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The wire
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098620/00054
 Material Information
Title: The wire
Uniform Title: Wire (Guantánamo Bay, Cuba)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Joint Task Force Guantánamo
Publisher: 362nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Joint Task Force Guantanamo
Place of Publication: Guanta´namo Bay Cuba
Guantánamo Bay, Cuba
Publication Date: June 7, 2002
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Navy-yards and naval stations, American -- Newspapers -- Cuba   ( lcsh )
Prisoners of war -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Military prisons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- Cuba -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base   ( lcsh )
Detention of persons -- Newspapers -- United States   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Guantánamo Bay Naval Base (Cuba)   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
System Details: Mode of access: Internet at the NAVY NSGTMO web site. Address as of 9/15/05: http://www.jtfgtmo.southcom.mil/wire.asp; current access is available via PURL.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, issue 5 (Jan. 3, 2003); title from caption (publisher Web site PDF, viewed on Sept. 15, 2005) .
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 52777640
lccn - 2005230299
System ID: UF00098620:00054

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Page 12 Camp America Raises Stars and Stripes Army Sgt. 1st Class John A. Lombard, 988th Military Police Company, Army Spc. Jason A. Murray Sr., 401st MP Co., and Army Spc. Seth D. Stoller, 339th MP Co.,. salute the newly raised flag at Camp America Thursday. The flag-raising marked the 58th anniversary of D-Day. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Wire staff cuts out The Wire is dead -long live the Wire. "The Wire," JTF-160's source of internal information and weekly morale-boosting field newspaper for servicemembers stationed at Guantanamo Bay, changed inkstained hands this week as the Army journalists of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment reluctantly gave their brainchild over to new management. As the 27th heads back home to Fort Drum, N.Y., and the 10th Mountain Division, the new staff, a team of journalists from the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of Fort Totten, New York, takes over a paper built from the ground up. "When we first got here in Janu ary there was nothing," said the paper's editor, Spc. James Strine. "There was no internal information at all for JTF 160, just 30 copies of a 10-page Microsoft Word docu ment made up of stories pulled off the Internet." "Jim took one look at it and just laughed, and said, 'we can do much better than this,' recalled the fourman print staff's Officer in Charge, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors. That process began with style -turning the lay out of the thrice-weekly handout into something that looked more like a newspaper -and ended with substance: news stories not only for but about the JTF-160 community. "As the folks out at X-Ray got more and more access to newspa pers, television and the Internet, they didn't need as much outside news -what was going on back home -from us," said Nors. So his staff dropped issues as time went by, and redirected their energies toward covering the soldiers themselves. Eventually the Wire got to the point where it is now: one edi tion per week on Friday, with the emphasis on the local content. "This stuff fires up the troops. They love to see their name in the paper," said Nors. "Our mission is morale -that's what field newspa pers are all about." The Wire also has a website now, thanks to the initiative of Pfc. Daniel Kelly. Only three months out of Defense Information School when he deployed, Kelly was con vinced that a modern newspaper had to have an Internet presence, and badgered his superiors until they let him have the task. Now, at www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/jtf-160, web surfers can get not only every edition of the Wire but press Navy sinks Army on gridiron Page 11 Talent show wows packed GTMO house Page 6 Read about the new MPs in town Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 A look inside... Friday, June 7, 2002 Q: What is your job at GTMO? A: Deputy SJA, Staff Judge Advocate of JTF 160. I also brief all the new people at GTMO on the Geneva Convention and the Rules of Engagement. Q: What made you join the Army? A: Patriotism. Family history. My grandfather landed in Normandy. Now Im trying to save the world all by myself. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: Im an Assistant District Attorney in Brooklyn, homicide bureau. Q: Havent you already had your 15 minutes? Your marriage on the Brooklyn Bridge was on the front page of the New York Post. A: Yeah, January 13. My grandfather, the one who landed in Normandy, was a retired judge, and he married us. It was the day before I reported for duty here. But I did go back for the actual reception in April. Its interesting going through a wedding ceremony when youre already married. Q: Seems like that bends some rules of engagement. Whats the most challenging part of living at GTMO? A: The most challenging part of GTMO is being mentally prepared to do pretty much the same job all over again, day after day after day. Q: So what do you do for fun here? A: Put on John Travolta costumes. Make fun of my roommate. Watch my NCOs do bucket races down Windward Loop. Otherwise, GTMO is a bit limited. Maybe some fishing. Q: Any good catches? A: My best catch was a 15 lb. Jack. I fish about as good as I dance. Q: So, youre a pretty good disco dancer? A: Self-proclaimed Tony Mainiero. Q: What did you think of being in the talent show last Friday? A: This was just a great event. Its good for morale. I demonstrated my special gifts. I donated my own personal humilition for the good of the audience. Q: How did you get rooked into it? A: How did I get rooked into it? Ill tell you. Commander Points, who was the organizer, thought I was funny, and he told me that other people thought I was funny, and therefore they thought Id be a good choice to be MC. Q: You were pretty crazy, but what is the craziest thing youve ever done? A: Thats a bad question. I was the president of a fraternity Some things are better left unsaid. Q: Ever done any hiking? A: Spent a lot my childhood in the Catskill Mountains. No one puts baby in the corner. Q: And here? A: Every day up Windward Loop. Q: How old do you weigh? A: 200 years. Q: Pick your favorite color from one to ten. A: I would have to say Sandra Bullock. Q: Who was your childhood hero? A: James Bond. Q: Do any impersonations? A: I do an excellent Lt. Col. Cline. (455th MP Commander) Q: What advice could you give those who just arrived at GTMO? A: Get out fast! But seriously, take advantage of all the MWR activities that the permanent party servicemembers have available to them. Q: And when are you getting out of here? A: Im scheduled to leave on the 29th of June. Im very excited to go home and see my family. Q: OK. Thanks, sir. Unless you have anything else? A: Hey, Lt. Williams interview two weeks ago was longer than that, and hes just a Squid! Q: It dont GTMO better than this. A: Youll look pretty funny saying that with no #$@%ing teeth! Nobody puts this Deputy SJA in the corner! Fifteen minutes of fame with Army Capt. Mike Farkas... Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The WIre Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Im trying to save the world all by myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See WIRE, page 5 Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris

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Page 11 Page 2 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Maj. Stephen A. Cox Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publisher: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose Martinez and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 27th Public Affairs Detachment assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friendly insults flew, sweat poured and the crowds for both sides loudly predicted victory. But at the end of the day, two teams of sailors had proved as skilled on the turf as on the surf. The Navy swept the Army in two Battle of the Branches flag football games on a hot and humid Saturday night June 1 at Cooper Field. In the womens game, the Navy womens defense proved as stifling as the air, giving up only a safety in a 20-2 victory over the Army women as drive after drive ended with the soon-familiar sight of a Navy player holding up a yellow Army players flag. Trailing 13-0 at halftime, the lady Black Knights threatened to make things close with a promising drive midway through the second half. But a 50-yard interception return for a touchdown by Chief Melba Benjamin sealed the victory. The mens game featured more spectacular plays but even less scoring as Navy QB and coach EN1 Bernard Jennings captained his team to a hard-fought 13-6 victory. Again, Army threatened at the end, driving to within 10 yards of the goal line before a last-second pass by Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner fell incomplete in the end zone. There was no more argument: the Navy had won the day. It was a close game we didnt expect it to be that close, said Jennings, who also coached the womens squad to victory. Its been fun. Its nice to get out here and release some tension of course, its always nicer when you win. Navy HM2 Tamika Richardson of the womens squad was somewhat less diplo matic. What did you expect? This is our base. This is our house. This is the Battle of the Branches, and the best branch won. For MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel, who runs all the athletic events on base and has been overseeing a months-long Battle of the Branches series in a variety of sports, the game was a success no matter who prevailed. We just wanted everyone to have fun in a family-type atmosphere, and athletics brings people together. he said. Besides, with so many of the JTF folks leaving soon, we wanted to make sure these two guys got as many shots at each other as possible. Next up is the last contest of this season: the Battle of the Branches basketball game, scheduled for Saturday night at the Main Gym. The games begin at 5 p.m.; the entire GTMO community is invited. Predicted Jennings: Theyre going on the plane with an L. More Helpful Thoughts Since Arriving in GITMO GODS FAITHFULNESS God tries our faith so that we may try His faithfulness. Anonymous KNOW GODS WILL The best to know Gods will is to say I will to God. Albert Lee GODS PROVIDENCE The Lord hath prepared His Throne in the heavens; and His Kingdom ruleth. Psalms 103: 19 TRIALS AND HARD PLACES Trials and hard places are needed to press us forward. B. Simpson RICHES If riches increase, do not set your heart on them. Psalms 62: 10 GREATNESS True greatness does not come to those who strive for worldly fame. It comes to those who choose to serve in Jesus Name. Richard DeHaan JOY There is no greater joy than to know God loves us. David Rope LIVING IN THE PAST To live in the past is to miss todays opportunities and tomorrows blessings. Anonymous Announcements A Special Thank You to each of you who have supported The ministry of Free dom Heights and Camp America. The pre cious memories of us worshiping and serving together will always be treasured. Your new Protestant JTF-160 Chaplain is CH (MAJ) Merrill. Let us support and pray for him faithfully. Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John W. Alexander, JTF-160 Chaplain Chaplains Corner Attempting to glorify Christ always... In Battle of Branches, Navy cruises By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris You go, girls: Jubilant Navy womens team members HM2 Tamika Richardson and MS3 SW JoJo Stafford parade their colors after the big win. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Navy coach EN1 Bernard Jennings coaches his womens team to victory. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris As night falls on Cooper Field, Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner tries to make his way to the end zone. Reminder from the CG: Alcohol Consumption Policy for JTF-160 The strict prohibition of alcohol con sumption is waived. To promote responsible consumption of alcohol, however, the following regulations apply: The possession or use of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21 is strictly prohibited. Those in possession of alcoholic beverages shall ensure minors do not consume such beverages. Drunkenness or abuse of alcohol will not be tolerated. Consumption of alcoholic beverages is authorized only within the confines of living spaces (to include the fencedin backyard areas) and at on-base establishments authorized to serve alcohol. Alcohol will not be consumed in locations other than those mentioned above, unless at a commandapproved party or picnic with command representation. Command sponsored parties must be approved by the JTF Commander. Drinking on duty is absolutely forbidden. There will be no alcohol consumed by anyone for eight hours prior to assuming watch or duty. No alcohol is allowed at Camp XRay, Camp America or other camp bil leting areas. The Commander may terminate alcohol consumption privileges if and when circumstances warrant such action. Violating this policy is punishable by UCMJ. Remember: Alcohol Consumption is a Force Protection issue. Drink responsibly. A special thanks to the soldierjournalists of the 27th PAD for a smooth transfer of power.

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Page 10 Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 The care, feeding and handling of the detainees at Camp Delta in Guantanamo Bay will be in new hands next week. The 160th Military Police Battalion will be replacing the 115th MPBN as the MP Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Command in charge of running Camp Delta and adjoining Camp America. Our mission is their mission: to process detainees as far as personal data, country data, to treat them humanely, and care for them until theyre dispositioned, said Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry, property book officer for the incoming 160th. Its what were trained to do. Being able to perform that mission in the relatively hospitable environs of Guantanamo Bay, however, turned out to be a much belated holiday gift. The 160th was originally activated for duty in forbidding Kandahar, Afghanistan on Christmas Day. But the pieces on the militarys chessboard often move in mysterious ways, and the reservists from Tallahassee, Fla., wound up spending their spring standing fast at Ft. Benning, Ga. yet another Army case of hurry up and wait. But the leadership of the 160th made sure their soldiers time wasnt completely idle. We had the time to expand our training goals, Hendry said. That creative task included additional land navigation and patrolling courses. Throw in some extra mockdetainee training and canine training with German Shepherd working dogs -and helping staff some undermanned Fort Benning stations -and the soldiers of the 160th were busy enough. We were proud to be going on a mission to Kandahar then, and now were proud to be here, said Hendry. Added S-4 officer Capt. Leslie Haines: Our job is to take this mission over and carry it down range. Members of the 160th agreed that with the help of the 115th, the transition has gone well. Weve had people from the 115th taken us hand in hand and told us exactly what to do, said mail clerk Spc. Michele P. Sumrell. Theyve made my first week here a pleas ure. The 115th have really been a godsend to us, said Hendry. Were blessed to have what was here as opposed to the other people who had to start completely from scratch, he said. When we got here, we started from scratch, said 1st Sgt. Eric Bokinsky, HHC, 115th MPBN. Weve evolved this place from its humble beginnings as X-Ray to what it is now. Bokinsky and his fellow National Guard soldiers have earned the time off. They were first called into action immediately after Sept. 11 and spent three weeks guarding the Pentagon. Then it was more force protec tion training at Fort Stewart, Ga., for another three months. Finally, they were sent to Guantanamo Bay, arriving just days before the first detainee hit the ground. Now, theyre all ready to go home. But sometimes a job this big is hard to hand off. Everybodys a little bit con cerned about the transition, said Bokinsky. But you reflect, you do your After Action Reports, and you remember theyve got the benefit of this mission already being done for five months. Theyll be fine, he added. Besides, theres always a better way to build a mousetrap. Im sure theyll continue to improve on what we built. New sheriffs at Camp America By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph P. Schrafel, 160th MPBN, toils away. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry and Army Maj. Steve Robinson of the 160th MPBN take a break outside their command hooch. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Army Sgt. Gary D. French, 160th MPBN, loads detainee laundry into the back of a Humvee. BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan -Family separa tions are routine in the military. Men and women in Americas armed forces often have to bid a temporary farewell to spouses, fianc(e)s, parents and children. Once in a while, though, peo ple get lucky. Thats what hap pened to a 1999 West Point graduate from Santa Fe, N.M., and her Green Beret fianc from Puerto Rico. Just over a month after Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega got engaged last August, she received orders to Afghanistan. At first, I didnt want to deploy, but then I realized this was what I had joined the Army to do, she said. This was why I went to West Point. Delavegas grandfather had served as a warrant officer in Korea and Guam. She grew up listening to stories about the mili tary. When it came time for col lege, she recalled the excitement shed felt hearing his tales, so she applied to West Point. I wanted to do something dif ferent and I wanted to make a dif ference. I thought West Point was the perfect route for that. Delavega went on to jump school, jumpmaster training and an assignment at Fort Bragg, N.C. There she met 1st Lt. Gregorios Zayas of the 3rd Special Forces Group. Delavega said it was not love at first sight. He walked into our company area and another lieutenant intro duced us, she recalled. The lieu tenant said, This is Valencia, and Greg said, Im Lt. Zayas. He wouldnt use his first name. He was so rude! Then, like three weeks later, he wants to go out on a date. I was a jerk at first, said Zayas, who is now a captain. She was nice. I was mean. Being the new person to the unit, she was the talk of the town and I did nt want to come across as any thing other than professional. Zayas, as he puts it, was born into the military at Fort Lewis, Wash. His dad is a retired enlisted man. Zayas joined the Army and qualified to be a member of the Special Forces. He said his unit spends a lot of time in Africa doing humanitarian and other missions. When youre out in Africa in 125-degree weather with no cold water and no cold drinks and you just have an MRE to eat, you reevaluate your priorities and your beliefs, Zayas said. Its matured me and Ive become a better per son. With seven years of active duty served, the captain said he plans on making the Army a career. My goal is to do at least 20 years. I love the military. I love the guys. And, as fate would have it, he fell in love with another soldier. As the weeks went by after their first meeting, the West Point grad and the Green Beret found they had a lot in common. Both are airborne. Both are jump masters responsible for making sure other paratroopers are safely out of the aircraft before they go out last. The coolest thing is looking at her on the other side of the air plane and were doing the same job at the same time together, Zayas said. There arent very many people in the military that can say they do that. Shortly after the couple got engaged, the world changed. Ter rorists attacked the United States and the military was sent into action. Zayas stayed behind at Fort Bragg while Delavega went to war. People in her unit were really motivated about the deployment, she said. We were fired up. Everyone wanted to show the world that nobody could do that to the United States without expecting some kind of repercus sions. I think weve proven that. Weve come out here and weve shown the world what we can do. Weve warned them not to mess with us and that we want to pre vent things like this from happen ing in the future. Zayas arrived in Afghanistan three months after Delavega. I was happy to get orders, he said. I hadnt seen my fiance in months. I was really excited. I couldnt get here fast enough. He said soldiers in his Special Forces unit welcomed the chance to fight. Thats what they train all their lives for, he said. We have guys who have been in the Special Forces for 15 years and theyve never seen combat. This mission means a lot. The terrorists took our pride away for a brief second. Delavega admitted she worries when Zayas is out on a mission, but thats our job. If you worry about it, youll never be able to live. Youve just got to take it for what it is and say this is what we signed up to do. If we didnt want to do it, we should never have signed up to do it. Delavega and Zayas know how fortunate they are to be in the same place at the same time. Were very blessed, Delavega said. We get to see each other every day. We do breakfast. We do dinner and we get to watch a movie every night. Even on the battlefield, wartime romance can bloom By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service The Army plays unwitting matchmaker for two soldiers in love Photo by Linda D. Kozaryn Army Capt. Greg Zayas and his fiancee Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega are both assigned to Bagram Air Base, near Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Page 4 Page 9 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 WASHINGTON -The war on terrorism and relations between India and Pakistan rep resent two hot topics on Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfelds agenda as he begins a trip tomorrow that will span Europe, South Asia and the Middle East, senior DoD offi cials said today. The secretarys European schedule features a stop in London to meet with the British Sec retary of State for Defense Geoffrey Hoon. Moving on to Brussels, Belgium, Rumsfeld is to attend multilateral North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministerial meetings, including first-ever NATORussia Committee talks, a senior DoD official noted. The London and Brussels meetings will feature updates on the war against terrorism, he said. Another topic of discussion in Brussels, he noted, will involve selection of new NATO members during November meetings slated in Prague, Czech Republic. Slated for discussion in Brussels will be possible NATORussia cooperative initiatives such as training and sharing airspace security information, an official said. Rumsfeld is scheduled to visit a NATO AWACS facility in Germany. He is to fly on to the Estonian capital of Tallinn to meet senior defense representatives from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, all of whom want to join NATO. Rumsfeld will also visit India and Pakistan, a senior DoD official said, to meet with their senior defense officials and to help lessen cur rent bellicose relations between the two South Asian nuclear powers. The secretary will also go to Bahrain, Qatar, and Kuwait to meet senior officials, the official said, adding that the three countries have been helpful in providing support to the United States in the global war against terror ism. At this point, he said, its unclear whether the secretary will visit South Asia or the Mid dle East first. The length of the trip, a senior DoD official said, could extend into the end of next week. Other countries could be added to the secre tarys trip itinerary, another official noted. Rumsfeld Trip Includes NATO, India, Pakistan, Mideast Stops By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON-The success of U.S. policy in the Philippines rests squarely on the shoulders of the extraordinary capabilities of our young men and women serving there, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today at the Hoover Institute Symposium here. In this case, (it is) not just their military skills, but their human skills, their sensitivity to local concerns and local issues, Wolfowitz said. The deputy secretary returned June 4 from a trip to Singapore and the Philippines. The deputy said many Philippine government officials did not want U.S. troops on Basilan Island, the stronghold of Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group linked to Osama bin Ladens al Qaeda network. Philippine President Gloria MacapagalArroyo overrode the objections and invited U.S. Special Forces sol diers and support elements into the country. Theres a certain quite understandable sen sitivity in a country that was an American colony about the dangers or the fears that the United States might be there to take over, Wolfowitz said. But the way U.S. service members approached their jobs has swayed opinion in the government. Secretary of National Defense Angelo Reyes said he saw no problem in allowing U.S. forces to continue their train-andassist mission past July 31, the date it is scheduled to end. Wolfowitz also praised the way American service members researched and planned the mission. Its a level of sophistication that you might expect in a graduate course on sociology, he said. These are people who carry guns and risk their lives and build roads and dig wells, but theyre able to do (the planning) piece of the job also. Its just a very, very high quality of professionalism and dedication, and I think it has an infectious influence on the people that we work with as well. Even on the trip over to East Asia and back, the deputy secretary got a chance to see American service members in action. Wolfowitz, his party and a traveling party of press flew 22 hours to Sin gapore aboard an Air Force KC-10 aerial refueler. Wolfowitz sat in the cockpit and watched as the plane refueled in the air. (It was the) first time Ive actually seen two planes come that close together and for a steady, long period of time, and the cool, calm confidence of those pilots, he said. Its not something that I would ever think one would ever take for granted, but obviously, theyve been doing it day after day throughout this conflict and in many others, and in much more difficult conditions than the ones we were under, including more than one instance in which they were shot at. And then I had the experience later on of going back into the tail section of the plane and having the boom operator, who has seven years of experience in doing this very difficult and at times very dangerous job, explain in loving detail how it all worked. Its that command of his job that Ive seen over and over again among our young men and women pride in their work, knowledge about what they do, he continued. It is terrific. Its the greatest strength of this great American military, and something we all should be grateful for as Americans. U.S. Philippine Policy Starts With Servicemembers Photo by Jim Garamone Air Force Tech Sgt. Bob Burdick shows Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz the refueling boom controls on a KC-10 Extender aircraft. Reserve sailors get the four-star treatment! Navy Admiral William J. Fallon pays a visit to Naval reservists stationed on Guantanamo Bay. He boosted their morale by assuring the sailors that their hard work is significant to the success and completion of Eduring Freedom. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A.Morris Man on the Street Next weeks question: What is your definition of motivation? Compiled by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose Martinez The WIre This weeks question: What did you think of Attack of the Clones? Army Pfc. Orlando Soto Jr. B company 122nd Infantry That little green dude with that light saber was almost as fierce as me with my bayonet. I can't wait for the next Star Wars movie to arrive in my part of the galaxy! Army Spc. Charles Cook 115th Military Police Company I thought Attack of the Clones was by far the best in the series. It was definitely the best Star Wars out of the five. Navy ABH3 Chad Dindo Naval Station The clone battle at the end was my favorite part. TheJedi knights were outnumbered by Trade Federation droids 1,000-to-1until those clones showed up! Army Pfc. Heather Sim 339th Military Police Company I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. The fighting scene between Yoda and Count Dooku was by far the best part. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service

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Page 8 Page 5 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Afghan Firefight Results in Friendly Force Casualties WASHINGTON -American and allied Afghan military forces conducting a raid May 31 mistakenly fired on other friendly Afghan troops, killing two and wounding three, a U.S. military official reported from Afghanistan today. The fight lasted less than two min utes. No Americans or accompanying Afghans were injured. NORAD-Sponsored Exercise Prepares For Worst-Case Scenarios WASHINGTON -The first part of todays multiagency, bilateral air secu rity exercise sponsored by the North American Aerospace Defense Command is already a go. This is the second year the U.S.Canada exercise has been held, Sny der noted. NORAD headquarters, at Colorado Springs, Colo., is responsible for air and space warning and aerospace control for the continental United States, Canada and Alaska. British MOD: Attacks on U.S., British Fliers in Iraq Increasing BRUSSELS, Belgium -Iraqi forces have resumed stepped-up attacks on U.S. and British fliers enforcing the northern and southern no-fly zones in that country, the British defense minis ter told American reporters today. Accompanying Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld from London for meetings here with other NATO defense ministers, Geoffrey Hoon spoke to reporters traveling with Rumsfeld. Immediately after Sept. 11, there was a fall-off of incidences over the no-fly zone. We judged that the regime in Iraq seemed to have gotten the message that military action would follow if they were not very, very careful, Hoon said. Bush Says Americas Freedom is Non-negotiable WASHINGTON The United States must have the best intelligence possible in the war against the shadowy enemy of terrorism, President Bush said June 3 in Little Rock, Ark. We need to know what theyre thinking and what theyre planning on doing before they do something, he said. Up until Sept. 11, Bush said, the FBI was running down white-collar criminals and worrying about spies. Now, law enforcement agencies new strategy focuses on preventing further terrorist attacks. The FBI is doing a better job of communicating with the CIA and sharing information, he said. The whole mission of the federal government, working in conjunction with the state and local governments, is to protect the American people, the president said. When it comes to defending our freedom, he added, Well defend it with all our might. We love freedom, and it is nonnegotiable. The United States has a great military and the American people are grateful for those who wear the nations uniform, Bush said. Any time Americas young are committed to battle, he added, they deserve the best pay, the best equipment (and) the best training possible. The nation has been at war for nine months, Bush noted, and in that time U.S. officials have learned that the terrorists are resourceful and devious. They hide in caves and theyre willing to send youngsters to their death. Theyre patient and theyre still determined. Theyve still got an army out there, he noted, but its not the kind of army the Amer ican people are used to. There are no tradi tional lines of defense. The enemy melds into society and takes advantage of our freedom, he said. Just as the United States has learned about the terrorists, they have learned that Ameri cans are patient people who are in for the long haul. Much to the enemys chagrin, he stressed, the American people understand that we face a new threat, the likes of which weve never seen before, and that we will do what it takes to win the war. Were on an international manhunt, Bush said. Were after them, one person at a time. Anybody who thinks theyre going to hurt America is going to be hunted down. This great country will lead the world to a more safe and secure and free society, he said. This nation is plenty patient and plenty tough. And were ready. The great strength of this country is not really our military, he said. The great strength of the country is the people of Amer ica. Drinking from the cup of victory, Generally speaking Army 1st Sgt. Michail D. Eckles, of the 414th Military Police Com pany, accepts the Commanders Cup from Army Commanding General Rick Baccus at Camp America Monday. The awarding of the Cup is the culmination of a series of 12 events, from a 5K run to spades to darts, that has been going on since May 1. Finishing behind the 414th were, in order: the 988th MP Co., a team from the 160th MP Battalion, and the 401st MP Co. Congratulations to everyone who participated, said Baccus. releases, biographies, photos, graphic art, audio released by JTF-160. Since Feb. 10, Kelly said, the site has received over 55,000 hits and not a few emails thanking Kelly for his good work. As the Wire has evolved, so has its staff. In the beginning Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year in 2001 and the most broadly experienced of the four, did most of the layout work. Now each member of the staff, in addi tion to writer and photographer duties, lays out his own stories and contributes equally to the final product. "These guys are a very talented group of young people," said the group's NCO in Charge, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti. "They have exceeded all my expectations when it comes to their journalism skills." But as journalists, the soldiers of the 27th still had to overcome one last challenge of a challeng ing deployment: the security con siderations of the historic detainee-handling operation going on right under their noses. "We were frustrated, as any journalists would be," said Spc. Travis Burnham. "They call it Heartbreak Ridge (the media van tage point for Camp X-Ray) for a reason. You stand there and it breaks your heart because you can't get any closer without put ting away your pen, paper and camera." But Kelly said it wasn't long before that feeling faded. "Once you realize what your mission is, not to cover this historical event but to write for the soldiers and sailors and marines and everyone else involved in this operation -once you get out there and start talking to soldiers and getting their stories, you don't mind any more. "In the end, they're just detainees. In some ways, it's more exciting to find out what an Army bus driver does." For Pfc. Jacob McDonald, just the chance to work on a newspa per was enough. "This is what I love to do. I got a lot of great experience that's going to help be with what I want to do in civilian life, which is be a journalist. It's the only job I wanted in the military." The 27th had been itching for a deployment for a long time. On Sept. 11, knowing they'd be needed somewhere, they were already packing up their office by the time the World Trade Center towers had finished tumbling to the ground. First they expected to be sent to Manhattan to help with the recovery effort; then, as the war in Afghanistan began, their best guess was Uzbekistan. Finally, on Jan. 13, the call to Cuba came. Just 48 hours later, they were Guantanamo-bound. Six months later, the 27th is "mission-proven," as Burnham puts it. To Nors, they're barely recognizable. "This is not the same unit, as far as training, as far as ability," he said. "We left Drum and we had a lot of soldiers that were just out of DINFOS. And now, you couldn't ask for a better crew. They're sea soned. They've got a deployment under their belt. We're excited they're going to go on and do great things." "I'm glad to be going home," said Strine, who admitted some nervousness at giving up control of the paper he created. "But I definitely won't forget what I learned here, and hopefully what we put together -the newspaper and the website -will stick around for years to come." The Wire will continue to evolve under the care of the 361st. Blessed with a larger staff, the unit will be able to produce more local content and will expand next Friday's edition to 16 pages instead of 12. Even the name may change (if only to preserve the Army tradi tion of strict accountability). But as long as JTF-160 and Operation Enduring Freedom continues at Guantanamo Bay, the spirit of the Wire -news and features for servicemembers, about servicemembers, wherever they may serve -will never die. WIRE, from page 1 Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The last stand, from left to right: Spc. James Strine, Pfc. Danny Kelly, Spc. Travis Burnham, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors and Pfc. Jacob A. McDonald. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Students Present Sept. 11 Lithograph to Joint Staff WASHINGTON -Two students from the Army Command and General Staff College recently presented the Joint Staff with a lithograph honoring the militarys response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director, accepted the lithograph May 10 on behalf of the Joint Staff. It now hangs in the outer office of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Every year the class gives a gift to the college, said Army Maj. Donald R. Baker, gift chairman. Habit ually, its an original oil painting. The staff college is at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The original painting by artist Jim Dietz is now the largest painting hanging in Bell Hall on Fort Leaven worth. The painting features representa tives of all the armed forces. The people depicted are real service members, all sta tioned in Washington state. In addition to the military members, the painting fea tures rubble scenes from the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the background is the American flag. To help pay the artists fee, the students sold a litho graph. The 1,000 copies printed sold out, according to Baker. The students gave litho graph 1/1000 to Congress. They also reserved other notable numbers. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is to receive 11/1000 for American Airlines Flight 11, the aircraft that slammed into the World Trade Center north tower. Litho 93/1000, for United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed near Shanksville, Pa., was pre sented to the adjutant general of Pennsylvania. The White House received 911/1000, and 1000/1000 went to the U.S. Supreme Court. By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Special to the American Forces Press Service Photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Maj. Donald R. Baker (left) presents the lithograph to Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service

PAGE 6

Page 6 Page 7 Friday, June 7, 2002 More than 200 people crammed the Windjammer Ballroom for the Spring Talent Show organized by A Group of Friends and the Senior Petty Officer Association here Friday, May 31. Many of the people who attended said that it was the biggest talent show ever held at Guantanamo Bay. The show, which was also a fund-raising event for the SPOAs High School Education Scholarship Fund, drew military and civilian performers from across the wide Guantanamo Bay spectrum. Each member of the armed services is represented: Army, Navy, Air Force, Cost Guard, Marine, federal and civilian employees, said Navy Cmdr. David Points, direc tor of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau and one of the sponsors of the show. That in itself allows us to say we can come together and respect each others view and talents, working together for a common cause. Following Points remarks and the singing of the national anthem, Army Capt. Michael Farkas, JTF 160 deputy staff judge advocate and master of ceremonies for the night kicked off the show, warming up the crowd with a stand-up comedy act that included the Brooklynborn Farkas New York salute: How you doin Oh no, how you doin. Farkas, who said he was chosen as the master of ceremonies because of his New York accent, tried everything to get a laugh from the audience. He orchestrated an impres sion of James Browns I feel Good and segued into the disco hit Night Fever, donning a white polyester suit in a tribute to John Travolta. This is just a great event. It was a fantastic idea, Farkas said. Its good for morale, and its good for the kids. Its good to get your mind off the day-to-day drudgery of Guan tanamo, especially with a weather like this, said Farkas. After Farkas opening act, the rest of the show was on. There was a little bit of everything R&B, country, folk and rap music, gospel singing, poetry reading, a contortionist act and step dancing. The audience looked and sounded as if they loved every minute. But every talent show must have its winners and losers, and at nights end, as Cmdr. Points handed out certificates of appreciation to all of the participants, a panel of judges made up of officers and enlisted personnel chose the best acts in three categories: Creative Music, Creative Lyrics and Creative Performance. Then the winners were called to the stage to receive their awards and pose for photos. In Creative Music, civilian computer contractor Mike Long took first place and Navy Lt. Jim Perry Como Bowman took second. In Creative Lyrics, first place went to freestyle rap act Throwd & Protg; fellow rappers Seven teen took second. In Creative Performance, first place went to the NH (Navy Hospital) Steppers and second went to local high school senior Marie Brewer for a stirring rendition of Every Breath You Take. After it was all over, Points called the show an unex pected success even by his high expectations. Everybody shared in this success. Here we are in a foreign environment, but we had a chance to share happiness and we made the most of it. One of the judges, Navy Lt. Andrea Petrovanie, heartily agreed. This is the first talent show Ive ever participated in. Its great. Added winning act Mike Long called the entire show wonderfulTo hear a whole bunch of people doing something diverse and eclectic so different from what you nor mally hear on the radio or on TV is amazing. In addition to being a hit with the audience and partici pants, the show raised more than $1000 for the scholarship fund. Spring Talent Show rocks Windjammer Club with amazing performers Story by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Marie Brewer dazzles the audience with a stirring performance of Every Breath You Take. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Capt. Michael Farkas, the shows master of ceremonies, turns the beat around when he calls for some audience participation while dancing to the song NIght Fever. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano During the 15 minute intermission, there was a special per formance by the Legendary A.A. Tony Atwood. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Navy Hospital Steppers bask in the glory of winning first place in the Creative Performance catergory. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Mike Long belts out a rendition of Ill Be, which won him first place in the Creative Music category.

PAGE 7

Page 6 Page 7 Friday, June 7, 2002 More than 200 people crammed the Windjammer Ballroom for the Spring Talent Show organized by A Group of Friends and the Senior Petty Officer Association here Friday, May 31. Many of the people who attended said that it was the biggest talent show ever held at Guantanamo Bay. The show, which was also a fund-raising event for the SPOAs High School Education Scholarship Fund, drew military and civilian performers from across the wide Guantanamo Bay spectrum. Each member of the armed services is represented: Army, Navy, Air Force, Cost Guard, Marine, federal and civilian employees, said Navy Cmdr. David Points, direc tor of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau and one of the sponsors of the show. That in itself allows us to say we can come together and respect each others view and talents, working together for a common cause. Following Points remarks and the singing of the national anthem, Army Capt. Michael Farkas, JTF 160 deputy staff judge advocate and master of ceremonies for the night kicked off the show, warming up the crowd with a stand-up comedy act that included the Brooklynborn Farkas New York salute: How you doin Oh no, how you doin. Farkas, who said he was chosen as the master of ceremonies because of his New York accent, tried everything to get a laugh from the audience. He orchestrated an impres sion of James Browns I feel Good and segued into the disco hit Night Fever, donning a white polyester suit in a tribute to John Travolta. This is just a great event. It was a fantastic idea, Farkas said. Its good for morale, and its good for the kids. Its good to get your mind off the day-to-day drudgery of Guan tanamo, especially with a weather like this, said Farkas. After Farkas opening act, the rest of the show was on. There was a little bit of everything R&B, country, folk and rap music, gospel singing, poetry reading, a contortionist act and step dancing. The audience looked and sounded as if they loved every minute. But every talent show must have its winners and losers, and at nights end, as Cmdr. Points handed out certificates of appreciation to all of the participants, a panel of judges made up of officers and enlisted personnel chose the best acts in three categories: Creative Music, Creative Lyrics and Creative Performance. Then the winners were called to the stage to receive their awards and pose for photos. In Creative Music, civilian computer contractor Mike Long took first place and Navy Lt. Jim Perry Como Bowman took second. In Creative Lyrics, first place went to freestyle rap act Throwd & Protg; fellow rappers Seven teen took second. In Creative Performance, first place went to the NH (Navy Hospital) Steppers and second went to local high school senior Marie Brewer for a stirring rendition of Every Breath You Take. After it was all over, Points called the show an unex pected success even by his high expectations. Everybody shared in this success. Here we are in a foreign environment, but we had a chance to share happiness and we made the most of it. One of the judges, Navy Lt. Andrea Petrovanie, heartily agreed. This is the first talent show Ive ever participated in. Its great. Added winning act Mike Long called the entire show wonderfulTo hear a whole bunch of people doing something diverse and eclectic so different from what you nor mally hear on the radio or on TV is amazing. In addition to being a hit with the audience and partici pants, the show raised more than $1000 for the scholarship fund. Spring Talent Show rocks Windjammer Club with amazing performers Story by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Marie Brewer dazzles the audience with a stirring performance of Every Breath You Take. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Capt. Michael Farkas, the shows master of ceremonies, turns the beat around when he calls for some audience participation while dancing to the song NIght Fever. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano During the 15 minute intermission, there was a special per formance by the Legendary A.A. Tony Atwood. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Navy Hospital Steppers bask in the glory of winning first place in the Creative Performance catergory. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Mike Long belts out a rendition of Ill Be, which won him first place in the Creative Music category.

PAGE 8

Page 8 Page 5 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Afghan Firefight Results in Friendly Force Casualties WASHINGTON -American and allied Afghan military forces conducting a raid May 31 mistakenly fired on other friendly Afghan troops, killing two and wounding three, a U.S. military official reported from Afghanistan today. The fight lasted less than two min utes. No Americans or accompanying Afghans were injured. NORAD-Sponsored Exercise Prepares For Worst-Case Scenarios WASHINGTON -The first part of todays multiagency, bilateral air secu rity exercise sponsored by the North American Aerospace Defense Command is already a go. This is the second year the U.S.Canada exercise has been held, Sny der noted. NORAD headquarters, at Colorado Springs, Colo., is responsible for air and space warning and aerospace control for the continental United States, Canada and Alaska. British MOD: Attacks on U.S., British Fliers in Iraq Increasing BRUSSELS, Belgium -Iraqi forces have resumed stepped-up attacks on U.S. and British fliers enforcing the northern and southern no-fly zones in that country, the British defense minis ter told American reporters today. Accompanying Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld from London for meetings here with other NATO defense ministers, Geoffrey Hoon spoke to reporters traveling with Rumsfeld. Immediately after Sept. 11, there was a fall-off of incidences over the no-fly zone. We judged that the regime in Iraq seemed to have gotten the message that military action would follow if they were not very, very careful, Hoon said. Bush Says Americas Freedom is Non-negotiable WASHINGTON The United States must have the best intelligence possible in the war against the shadowy enemy of terrorism, President Bush said June 3 in Little Rock, Ark. We need to know what theyre thinking and what theyre planning on doing before they do something, he said. Up until Sept. 11, Bush said, the FBI was running down white-collar criminals and worrying about spies. Now, law enforcement agencies new strategy focuses on preventing further terrorist attacks. The FBI is doing a better job of communicating with the CIA and sharing information, he said. The whole mission of the federal government, working in conjunction with the state and local governments, is to protect the American people, the president said. When it comes to defending our freedom, he added, Well defend it with all our might. We love freedom, and it is nonnegotiable. The United States has a great military and the American people are grateful for those who wear the nations uniform, Bush said. Any time Americas young are committed to battle, he added, they deserve the best pay, the best equipment (and) the best training possible. The nation has been at war for nine months, Bush noted, and in that time U.S. officials have learned that the terrorists are resourceful and devious. They hide in caves and theyre willing to send youngsters to their death. Theyre patient and theyre still determined. Theyve still got an army out there, he noted, but its not the kind of army the Amer ican people are used to. There are no tradi tional lines of defense. The enemy melds into society and takes advantage of our freedom, he said. Just as the United States has learned about the terrorists, they have learned that Ameri cans are patient people who are in for the long haul. Much to the enemys chagrin, he stressed, the American people understand that we face a new threat, the likes of which weve never seen before, and that we will do what it takes to win the war. Were on an international manhunt, Bush said. Were after them, one person at a time. Anybody who thinks theyre going to hurt America is going to be hunted down. This great country will lead the world to a more safe and secure and free society, he said. This nation is plenty patient and plenty tough. And were ready. The great strength of this country is not really our military, he said. The great strength of the country is the people of Amer ica. Drinking from the cup of victory, Generally speaking Army 1st Sgt. Michail D. Eckles, of the 414th Military Police Com pany, accepts the Commanders Cup from Army Commanding General Rick Baccus at Camp America Monday. The awarding of the Cup is the culmination of a series of 12 events, from a 5K run to spades to darts, that has been going on since May 1. Finishing behind the 414th were, in order: the 988th MP Co., a team from the 160th MP Battalion, and the 401st MP Co. Congratulations to everyone who participated, said Baccus. releases, biographies, photos, graphic art, audio released by JTF-160. Since Feb. 10, Kelly said, the site has received over 55,000 hits and not a few emails thanking Kelly for his good work. As the Wire has evolved, so has its staff. In the beginning Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year in 2001 and the most broadly experienced of the four, did most of the layout work. Now each member of the staff, in addi tion to writer and photographer duties, lays out his own stories and contributes equally to the final product. "These guys are a very talented group of young people," said the group's NCO in Charge, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti. "They have exceeded all my expectations when it comes to their journalism skills." But as journalists, the soldiers of the 27th still had to overcome one last challenge of a challeng ing deployment: the security con siderations of the historic detainee-handling operation going on right under their noses. "We were frustrated, as any journalists would be," said Spc. Travis Burnham. "They call it Heartbreak Ridge (the media van tage point for Camp X-Ray) for a reason. You stand there and it breaks your heart because you can't get any closer without put ting away your pen, paper and camera." But Kelly said it wasn't long before that feeling faded. "Once you realize what your mission is, not to cover this historical event but to write for the soldiers and sailors and marines and everyone else involved in this operation -once you get out there and start talking to soldiers and getting their stories, you don't mind any more. "In the end, they're just detainees. In some ways, it's more exciting to find out what an Army bus driver does." For Pfc. Jacob McDonald, just the chance to work on a newspa per was enough. "This is what I love to do. I got a lot of great experience that's going to help be with what I want to do in civilian life, which is be a journalist. It's the only job I wanted in the military." The 27th had been itching for a deployment for a long time. On Sept. 11, knowing they'd be needed somewhere, they were already packing up their office by the time the World Trade Center towers had finished tumbling to the ground. First they expected to be sent to Manhattan to help with the recovery effort; then, as the war in Afghanistan began, their best guess was Uzbekistan. Finally, on Jan. 13, the call to Cuba came. Just 48 hours later, they were Guantanamo-bound. Six months later, the 27th is "mission-proven," as Burnham puts it. To Nors, they're barely recognizable. "This is not the same unit, as far as training, as far as ability," he said. "We left Drum and we had a lot of soldiers that were just out of DINFOS. And now, you couldn't ask for a better crew. They're sea soned. They've got a deployment under their belt. We're excited they're going to go on and do great things." "I'm glad to be going home," said Strine, who admitted some nervousness at giving up control of the paper he created. "But I definitely won't forget what I learned here, and hopefully what we put together -the newspaper and the website -will stick around for years to come." The Wire will continue to evolve under the care of the 361st. Blessed with a larger staff, the unit will be able to produce more local content and will expand next Friday's edition to 16 pages instead of 12. Even the name may change (if only to preserve the Army tradi tion of strict accountability). But as long as JTF-160 and Operation Enduring Freedom continues at Guantanamo Bay, the spirit of the Wire -news and features for servicemembers, about servicemembers, wherever they may serve -will never die. WIRE, from page 1 Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The last stand, from left to right: Spc. James Strine, Pfc. Danny Kelly, Spc. Travis Burnham, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors and Pfc. Jacob A. McDonald. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Students Present Sept. 11 Lithograph to Joint Staff WASHINGTON -Two students from the Army Command and General Staff College recently presented the Joint Staff with a lithograph honoring the militarys response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director, accepted the lithograph May 10 on behalf of the Joint Staff. It now hangs in the outer office of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Every year the class gives a gift to the college, said Army Maj. Donald R. Baker, gift chairman. Habit ually, its an original oil painting. The staff college is at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The original painting by artist Jim Dietz is now the largest painting hanging in Bell Hall on Fort Leaven worth. The painting features representa tives of all the armed forces. The people depicted are real service members, all sta tioned in Washington state. In addition to the military members, the painting fea tures rubble scenes from the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the background is the American flag. To help pay the artists fee, the students sold a litho graph. The 1,000 copies printed sold out, according to Baker. The students gave litho graph 1/1000 to Congress. They also reserved other notable numbers. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is to receive 11/1000 for American Airlines Flight 11, the aircraft that slammed into the World Trade Center north tower. Litho 93/1000, for United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed near Shanksville, Pa., was pre sented to the adjutant general of Pennsylvania. The White House received 911/1000, and 1000/1000 went to the U.S. Supreme Court. By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Special to the American Forces Press Service Photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Maj. Donald R. Baker (left) presents the lithograph to Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service

PAGE 9

Page 4 Page 9 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 WASHINGTON -The war on terrorism and relations between India and Pakistan rep resent two hot topics on Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfelds agenda as he begins a trip tomorrow that will span Europe, South Asia and the Middle East, senior DoD offi cials said today. The secretarys European schedule features a stop in London to meet with the British Sec retary of State for Defense Geoffrey Hoon. Moving on to Brussels, Belgium, Rumsfeld is to attend multilateral North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministerial meetings, including first-ever NATORussia Committee talks, a senior DoD official noted. The London and Brussels meetings will feature updates on the war against terrorism, he said. Another topic of discussion in Brussels, he noted, will involve selection of new NATO members during November meetings slated in Prague, Czech Republic. Slated for discussion in Brussels will be possible NATORussia cooperative initiatives such as training and sharing airspace security information, an official said. Rumsfeld is scheduled to visit a NATO AWACS facility in Germany. He is to fly on to the Estonian capital of Tallinn to meet senior defense representatives from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, all of whom want to join NATO. Rumsfeld will also visit India and Pakistan, a senior DoD official said, to meet with their senior defense officials and to help lessen cur rent bellicose relations between the two South Asian nuclear powers. The secretary will also go to Bahrain, Qatar, and Kuwait to meet senior officials, the official said, adding that the three countries have been helpful in providing support to the United States in the global war against terror ism. At this point, he said, its unclear whether the secretary will visit South Asia or the Mid dle East first. The length of the trip, a senior DoD official said, could extend into the end of next week. Other countries could be added to the secre tarys trip itinerary, another official noted. Rumsfeld Trip Includes NATO, India, Pakistan, Mideast Stops By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON-The success of U.S. policy in the Philippines rests squarely on the shoulders of the extraordinary capabilities of our young men and women serving there, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today at the Hoover Institute Symposium here. In this case, (it is) not just their military skills, but their human skills, their sensitivity to local concerns and local issues, Wolfowitz said. The deputy secretary returned June 4 from a trip to Singapore and the Philippines. The deputy said many Philippine government officials did not want U.S. troops on Basilan Island, the stronghold of Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group linked to Osama bin Ladens al Qaeda network. Philippine President Gloria MacapagalArroyo overrode the objections and invited U.S. Special Forces sol diers and support elements into the country. Theres a certain quite understandable sen sitivity in a country that was an American colony about the dangers or the fears that the United States might be there to take over, Wolfowitz said. But the way U.S. service members approached their jobs has swayed opinion in the government. Secretary of National Defense Angelo Reyes said he saw no problem in allowing U.S. forces to continue their train-andassist mission past July 31, the date it is scheduled to end. Wolfowitz also praised the way American service members researched and planned the mission. Its a level of sophistication that you might expect in a graduate course on sociology, he said. These are people who carry guns and risk their lives and build roads and dig wells, but theyre able to do (the planning) piece of the job also. Its just a very, very high quality of professionalism and dedication, and I think it has an infectious influence on the people that we work with as well. Even on the trip over to East Asia and back, the deputy secretary got a chance to see American service members in action. Wolfowitz, his party and a traveling party of press flew 22 hours to Sin gapore aboard an Air Force KC-10 aerial refueler. Wolfowitz sat in the cockpit and watched as the plane refueled in the air. (It was the) first time Ive actually seen two planes come that close together and for a steady, long period of time, and the cool, calm confidence of those pilots, he said. Its not something that I would ever think one would ever take for granted, but obviously, theyve been doing it day after day throughout this conflict and in many others, and in much more difficult conditions than the ones we were under, including more than one instance in which they were shot at. And then I had the experience later on of going back into the tail section of the plane and having the boom operator, who has seven years of experience in doing this very difficult and at times very dangerous job, explain in loving detail how it all worked. Its that command of his job that Ive seen over and over again among our young men and women pride in their work, knowledge about what they do, he continued. It is terrific. Its the greatest strength of this great American military, and something we all should be grateful for as Americans. U.S. Philippine Policy Starts With Servicemembers Photo by Jim Garamone Air Force Tech Sgt. Bob Burdick shows Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz the refueling boom controls on a KC-10 Extender aircraft. Reserve sailors get the four-star treatment! Navy Admiral William J. Fallon pays a visit to Naval reservists stationed on Guantanamo Bay. He boosted their morale by assuring the sailors that their hard work is significant to the success and completion of Eduring Freedom. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A.Morris Man on the Street Next weeks question: What is your definition of motivation? Compiled by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose Martinez The WIre This weeks question: What did you think of Attack of the Clones? Army Pfc. Orlando Soto Jr. B company 122nd Infantry That little green dude with that light saber was almost as fierce as me with my bayonet. I can't wait for the next Star Wars movie to arrive in my part of the galaxy! Army Spc. Charles Cook 115th Military Police Company I thought Attack of the Clones was by far the best in the series. It was definitely the best Star Wars out of the five. Navy ABH3 Chad Dindo Naval Station The clone battle at the end was my favorite part. TheJedi knights were outnumbered by Trade Federation droids 1,000-to-1until those clones showed up! Army Pfc. Heather Sim 339th Military Police Company I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. The fighting scene between Yoda and Count Dooku was by far the best part. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service

PAGE 10

Page 10 Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 The care, feeding and handling of the detainees at Camp Delta in Guantanamo Bay will be in new hands next week. The 160th Military Police Battalion will be replacing the 115th MPBN as the MP Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Command in charge of running Camp Delta and adjoining Camp America. Our mission is their mission: to process detainees as far as personal data, country data, to treat them humanely, and care for them until theyre dispositioned, said Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry, property book officer for the incoming 160th. Its what were trained to do. Being able to perform that mission in the relatively hospitable environs of Guantanamo Bay, however, turned out to be a much belated holiday gift. The 160th was originally activated for duty in forbidding Kandahar, Afghanistan on Christmas Day. But the pieces on the militarys chessboard often move in mysterious ways, and the reservists from Tallahassee, Fla., wound up spending their spring standing fast at Ft. Benning, Ga. yet another Army case of hurry up and wait. But the leadership of the 160th made sure their soldiers time wasnt completely idle. We had the time to expand our training goals, Hendry said. That creative task included additional land navigation and patrolling courses. Throw in some extra mockdetainee training and canine training with German Shepherd working dogs -and helping staff some undermanned Fort Benning stations -and the soldiers of the 160th were busy enough. We were proud to be going on a mission to Kandahar then, and now were proud to be here, said Hendry. Added S-4 officer Capt. Leslie Haines: Our job is to take this mission over and carry it down range. Members of the 160th agreed that with the help of the 115th, the transition has gone well. Weve had people from the 115th taken us hand in hand and told us exactly what to do, said mail clerk Spc. Michele P. Sumrell. Theyve made my first week here a pleas ure. The 115th have really been a godsend to us, said Hendry. Were blessed to have what was here as opposed to the other people who had to start completely from scratch, he said. When we got here, we started from scratch, said 1st Sgt. Eric Bokinsky, HHC, 115th MPBN. Weve evolved this place from its humble beginnings as X-Ray to what it is now. Bokinsky and his fellow National Guard soldiers have earned the time off. They were first called into action immediately after Sept. 11 and spent three weeks guarding the Pentagon. Then it was more force protec tion training at Fort Stewart, Ga., for another three months. Finally, they were sent to Guantanamo Bay, arriving just days before the first detainee hit the ground. Now, theyre all ready to go home. But sometimes a job this big is hard to hand off. Everybodys a little bit con cerned about the transition, said Bokinsky. But you reflect, you do your After Action Reports, and you remember theyve got the benefit of this mission already being done for five months. Theyll be fine, he added. Besides, theres always a better way to build a mousetrap. Im sure theyll continue to improve on what we built. New sheriffs at Camp America By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph P. Schrafel, 160th MPBN, toils away. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry and Army Maj. Steve Robinson of the 160th MPBN take a break outside their command hooch. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Army Sgt. Gary D. French, 160th MPBN, loads detainee laundry into the back of a Humvee. BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan -Family separa tions are routine in the military. Men and women in Americas armed forces often have to bid a temporary farewell to spouses, fianc(e)s, parents and children. Once in a while, though, peo ple get lucky. Thats what hap pened to a 1999 West Point graduate from Santa Fe, N.M., and her Green Beret fianc from Puerto Rico. Just over a month after Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega got engaged last August, she received orders to Afghanistan. At first, I didnt want to deploy, but then I realized this was what I had joined the Army to do, she said. This was why I went to West Point. Delavegas grandfather had served as a warrant officer in Korea and Guam. She grew up listening to stories about the mili tary. When it came time for col lege, she recalled the excitement shed felt hearing his tales, so she applied to West Point. I wanted to do something dif ferent and I wanted to make a dif ference. I thought West Point was the perfect route for that. Delavega went on to jump school, jumpmaster training and an assignment at Fort Bragg, N.C. There she met 1st Lt. Gregorios Zayas of the 3rd Special Forces Group. Delavega said it was not love at first sight. He walked into our company area and another lieutenant intro duced us, she recalled. The lieu tenant said, This is Valencia, and Greg said, Im Lt. Zayas. He wouldnt use his first name. He was so rude! Then, like three weeks later, he wants to go out on a date. I was a jerk at first, said Zayas, who is now a captain. She was nice. I was mean. Being the new person to the unit, she was the talk of the town and I did nt want to come across as any thing other than professional. Zayas, as he puts it, was born into the military at Fort Lewis, Wash. His dad is a retired enlisted man. Zayas joined the Army and qualified to be a member of the Special Forces. He said his unit spends a lot of time in Africa doing humanitarian and other missions. When youre out in Africa in 125-degree weather with no cold water and no cold drinks and you just have an MRE to eat, you reevaluate your priorities and your beliefs, Zayas said. Its matured me and Ive become a better per son. With seven years of active duty served, the captain said he plans on making the Army a career. My goal is to do at least 20 years. I love the military. I love the guys. And, as fate would have it, he fell in love with another soldier. As the weeks went by after their first meeting, the West Point grad and the Green Beret found they had a lot in common. Both are airborne. Both are jump masters responsible for making sure other paratroopers are safely out of the aircraft before they go out last. The coolest thing is looking at her on the other side of the air plane and were doing the same job at the same time together, Zayas said. There arent very many people in the military that can say they do that. Shortly after the couple got engaged, the world changed. Ter rorists attacked the United States and the military was sent into action. Zayas stayed behind at Fort Bragg while Delavega went to war. People in her unit were really motivated about the deployment, she said. We were fired up. Everyone wanted to show the world that nobody could do that to the United States without expecting some kind of repercus sions. I think weve proven that. Weve come out here and weve shown the world what we can do. Weve warned them not to mess with us and that we want to pre vent things like this from happen ing in the future. Zayas arrived in Afghanistan three months after Delavega. I was happy to get orders, he said. I hadnt seen my fiance in months. I was really excited. I couldnt get here fast enough. He said soldiers in his Special Forces unit welcomed the chance to fight. Thats what they train all their lives for, he said. We have guys who have been in the Special Forces for 15 years and theyve never seen combat. This mission means a lot. The terrorists took our pride away for a brief second. Delavega admitted she worries when Zayas is out on a mission, but thats our job. If you worry about it, youll never be able to live. Youve just got to take it for what it is and say this is what we signed up to do. If we didnt want to do it, we should never have signed up to do it. Delavega and Zayas know how fortunate they are to be in the same place at the same time. Were very blessed, Delavega said. We get to see each other every day. We do breakfast. We do dinner and we get to watch a movie every night. Even on the battlefield, wartime romance can bloom By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service The Army plays unwitting matchmaker for two soldiers in love Photo by Linda D. Kozaryn Army Capt. Greg Zayas and his fiancee Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega are both assigned to Bagram Air Base, near Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Page 11 Page 2 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Maj. Stephen A. Cox Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publisher: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose Martinez and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 27th Public Affairs Detachment assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friendly insults flew, sweat poured and the crowds for both sides loudly predicted victory. But at the end of the day, two teams of sailors had proved as skilled on the turf as on the surf. The Navy swept the Army in two Battle of the Branches flag football games on a hot and humid Saturday night June 1 at Cooper Field. In the womens game, the Navy womens defense proved as stifling as the air, giving up only a safety in a 20-2 victory over the Army women as drive after drive ended with the soon-familiar sight of a Navy player holding up a yellow Army players flag. Trailing 13-0 at halftime, the lady Black Knights threatened to make things close with a promising drive midway through the second half. But a 50-yard interception return for a touchdown by Chief Melba Benjamin sealed the victory. The mens game featured more spectacular plays but even less scoring as Navy QB and coach EN1 Bernard Jennings captained his team to a hard-fought 13-6 victory. Again, Army threatened at the end, driving to within 10 yards of the goal line before a last-second pass by Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner fell incomplete in the end zone. There was no more argument: the Navy had won the day. It was a close game we didnt expect it to be that close, said Jennings, who also coached the womens squad to victory. Its been fun. Its nice to get out here and release some tension of course, its always nicer when you win. Navy HM2 Tamika Richardson of the womens squad was somewhat less diplo matic. What did you expect? This is our base. This is our house. This is the Battle of the Branches, and the best branch won. For MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel, who runs all the athletic events on base and has been overseeing a months-long Battle of the Branches series in a variety of sports, the game was a success no matter who prevailed. We just wanted everyone to have fun in a family-type atmosphere, and athletics brings people together. he said. Besides, with so many of the JTF folks leaving soon, we wanted to make sure these two guys got as many shots at each other as possible. Next up is the last contest of this season: the Battle of the Branches basketball game, scheduled for Saturday night at the Main Gym. The games begin at 5 p.m.; the entire GTMO community is invited. Predicted Jennings: Theyre going on the plane with an L. More Helpful Thoughts Since Arriving in GITMO GODS FAITHFULNESS God tries our faith so that we may try His faithfulness. Anonymous KNOW GODS WILL The best to know Gods will is to say I will to God. Albert Lee GODS PROVIDENCE The Lord hath prepared His Throne in the heavens; and His Kingdom ruleth. Psalms 103: 19 TRIALS AND HARD PLACES Trials and hard places are needed to press us forward. B. Simpson RICHES If riches increase, do not set your heart on them. Psalms 62: 10 GREATNESS True greatness does not come to those who strive for worldly fame. It comes to those who choose to serve in Jesus Name. Richard DeHaan JOY There is no greater joy than to know God loves us. David Rope LIVING IN THE PAST To live in the past is to miss todays opportunities and tomorrows blessings. Anonymous Announcements A Special Thank You to each of you who have supported The ministry of Free dom Heights and Camp America. The pre cious memories of us worshiping and serving together will always be treasured. Your new Protestant JTF-160 Chaplain is CH (MAJ) Merrill. Let us support and pray for him faithfully. Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John W. Alexander, JTF-160 Chaplain Chaplains Corner Attempting to glorify Christ always... In Battle of Branches, Navy cruises By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris You go, girls: Jubilant Navy womens team members HM2 Tamika Richardson and MS3 SW JoJo Stafford parade their colors after the big win. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Navy coach EN1 Bernard Jennings coaches his womens team to victory. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris As night falls on Cooper Field, Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner tries to make his way to the end zone. Reminder from the CG: Alcohol Consumption Policy for JTF-160 The strict prohibition of alcohol con sumption is waived. To promote responsible consumption of alcohol, however, the following regulations apply: The possession or use of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21 is strictly prohibited. Those in possession of alcoholic beverages shall ensure minors do not consume such beverages. Drunkenness or abuse of alcohol will not be tolerated. Consumption of alcoholic beverages is authorized only within the confines of living spaces (to include the fencedin backyard areas) and at on-base establishments authorized to serve alcohol. Alcohol will not be consumed in locations other than those mentioned above, unless at a commandapproved party or picnic with command representation. Command sponsored parties must be approved by the JTF Commander. Drinking on duty is absolutely forbidden. There will be no alcohol consumed by anyone for eight hours prior to assuming watch or duty. No alcohol is allowed at Camp XRay, Camp America or other camp bil leting areas. The Commander may terminate alcohol consumption privileges if and when circumstances warrant such action. Violating this policy is punishable by UCMJ. Remember: Alcohol Consumption is a Force Protection issue. Drink responsibly. A special thanks to the soldierjournalists of the 27th PAD for a smooth transfer of power.

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Page 12 Camp America Raises Stars and Stripes Army Sgt. 1st Class John A. Lombard, 988th Military Police Company, Army Spc. Jason A. Murray Sr., 401st MP Co., and Army Spc. Seth D. Stoller, 339th MP Co.,. salute the newly raised flag at Camp America Thursday. The flag-raising marked the 58th anniversary of D-Day. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Wire staff cuts out The Wire is dead -long live the Wire. "The Wire," JTF-160's source of internal information and weekly morale-boosting field newspaper for servicemembers stationed at Guantanamo Bay, changed inkstained hands this week as the Army journalists of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment reluctantly gave their brainchild over to new management. As the 27th heads back home to Fort Drum, N.Y., and the 10th Mountain Division, the new staff, a team of journalists from the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of Fort Totten, New York, takes over a paper built from the ground up. "When we first got here in Janu ary there was nothing," said the paper's editor, Spc. James Strine. "There was no internal information at all for JTF 160, just 30 copies of a 10-page Microsoft Word docu ment made up of stories pulled off the Internet." "Jim took one look at it and just laughed, and said, 'we can do much better than this,' recalled the fourman print staff's Officer in Charge, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors. That process began with style -turning the lay out of the thrice-weekly handout into something that looked more like a newspaper -and ended with substance: news stories not only for but about the JTF-160 community. "As the folks out at X-Ray got more and more access to newspa pers, television and the Internet, they didn't need as much outside news -what was going on back home -from us," said Nors. So his staff dropped issues as time went by, and redirected their energies toward covering the soldiers themselves. Eventually the Wire got to the point where it is now: one edi tion per week on Friday, with the emphasis on the local content. "This stuff fires up the troops. They love to see their name in the paper," said Nors. "Our mission is morale -that's what field newspa pers are all about." The Wire also has a website now, thanks to the initiative of Pfc. Daniel Kelly. Only three months out of Defense Information School when he deployed, Kelly was con vinced that a modern newspaper had to have an Internet presence, and badgered his superiors until they let him have the task. Now, at www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/jtf-160, web surfers can get not only every edition of the Wire but press Navy sinks Army on gridiron Page 11 Talent show wows packed GTMO house Page 6 Read about the new MPs in town Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 A look inside... Friday, June 7, 2002 Q: What is your job at GTMO? A: Deputy SJA, Staff Judge Advocate of JTF 160. I also brief all the new people at GTMO on the Geneva Convention and the Rules of Engagement. Q: What made you join the Army? A: Patriotism. Family history. My grandfather landed in Normandy. Now Im trying to save the world all by myself. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: Im an Assistant District Attorney in Brooklyn, homicide bureau. Q: Havent you already had your 15 minutes? Your marriage on the Brooklyn Bridge was on the front page of the New York Post. A: Yeah, January 13. My grandfather, the one who landed in Normandy, was a retired judge, and he married us. It was the day before I reported for duty here. But I did go back for the actual reception in April. Its interesting going through a wedding ceremony when youre already married. Q: Seems like that bends some rules of engagement. Whats the most challenging part of living at GTMO? A: The most challenging part of GTMO is being mentally prepared to do pretty much the same job all over again, day after day after day. Q: So what do you do for fun here? A: Put on John Travolta costumes. Make fun of my roommate. Watch my NCOs do bucket races down Windward Loop. Otherwise, GTMO is a bit limited. Maybe some fishing. Q: Any good catches? A: My best catch was a 15 lb. Jack. I fish about as good as I dance. Q: So, youre a pretty good disco dancer? A: Self-proclaimed Tony Mainiero. Q: What did you think of being in the talent show last Friday? A: This was just a great event. Its good for morale. I demonstrated my special gifts. I donated my own personal humilition for the good of the audience. Q: How did you get rooked into it? A: How did I get rooked into it? Ill tell you. Commander Points, who was the organizer, thought I was funny, and he told me that other people thought I was funny, and therefore they thought Id be a good choice to be MC. Q: You were pretty crazy, but what is the craziest thing youve ever done? A: Thats a bad question. I was the president of a fraternity Some things are better left unsaid. Q: Ever done any hiking? A: Spent a lot my childhood in the Catskill Mountains. No one puts baby in the corner. Q: And here? A: Every day up Windward Loop. Q: How old do you weigh? A: 200 years. Q: Pick your favorite color from one to ten. A: I would have to say Sandra Bullock. Q: Who was your childhood hero? A: James Bond. Q: Do any impersonations? A: I do an excellent Lt. Col. Cline. (455th MP Commander) Q: What advice could you give those who just arrived at GTMO? A: Get out fast! But seriously, take advantage of all the MWR activities that the permanent party servicemembers have available to them. Q: And when are you getting out of here? A: Im scheduled to leave on the 29th of June. Im very excited to go home and see my family. Q: OK. Thanks, sir. Unless you have anything else? A: Hey, Lt. Williams interview two weeks ago was longer than that, and hes just a Squid! Q: It dont GTMO better than this. A: Youll look pretty funny saying that with no #$@%ing teeth! Nobody puts this Deputy SJA in the corner! Fifteen minutes of fame with Army Capt. Mike Farkas... Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The WIre Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Im trying to save the world all by myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See WIRE, page 5 Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris



PAGE 1

Page 12 Camp America Raises Stars and Stripes Army Sgt. 1st Class John A. Lombard, 988th Military Police Company, Army Spc. Jason A. Murray Sr., 401st MP Co., and Army Spc. Seth D. Stoller, 339th MP Co.,. salute the newly raised flag at Camp America Thursday. The flag-raising marked the 58th anniversary of D-Day. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Wire staff cuts out The Wire is dead -long live the Wire. "The Wire," JTF-160's source of internal information and weekly morale-boosting field newspaper for servicemembers stationed at Guantanamo Bay, changed inkstained hands this week as the Army journalists of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment reluctantly gave their brainchild over to new management. As the 27th heads back home to Fort Drum, N.Y., and the 10th Mountain Division, the new staff, a team of journalists from the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of Fort Totten, New York, takes over a paper built from the ground up. "When we first got here in Janu ary there was nothing," said the paper's editor, Spc. James Strine. "There was no internal information at all for JTF 160, just 30 copies of a 10-page Microsoft Word docu ment made up of stories pulled off the Internet." "Jim took one look at it and just laughed, and said, 'we can do much better than this,' recalled the fourman print staff's Officer in Charge, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors. That process began with style -turning the lay out of the thrice-weekly handout into something that looked more like a newspaper -and ended with substance: news stories not only for but about the JTF-160 community. "As the folks out at X-Ray got more and more access to newspa pers, television and the Internet, they didn't need as much outside news -what was going on back home -from us," said Nors. So his staff dropped issues as time went by, and redirected their energies toward covering the soldiers them selves. Eventually the Wire got to the point where it is now: one edi tion per week on Friday, with the emphasis on the local content. "This stuff fires up the troops. They love to see their name in the paper," said Nors. "Our mission is morale -that's what field newspa pers are all about." The Wire also has a website now, thanks to the initiative of Pfc. Daniel Kelly. Only three months out of Defense Information School when he deployed, Kelly was con vinced that a modern newspaper had to have an Internet presence, and badgered his superiors until they let him have the task. Now, at www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/jtf-160, web surfers can get not only every edition of the Wire but press Navy sinks Army on gridiron Page 11 Talent show wows packed GTMO house Page 6 Read about the new MPs in town Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 A look inside... Friday, June 7, 2002 Q: What is your job at GTMO? A: Deputy SJA, Staff Judge Advocate of JTF 160. I also brief all the new people at GTMO on the Geneva Convention and the Rules of Engagement. Q: What made you join the Army? A: Patriotism. Family history. My grandfa ther landed in Normandy. Now Im trying to save the world all by myself. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: Im an Assistant District Attorney in Brooklyn, homicide bureau. Q: Havent you already had your 15 minutes? Your marriage on the Brooklyn Bridge was on the front page of the New York Post. A: Yeah, January 13. My grandfather, the one who landed in Normandy, was a retired judge, and he married us. It was the day before I reported for duty here. But I did go back for the actual reception in April. Its interesting going through a wedding ceremony when youre already married. Q: Seems like that bends some rules of engagement. Whats the most challenging part of living at GTMO? A: The most challenging part of GTMO is being mentally prepared to do pretty much the same job all over again, day after day after day. Q: So what do you do for fun here? A: Put on John Travolta costumes. Make fun of my roommate. Watch my NCOs do bucket races down Windward Loop. Otherwise, GTMO is a bit limited. Maybe some fishing. Q: Any good catches? A: My best catch was a 15 lb. Jack. I fish about as good as I dance. Q: So, youre a pretty good disco dancer? A: Self-proclaimed Tony Mainiero. Q: What did you think of being in the talent show last Friday? A: This was just a great event. Its good for morale. I demonstrated my special gifts. I donated my own personal humilition for the good of the audience. Q: How did you get rooked into it? A: How did I get rooked into it? Ill tell you. Commander Points, who was the organizer, thought I was funny, and he told me that other people thought I was funny, and therefore they thought Id be a good choice to be MC. Q: You were pretty crazy, but what is the cra ziest thing youve ever done? A: Thats a bad question. I was the president of a fraternity Some things are better left unsaid. Q: Ever done any hiking? A: Spent a lot my childhood in the Catskill Mountains. No one puts baby in the corner. Q: And here? A: Every day up Windward Loop. Q: How old do you weigh? A: 200 years. Q: Pick your favorite color from one to ten. A: I would have to say Sandra Bullock. Q: Who was your childhood hero? A: James Bond. Q: Do any impersonations? A: I do an excellent Lt. Col. Cline. (455th MP Commander) Q: What advice could you give those who just arrived at GTMO? A: Get out fast! But seriously, take advantage of all the MWR activities that the permanent party servicemembers have available to them. Q: And when are you getting out of here? A: Im scheduled to leave on the 29th of June. Im very excited to go home and see my family. Q: OK. Thanks, sir. Unless you have any thing else? A: Hey, Lt. Williams interview two weeks ago was longer than that, and hes just a Squid Q: It dont GTMO better than this. A: Youll look pretty funny saying that with no #$@%ing teeth! Nobody puts this Deputy SJA in the corner! Fifteen minutes of fame with Army Capt. Mike Farkas... Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The WIre Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Im trying to save the world all by myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See WIRE, page 5 Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris

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Page 11 Page 2 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Maj. Stephen A. Cox Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publisher: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose Martinez and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 27th Public Affairs Detachment assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friendly insults flew, sweat poured and the crowds for both sides loudly predicted victory. But at the end of the day, two teams of sailors had proved as skilled on the turf as on the surf. The Navy swept the Army in two Battle of the Branches flag football games on a hot and humid Saturday night June 1 at Cooper Field. In the womens game, the Navy womens defense proved as stifling as the air, giving up only a safety in a 20-2 victory over the Army women as drive after drive ended with the soon-familiar sight of a Navy player holding up a yellow Army players flag. Trailing 13-0 at halftime, the lady Black Knights threatened to make things close with a promising drive midway through the second half. But a 50-yard interception return for a touchdown by Chief Melba Benjamin sealed the victory. The mens game featured more spectacular plays but even less scoring as Navy QB and coach EN1 Bernard Jennings captained his team to a hard-fought 13-6 victory. Again, Army threatened at the end, driving to within 10 yards of the goal line before a last-second pass by Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner fell incomplete in the end zone. There was no more argument: the Navy had won the day. It was a close game we didnt expect it to be that close, said Jennings, who also coached the womens squad to victory. Its been fun. Its nice to get out here and release some tension of course, its always nicer when you win. Navy HM2 Tamika Richardson of the womens squad was somewhat less diplo matic. What did you expect? This is our base. This is our house. This is the Battle of the Branches, and the best branch won. For MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel, who runs all the athletic events on base and has been overseeing a months-long Battle of the Branches series in a variety of sports, the game was a success no matter who prevailed. We just wanted everyone to have fun in a family-type atmosphere, and athletics brings people together. he said. Besides, with so many of the JTF folks leaving soon, we wanted to make sure these two guys got as many shots at each other as possible. Next up is the last contest of this season: the Battle of the Branches basketball game, scheduled for Saturday night at the Main Gym. The games begin at 5 p.m.; the entire GTMO community is invited. Predicted Jennings: Theyre going on the plane with an L. More Helpful Thoughts Since Arriving in GITMO GODS FAITHFULNESS God tries our faith so that we may try His faithfulness. Anonymous KNOW GODS WILL The best to know Gods will is to say I will to God. Albert Lee GODS PROVIDENCE The Lord hath prepared His Throne in the heavens; and His Kingdom ruleth. Psalms 103: 19 TRIALS AND HARD PLACES Trials and hard places are needed to press us forward. B. Simpson RICHES If riches increase, do not set your heart on them. Psalms 62: 10 GREATNESS True greatness does not come to those who strive for worldly fame. It comes to those who choose to serve in Jesus Name. Richard DeHaan JOY There is no greater joy than to know God loves us. David Rope LIVING IN THE PAST To live in the past is to miss todays opportunities and tomorrows blessings. Anonymous Announcements A Special Thank You to each of you who have supported The ministry of Free dom Heights and Camp America. The pre cious memories of us worshiping and serving together will always be treasured. Your new Protestant JTF-160 Chaplain is CH (MAJ) Merrill. Let us support and pray for him faithfully. Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John W. Alexander, JTF-160 Chap lain Chaplains Corner Attempting to glorify Christ always... In Battle of Branches, Navy cruises By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris You go, girls: Jubilant Navy womens team members HM2 Tamika Richardson and MS3 SW JoJo Stafford parade their colors after the big win. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Navy coach EN1 Bernard Jennings coaches his womens team to victory. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris As night falls on Cooper Field, Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner tries to make his way to the end zone. Reminder from the CG: Alcohol Consumption Policy for JTF-160 The strict prohibition of alcohol con sumption is waived. To promote responsible consumption of alcohol, however, the following regulations apply: The possession or use of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21 is strictly prohibited. Those in possession of alcoholic beverages shall ensure minors do not consume such beverages. Drunkenness or abuse of alcohol will not be tolerated. Consumption of alcoholic beverages is authorized only within the confines of living spaces (to include the fencedin backyard areas) and at on-base establishments authorized to serve alcohol. Alcohol will not be consumed in loca tions other than those mentioned above, unless at a commandapproved party or picnic with com mand representation. Command sponsored parties must be approved by the JTF Commander. Drinking on duty is absolutely forbid den. There will be no alcohol con sumed by anyone for eight hours prior to assuming watch or duty. No alcohol is allowed at Camp XRay, Camp America or other camp bil leting areas. The Commander may terminate alcohol consumption privileges if and when circumstances warrant such action. Violating this policy is punishable by UCMJ. Remember: Alcohol Consumption is a Force Protection issue. Drink responsibly. A special thanks to the soldierjournalists of the 27th PAD for a smooth transfer of power.

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Page 10 Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 The care, feeding and handling of the detainees at Camp Delta in Guantanamo Bay will be in new hands next week. The 160th Military Police Battalion will be replacing the 115th MPBN as the MP Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Command in charge of running Camp Delta and adjoining Camp America. Our mission is their mission: to process detainees as far as per sonal data, country data, to treat them humanely, and care for them until theyre dispositioned, said Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry, property book officer for the incoming 160th. Its what were trained to do. Being able to perform that mission in the relatively hos pitable environs of Guantanamo Bay, however, turned out to be a much belated holiday gift. The 160th was originally acti vated for duty in forbidding Kan dahar, Afghanistan on Christmas Day. But the pieces on the militarys chessboard often move in myste rious ways, and the reservists from Tallahassee, Fla., wound up spending their spring standing fast at Ft. Benning, Ga. yet another Army case of hurry up and wait. But the leadership of the 160th made sure their sol diers time wasnt completely idle. We had the time to expand our train ing goals, Hendry said. That creative task included addi tional land naviga tion and patrolling courses. Throw in some extra mockdetainee training and canine training with German Shep herd working dogs -and helping staff some undermanned Fort Ben ning stations -and the soldiers of the 160th were busy enough. We were proud to be going on a mission to Kandahar then, and now were proud to be here, said Hendry. Added S-4 officer Capt. Leslie Haines: Our job is to take this mission over and carry it down range. Members of the 160th agreed that with the help of the 115th, the transition has gone well. Weve had people from the 115th taken us hand in hand and told us exactly what to do, said mail clerk Spc. Michele P. Sumrell. Theyve made my first week here a pleas ure. The 115th have really been a godsend to us, said Hendry. Were blessed to have what was here as opposed to the other people who had to start completely from scratch, he said. When we got here, we started from scratch, said 1st Sgt. Eric Bokinsky, HHC, 115th MPBN. Weve evolved this place from its humble beginnings as X-Ray to what it is now. Bokinsky and his fellow National Guard soldiers have earned the time off. They were first called into action immedi ately after Sept. 11 and spent three weeks guarding the Penta gon. Then it was more force protec tion training at Fort Stewart, Ga., for another three months. Finally, they were sent to Guantanamo Bay, arriving just days before the first detainee hit the ground. Now, theyre all ready to go home. But sometimes a job this big is hard to hand off. Everybodys a little bit con cerned about the transition, said Bokinsky. But you reflect, you do your After Action Reports, and you remember theyve got the benefit of this mission already being done for five months. Theyll be fine, he added. Besides, theres always a better way to build a mousetrap. Im sure theyll continue to improve on what we built. New sheriffs at Camp America By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph P. Schrafel, 160th MPBN, toils away. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry and Army Maj. Steve Robinson of the 160th MPBN take a break outside their command hooch. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Army Sgt. Gary D. French, 160th MPBN, loads detainee laundry into the back of a Humvee. BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan -Family separa tions are routine in the military. Men and women in Americas armed forces often have to bid a temporary farewell to spouses, fianc(e)s, parents and children. Once in a while, though, peo ple get lucky. Thats what hap pened to a 1999 West Point graduate from Santa Fe, N.M., and her Green Beret fianc from Puerto Rico. Just over a month after Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega got engaged last August, she received orders to Afghanistan. At first, I didnt want to deploy, but then I realized this was what I had joined the Army to do, she said. This was why I went to West Point. Delavegas grandfather had served as a warrant officer in Korea and Guam. She grew up listening to stories about the mili tary. When it came time for col lege, she recalled the excitement shed felt hearing his tales, so she applied to West Point. I wanted to do something dif ferent and I wanted to make a dif ference. I thought West Point was the perfect route for that. Delavega went on to jump school, jumpmaster training and an assignment at Fort Bragg, N.C. There she met 1st Lt. Gregorios Zayas of the 3rd Special Forces Group. Delavega said it was not love at first sight. He walked into our company area and another lieutenant intro duced us, she recalled. The lieu tenant said, This is Valencia, and Greg said, Im Lt. Zayas. He wouldnt use his first name. He was so rude! Then, like three weeks later, he wants to go out on a date. I was a jerk at first, said Zayas, who is now a captain. She was nice. I was mean. Being the new person to the unit, she was the talk of the town and I did nt want to come across as any thing other than professional. Zayas, as he puts it, was born into the military at Fort Lewis, Wash. His dad is a retired enlisted man. Zayas joined the Army and qualified to be a member of the Special Forces. He said his unit spends a lot of time in Africa doing humanitarian and other missions. When youre out in Africa in 125-degree weather with no cold water and no cold drinks and you just have an MRE to eat, you reevaluate your priorities and your beliefs, Zayas said. Its matured me and Ive become a better per son. With seven years of active duty served, the captain said he plans on making the Army a career. My goal is to do at least 20 years. I love the military. I love the guys. And, as fate would have it, he fell in love with another soldier. As the weeks went by after their first meeting, the West Point grad and the Green Beret found they had a lot in common. Both are airborne. Both are jump mas ters responsible for making sure other paratroopers are safely out of the aircraft before they go out last. The coolest thing is looking at her on the other side of the air plane and were doing the same job at the same time together, Zayas said. There arent very many people in the military that can say they do that. Shortly after the couple got engaged, the world changed. Ter rorists attacked the United States and the military was sent into action. Zayas stayed behind at Fort Bragg while Delavega went to war. People in her unit were really motivated about the deployment, she said. We were fired up. Everyone wanted to show the world that nobody could do that to the United States without expecting some kind of repercus sions. I think weve proven that. Weve come out here and weve shown the world what we can do. Weve warned them not to mess with us and that we want to pre vent things like this from happen ing in the future. Zayas arrived in Afghanistan three months after Delavega. I was happy to get orders, he said. I hadnt seen my fiance in months. I was really excited. I couldnt get here fast enough. He said soldiers in his Special Forces unit welcomed the chance to fight. Thats what they train all their lives for, he said. We have guys who have been in the Special Forces for 15 years and theyve never seen combat. This mission means a lot. The terror ists took our pride away for a brief second. Delavega admitted she worries when Zayas is out on a mission, but thats our job. If you worry about it, youll never be able to live. Youve just got to take it for what it is and say this is what we signed up to do. If we didnt want to do it, we should never have signed up to do it. Delavega and Zayas know how fortunate they are to be in the same place at the same time. Were very blessed, Delavega said. We get to see each other every day. We do breakfast. We do dinner and we get to watch a movie every night. Even on the battlefield, wartime romance can bloom By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service The Army plays unwitting matchmaker for two soldiers in love Photo by Linda D. Kozaryn Army Capt. Greg Zayas and his fiancee Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega are both assigned to Bagram Air Base, near Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Page 4 Page 9 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 WASHINGTON -The war on terrorism and relations between India and Pakistan rep resent two hot topics on Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfelds agenda as he begins a trip tomorrow that will span Europe, South Asia and the Middle East, senior DoD offi cials said today. The secretarys European schedule features a stop in London to meet with the British Sec retary of State for Defense Geoffrey Hoon. Moving on to Brussels, Belgium, Rumsfeld is to attend multilateral North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministerial meetings, including first-ever NATORussia Committee talks, a senior DoD official noted. The London and Brussels meetings will feature updates on the war against terrorism, he said. Another topic of discussion in Brus sels, he noted, will involve selection of new NATO members during November meetings slated in Prague, Czech Republic. Slated for discussion in Brussels will be possible NATORussia cooperative initiatives such as training and sharing airspace security information, an official said. Rumsfeld is scheduled to visit a NATO AWACS facility in Germany. He is to fly on to the Estonian capital of Tallinn to meet senior defense representatives from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, all of whom want to join NATO. Rumsfeld will also visit India and Pakistan, a senior DoD official said, to meet with their senior defense officials and to help lessen cur rent bellicose relations between the two South Asian nuclear powers. The secretary will also go to Bahrain, Qatar, and Kuwait to meet senior officials, the official said, adding that the three countries have been helpful in providing support to the United States in the global war against terror ism. At this point, he said, its unclear whether the secretary will visit South Asia or the Mid dle East first. The length of the trip, a senior DoD official said, could extend into the end of next week. Other countries could be added to the secre tarys trip itinerary, another official noted. Rumsfeld Trip Includes NATO, India, Pakistan, Mideast Stops By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON -The success of U.S. policy in the Philippines rests squarely on the shoulders of the extraordinary capabilities of our young men and women serving there, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today at the Hoover Institute Symposium here. In this case, (it is) not just their military skills, but their human skills, their sensitivity to local concerns and local issues, Wolfowitz said. The deputy secretary returned June 4 from a trip to Singapore and the Philippines. The deputy said many Philippine government officials did not want U.S. troops on Basilan Island, the stronghold of Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group linked to Osama bin Ladens al Qaeda net work. Philippine President Gloria MacapagalArroyo overrode the objections and invited U.S. Special Forces sol diers and support ele ments into the country. Theres a certain quite understandable sen sitivity in a country that was an American colony about the dangers or the fears that the United States might be there to take over, Wolfowitz said. But the way U.S. serv ice members approached their jobs has swayed opinion in the govern ment. Secretary of National Defense Angelo Reyes said he saw no problem in allowing U.S. forces to continue their train-andassist mission past July 31, the date it is scheduled to end. Wolfowitz also praised the way American service members researched and planned the mission. Its a level of sophisti cation that you might expect in a graduate course on sociology, he said. These are people who carry guns and risk their lives and build roads and dig wells, but theyre able to do (the planning) piece of the job also. Its just a very, very high quality of profession alism and dedication, and I think it has an infectious influence on the people that we work with as well. Even on the trip over to East Asia and back, the deputy secretary got a chance to see American service members in action. Wolfowitz, his party and a traveling party of press flew 22 hours to Sin gapore aboard an Air Force KC-10 aerial refu eler. Wolfowitz sat in the cockpit and watched as the plane refueled in the air. (It was the) first time Ive actually seen two planes come that close together and for a steady, long period of time, and the cool, calm confidence of those pilots, he said. Its not something that I would ever think one would ever take for granted, but obviously, theyve been doing it day after day throughout this conflict and in many others, and in much more difficult conditions than the ones we were under, including more than one instance in which they were shot at. And then I had the experience later on of going back into the tail section of the plane and having the boom operator, who has seven years of experience in doing this very difficult and at times very dangerous job, explain in loving detail how it all worked. Its that command of his job that Ive seen over and over again among our young men and women pride in their work, knowledge about what they do, he continued. It is terrific. Its the greatest strength of this great American military, and something we all should be grateful for as Americans. U.S. Philippine Policy Starts With Servicemembers Photo by Jim Garamone Air Force Tech Sgt. Bob Burdick shows Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz the refueling boom controls on a KC-10 Extender aircraft. Reserve sailors get the four-star treatment! Navy Admiral William J. Fallon pays a visit to Naval reservists stationed on Guantanamo Bay. He boosted their morale by assuring the sailors that their hard work is significant to the success and completion of Eduring Freedom. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A.Morris Man on the Street Next weeks question: What is your definition of motivation? Compiled by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose Martinez The WIre This weeks question: What did you think of Attack of the Clones? Army Pfc. Orlando Soto Jr. B company 122nd Infantry That little green dude with that light saber was almost as fierce as me with my bayonet. I can't wait for the next Star Wars movie to arrive in my part of the galaxy! Army Spc. Charles Cook 115th Military Police Company I thought Attack of the Clones was by far the best in the series. It was definitely the best Star Wars out of the five. Navy ABH3 Chad Dindo Naval Station The clone battle at the end was my favorite part. TheJedi knights were outnumbered by Trade Federation droids 1,000-to-1until those clones showed up! Army Pfc. Heather Sim 339th Military Police Company I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. The fighting scene between Yoda and Count Dooku was by far the best part. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service

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Page 8 Page 5 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Afghan Firefight Results in Friendly Force Casualties WASHINGTON -American and allied Afghan military forces conducting a raid May 31 mistakenly fired on other friendly Afghan troops, killing two and wounding three, a U.S. military official reported from Afghanistan today. The fight lasted less than two min utes. No Americans or accompanying Afghans were injured. NORAD-Sponsored Exercise Prepares For Worst-Case Scenarios WASHINGTON -The first part of todays multiagency, bilateral air secu rity exercise sponsored by the North American Aerospace Defense Com mand is already a go. This is the second year the U.S.Canada exercise has been held, Sny der noted. NORAD headquarters, at Colorado Springs, Colo., is responsible for air and space warning and aero space control for the continental United States, Canada and Alaska. British MOD: Attacks on U.S., British Fliers in Iraq Increasing BRUSSELS, Belgium -Iraqi forces have resumed stepped-up attacks on U.S. and British fliers enforcing the northern and southern no-fly zones in that country, the British defense minis ter told American reporters today. Accompanying Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld from London for meetings here with other NATO defense ministers, Geoffrey Hoon spoke to reporters traveling with Rumsfeld. Immediately after Sept. 11, there was a fall-off of incidences over the no-fly zone. We judged that the regime in Iraq seemed to have gotten the message that military action would fol low if they were not very, very careful, Hoon said. Bush Says Americas Freedom is Non-negotiable WASHINGTON The United States must have the best intelligence possible in the war against the shadowy enemy of ter rorism, President Bush said June 3 in Little Rock, Ark. We need to know what theyre thinking and what theyre planning on doing before they do something, he said. Up until Sept. 11, Bush said, the FBI was running down white-collar criminals and worrying about spies. Now, law enforcement agencies new strategy focuses on preventing further terrorist attacks. The FBI is doing a better job of communicating with the CIA and sharing information, he said. The whole mission of the federal gov ernment, working in conjunction with the state and local governments, is to protect the American people, the president said. When it comes to defending our freedom, he added, Well defend it with all our might. We love freedom, and it is nonnegotiable. The United States has a great military and the American people are grateful for those who wear the nations uniform, Bush said. Any time Americas young are committed to battle, he added, they deserve the best pay, the best equipment (and) the best training possible. The nation has been at war for nine months, Bush noted, and in that time U.S. officials have learned that the terrorists are resourceful and devious. They hide in caves and theyre willing to send youngsters to their death. Theyre patient and theyre still determined. Theyve still got an army out there, he noted, but its not the kind of army the Amer ican people are used to. There are no tradi tional lines of defense. The enemy melds into society and takes advantage of our freedom, he said. Just as the United States has learned about the terrorists, they have learned that Ameri cans are patient people who are in for the long haul. Much to the enemys chagrin, he stressed, the American people understand that we face a new threat, the likes of which weve never seen before, and that we will do what it takes to win the war. Were on an international manhunt, Bush said. Were after them, one person at a time. Anybody who thinks theyre going to hurt America is going to be hunted down. This great country will lead the world to a more safe and secure and free society, he said. This nation is plenty patient and plenty tough. And were ready. The great strength of this country is not really our military, he said. The great strength of the country is the people of Amer ica. Drinking from the cup of victory, Generally speaking Army 1st Sgt. Michail D. Eckles, of the 414th Military Police Com pany, accepts the Commanders Cup from Army Commanding General Rick Baccus at Camp America Monday. The awarding of the Cup is the culmination of a series of 12 events, from a 5K run to spades to darts, that has been going on since May 1. Finishing behind the 414th were, in order: the 988th MP Co., a team from the 160th MP Battalion, and the 401st MP Co. Congratulations to everyone who participated, said Baccus. releases, biographies, photos, graphic art, audio released by JTF-160. Since Feb. 10, Kelly said, the site has received over 55,000 hits and not a few emails thanking Kelly for his good work. As the Wire has evolved, so has its staff. In the beginning Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year in 2001 and the most broadly experienced of the four, did most of the layout work. Now each member of the staff, in addi tion to writer and photographer duties, lays out his own stories and contributes equally to the final product. "These guys are a very talented group of young people," said the group's NCO in Charge, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti. "They have exceeded all my expectations when it comes to their journalism skills." But as journalists, the soldiers of the 27th still had to overcome one last challenge of a challeng ing deployment: the security con siderations of the historic detainee-handling operation going on right under their noses. "We were frustrated, as any journalists would be," said Spc. Travis Burnham. "They call it Heartbreak Ridge (the media van tage point for Camp X-Ray) for a reason. You stand there and it breaks your heart because you can't get any closer without put ting away your pen, paper and camera." But Kelly said it wasn't long before that feeling faded. "Once you realize what your mission is, not to cover this historical event but to write for the soldiers and sailors and marines and everyone else involved in this operation -once you get out there and start talking to soldiers and getting their stories, you don't mind any more. "In the end, they're just detainees. In some ways, it's more exciting to find out what an Army bus driver does." For Pfc. Jacob McDonald, just the chance to work on a newspa per was enough. "This is what I love to do. I got a lot of great experience that's going to help be with what I want to do in civilian life, which is be a journalist. It's the only job I wanted in the military." The 27th had been itching for a deployment for a long time. On Sept. 11, knowing they'd be needed somewhere, they were already packing up their office by the time the World Trade Center towers had finished tumbling to the ground. First they expected to be sent to Manhattan to help with the recovery effort; then, as the war in Afghanistan began, their best guess was Uzbekistan. Finally, on Jan. 13, the call to Cuba came. Just 48 hours later, they were Guantanamo-bound. Six months later, the 27th is "mission-proven," as Burnham puts it. To Nors, they're barely recog nizable. "This is not the same unit, as far as training, as far as ability," he said. "We left Drum and we had a lot of soldiers that were just out of DINFOS. And now, you couldn't ask for a better crew. They're sea soned. They've got a deployment under their belt. We're excited they're going to go on and do great things." "I'm glad to be going home," said Strine, who admitted some nervousness at giving up control of the paper he created. "But I definitely won't forget what I learned here, and hopefully what we put together -the newspaper and the website -will stick around for years to come." The Wire will continue to evolve under the care of the 361st. Blessed with a larger staff, the unit will be able to produce more local content and will expand next Friday's edition to 16 pages instead of 12. Even the name may change (if only to preserve the Army tradi tion of strict accountability). But as long as JTF-160 and Operation Enduring Freedom continues at Guantanamo Bay, the spirit of the Wire -news and features for servicemembers, about servicemembers, wherever they may serve -will never die. WIRE, from page 1 Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The last stand, from left to right: Spc. James Strine, Pfc. Danny Kelly, Spc. Travis Burnham, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors and Pfc. Jacob A. McDonald. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Students Present Sept. 11 Lithograph to Joint Staff WASHINGTON -Two students from the Army Command and General Staff College recently presented the Joint Staff with a litho graph honoring the militarys response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director, accepted the lithograph May 10 on behalf of the Joint Staff. It now hangs in the outer office of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Every year the class gives a gift to the college, said Army Maj. Donald R. Baker, gift chairman. Habit ually, its an original oil painting. The staff college is at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The original painting by artist Jim Dietz is now the largest painting hanging in Bell Hall on Fort Leaven worth. The painting features representa tives of all the armed forces. The people depicted are real service members, all sta tioned in Washing ton state. In addition to the military members, the painting fea tures rubble scenes from the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the background is the American flag. To help pay the artists fee, the students sold a litho graph. The 1,000 copies printed sold out, according to Baker. The students gave litho graph 1/1000 to Congress. They also reserved other notable numbers. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is to receive 11/1000 for American Airlines Flight 11, the aircraft that slammed into the World Trade Center north tower. Litho 93/1000, for United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed near Shanksville, Pa., was pre sented to the adjutant general of Pennsylvania. The White House received 911/1000, and 1000/1000 went to the U.S. Supreme Court. By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Special to the American Forces Press Service Photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Maj. Donald R. Baker (left) presents the lithograph to Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service

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Page 6 Page 7 Friday, June 7, 2002 More than 200 people crammed the Windjammer Ball room for the Spring Talent Show organized by A Group of Friends and the Senior Petty Officer Association here Fri day, May 31. Many of the people who attended said that it was the biggest talent show ever held at Guantanamo Bay. The show, which was also a fund-raising event for the SPOAs High School Education Scholarship Fund, drew military and civilian performers from across the wide Guantanamo Bay spectrum. Each member of the armed services is represented: Army, Navy, Air Force, Cost Guard, Marine, federal and civilian employees, said Navy Cmdr. David Points, direc tor of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau and one of the sponsors of the show. That in itself allows us to say we can come together and respect each others view and talents, working together for a common cause. Following Points remarks and the singing of the national anthem, Army Capt. Michael Farkas, JTF 160 deputy staff judge advocate and master of ceremonies for the night kicked off the show, warming up the crowd with a stand-up comedy act that included the Brooklynborn Farkas New York salute: How you doin Oh no, how you doin. Farkas, who said he was chosen as the master of cere monies because of his New York accent, tried everything to get a laugh from the audience. He orchestrated an impres sion of James Browns I feel Good and segued into the disco hit Night Fever, donning a white polyester suit in a tribute to John Travolta. This is just a great event. It was a fantastic idea, Farkas said. Its good for morale, and its good for the kids. Its good to get your mind off the day-to-day drudgery of Guan tanamo, especially with a weather like this, said Farkas. After Farkas opening act, the rest of the show was on. There was a little bit of everything R&B, country, folk and rap music, gospel singing, poetry reading, a contortion ist act and step dancing. The audience looked and sounded as if they loved every minute. But every talent show must have its winners and losers, and at nights end, as Cmdr. Points handed out certificates of appreciation to all of the participants, a panel of judges made up of officers and enlisted personnel chose the best acts in three categories: Creative Music, Creative Lyrics and Creative Performance. Then the winners were called to the stage to receive their awards and pose for photos. In Creative Music, civilian computer contractor Mike Long took first place and Navy Lt. Jim Perry Como Bow man took second. In Creative Lyrics, first place went to freestyle rap act Throwd & Protg; fellow rappers Seven teen took second. In Creative Performance, first place went to the NH (Navy Hospital) Steppers and second went to local high school senior Marie Brewer for a stirring rendi tion of Every Breath You Take. After it was all over, Points called the show an unex pected success even by his high expectations. Everybody shared in this success. Here we are in a foreign environ ment, but we had a chance to share happiness and we made the most of it. One of the judges, Navy Lt. Andrea Petrovanie, heartily agreed. This is the first talent show Ive ever participated in. Its great. Added winning act Mike Long called the entire show wonderfulTo hear a whole bunch of people doing some thing diverse and eclectic so different from what you nor mally hear on the radio or on TV is amazing. In addition to being a hit with the audience and partici pants, the show raised more than $1000 for the scholarship fund. Spring Talent Show rocks Windjammer Club with amazing performers Story by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Marie Brewer dazzles the audience with a stirring performance of Every Breath You Take. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Capt. Michael Farkas, the shows master of ceremonies, turns the beat around when he calls for some audience participation while dancing to the song NIght Fever. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano During the 15 minute intermission, there was a special per formance by the Legendary A.A. Tony Atwood. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Navy Hospital Steppers bask in the glory of winning first place in the Creative Performance catergory. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Mike Long belts out a rendition of Ill Be, which won him first place in the Creative Music category.

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Page 6 Page 7 Friday, June 7, 2002 More than 200 people crammed the Windjammer Ball room for the Spring Talent Show organized by A Group of Friends and the Senior Petty Officer Association here Fri day, May 31. Many of the people who attended said that it was the biggest talent show ever held at Guantanamo Bay. The show, which was also a fund-raising event for the SPOAs High School Education Scholarship Fund, drew military and civilian performers from across the wide Guantanamo Bay spectrum. Each member of the armed services is represented: Army, Navy, Air Force, Cost Guard, Marine, federal and civilian employees, said Navy Cmdr. David Points, direc tor of the JTF-160 Joint Information Bureau and one of the sponsors of the show. That in itself allows us to say we can come together and respect each others view and talents, working together for a common cause. Following Points remarks and the singing of the national anthem, Army Capt. Michael Farkas, JTF 160 deputy staff judge advocate and master of ceremonies for the night kicked off the show, warming up the crowd with a stand-up comedy act that included the Brooklynborn Farkas New York salute: How you doin Oh no, how you doin. Farkas, who said he was chosen as the master of cere monies because of his New York accent, tried everything to get a laugh from the audience. He orchestrated an impres sion of James Browns I feel Good and segued into the disco hit Night Fever, donning a white polyester suit in a tribute to John Travolta. This is just a great event. It was a fantastic idea, Farkas said. Its good for morale, and its good for the kids. Its good to get your mind off the day-to-day drudgery of Guan tanamo, especially with a weather like this, said Farkas. After Farkas opening act, the rest of the show was on. There was a little bit of everything R&B, country, folk and rap music, gospel singing, poetry reading, a contortion ist act and step dancing. The audience looked and sounded as if they loved every minute. But every talent show must have its winners and losers, and at nights end, as Cmdr. Points handed out certificates of appreciation to all of the participants, a panel of judges made up of officers and enlisted personnel chose the best acts in three categories: Creative Music, Creative Lyrics and Creative Performance. Then the winners were called to the stage to receive their awards and pose for photos. In Creative Music, civilian computer contractor Mike Long took first place and Navy Lt. Jim Perry Como Bow man took second. In Creative Lyrics, first place went to freestyle rap act Throwd & Protg; fellow rappers Seven teen took second. In Creative Performance, first place went to the NH (Navy Hospital) Steppers and second went to local high school senior Marie Brewer for a stirring rendi tion of Every Breath You Take. After it was all over, Points called the show an unex pected success even by his high expectations. Everybody shared in this success. Here we are in a foreign environ ment, but we had a chance to share happiness and we made the most of it. One of the judges, Navy Lt. Andrea Petrovanie, heartily agreed. This is the first talent show Ive ever participated in. Its great. Added winning act Mike Long called the entire show wonderfulTo hear a whole bunch of people doing some thing diverse and eclectic so different from what you nor mally hear on the radio or on TV is amazing. In addition to being a hit with the audience and partici pants, the show raised more than $1000 for the scholarship fund. Spring Talent Show rocks Windjammer Club with amazing performers Story by Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Marie Brewer dazzles the audience with a stirring performance of Every Breath You Take. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Capt. Michael Farkas, the shows master of ceremonies, turns the beat around when he calls for some audience participation while dancing to the song NIght Fever. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano During the 15 minute intermission, there was a special per formance by the Legendary A.A. Tony Atwood. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Navy Hospital Steppers bask in the glory of winning first place in the Creative Performance catergory. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Mike Long belts out a rendition of Ill Be, which won him first place in the Creative Music category.

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Page 8 Page 5 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Afghan Firefight Results in Friendly Force Casualties WASHINGTON -American and allied Afghan military forces conducting a raid May 31 mistakenly fired on other friendly Afghan troops, killing two and wounding three, a U.S. military official reported from Afghanistan today. The fight lasted less than two min utes. No Americans or accompanying Afghans were injured. NORAD-Sponsored Exercise Prepares For Worst-Case Scenarios WASHINGTON -The first part of todays multiagency, bilateral air secu rity exercise sponsored by the North American Aerospace Defense Com mand is already a go. This is the second year the U.S.Canada exercise has been held, Sny der noted. NORAD headquarters, at Colorado Springs, Colo., is responsible for air and space warning and aero space control for the continental United States, Canada and Alaska. British MOD: Attacks on U.S., British Fliers in Iraq Increasing BRUSSELS, Belgium -Iraqi forces have resumed stepped-up attacks on U.S. and British fliers enforcing the northern and southern no-fly zones in that country, the British defense minis ter told American reporters today. Accompanying Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld from London for meetings here with other NATO defense ministers, Geoffrey Hoon spoke to reporters traveling with Rumsfeld. Immediately after Sept. 11, there was a fall-off of incidences over the no-fly zone. We judged that the regime in Iraq seemed to have gotten the message that military action would fol low if they were not very, very careful, Hoon said. Bush Says Americas Freedom is Non-negotiable WASHINGTON The United States must have the best intelligence possible in the war against the shadowy enemy of ter rorism, President Bush said June 3 in Little Rock, Ark. We need to know what theyre thinking and what theyre planning on doing before they do something, he said. Up until Sept. 11, Bush said, the FBI was running down white-collar criminals and worrying about spies. Now, law enforcement agencies new strategy focuses on preventing further terrorist attacks. The FBI is doing a better job of communicating with the CIA and sharing information, he said. The whole mission of the federal gov ernment, working in conjunction with the state and local governments, is to protect the American people, the president said. When it comes to defending our freedom, he added, Well defend it with all our might. We love freedom, and it is nonnegotiable. The United States has a great military and the American people are grateful for those who wear the nations uniform, Bush said. Any time Americas young are committed to battle, he added, they deserve the best pay, the best equipment (and) the best training possible. The nation has been at war for nine months, Bush noted, and in that time U.S. officials have learned that the terrorists are resourceful and devious. They hide in caves and theyre willing to send youngsters to their death. Theyre patient and theyre still determined. Theyve still got an army out there, he noted, but its not the kind of army the Amer ican people are used to. There are no tradi tional lines of defense. The enemy melds into society and takes advantage of our freedom, he said. Just as the United States has learned about the terrorists, they have learned that Ameri cans are patient people who are in for the long haul. Much to the enemys chagrin, he stressed, the American people understand that we face a new threat, the likes of which weve never seen before, and that we will do what it takes to win the war. Were on an international manhunt, Bush said. Were after them, one person at a time. Anybody who thinks theyre going to hurt America is going to be hunted down. This great country will lead the world to a more safe and secure and free society, he said. This nation is plenty patient and plenty tough. And were ready. The great strength of this country is not really our military, he said. The great strength of the country is the people of Amer ica. Drinking from the cup of victory, Generally speaking Army 1st Sgt. Michail D. Eckles, of the 414th Military Police Com pany, accepts the Commanders Cup from Army Commanding General Rick Baccus at Camp America Monday. The awarding of the Cup is the culmination of a series of 12 events, from a 5K run to spades to darts, that has been going on since May 1. Finishing behind the 414th were, in order: the 988th MP Co., a team from the 160th MP Battalion, and the 401st MP Co. Congratulations to everyone who participated, said Baccus. releases, biographies, photos, graphic art, audio released by JTF-160. Since Feb. 10, Kelly said, the site has received over 55,000 hits and not a few emails thanking Kelly for his good work. As the Wire has evolved, so has its staff. In the beginning Strine, FORSCOM Journalist of the Year in 2001 and the most broadly experienced of the four, did most of the layout work. Now each member of the staff, in addi tion to writer and photographer duties, lays out his own stories and contributes equally to the final product. "These guys are a very talented group of young people," said the group's NCO in Charge, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti. "They have exceeded all my expectations when it comes to their journalism skills." But as journalists, the soldiers of the 27th still had to overcome one last challenge of a challeng ing deployment: the security con siderations of the historic detainee-handling operation going on right under their noses. "We were frustrated, as any journalists would be," said Spc. Travis Burnham. "They call it Heartbreak Ridge (the media van tage point for Camp X-Ray) for a reason. You stand there and it breaks your heart because you can't get any closer without put ting away your pen, paper and camera." But Kelly said it wasn't long before that feeling faded. "Once you realize what your mission is, not to cover this historical event but to write for the soldiers and sailors and marines and everyone else involved in this operation -once you get out there and start talking to soldiers and getting their stories, you don't mind any more. "In the end, they're just detainees. In some ways, it's more exciting to find out what an Army bus driver does." For Pfc. Jacob McDonald, just the chance to work on a newspa per was enough. "This is what I love to do. I got a lot of great experience that's going to help be with what I want to do in civilian life, which is be a journalist. It's the only job I wanted in the military." The 27th had been itching for a deployment for a long time. On Sept. 11, knowing they'd be needed somewhere, they were already packing up their office by the time the World Trade Center towers had finished tumbling to the ground. First they expected to be sent to Manhattan to help with the recovery effort; then, as the war in Afghanistan began, their best guess was Uzbekistan. Finally, on Jan. 13, the call to Cuba came. Just 48 hours later, they were Guantanamo-bound. Six months later, the 27th is "mission-proven," as Burnham puts it. To Nors, they're barely recog nizable. "This is not the same unit, as far as training, as far as ability," he said. "We left Drum and we had a lot of soldiers that were just out of DINFOS. And now, you couldn't ask for a better crew. They're sea soned. They've got a deployment under their belt. We're excited they're going to go on and do great things." "I'm glad to be going home," said Strine, who admitted some nervousness at giving up control of the paper he created. "But I definitely won't forget what I learned here, and hopefully what we put together -the newspaper and the website -will stick around for years to come." The Wire will continue to evolve under the care of the 361st. Blessed with a larger staff, the unit will be able to produce more local content and will expand next Friday's edition to 16 pages instead of 12. Even the name may change (if only to preserve the Army tradi tion of strict accountability). But as long as JTF-160 and Operation Enduring Freedom continues at Guantanamo Bay, the spirit of the Wire -news and features for servicemembers, about servicemembers, wherever they may serve -will never die. WIRE, from page 1 Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The last stand, from left to right: Spc. James Strine, Pfc. Danny Kelly, Spc. Travis Burnham, Sgt. Christina M. Bhatti, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors and Pfc. Jacob A. McDonald. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Students Present Sept. 11 Lithograph to Joint Staff WASHINGTON -Two students from the Army Command and General Staff College recently presented the Joint Staff with a litho graph honoring the militarys response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director, accepted the lithograph May 10 on behalf of the Joint Staff. It now hangs in the outer office of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Every year the class gives a gift to the college, said Army Maj. Donald R. Baker, gift chairman. Habit ually, its an original oil painting. The staff college is at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The original painting by artist Jim Dietz is now the largest painting hanging in Bell Hall on Fort Leaven worth. The painting features representa tives of all the armed forces. The people depicted are real service members, all sta tioned in Washing ton state. In addition to the military members, the painting fea tures rubble scenes from the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the background is the American flag. To help pay the artists fee, the students sold a litho graph. The 1,000 copies printed sold out, according to Baker. The students gave litho graph 1/1000 to Congress. They also reserved other notable numbers. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is to receive 11/1000 for American Airlines Flight 11, the aircraft that slammed into the World Trade Center north tower. Litho 93/1000, for United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed near Shanksville, Pa., was pre sented to the adjutant general of Pennsylvania. The White House received 911/1000, and 1000/1000 went to the U.S. Supreme Court. By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Special to the American Forces Press Service Photo by Air Force Tech. Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff Maj. Donald R. Baker (left) presents the lithograph to Marine Lt. Gen. Gregory S. Newbold, J-3 director. By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service

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Page 4 Page 9 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 WASHINGTON -The war on terrorism and relations between India and Pakistan rep resent two hot topics on Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfelds agenda as he begins a trip tomorrow that will span Europe, South Asia and the Middle East, senior DoD offi cials said today. The secretarys European schedule features a stop in London to meet with the British Sec retary of State for Defense Geoffrey Hoon. Moving on to Brussels, Belgium, Rumsfeld is to attend multilateral North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministerial meetings, including first-ever NATORussia Committee talks, a senior DoD official noted. The London and Brussels meetings will feature updates on the war against terrorism, he said. Another topic of discussion in Brus sels, he noted, will involve selection of new NATO members during November meetings slated in Prague, Czech Republic. Slated for discussion in Brussels will be possible NATORussia cooperative initiatives such as training and sharing airspace security information, an official said. Rumsfeld is scheduled to visit a NATO AWACS facility in Germany. He is to fly on to the Estonian capital of Tallinn to meet senior defense representatives from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, all of whom want to join NATO. Rumsfeld will also visit India and Pakistan, a senior DoD official said, to meet with their senior defense officials and to help lessen cur rent bellicose relations between the two South Asian nuclear powers. The secretary will also go to Bahrain, Qatar, and Kuwait to meet senior officials, the official said, adding that the three countries have been helpful in providing support to the United States in the global war against terror ism. At this point, he said, its unclear whether the secretary will visit South Asia or the Mid dle East first. The length of the trip, a senior DoD official said, could extend into the end of next week. Other countries could be added to the secre tarys trip itinerary, another official noted. Rumsfeld Trip Includes NATO, India, Pakistan, Mideast Stops By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON -The success of U.S. policy in the Philippines rests squarely on the shoulders of the extraordinary capabilities of our young men and women serving there, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said today at the Hoover Institute Symposium here. In this case, (it is) not just their military skills, but their human skills, their sensitivity to local concerns and local issues, Wolfowitz said. The deputy secretary returned June 4 from a trip to Singapore and the Philippines. The deputy said many Philippine government officials did not want U.S. troops on Basilan Island, the stronghold of Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group linked to Osama bin Ladens al Qaeda net work. Philippine President Gloria MacapagalArroyo overrode the objections and invited U.S. Special Forces sol diers and support ele ments into the country. Theres a certain quite understandable sen sitivity in a country that was an American colony about the dangers or the fears that the United States might be there to take over, Wolfowitz said. But the way U.S. serv ice members approached their jobs has swayed opinion in the govern ment. Secretary of National Defense Angelo Reyes said he saw no problem in allowing U.S. forces to continue their train-andassist mission past July 31, the date it is scheduled to end. Wolfowitz also praised the way American service members researched and planned the mission. Its a level of sophisti cation that you might expect in a graduate course on sociology, he said. These are people who carry guns and risk their lives and build roads and dig wells, but theyre able to do (the planning) piece of the job also. Its just a very, very high quality of profession alism and dedication, and I think it has an infectious influence on the people that we work with as well. Even on the trip over to East Asia and back, the deputy secretary got a chance to see American service members in action. Wolfowitz, his party and a traveling party of press flew 22 hours to Sin gapore aboard an Air Force KC-10 aerial refu eler. Wolfowitz sat in the cockpit and watched as the plane refueled in the air. (It was the) first time Ive actually seen two planes come that close together and for a steady, long period of time, and the cool, calm confidence of those pilots, he said. Its not something that I would ever think one would ever take for granted, but obviously, theyve been doing it day after day throughout this conflict and in many others, and in much more difficult conditions than the ones we were under, including more than one instance in which they were shot at. And then I had the experience later on of going back into the tail section of the plane and having the boom operator, who has seven years of experience in doing this very difficult and at times very dangerous job, explain in loving detail how it all worked. Its that command of his job that Ive seen over and over again among our young men and women pride in their work, knowledge about what they do, he continued. It is terrific. Its the greatest strength of this great American military, and something we all should be grateful for as Americans. U.S. Philippine Policy Starts With Servicemembers Photo by Jim Garamone Air Force Tech Sgt. Bob Burdick shows Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz the refueling boom controls on a KC-10 Extender aircraft. Reserve sailors get the four-star treatment! Navy Admiral William J. Fallon pays a visit to Naval reservists stationed on Guantanamo Bay. He boosted their morale by assuring the sailors that their hard work is significant to the success and completion of Eduring Freedom. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A.Morris Man on the Street Next weeks question: What is your definition of motivation? Compiled by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris and Army Spc. Jose Martinez The WIre This weeks question: What did you think of Attack of the Clones? Army Pfc. Orlando Soto Jr. B company 122nd Infantry That little green dude with that light saber was almost as fierce as me with my bayonet. I can't wait for the next Star Wars movie to arrive in my part of the galaxy! Army Spc. Charles Cook 115th Military Police Company I thought Attack of the Clones was by far the best in the series. It was definitely the best Star Wars out of the five. Navy ABH3 Chad Dindo Naval Station The clone battle at the end was my favorite part. TheJedi knights were outnumbered by Trade Federation droids 1,000-to-1until those clones showed up! Army Pfc. Heather Sim 339th Military Police Company I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. The fighting scene between Yoda and Count Dooku was by far the best part. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service

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Page 10 Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 The care, feeding and handling of the detainees at Camp Delta in Guantanamo Bay will be in new hands next week. The 160th Military Police Battalion will be replacing the 115th MPBN as the MP Battalion Headquarters and Headquarters Command in charge of running Camp Delta and adjoining Camp America. Our mission is their mission: to process detainees as far as per sonal data, country data, to treat them humanely, and care for them until theyre dispositioned, said Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry, property book officer for the incoming 160th. Its what were trained to do. Being able to perform that mission in the relatively hos pitable environs of Guantanamo Bay, however, turned out to be a much belated holiday gift. The 160th was originally acti vated for duty in forbidding Kan dahar, Afghanistan on Christmas Day. But the pieces on the militarys chessboard often move in myste rious ways, and the reservists from Tallahassee, Fla., wound up spending their spring standing fast at Ft. Benning, Ga. yet another Army case of hurry up and wait. But the leadership of the 160th made sure their sol diers time wasnt completely idle. We had the time to expand our train ing goals, Hendry said. That creative task included addi tional land naviga tion and patrolling courses. Throw in some extra mockdetainee training and canine training with German Shep herd working dogs -and helping staff some undermanned Fort Ben ning stations -and the soldiers of the 160th were busy enough. We were proud to be going on a mission to Kandahar then, and now were proud to be here, said Hendry. Added S-4 officer Capt. Leslie Haines: Our job is to take this mission over and carry it down range. Members of the 160th agreed that with the help of the 115th, the transition has gone well. Weve had people from the 115th taken us hand in hand and told us exactly what to do, said mail clerk Spc. Michele P. Sumrell. Theyve made my first week here a pleas ure. The 115th have really been a godsend to us, said Hendry. Were blessed to have what was here as opposed to the other people who had to start completely from scratch, he said. When we got here, we started from scratch, said 1st Sgt. Eric Bokinsky, HHC, 115th MPBN. Weve evolved this place from its humble beginnings as X-Ray to what it is now. Bokinsky and his fellow National Guard soldiers have earned the time off. They were first called into action immedi ately after Sept. 11 and spent three weeks guarding the Penta gon. Then it was more force protec tion training at Fort Stewart, Ga., for another three months. Finally, they were sent to Guantanamo Bay, arriving just days before the first detainee hit the ground. Now, theyre all ready to go home. But sometimes a job this big is hard to hand off. Everybodys a little bit con cerned about the transition, said Bokinsky. But you reflect, you do your After Action Reports, and you remember theyve got the benefit of this mission already being done for five months. Theyll be fine, he added. Besides, theres always a better way to build a mousetrap. Im sure theyll continue to improve on what we built. New sheriffs at Camp America By Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph P. Schrafel, 160th MPBN, toils away. Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Chief Warrant Officer Larry J. Hendry and Army Maj. Steve Robinson of the 160th MPBN take a break outside their command hooch. Photo by Army Spc. Jose Martinez Army Sgt. Gary D. French, 160th MPBN, loads detainee laundry into the back of a Humvee. BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan -Family separa tions are routine in the military. Men and women in Americas armed forces often have to bid a temporary farewell to spouses, fianc(e)s, parents and children. Once in a while, though, peo ple get lucky. Thats what hap pened to a 1999 West Point graduate from Santa Fe, N.M., and her Green Beret fianc from Puerto Rico. Just over a month after Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega got engaged last August, she received orders to Afghanistan. At first, I didnt want to deploy, but then I realized this was what I had joined the Army to do, she said. This was why I went to West Point. Delavegas grandfather had served as a warrant officer in Korea and Guam. She grew up listening to stories about the mili tary. When it came time for col lege, she recalled the excitement shed felt hearing his tales, so she applied to West Point. I wanted to do something dif ferent and I wanted to make a dif ference. I thought West Point was the perfect route for that. Delavega went on to jump school, jumpmaster training and an assignment at Fort Bragg, N.C. There she met 1st Lt. Gregorios Zayas of the 3rd Special Forces Group. Delavega said it was not love at first sight. He walked into our company area and another lieutenant intro duced us, she recalled. The lieu tenant said, This is Valencia, and Greg said, Im Lt. Zayas. He wouldnt use his first name. He was so rude! Then, like three weeks later, he wants to go out on a date. I was a jerk at first, said Zayas, who is now a captain. She was nice. I was mean. Being the new person to the unit, she was the talk of the town and I did nt want to come across as any thing other than professional. Zayas, as he puts it, was born into the military at Fort Lewis, Wash. His dad is a retired enlisted man. Zayas joined the Army and qualified to be a member of the Special Forces. He said his unit spends a lot of time in Africa doing humanitarian and other missions. When youre out in Africa in 125-degree weather with no cold water and no cold drinks and you just have an MRE to eat, you reevaluate your priorities and your beliefs, Zayas said. Its matured me and Ive become a better per son. With seven years of active duty served, the captain said he plans on making the Army a career. My goal is to do at least 20 years. I love the military. I love the guys. And, as fate would have it, he fell in love with another soldier. As the weeks went by after their first meeting, the West Point grad and the Green Beret found they had a lot in common. Both are airborne. Both are jump mas ters responsible for making sure other paratroopers are safely out of the aircraft before they go out last. The coolest thing is looking at her on the other side of the air plane and were doing the same job at the same time together, Zayas said. There arent very many people in the military that can say they do that. Shortly after the couple got engaged, the world changed. Ter rorists attacked the United States and the military was sent into action. Zayas stayed behind at Fort Bragg while Delavega went to war. People in her unit were really motivated about the deployment, she said. We were fired up. Everyone wanted to show the world that nobody could do that to the United States without expecting some kind of repercus sions. I think weve proven that. Weve come out here and weve shown the world what we can do. Weve warned them not to mess with us and that we want to pre vent things like this from happen ing in the future. Zayas arrived in Afghanistan three months after Delavega. I was happy to get orders, he said. I hadnt seen my fiance in months. I was really excited. I couldnt get here fast enough. He said soldiers in his Special Forces unit welcomed the chance to fight. Thats what they train all their lives for, he said. We have guys who have been in the Special Forces for 15 years and theyve never seen combat. This mission means a lot. The terror ists took our pride away for a brief second. Delavega admitted she worries when Zayas is out on a mission, but thats our job. If you worry about it, youll never be able to live. Youve just got to take it for what it is and say this is what we signed up to do. If we didnt want to do it, we should never have signed up to do it. Delavega and Zayas know how fortunate they are to be in the same place at the same time. Were very blessed, Delavega said. We get to see each other every day. We do breakfast. We do dinner and we get to watch a movie every night. Even on the battlefield, wartime romance can bloom By Linda D. Kozaryn American Forces Press Service The Army plays unwitting matchmaker for two soldiers in love Photo by Linda D. Kozaryn Army Capt. Greg Zayas and his fiancee Army 1st Lt. Valencia Delavega are both assigned to Bagram Air Base, near Kabul, Afghanistan.

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Page 11 Page 2 JTF-160 Command Commander: Brig. Gen. Rick Baccus Deputy Commander: Navy Capt. Robert A. Buehn Joint Information Bureau Director: Cmdr. David Points Public Affairs Officer: Maj. Stephen A. Cox Online at: www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/JTF-160/index.htm The Wire Staff Publisher: Army Sgt. Maj. Daniel Polinski Editor: Army Spc.Frank N. Pellegrini pellegrinifn@jtf160.usnbgtmo.navy.mil Staff writers and design team: Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris Army Spc. Jose Martinez and Army Pfc. Jean-Carl Bertin Contact us: 5239 (Local) 5241 (Local fax) Joint Information Bureau / Pink Palace The Wire is produced by the 27th Public Affairs Detachment assigned to the Joint Information Bureau at JTF-160. Some content is collected from the World Wide Web and edited to fit. This publication is printed under the provisions provided in Army Regulation 360-1 and does not reflect the views of the Department of Defense or the personnel within. Friday, June 7, 2002 Friday, June 7, 2002 Friendly insults flew, sweat poured and the crowds for both sides loudly predicted victory. But at the end of the day, two teams of sailors had proved as skilled on the turf as on the surf. The Navy swept the Army in two Battle of the Branches flag football games on a hot and humid Saturday night June 1 at Cooper Field. In the womens game, the Navy womens defense proved as stifling as the air, giving up only a safety in a 20-2 victory over the Army women as drive after drive ended with the soon-familiar sight of a Navy player holding up a yellow Army players flag. Trailing 13-0 at halftime, the lady Black Knights threatened to make things close with a promising drive midway through the second half. But a 50-yard interception return for a touchdown by Chief Melba Benjamin sealed the victory. The mens game featured more spectacular plays but even less scoring as Navy QB and coach EN1 Bernard Jennings captained his team to a hard-fought 13-6 victory. Again, Army threatened at the end, driving to within 10 yards of the goal line before a last-second pass by Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner fell incomplete in the end zone. There was no more argument: the Navy had won the day. It was a close game we didnt expect it to be that close, said Jennings, who also coached the womens squad to victory. Its been fun. Its nice to get out here and release some tension of course, its always nicer when you win. Navy HM2 Tamika Richardson of the womens squad was somewhat less diplo matic. What did you expect? This is our base. This is our house. This is the Battle of the Branches, and the best branch won. For MWR Athletic Director Donnell Daniel, who runs all the athletic events on base and has been overseeing a months-long Battle of the Branches series in a variety of sports, the game was a success no matter who prevailed. We just wanted everyone to have fun in a family-type atmosphere, and athletics brings people together. he said. Besides, with so many of the JTF folks leaving soon, we wanted to make sure these two guys got as many shots at each other as possible. Next up is the last contest of this season: the Battle of the Branches basketball game, scheduled for Saturday night at the Main Gym. The games begin at 5 p.m.; the entire GTMO community is invited. Predicted Jennings: Theyre going on the plane with an L. More Helpful Thoughts Since Arriving in GITMO GODS FAITHFULNESS God tries our faith so that we may try His faithfulness. Anonymous KNOW GODS WILL The best to know Gods will is to say I will to God. Albert Lee GODS PROVIDENCE The Lord hath prepared His Throne in the heavens; and His Kingdom ruleth. Psalms 103: 19 TRIALS AND HARD PLACES Trials and hard places are needed to press us forward. B. Simpson RICHES If riches increase, do not set your heart on them. Psalms 62: 10 GREATNESS True greatness does not come to those who strive for worldly fame. It comes to those who choose to serve in Jesus Name. Richard DeHaan JOY There is no greater joy than to know God loves us. David Rope LIVING IN THE PAST To live in the past is to miss todays opportunities and tomorrows blessings. Anonymous Announcements A Special Thank You to each of you who have supported The ministry of Free dom Heights and Camp America. The pre cious memories of us worshiping and serving together will always be treasured. Your new Protestant JTF-160 Chaplain is CH (MAJ) Merrill. Let us support and pray for him faithfully. Submitted by Army Chaplain (Lt. Col.) John W. Alexander, JTF-160 Chap lain Chaplains Corner Attempting to glorify Christ always... In Battle of Branches, Navy cruises By Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris You go, girls: Jubilant Navy womens team members HM2 Tamika Richardson and MS3 SW JoJo Stafford parade their colors after the big win. Photo by Army Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini Navy coach EN1 Bernard Jennings coaches his womens team to victory. Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris As night falls on Cooper Field, Army QB Staff Sgt. Rockne Gardner tries to make his way to the end zone. Reminder from the CG: Alcohol Consumption Policy for JTF-160 The strict prohibition of alcohol con sumption is waived. To promote responsible consumption of alcohol, however, the following regulations apply: The possession or use of alcoholic beverages by a person under 21 is strictly prohibited. Those in possession of alcoholic beverages shall ensure minors do not consume such beverages. Drunkenness or abuse of alcohol will not be tolerated. Consumption of alcoholic beverages is authorized only within the confines of living spaces (to include the fencedin backyard areas) and at on-base establishments authorized to serve alcohol. Alcohol will not be consumed in loca tions other than those mentioned above, unless at a commandapproved party or picnic with com mand representation. Command sponsored parties must be approved by the JTF Commander. Drinking on duty is absolutely forbid den. There will be no alcohol con sumed by anyone for eight hours prior to assuming watch or duty. No alcohol is allowed at Camp XRay, Camp America or other camp bil leting areas. The Commander may terminate alcohol consumption privileges if and when circumstances warrant such action. Violating this policy is punishable by UCMJ. Remember: Alcohol Consumption is a Force Protection issue. Drink responsibly. A special thanks to the soldierjournalists of the 27th PAD for a smooth transfer of power.

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Page 12 Camp America Raises Stars and Stripes Army Sgt. 1st Class John A. Lombard, 988th Military Police Company, Army Spc. Jason A. Murray Sr., 401st MP Co., and Army Spc. Seth D. Stoller, 339th MP Co.,. salute the newly raised flag at Camp America Thursday. The flag-raising marked the 58th anniversary of D-Day. Published in the interest of personnel assigned to JTF-160 and COMNAV Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Wire staff cuts out The Wire is dead -long live the Wire. "The Wire," JTF-160's source of internal information and weekly morale-boosting field newspaper for servicemembers stationed at Guantanamo Bay, changed inkstained hands this week as the Army journalists of the 27th Public Affairs Detachment reluctantly gave their brainchild over to new management. As the 27th heads back home to Fort Drum, N.Y., and the 10th Mountain Division, the new staff, a team of journalists from the 361st Press Camp Headquarters out of Fort Totten, New York, takes over a paper built from the ground up. "When we first got here in Janu ary there was nothing," said the paper's editor, Spc. James Strine. "There was no internal information at all for JTF 160, just 30 copies of a 10-page Microsoft Word docu ment made up of stories pulled off the Internet." "Jim took one look at it and just laughed, and said, 'we can do much better than this,' recalled the fourman print staff's Officer in Charge, Capt. Jeffrey P. Nors. That process began with style -turning the lay out of the thrice-weekly handout into something that looked more like a newspaper -and ended with substance: news stories not only for but about the JTF-160 community. "As the folks out at X-Ray got more and more access to newspa pers, television and the Internet, they didn't need as much outside news -what was going on back home -from us," said Nors. So his staff dropped issues as time went by, and redirected their energies toward covering the soldiers them selves. Eventually the Wire got to the point where it is now: one edi tion per week on Friday, with the emphasis on the local content. "This stuff fires up the troops. They love to see their name in the paper," said Nors. "Our mission is morale -that's what field newspa pers are all about." The Wire also has a website now, thanks to the initiative of Pfc. Daniel Kelly. Only three months out of Defense Information School when he deployed, Kelly was con vinced that a modern newspaper had to have an Internet presence, and badgered his superiors until they let him have the task. Now, at www.nsgtmo.navy.mil/jtf-160, web surfers can get not only every edition of the Wire but press Navy sinks Army on gridiron Page 11 Talent show wows packed GTMO house Page 6 Read about the new MPs in town Page 3 Friday, June 7, 2002 A look inside... Friday, June 7, 2002 Q: What is your job at GTMO? A: Deputy SJA, Staff Judge Advocate of JTF 160. I also brief all the new people at GTMO on the Geneva Convention and the Rules of Engagement. Q: What made you join the Army? A: Patriotism. Family history. My grandfa ther landed in Normandy. Now Im trying to save the world all by myself. Q: What do you do in the civilian world? A: Im an Assistant District Attorney in Brooklyn, homicide bureau. Q: Havent you already had your 15 minutes? Your marriage on the Brooklyn Bridge was on the front page of the New York Post. A: Yeah, January 13. My grandfather, the one who landed in Normandy, was a retired judge, and he married us. It was the day before I reported for duty here. But I did go back for the actual reception in April. Its interesting going through a wedding ceremony when youre already married. Q: Seems like that bends some rules of engagement. Whats the most challenging part of living at GTMO? A: The most challenging part of GTMO is being mentally prepared to do pretty much the same job all over again, day after day after day. Q: So what do you do for fun here? A: Put on John Travolta costumes. Make fun of my roommate. Watch my NCOs do bucket races down Windward Loop. Otherwise, GTMO is a bit limited. Maybe some fishing. Q: Any good catches? A: My best catch was a 15 lb. Jack. I fish about as good as I dance. Q: So, youre a pretty good disco dancer? A: Self-proclaimed Tony Mainiero. Q: What did you think of being in the talent show last Friday? A: This was just a great event. Its good for morale. I demonstrated my special gifts. I donated my own personal humilition for the good of the audience. Q: How did you get rooked into it? A: How did I get rooked into it? Ill tell you. Commander Points, who was the organizer, thought I was funny, and he told me that other people thought I was funny, and therefore they thought Id be a good choice to be MC. Q: You were pretty crazy, but what is the cra ziest thing youve ever done? A: Thats a bad question. I was the president of a fraternity Some things are better left unsaid. Q: Ever done any hiking? A: Spent a lot my childhood in the Catskill Mountains. No one puts baby in the corner. Q: And here? A: Every day up Windward Loop. Q: How old do you weigh? A: 200 years. Q: Pick your favorite color from one to ten. A: I would have to say Sandra Bullock. Q: Who was your childhood hero? A: James Bond. Q: Do any impersonations? A: I do an excellent Lt. Col. Cline. (455th MP Commander) Q: What advice could you give those who just arrived at GTMO? A: Get out fast! But seriously, take advantage of all the MWR activities that the permanent party servicemembers have available to them. Q: And when are you getting out of here? A: Im scheduled to leave on the 29th of June. Im very excited to go home and see my family. Q: OK. Thanks, sir. Unless you have any thing else? A: Hey, Lt. Williams interview two weeks ago was longer than that, and hes just a Squid Q: It dont GTMO better than this. A: Youll look pretty funny saying that with no #$@%ing teeth! Nobody puts this Deputy SJA in the corner! Fifteen minutes of fame with Army Capt. Mike Farkas... Compiled by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano The WIre Photo by Army Spc. Chris S. Pisano Im trying to save the world all by myself. Next weeks 15 minutes of fame could be you! By Spc. Frank N. Pellegrini The Wire See WIRE, page 5 Photo by Army Spc. Joseph A. Morris