine Hill pool Dart tournament, 7p.m., Liberty Center, CBQ Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 20th Final sports league rosters are due to J5 by noon. Tae kwon do, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Marine Hill gym Free Movie, downtown or Camp Buckeley Lyceum, 8 p.m. Page 3 Friday, June 14, 2002 Before the first detainee arrived, before Camp X-Ray was even a camp, before they even knew exactly what their part in Opera tion Enduring Freedom would be, the soldiers of the 401st Military Police Company -motto Always First -were here. And now they're going home. When we got here January 6, we didn't know what to expect, said 2nd Lt. Roscoe E. Woods. There was nothing here for us. XRay wasnt finished being built yet. It cer tainly wasnt a typical deployment in terms of what weve been trained for. But the soldiers and NCOs adjusted well, and did what needed to be done." For the first few weeks, that meant a life in Guantanamo Bay that, while better perhaps than normal field conditions, was one that few arrivals here since have known: twelve-hour shifts, dirt floors, no running water. The rest of Guantanamo Bay was right down the road -the movie theater, the NEX, the McDonalds. But if the troops werent working, they were sleeping. And if they were awake, and had the time, the companys round-the-clock shifts often freed soldiers long after the shops of GTMO had closed their doors. And then there was the matter of the mission. Nor mally, the skills of the 401st center on law enforcement in a war zone: battle field circulation control, checkpoints and encampment security. But at Camp XRay, and later at Camp Delta, there was no war. There were only the leftovers of one -the detainees that began arriving only days after the 401st did -and suddenly this unit of military policemen found itself having to retrain on the ground and learn the business of corrections. The Marines gave us some additional cor rections training, said Staff Sgt. Corey J. Cor win, a squad leader in the company. Wed had some previous training for maintain ing security in a pris oner of war camp during wartime, but that wasnt too applica ble either. It was a very different challenge. But the companys commander, Capt. Luis R. Hernandez, said that through it all -getting called up on a Friday and going wheels up on a Sunday, starting off with little in the way of preparation and less in the way of accom modations, and landing in the middle of a mis sion they hadnt really been previously trained to do -his soldiers came through. It was pretty rough for a while. It was hard to adjust, he said. But I never heard a com plaint out of them. Theyve been great. Tuesday, the sol diers of the 401st cele brated a mission well done with a barbecue at Windmill Beach. With 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips on grill and filling bellies with ham burgers paid for by MWR -whose varied sports program Phillips credited with keeping his soldiers healthy and sane for six months -everyone had a chance to sit amid the sun and sand and look back on their time here. People say this job is easy, that any soldier or sailor could do it, said Corwin. And in terms of what the actual day-to-day tasks are, the corrections work, maybe thats true. But in normal corrections-type work there isn't a large international political influence, and all the pressures that come with it. In addition to that, theres the nature of who the detainees are, why theyre here, he said. You have to be so careful because of all the personal feelings that are involved in this. Youve got to remain professional at all times, and keeping up that professionalism every day for six months is tough, he said. But we all did it. I'm proud. It was also time for the 401st to look for ward -to going home. They call GTMO the least worst place, said Hernandez. Fort Hood, where were from -we call that the great place to be. Were looking forward to rediscovering the difference. How do we feel? We're all very -how can I say it? -happy to get home and see our wives, said Corwin. Spc. Mark Schaffer, a driver with the com pany, was due to get out of the military May 20; the mission here -and the Army stop-loss policy that came with it -prevented that. His hair at regulation-stretching length in his final days, Shaffer said he was looking forward to getting on with a planned career in corrections in the civilian world. But, he said, he didn't mind the extra month if it meant being a part of this mission. After all, he said, it ought to help me on my resume. Changing of the guards: 401st leaves By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Capt. Luis R. Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Ronnie E. Phillips man the grill. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini From left to right: Pvt. Brandon T. Schaefer, Pvt. Sara M. Felix, and Pvt. Gary D. Fish, detainee guards with the 401st, reminisce at the companys farewell barbecue. First MP company on ground heads home

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Page 2 Friday, June 14, 2002 Chaplains Corner Policy Reminders Some circumstances in your life such as financial problems, marital difficulties or seri ous illness might leave you feeling trapped. But no matter how hopeless your situation might seem, God can and will lead you out of it if you trust Him. Here are some principles to keep in mind when you feel trapped: "Realize that God means for you to be where you are." "Be more concerned for God's glory than for your relief." "Acknowledge your enemy, but keep your eyes on the Lord" "Pray!" "Stay calm and confident, and give God time to work." "When unsure, take the next logical step by faith." "Envision God's enveloping presence." "Trust God to deliver in His own unique way." "View your current crisis as a faith builder for the future." "Don't forget to praise Him." Submitted by Navy Lt. Sharon Bush, CHC, USNR JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Lt. Col. Joseph A. Hoey Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publishers: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Army Sgt. Michelle M. Pessoa Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 361st Public Affairs Detach ment (PCH) assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Page 15 Friday, June 14, 2002 The Army had its revenge in the final Battle of the Branches match-up, a pair of basketball games June 8 at the Main Gym. After last week's defeats to the Navy on the football field, the Army was determined to win the battle on the hardwood. Game one featured the females in a well-played defensive first half where the Navy held the lead 10 to 6. Both teams came out strong in the second half and bat tled back and forth down the court. With tightly matched offensive and defensive play, the Army went up by two points with under a minute left in the game. With only seconds left on the clock, Navy desperately tried to come back and sink a shot, but the Army's defense held on for a 2523 victory. It was a tough defensive game. It came down to the wire, but the Army came out on top, said Sgt 1st Class Franklin M. Blache, coach of the Army's female team. I am glad that we won. My shots were not falling in the bas ket, so I had to come inside and score some points, said Maj. Sharon D. Green, from JTF 160, who led the Army's team to vic tory scoring 17 points. In the second game the males came out determined to put more points on the board. In a close first half, the Army held just a two-point lead when the buzzer sounded. But the team came out and played, as Blache had predicted at halftime, Army basketball -I guarantee the second half will not even be close. And after halftime, the Army turned up the heat and outplayed the Navy. With solid play in the second half, Army came out vic torious winning 51 to 39. It felt good to beat the Navy on their home court," said Army Spc. Wascar Vizcaino, of the mil itary police brigade who scored 9 points in the victory. There are always strong bat tles between the Army and Navy, said Bishop. "The Army outplayed us tonight, but next time we'll give them a better game." It was a good game," said Staff Sgt. Harry G. Darden, the Army's loudest fan in the crowd. We played basic basketball start ing out slow and then turning it up in the second half. We were able to win, just like we knew we would. With the softball game planned for June 15 recently can celed, Saturdays game was the last matchup of this Battle of the Branches season. This was the revenge game, said Blanche. And now well have the last word. Redemption: Army sinks Navy on hardwood By Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez Spc. Wascar Vizcaino of the Army squad goes strong to the hoop in the first half. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army comes out victorious in the seasons final Battle of the Branches matchup. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Navy HM3 Kizzy H. Duncan tries to make her way around the Army's defense. The use of government vehicles and gov ernment contract vehicles during off-duty hours will be limited to establishments provid ing goods and services to the servicemember. If a government vehicle or government con tract vehicle is used to transport personnel to establishments that serve alcohol, the driver is considered on duty as described in Policy Let ter #1; Alcohol Consumption. At no time will any JTF-160 personnel operate a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. (From Policy Letter #20; JTF-160 Vehicle Use Regulations.) Remember: If you drink, dont drive. You will fined, subject to UCMJ, lose your privi leges, and your state DMV will be notified. Visiting hours for JTF-160 personnel in BEQ, BOQ and CBQ housing, including Gold Hill Towers, are as follows: Sunday-Thursday and holidays before a duty day, 1100-2200 hours; Friday, Saturday and the day before a legal holiday, 1000-2400 hours. As a common courtesy, permission should be obtained from roommates for all visiting, particularly for group guests. Sponsors must accompany guests at all times. Unescorted guests are not permitted in quarters. (From Policy Letter #11; JTF-160 Visiting Hours in Quarters.) -from the JTF-160 Provost Marshal's Office Happy Birthday, U.S. Army As we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the United States Army, we can all reflect on why we are here. For 227 years it has been the citizen soldier who has been called upon to defend our way of life. Our freedoms are being ques tioned again. We have left the com forts of home once again to show the world that we are willing to defend what we have. As I walk among our service members and talk with them, I find a renewed sense of determination to take care of business and show the world not to mess with us. Our young men and women in uniform today are the best that America can produce, and I am proud of the pro fessionalism I find among you. Each and every person at GTMO is making a contribution to the suc cess of this mission.. Do not take what you do for granted, because I surely do not. We follow in the steps of our fore fathers and continue to say "Don't Tread on Us." Photo by Army Spc. Jose A. Martinez JTF-160 CSM R.W. Funaro Trust God to lead you out of tough circumstances

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Although the detainees of the U.S. war on terrorism are not considered prisoners of war, they are provided here at Camp Delta with some of the privileges afforded POWs. One of those is to send and receive mail. Upon arrival here, they are given the option to fill out a short postcard confirming where they are and that they are safe. Provided with pencils and other writing accessories, the detainees are allowed to send four postcards and two letters each month. And Army Master Sgt. Debra Tart, of the 160th Military Police Battalion S1 shop, might be called their postmaster. Tart is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the detainees mail operation, and every piece of detainee mail has to go through her. "My primary mission here is to handle all aspects of detainee mail operations. I must track each piece of incoming and outgoing mail individually, she said. I must be able to say where in the process that mail is upon request," she added But before the outgoing mail reaches Tart's shop, they have to be screened by S2, which has the mission to prevent the dissemi nation of information that could be detrimental to camp function, force protection, or ongoing intelligence operations, said Spc. John B. Kane, who works for the 160th MP BN S2 counter intelli gence section. "We read every single piece of mail that comes in or goes out of this camp. We're looking for indicators: location of the camp, obviously; guard shifts, threats to U.S. personnel or anything else. If there's anything of intelli gence value, we make sure we take care of that," he added. Most correspondence has to be translated first. Some of the most common languages that detainees use in their letters are Arabic, Farsi (Persian), Pashtu Page 16 Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Friday, June 14, 2002 With Army Pfc. Eric J. Brown Q: Who is the man behind the wheel of the shuttle bus at GTMO? A: Pfc. Eric J. Brown, A.K.A. The Secret Undercover Lover. Q: What kind of clearance is that, and where did you get it? A: You've got to be born with it. Q: Ever have your 15 minutes of fame? A: In my own my mind. But seriously, not until Im rich. Q: Where are you from? A: I'm stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, but I'm originally from New York City. Q: How long have you been here? A: I've been here since February. Q: And how's GTMO been treating you? A: Not so bad, at first I did a lot of party ing, but that got old. Now, just relax and play ball. Q: Basketball? A: Yeah, I love ball. I always wanted to play in the NBA. Q: Driving the bus, you must meet a lot of different people? A: That's one of the bonuses to my job. I've met a lot of different people, people from dif ferent branches and backgrounds. Q: Notice any differences between the per sonalities of the members of the services? A: All I'll say is some branches, which I wont name, never walk. They'll take the bus to go down the block. Q: Anything out of the ordinary ever take place on the bus? A: Besides the occasional person throwing up, it always amazes me how lost people can be here. They walk around looking so con fused. I don't get how that's possible. Q: So, when you're not being entertained or disgusted by your passengers, what do you do to get you through the day? A: I like to listen to music, mainly R&B and rap. Too bad the radio rarely plays any. Q: What do you do when you want to relax? A: I like going to the beach. It's really peaceful there. Q: Well, you must have come up with some interesting theories and philosophies, with all the time you've had to think. Care to share any? A: I think that people should pray for what they need and work for what they want. I think it's important to have faith in God. Q: What have you been praying and work ing for lately. A: I've been praying for the United States and its troops that everything will be all right, and I've been working to make money. Q: Trying to save any? A: Yeah, and I've been doing pretty well. Getting a lot use out of my meal card. Q: So what are you looking forward to upon leaving GTMO? A: Travel! I miss being mobile. There are only so many places to go here. Q: Guess you would know. Thank you for your time. Is there any thing you'd like to say before we wrap up? A: I'd like to say to everyone here that there is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldn't know about it. Photo by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko There is a special thing on this island and if you never met me you wouldnt know about it. Army has its hoops revenge Page 15 Cardboard boats hit the high seas Page 8 First MPs to show get to go Page 3 Letters from the detainee camp Friday, June 14, 2002 Volume 1, Issue 1 Workin on a building, a Camp America building Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! Compiled by Army Spc. Michelle M. Scsepko The WIre Need a lift? Hop on board the Love Bus By Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The WIre See MAIL, page 5 A look inside... Navy Seabees, the hammer-wielding sailors responsible for the construction of Camp X-Ray, throw up a new hooch in the ever-growing living area at Camp America.