The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00351


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By Kevin CopelandCommander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Public Affairse annual Submarine Veter ans of World War II Memorial Service was conducted May 22 at the Submarine Learning Fa cility, Naval Station Norfolk. Hosted by SUBLRNFAC, the Norfolk-based event is held each year prior to Memorial Day. In past years, the service hon ored the 52 submarines and the gallant Sailors lost during World War II, and the losses of the USS resher (SSN 593), April 10, 1963, and the USS Scorpion (SSN 589), May 22, 1968. But since the World War II subma rine veterans were rolled into the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. during the 2012 national convention, the ceremony also honors all submarines and submariners lost since the subma rines force inception April 11, 1900. Cmdr. Stan Stewart, Jr., SUB LRNFAC commanding ocer, welcomed the more than 100 veterans, active duty Sailors, spouses, and visitors. Good morning and once again welcome to Submarine Learning Facility Norfolk, Stewart said. We are grateful to have such a magnicent group gathered with us to celebrate our submarine veterans. I can not express how proud my crew and I are to host such a prestigious, important and time hon ored event. As always, my greatest grati tude goes to United States Submarine Veterans of World War II and United States Submarine Veterans, Incorporated. ank Housing survey to beginBalfour Beatty takes annual polling of residents From Balfour Beatty CommunitiesAt Balfour Beatty Communities, the goal is to provide quality housing and customer service so residents have a positive and en joyable living experience. Soon, residents will be in vited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty operations through its CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. e annual survey is an important part of Balfour Beattys continuous improvement program that helps sta analyze performance and make changes and enhancements to ensure consistent quality service deliv ered across all aspects of commu nity operations. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community manage ment, maintenance and quality of homes. All surveys are complete ly condential and anonymous and residents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. e Resident Satisfaction Sur vey allows us to see where we are excelling operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Tony Cartagena, community manager for BBC. We encour age all residents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be available at the Annual Beautication/Resident Appreciation Day, 2 to 7 p.m., June 6 at the Balfour Beatty Com munity Center. If you cant attend, stop by the Community Management Oce, at 1083 USS Andrew Jackson, to pick up a survey or call (912) 882-1211 and one will be delivered to your residence. Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage paid enve lope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox at the Balfour Be atty Communities Management Oce. Residents who submit a completed survey by June 30 will be entered to win a prize. Residents that hand in a survey before June 15 also will qualify for a special early bird prize drawing. e nal day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Unit disbands in October, members to join other Seabee units around NavyBy CM2 Travis J. WyattConstruction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202With the disestablishment of Construc tion Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 De tachment Kings Bay due to force realign ment, Naval Submarine Base and the local community will be losing a valuable asset come October. e Seabees came to Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay in March 1995 when Construction Battalion Unit 412 was es tablished. In February 2005, CBU412 was re-designated as CBMU 202 Detachment Kings Bay. e Navy Seabees have a long lasting legacy in Naval history for their compas sion and Can Do attitudes. Local Seabees have proudly carried on that legacy over their past 19 years here. e Seabees on board NSB have left a lasting impression on the base with their compassion and community involve ment. Every year, the Seabees assigned to the detachment selessly contribute thousands of hours to local volunteer or ganizations supporting such worthwhile community events as e Southeast Re gional Special Olympics, Relay for Life, Habitat for Humanity and e Humane Society. ey also have contribut ed time in local schools for career days, static equipment displays and the construction of playground equipment. Up Periscope Whats your summer vacation plan? Page 9 School news College tours, Pre-K registration Page 2 Volunteer Camden Chamber honors service member Page 92009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenDavid Hudson talks to DC3 Nathan Bridges, center, and MK3 Tyler Arledge inside the cabin of Maritime Force Protection 33-foot security boat. See Seabees, Page 3 Community designation brings county, Guard together for day of fun with tours, picnicBy PA1 Lauren JorgensenCoast Guard Public Affairs Detachment Jacksonville, Fla.Members of the Coast Guard were the distin guished guests during a picnic and community celebration held in St. Marys Saturday, May 17, to recognize Camden Countys designation as the nations rst Coast Guard community. Coast Guard cities and communities are those that have gone above and beyond to ensure the Coast Guard members in their regions feel wel come and at home while assigned there. Members of e Camden Partnership, a St. Marys-based civilian organization aiming to strengthen military and community partnerships, applied for the designation August 2012 and be gan planning the waterfront community celebra tion after learning Feb. 5, the designation was awarded. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, ocially designated May 17, 2014, as Coast Guard Community Cel ebration Day, and the proclamation announcing so was read during the festivities. Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Part nership, briey described to those in attendance what the designation meant and how unique it was. CBMU 202 Seabee UT1 Richard Cruikshank rides a 5-tonner during a parade. Inset right, Seabee Chief Steven Maldonado wel comes NJROTC members. Inset below, YN1 Tina Mcrae helps Wyatt Brock into the cab of a Seabee dump truck.Navy photos During the 19 years of quality construction onboard NSB, the Seabees have saved the Navy more than $100 million ... Cartagena Coast Guard celebratesSee Camden, Page 4 See Sub Vets, Page 7Sub Vets attend memorial in NorfolkNavy photo by MC1 Shannon BarnwellCmdr. Scott Luers, commanding officer, USS Boise (SSN 764); STSCM Chris Conry, chief of the boat, USS Boise; and Ed Kracker, the oldest submarine-qualified WWII Submarine Veteran in the Hampton Roads area, honors colors during the annual Submarine Veterans of World War II Memorial Service May 22 in Norfolk.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 By Clainetta JeffersonNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child and Youth Education Services School Liaison Office Summer is just around the corner and it is a great time for high school students to begin gathering infor mation about college. e Kings Bay Youth Sponsor ship Program is hosting its annual college tour the week of June 2 to 6. High school students of active duty and retired service members and Department of Defense contractors, who have completed their sopho more or junior years, are invited to join this exciting ve-day, four-night tour of 10 colleges and universities around the state of Georgia. is tour is not about attending a Georgia college, but rather it is about helping students know what to look for in a college, whether large or small, private or public, in a small city or larger metropolitan area. e truth is that most high school students do not visit college campuses or wait until too late in the high school years to make informed decisions. Now is the time to get in on this great deal. Funded by the Georgia Gover nors Oce and Children and Fami lies, this unbelievable opportunity is being oered to eligible teenagers for only $175. ere are only 24 seats available and they will go quickly. Register deadline is Friday, May 30. Get started now. Any questions may be directed to the Child and Youth Education Services oce at kingsbayslo@navy.mil or by calling (912) 573-8986.Pre-Kindergarten registration beginse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child Development Center will have open registration for the 2014 15 Georgia Bright From e Start Pre-K Program from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., ursday, June 12 at the Child Development Center, Building 0152, 655 Wahoo Ave. Georgias Pre-K Program is a lot tery-funded educational program for Georgias four year olds to pre pare children for kindergarten Children four years of age on or before Sept. 1, 2014 of the upcoming school year who are Georgia resi dents are eligible to attend Georgias Pre-K Program. Georgias Pre-K is voluntary for families and for pro viders. is program will be a 6.5 hour instructional day with extend ed daycare services available for before and after care. is program is oered on a rstcome, rst-served basis and a wait ing list will be started once all spaces are lled. You will need to provide proof of age eligibility and a Georgia resident to register for Pre-K. Ac ceptable proofof-age includes birth certicate, passport, hospital record of live birth, green card, pink card or Federal I-94 card. Acceptable proof of residency in cludes a lease, utility bill or letter from a shelter or employer. For additional information about enrolling a child in Georgias Pre-K Program, contact the CDC at (912) 573-3888. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.Kids Fishing Clinic at Ft. Clinche Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park has a Kids Fishing Clinic Saturday, May 31, to teach les sons on knot tying, shing ethics, tackle, habi tat, casting and more. e clinic is open to ages ve to 15 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. e rst 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. A free hot dog lunch will be provided. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwa ter shing. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274.St. Marys offers music seriese next Starry Nights, Music in the Park free series is 6 to 8 p.m. June 21 at the St. Marys Waterfront Park amphitheater featuring e Just Jazz Quartet. Future bands are No Known Cure July 19, e Just Jazz Quartet returns Aug. 16 and Back From the Brink Sept. 20. Additional Music in the Park dates will be June 28, July 12, Aug. 9 and Sept. Fish Head will begin these dates. For more information, call the St. Marys Welcome Center at (912) 882-4000.Maritime jobs June 4 in JaxA Military to Maritime career event is 1 to 5 p.m., June 4, for current and former military personnel interested in transitioning into a maritime-related eld. e free event will be at the JAXPORT cruise terminal. For more in formation, contact the American Maritime Partnership, (202) 661-3740, or e-mail info at Americanmaritimepartnership.com. Advance registration is recommended. To register on line, visit http://bit.ly/military2maritime.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.RC model air show May 31Kings Bay RC Modelers will have an air show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, May 31 at Oak well RC Aireld, at the intersection of Clarks Blu and Oakwell roads. Demonstrations be gin at 11 a.m. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for more and updated information. Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of com munity, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! College Tour deadline is May 30 School Liaison Ocer Gum disease easily preventableQuestion: What is gum disease, and how do you get it? Answer: Gum disease, one of the most common problems seen by dentists, is the swelling or sore ness of the gums the soft tissue around your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, col orless lm that forms on teeth. If not removed, the bacteria can build up and infect gums, teeth and the sup porting bone. Q: What are some of the signs and risk factors associated with gum dis ease? A: Signs of gum disease are not always easily seen, and can sometimes be painless. Early signs of gum disease include red, bleeding gums. Other signs include gums that have pulled away from the teeth, changes in the way teeth t together when biting, pus appearing between teeth and gum or constant bad breath or bad taste in mouth. Common risk fac tors are smoking, the most signifi cant, hor monal changes in girls and women, diabetes, medications and heredity. Q: How is gum disease treated? A: e rst priority is to control infection. Gum disease treatment can range from nonsurgical thera pies to surgery, to restore supportive tissues, and treatment decisions are based on the extent of the disease. However, any type of treatment will require good daily teeth and gum hygiene care at home. Q: Is gum disease preventable? A: While common, gum disease is preventable. To keep teeth and gums healthy, brush teeth twice a day with uoride toothpaste, oss regularly to remove plaque from between teeth, get routine dental check-ups and dont smoke. By taking these precautions, you can greatly reduce your chances of developing gum disease in the future. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. is column was written by Lt. Cmdr. Wil liam Boggess, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West dentist. If you have a question for a physi cian, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, send it to jaxpublicaairs@med. navy.mil. Ask the Doc By Lt. Cmdr. Wm. Boggess NBHC Key West From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment FacilityEach summer heat injuries claim many victims among our dog and cat population. Normal body tem perature of dogs and cats typically range from 100 to 102 degrees Fahr enheit, slightly higher than humans. Heat injuries range from heat stress body temperature greater than 106 degrees F to heat stroke body temperature greater than 108 degrees F. is is almost always preventable. Most often, heat inju ries occur when owners leave their pets in an enclosed, parked car or leave the pet outside without access to shade and water. As we know, the South gets very hot in the summer, and the heat index can rise over 100 degrees any day. Pets are even more susceptible than humans to heat stroke in cars, as dogs, cats and other animals cannot produce whole body sweat and rely solely on panting and sweat from their feet to reduce body temperature. Temperatures inside a hot, parked car can reach lethal levels within minutes. When the outside tem perature is 70 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature inside the car can exceed 120 degrees, even when the windows are partially open. is also can happen when pets exercise too much in the heat and are denied shade and fresh water to help keep them cool. Additionally, if you and your pet recently moved to the South, ensure that pets slowly get acclimated to the summer heat. Certain types of dogs are more sensitive to heat, especially obese dogs and brachycephalic, or shortnosed, breeds, like pugs and bull dogs. Use extreme caution when these dogs are exposed to heat. Keep in mind that just as with humans, if pets have even one episode of any heat injuries, they are even more at risk for future heat injuries. Symptoms of heat injuries include heavy panting, weakness, excessive drooling, vomiting and/or diarrhea, and can rapidly progress to collapse, coma and death. If your pet is experiencing these symptoms, you must quickly reduce the body temperature by moving to a cool area out of the sun and soak ing the animal with cool water tap water, not ice water and immediate seek veterinary treatment. Without treatment, body tem peratures can continue to rise to 109 degrees or greater, at which irrevers ible brain damage, organ failure and death can occur. NSB Veterinarian Helping your pet avoid heat injury Pet safetyTips for keeping your pet safe from this poten tially lethal disease are as follows. Never leave your pet or child in a parked car! Only exercise your pet during the coolest times of the day. Provide plenty of clean, cool water and shade for outdoor pets. Provide adequate ven tilation with screened, open windows, air conditioning, or fans for indoor pets. Gradually acclimate your pet to the outdoor heat. As with humans, this is especially impor tant for very young, very old, obese and sick or de bilitated animals. Again, never leave your pet or child in a parked car!

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By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Servicee Defense Department is calling on Congress to authorize another round of base realignments and clo sures because of excess capacity that is cutting into funding for troop readi ness and other higher priority needs, a senior DOD ocial said. We cannot aord to waste money on infrastructure that essentially taxes the warghters for the readiness funds they need, John Conger, the acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installations and environment, told American Forces Press Service. e DOD is asking for another BRAC round in 2017. For the last three years, he said, DOD has requested BRAC authority and Congress has rejected it every time. As time goes on, our budget problems get worse, our force structure reductions get more signicant and more near term, Conger said. e reception for BRAC on the Hill was chilly. I understand why Congress isnt excited about this, Conger said. Setting aside parochial concerns they have talked about the cost of the last BRAC round. Announced in 2005, the last BRAC round cost $35 bil lion to accomplish a huge sum compared to previous rounds, Conger said. It will save on a recurring basis $4 billion a year. Congress asserts it doesnt save enough. Conger maintains it is unfair to focus on that round since roughly half of its recommendations dealt with changes for transformational purposes. is included consolidating similar functions and moving people, he said, where it made sense for them to be. ose recommendations cost $29 billion to execute and only resulted in $1 billion in savings, Conger said. e rest of the recommendations in the 2005 round were intended to save money. ey cost $6 billion and resulted in $3 billion per year in recurring savings. Conger says studies show a BRAC round in 2017 would cost $6 billion to implement. en, recurring sav ings would be on the order of $2 billion per year. e Seabees and their equipment are also staples at parades and auto shows throughout the area along with the annual Haunted House they host. Serving the military community on NSB since March 1995, the Seabees have completed various projects to enhance the facilities, grounds and mis sion readiness of the base. Some of these projects included the remodeling of the Navy Federal Credit Union, several up grades to Trident Lakes Golf course, construction of rest room facilities near playgrounds, building a motorcycle training facility, grounds enhancements at Lake D, plus building watch towers, ammunition magazines, laydown yards and parking lots, along with several more projects that increased mission capabilities and quality of life on the instal lation. During the 19 years of quality construction onboard NSB, the Seabees have saved the Navy more than $100 million in labor costs for base projects and have proven themselves as highly reliable when called upon for critical and time sensitive jobs. ey have helped provide assistance during storm recovery eorts, disaster preparedness drills and have provided equipment to help secure the installation during the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Post Sept. 11 opera tional security of the base has stayed a part of the Seabees mission, as they have provided support for countless security training drills and have provided grounds, facilities and equipment to aid with the training of military work ing dogs. e Seabees also played a key role in the expansion of the security fence line, which included spreading concertina wire along two-and-one-quarter miles of patrol roads and the installing six mainte nance gates around the installation. e Seabees have been an integral part of the communities on and around NSB Kings Bay for the past 19 years and they will certainly be missed when they leave the base later this year. So as you enjoy many of the great facilities here, if you see a Seabee, take some time and say, ank you. e Seabees have helped make the base and local community a bet ter place to live, work and play. Navy photoSeabees assigned to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 build a playground during 2010.SeabeesFrom Page 1 DOD eyes closing more installations Conger THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Photos by EM1 Mark Treen and PA1 Lauren JorgensenMay 17 was a day to celebrate at the St. Marys Waterfront Park. Coast Guard Community proclamation & picnicSt. Marys Council Member Jim Gant reads the proclamation declaring Camden County as a Coast Guard Community. Commanding Officer Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay Cmdr. Steve Love expresses his apprecia tion to the community for their support. Navy Band Jacksonville played songs to celebrate. Camden County is the nations first Coast Guard community. The St. Marys waterfront was dressed for the occasion.We will forever be the rst Coast Guard community, McNeill said. ere may be more in the future, but well always be the rst. While 15 other cities around the country have earned the congressio nal designation as Coast Guard cit ies, Camden County is the rst region to earn the distinction and includes the cities of Kingsland, St. Marys and Woodbine.CamdenFrom Page 1

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 The line for food was long but worth the wait. Volunteers, like the Navy Leagues Liz Rieling, helped serve 1,000 community members. A Coast Guard 33-foot patrol boat was docked at St. Marys for tours of the deck and cabin. From left, Michaela Batten holds Charlotte as Staff Sgt. Trent Batten dishes up the barbecue sandwiches. Kings Bay Division Navy League Cadets Caleb Picard and Gavin Jelinek were at the end of the line serving ice cold sweet tea. For service members Camden County is a great place to raise a family, because it is a military friendly place. ME2 Joshua Clabby can attest to this. So can his wife, Meghan, and daughters, clockwise from right, Shianne, Abagale and Savannah.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your chil dren? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores with out asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet June 3, 10, 17 and 24. No pre-registration required.Pre-marital workshop offered June 4 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are con templating marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expecta tions of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 2 to 6. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 11A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., June 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshops coming soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 10. For more information, call 573-4513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Transition GPS Capstone Event upcomingNAVADMIN 187-13 mandates that all service members leaving military service attend a CAPSTONE event to demonstrate completion of all required Career Readiness Standards. Service members are introduced to Career Readiness Standards during their initial pre-sepa ration counseling, and then again dur ing attendance to the Transition Goal, Plan, Success five-day workshop. During the workshop attendees work on their Individual Transition Plan and begin to gather the documents and evidence to bring to their CAPSTONE event. After completion of the Transition GPS work shop, service members continue to work on their individual Career Readiness Standards items, seeking assistance from their Command Career Counselor, Fleet and Family Support Center or other agencies identified during the Transition GPS workshop. Ninety days prior to their actual separation date, service members attend their CAPSTONE event, bringing with them all evidence neces sary to show completion of each Career Readiness Standards. If a service member needs additional assistance they will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. Upon completion of the CAPSTONE event, the service members Commanding Officer signs the members ITP Checklist, DD Form 2958, signifying that the Service Member is Career Ready and has met all of their individual CRS or have received appropriate assis tance in meeting those CRS. Fleet and Family Support Center, Kings Bay, holds a CAPSTONE event monthly. Interested Service members should call (912)5734513 for more information, or have their Command Career Counselors make a reservation for them to attend. This event will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13.Want to be an Ombudsman? Training session comingThis workshop educates persons with a desire to be a Command Ombudsman, but unsure of what the position will entail. Participants will be educated by defining what an Ombudsman is, learn positive and needed characteristics, and the roles and responsibilities expected of them. This workshop is offered 9 a.m. to noon June 4. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 to register. Financial planning for deployment June 5This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a comprehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It pro vides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 5. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 9 to 13. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive train ing on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 12. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 16 to 20. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 23. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., June 17. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is spon sored by Commander, Navy Installa tions Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide informa tion, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without ad vanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of haz ards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative govern ment resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emer gency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emer gency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emer gency Preparedness Town Hall meet ing from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emer gency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4

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Sign up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration is at the customer service coun ter in the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at registration. No refunds. Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-weeks. Private lessons available for $75 with ve 1-on-1 lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or 5733990 for more details. Arrive on time, bring sunscreen and towels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Intramural Indoor Summer Volleyball Registra tion is ongoing. Play begins June 9 with a 5 p.m. captains meeting June 4 at the Fitness Center. Fee is $100. Parent & Child Golf Tournament Saturday, June 14, Trident Lakes starts with 11 a.m. registration, 11:30 a.m. lunch and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $30 or $20 for 9 holes. Sign up at the Pro Shop Customer Service counter. (912) 573-8475. Trident Lakes shing Open 6 to 8 a.m., May 30 and 31. For details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Mother and Son Beach Party June 14 inside the Triplex Conference Center. Tickets at ITT are $15 for adult and 12 and older, $12 for children 3 to 11. Food 5 to 7 p.m., music and more until 8 p.m. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-4564. Dive-In Movies Saturday, June 21 at the Kings Bay Pool, MWR will show Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2, rated PG. Showtime is dusk, about 8:30 p.m. Bring your oaties and enjoy the free entry to the pool. Call (912) 573-3001 for more details. Fathers Day at RackN-Roll Dads bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., June 15. For details, call (912) 573-9492. Triplex is coming e rebranding of Bldg.1039 is almost complete and Triplex could be up and running as early as June 1. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/kingsbaydominos Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is sup ported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and un der, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Additional kids movies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bever ages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kindergarten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up began April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student let ter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide or ders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Junior Golf Camp For ages 12 to 17 at Trident Lakes, June 2 to 6 and July 21 to 25. Camp is $150 per person and is limited to 16 golfers per camp. This is a full day. Be prepared for sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chip ping, putting, drivers and situations. Bring your own packed lunch. Sign up early, sessions fill quickly. (912) 573-8475. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to startNavy photo by EM1 Mark TreenAngry Birdz, left, topped the Wildcats for the 2014 Kings Bay Intramural Spring Coed Softball title. 2014 Spring Mens Intramural champs were JCs Crew, right, topping Shop 38 to finish the season undefeated. 4v4 Flag FootballTeam W L 1, Trident Refit Facility 4 0 2, N.W.A. 1 0 3, Eliminators 3 1 4, Team Chive 2 2 5, MCSFB Avengers 2 5Upcoming Indoor Volleyball registration is open. The captains meeting is June 4 and play begins June 9. Intramural Sports Just for kids you so much for being here today. We are humbled by your presence. But more importantly, thank you for the contributions you and your families made and continue to make to our country. You established the standards we strive to maintain today. Today as we take the time to remember submarine heroes of the past, I wanted to emphasize the word heroes. Too often we forget what the word means, and I believe it means something dier ent to all of us. So today, I ask that you all take a mo ment and consider what the word hero means to you. Again, thank you all for coming and I hope you enjoy the ceremony. Stewart then announced the ceremonial wreath would be presented by WWII submarine veteran Ed Kracker to Cmdr. Scott Luers, commanding of cer, of the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764). While underway, Luers and his crew will inter the wreath at sea to honor the fallen submariners. Kracker is the oldest submarine-qualied WWII submarine veteran in the Hampton Roads area. He got his subma rine qualications on the Balao-class submarine USS Bang (SS 385) in 1944. Retired U.S. Navy Capt. Kent Siegel, the last commanding ocer of the Tench-class diesel-electric submarine USS Pickerel (SS 524), was scheduled to be the guest speaker at the ceremony because the submarine was being inducted into the Subma rine Hall of Fame. Dick Helm, a retired U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. who served briey with Siegel as his engineer, read his speech. I regret that I could not be with you today, Helm read. Cmdr. Stewart, I appreciate your invitation in oering remarks for the Hall of Fame induction for USS Pickerel. I extend my gratitude to the Submarine Veterans of the Hampton Roads Base who elected Pickerel to be inducted at the Submarine Learning Facility. As the last commanding ocer before our boats transfer to the Italian Navy in Au gust of 1972, I am honored to represent the hundreds of ne submariners who served in Pickerel from 1949 to 1972. In her 33 years of operation Pickerel had an illustrious history. All of us from the com manding ocers to the most junior hot-bunking Sailors who loved our boat thank you for this honor. I want to wish the submarine veterans a successful and enjoyable future in Norfolk. Following the ceremo ny, Pickerel became the 16th submarine inducted into the Submarine Hall of Fame. Pickerel was commis sioned April 4, 1949 and decommissioned Aug. 18, 1972. Selection into the Hall of Fame is merited by the submarines contribution to national security, and is conducted by the Hamp ton Roads Chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. organization. Sub VetsFrom Page 1 A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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Sing along now, Schools out for summer! Vacation is on peoples minds. Id like to go up to Illinois and see my daughter, granddaughter and son-in-law, but I really cant swing it. My doctor has been trying to get me to have a colonoscopy, and my week off would be a good time. But what kind of a vacation would that be? Probably not going to happen. Option 3: Maybe Ill go to Charleston and visit friends who broke a lamp at my house during a party last winter. And break one of their lamps.What are your summer vacation plans?Alice Simmons Retired Navy Tallahassee, Fla. Im going on two. One is in Tampa and the other at Disney. BM2 Bryant Gooch Maritime Force Protection Unit Durham, N.C. Im being stationed in Puerto Rico. Thats my summer vacation. QM1 Darkemu Canmu Port Ops Staten Island, N.Y. I just plan on continuing my college education and really dont have any other plans. STSSA Jason Anderson USS Alaska Blue New Orleans Im going home to New Orleans to see my mom, dad, family and friends. Shirley Alexander Family member Quitman, Ga. Im going to Disneyworld with my kids and grandkids. Nicole Donaldson Exchange employee Yulee, Fla. Im going to Atlanta to see my mother-in-law and my husband and Im going to St. Augustine for a spa day. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCommunity Outreach Greg McCarty and Scheduling Coordinator Ralph Jimenez of Florida Safe Inc. demonstrate what happens to you after a traumatic accident to emphasize the need to wear seat belts and to not be distracted while you drive during a safety stand down at the Chapel at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every injury and its treatment was described in detail while a volunteer played the role of a helpless victim. Safety Stand Down Courtesy photoMA3 William Roberts was recognized as the Military Service Member of the Month, May 15, by the Camden County Chambers of Commerce for his outstanding community volunteer work. He is a member of Bravo 1st Co. in Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. May honoree American Forces Press ServiceRetired Marine Corps Cpl. William Kyle Carpenter will receive the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry in Afghanistan from President Barack Obama at a June 19 White House cer emony, according to a White House news release issued May 19. Carpenter will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions on Nov. 21, 2010, while serving as an automatic rie man with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force Retired Marine to get MOH Carpenter See MOH, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 By MC2 Laurie DexterNavy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Hawaiiree-time Olympic medalist Kelly Clark, three-time Olympic medalist Ste ven Holcomb and two-time Olympic medalist Andrew Weibrecht visited Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, May 9, dur ing a United Service Organizations tour of Oahu. During the tour, the Olympians went aboard the Ticonderoga-class guidedmissile cruiser USS Chosin (CG 65) for a meet and greet with the Sailors. One of the Sailors got to meet her child hood hero and inspiration. Ive been snowboarding since I was 7 years old, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Danielle Howard. Ive watched Kelly Clark for years and I cant believe Im meeting her while being in the Navy. Ive watched her since I was little and shes probably the reason why I snow board today. According to Clark, inspiration and morale is what its all about. Ive been inspired, to say the least, and thats really what I hope to achieve in snowboarding, Clark said. I want to make sure I am inspiring people to be their best. Its amazing to hear that maybe someone would dare to dream and be inspired by what Ive done. American 300 Tours Founder and Man aging Director Robi Powers explained a comparable connection between the Olympians and service members. Olympians and armed forces mem bers work under the same premises: duty, sacrice, commitment, honor and integrity, in everything they do, said Powers. What we have found is that by bringing Olympians out, were really just bringing individuals from a parallel universe. e time away from home, the commitment to training, the ability to take directions from coaches, is so parallel to what our armed forces do. After their visit aboard USS Chosin, the Olympians conducted a meet and greet with members of the Air Force and ob served demonstrations at the joint-ser vices military working dog kennels. e Olympians also participated in a Fitness and Wellness Fair at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Fitness Cen ter. e activities at the fair included a re truck pull, bench press competition, aerobic workouts, health evaluations and informational booths from various orga nizations. e USO plans and creates events around the world designed to lift the spir its of Americas troops and their families. A non-prot, congressionally char tered, private organization, the USO relies on individuals, organizations and corporations to support its activities. e USO is not part of the U.S. govern ment, but is recognized by the Depart ment of Defense, Congress and President of the United States, who serves as Hon orary Chairman of the USO. ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Navy photo by MC1 Daniel BarkerOlympic athletes Steven Holcomb, left, Kelly Clark and Andrew Weibrecht sign autographs at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Fitness Center.Olympic trio visits ships

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By Staff Sgt. John JacksonMarine Expeditionary Brigade AfghanistanMultiple mounted patrols totaling 174 tacti cal vehicles with approximately 700 service members entered Camp Leathernecks North Gate during the early morning hours and throughout the day, May 5. Tactical vehicles driv ing through a gate on the Marine Corps centralHelmand base is a regular occurrence; however, this was a signicant occasion for Marines, coalition forces and their Afghan counterparts. e armored vehicles were returning from San gin, Afghanistan, an in famous battleground in northern Helmand prov ince, and a village that will be remembered in Marine Corps and British history. e Battle for Sangin During September 2010, there was a reorganization of ground forces through out Helmand province. A more than 1,000-strong British Battle Group based in the northern portion of the province transferred security responsibility of Sangin District to U.S. ser vice members. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, who had been ghting along side British service members since May 2010, took command. Sangin is a small city of approximately 14,000 that sits on the Helmand River roughly 60 miles northeast of Helmand provinces capital of Lashkar Gah. It was infamous for Taliban inuence and played a signicant role in the poppy cultivation and opium trade in southern Afghanistan. More than 100 British troops were killed in the region, which accounts for approximately 25 percent of their fatalities through out Afghanistan. A month after the Ma rines took charge in San gin, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, arrived to begin their six-month deployment in an area at the time known as the most dangerous place in Afghanistan. From October 2010 until the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines deployment concluded during April 2011, 25 of the battalions Marines were killed in ac tion, with more than 200 injured. Despite their losses, the Darkhorse Marines were able to improve security in the area. Marines operated out of more than 35 bases in the Sangin area since 2010. Forward Operating Base Nolay housed the 2nd Brigade headquarters as well as a team of approximately 40 Marine Corps advisors, while FOB Sabit Qadam was home to ANA infantry soldiers and a company of infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines. On May 5, Marines at both remaining FOBs said goodbye to their Afghan counterparts and left the two bases as well as the security of the region in the hands of the capable and credible Afghans. e MAGTF retrograde Beginning during the late hours of May 4, Marines at FOB Nolay and FOB Sabit Qadam began to load their vehicles and drive out the gates for the nal time. Prior to a long convoy down a highway once riddled with improvised ex plosive devices, Marines across Marine Expeditionary Brigade Afghani stan as well as soldiers with the 215th Corps worked together to plan and prepare for a success ful retrograde. Aircrews with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 466, a Marine Corps Air Station Miramar-based CH-53 Super Stallion squadron, began ying equipment and personnel out of northern Helmand weeks prior to the nal de parture. Marines with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion left two days prior to the retrograde to ensure the route Marines would use to return to Camp Leatherneck was cleared of any IEDs. Infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, posted security along the route to ward o any would-be attackers look ing to strike one last time. And Marines with Com bat Logistics Battalion 7 arrived at both remain ing FOBs a day before the retrograde to load up lastminute gear and equip ment to be driven back to Camp Leatherneck in central Helmand. In addition to Marine assets throughout the Marine Air Ground Task Force, ANA soldiers from the 215th Corps 2nd and 3rd Brigades also provided layered security throughout the region and along the route. ey also sent a team of soldiers to clear the route Marines took. Success of Sangin e success in Sangin has not only been seen in the city, but heard around Camp Leatherneck following the Marines return from the region. Marines like Sgt. Troy Garza, a squad leader with Charlie Company, 1st Bat talion, 7th Marines, who was in Sangin during the most intense ghting the Marines saw in northern Helmand. Garza previously served with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, during 2010 and 2011. He remembers the long days of patrolling, the high kinetics in the region and the intense reghts. However, during this deployment, Garza and his Charley Company Marines only saw outside the connes of their small for ward operating base while standing a security post. eir ANA soldiers were patrolling the region and keeping Sangin secure. Many Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines and the 2-215 Security Force Assistance Advisor Team tell similar stories of the dierence four years has made in Sangin. Another sign of success in the city nestled on the Helmand River was the tremendous turnout of lo cal citizens for the April 5 elections. Afghanistan held its third democratic election and the rst one where current President Hamid Karzais name was not on the ballot. During the pre vious 2009 election, only 177 votes were cast. is year an estimated 5,000 votes were cast in the Sangin District, ac cording to the Indepen dent Election Commis sion of Afghanistan. Not only did the locals come out to vote, they came out knowing their countrys own security forces were keeping the polling cites secure and safe, a testament to the change in the local popu laces condence in the Afghan National Security Forces. Always remembered Despite the Marines departure from FOB Nolay and FOB Sabit Qadam for the nal time May 5, San gin will forever be etched in Marine Corps history. For four years Marines fought tirelessly to rid the city of enemy ghters and not allow insurgents a safe haven in Sangin. More than 50 Marines paid the ultimate sacrice ghting for Sangin and hundreds were seriously wounded. Marines had bittersweet feelings when arriving back to Camp Leatherneck after the more than 60-kilometer journey. ey were happy to be leaving the area that claimed the lives and limbs of so many of their brothers-in-arms, but sad to leave their new found brothers of the ANA and Afghan National Po lice. May 5 marked the end of an era for Marines in northern Helmand prov ince, but started a new chapter for the Afghan National Security Forces and the local Sangin ci vilians, and the Marines are condent the soldiers and police will continue to succeed in Sangin just as they did.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Frances JohnsonCpl. Andrew Harris, a UH-1Y Huey crew chief with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369, performs a weapons check before an aerial assault support mission for ground convoys in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 3. Marines prep to leave SanginMarine Corps photo by Sgt. Francis JohnsonA Marine Corps ground convoy safely maneuvers a route in support of retrograde operations in Helmand prov ince, Afghanistan, May 3. (Forward), in Helmand Province, Af ghanistan, according to the release. In July 2013, Carpenter was medically retired from the Marine Corps as a corporal due to his wounds, the release said. He is currently a full-time student at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. Carpenter will be the eighth living recipient to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq or Afghani stan, according to the release. On Nov. 21, 2010, Taliban insur gents initiated an attack on Car penters squad, part of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment. Carpenter, the squad automatic ri eman for his re team, and Lance Cpl. Nicholas Eufrazio were holding a rooftop security position when a hand grenade was thrown their way. Without hesitation, Carpenter re acted, rushing toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his brotherin-arms from its blast. e grenade detonated with Carpenters body taking the majority of the blast. Carpenter lay on the rooftop, barely clinging to life; his fellow Marine also severely wounded. A seless action and a hellish tragedy happened in the blink of an eye, leaving both Carpenter and Eufrazio with painstaking recoveries. Carpenter suered severe injuries from the blast. Much of his jaw was rebuilt and he lost his right eye; he sustained countless shattered bones throughout his body and a collapsed right lung. He endured a strenuous recovery process at Walter Reed National Mil itary Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. After two and a half years, Carpenter was medically retired from the Ma rine Corps on July 30, 2013. I look back and Im actually very appreciative I had those two and a half years because those years put things in perspective more than a whole lifetime of things could if I wasnt there, Carpenter said. Carpenters mind and emotions were not left unscarred either. e hardest part was dealing with letting others help, he said. Going from toting a machinegun in Afghanistan to using a bed pan, and I cant even put my own socks on that was hard to kind of suck it up, Carpenter said. Although the recovery process seemed endless and small tasks re quired assistance, Carpenter over came the odds and has a new out look on life from the entire tragedy, he said. He is grateful for all the help and support he received. Ive just been very fortunate that Ive had not only my family, but friends, Marines and the community of South Carolina, Carpenter said, Early on in my recovery, the entire United States seemed to be support ive. Letters ooded in from all over the place, so from the second I woke up in the hospital, Ive always had a great team and great people. Ive been very fortunate. Even with such a great honor be stowed on him, he remains humble. As many reghts and instances where theres been opportunity, Ma rines have stepped up to the plate not only in Iraq and Afghanistan but since the beginning of our country, Carpenter said So I truly feel like Im on an even playing eld. Looking back at his time in the Corps, Carpenters fondest memories are being deployed with his fel low Marines in Afghanistan. To him, nothing will compare to months without a shower, sleeping in the dirt and being with 50 of his best friends. If I look at it that way, Im very thankful for Afghanistan and it really means a lot to me, Carpenter said. I wouldnt trade it for anything in the world. Carpenter was born in Flowood, Miss., on Oct. 17, 1989, and graduat ed from W. Wyman King Academy, Batesburg, S.C., in 2008, the release said. In February 2009, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at Recruiting Station Columbia, South Carolina, and completed his basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, later that year. According to the release, Car penters personal awards include a Purple Heart Medal, Navy and Ma rine Corps Achievement Medal, and Combat Action Ribbon. e Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the armed forces who distinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; engaged in military operations involving conict with an opposing foreign force; or serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a bel ligerent party. e meritorious conduct must involve great personal bravery or self-sacrice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his or her comrades and must have involved risk of life. ere must be incontestable proof of the perfor mance of the meritorious conduct, and each recommendation for the award must be considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.MOHFrom Page 9 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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By Kevin CopelandCommander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Public Affairse annual Submarine Veterans of World War II Memorial Service was conducted May 22 at the Submarine Learning Facility, Naval Station Norfolk. Hosted by SUBLRNFAC, the Norfolk-based event is held each year prior to Memorial Day. In past years, the service honored the 52 submarines and the gallant Sailors lost during World War II, and the losses of the USS resher (SSN 593), April 10, 1963, and the USS Scorpion (SSN 589), May 22, 1968. But since the World War II submarine veterans were rolled into the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. during the 2012 national convention, the ceremony also honors all submarines and submariners lost since the submarines force inception April 11, 1900. Cmdr. Stan Stewart, Jr., SUBLRNFAC commanding ocer, welcomed the more than 100 veterans, active duty Sailors, spouses, and visitors. Good morning and once again welcome to Submarine Learning Facility Norfolk, Stewart said. We are grateful to have such a magnicent group gathered with us to celebrate our submarine veterans. I cannot express how proud my crew and I are to host such a prestigious, important and time honored event. As always, my greatest gratitude goes to United States Submarine Veterans of World War II and United States Submarine Veterans, Incorporated. ank Housing survey to beginBalfour Beatty takes annual polling of residents From Balfour Beatty CommunitiesAt Balfour Beatty Communities, the goal is to provide quality housing and customer service so residents have a positive and enjoyable living experience. Soon, residents will be invited to give feedback on Balfour Beatty operations through its CEL Resident Satisfaction Survey. e annual survey is an important part of Balfour Beattys continuous improvement program that helps sta analyze performance and make changes and enhancements to ensure consistent quality service delivered across all aspects of community operations. Topics covered in the survey include resident experience with leasing, community management, maintenance and quality of homes. All surveys are completely condential and anonymous and residents are encouraged to provide open and honest insights. e Resident Satisfaction Survey allows us to see where we are excelling operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Tony Cartagena, community manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to complete the survey so that we may better meet their needs as well as those of our future residents. Surveys will be available at the Annual Beautication/Resident Appreciation Day, 2 to 7 p.m., June 6 at the Balfour Beatty Community Center. If you cant attend, stop by the Community Management Oce, at 1083 USS Andrew Jackson, to pick up a survey or call (912) 882-1211 and one will be delivered to your residence. Completed surveys should be sealed in the postage paid envelope provided and either mailed or returned to the authorized locked mailbox at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Oce. Residents who submit a completed survey by June 30 will be entered to win a prize. Residents that hand in a survey before June 15 also will qualify for a special early bird prize drawing. e nal day for residents to submit their completed Resident Satisfaction Survey is June 30. Unit disbands in October, members to join other Seabee units around NavyBy CM2 Travis J. WyattConstruction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202With the disestablishment of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Detachment Kings Bay due to force realignment, Naval Submarine Base and the local community will be losing a valuable asset come October. e Seabees came to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in March 1995 when Construction Battalion Unit 412 was established. In February 2005, CBU412 was re-designated as CBMU 202 Detachment Kings Bay. e Navy Seabees have a long lasting legacy in Naval history for their compassion and Can Do attitudes. Local Seabees have proudly carried on that legacy over their past 19 years here. e Seabees on board NSB have left a lasting impression on the base with their compassion and community involvement. Every year, the Seabees assigned to the detachment selessly contribute thousands of hours to local volunteer organizations supporting such worthwhile community events as e Southeast Regional Special Olympics, Relay for Life, Habitat for Humanity and e Humane Society. ey also have contributed time in local schools for career days, static equipment displays and the construction of playground equipment. Up Periscope Whats your summer vacation plan? Page 9 School news College tours, Pre-K registration Page 2 Volunteer Camden Chamber honors service member Page 92009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenDavid Hudson talks to DC3 Nathan Bridges, center, and MK3 Tyler Arledge inside the cabin of Maritime Force Protection 33-foot security boat. See Seabees, Page 3 Community designation brings county, Guard together for day of fun with tours, picnicBy PA1 Lauren JorgensenCoast Guard Public Affairs Detachment Jacksonville, Fla.Members of the Coast Guard were the distinguished guests during a picnic and community celebration held in St. Marys Saturday, May 17, to recognize Camden Countys designation as the nations rst Coast Guard community. Coast Guard cities and communities are those that have gone above and beyond to ensure the Coast Guard members in their regions feel welcome and at home while assigned there. Members of e Camden Partnership, a St. Marys-based civilian organization aiming to strengthen military and community partnerships, applied for the designation August 2012 and began planning the waterfront community celebration after learning Feb. 5, the designation was awarded. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, ocially designated May 17, 2014, as Coast Guard Community Celebration Day, and the proclamation announcing so was read during the festivities. Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership, briey described to those in attendance what the designation meant and how unique it was. CBMU 202 Seabee UT1 Richard Cruikshank rides a 5-tonner during a parade. Inset right, Seabee Chief Steven Maldonado welcomes NJROTC members. Inset below, YN1 Tina Mcrae helps Wyatt Brock into the cab of a Seabee dump truck.Navy photos During the 19 years of quality construction onboard NSB, the Seabees have saved the Navy more than $100 million ... Cartagena Coast Guard celebratesSee Camden, Page 4 See Sub Vets, Page 7Sub Vets attend memorial in NorfolkNavy photo by MC1 Shannon BarnwellCmdr. Scott Luers, commanding officer, USS Boise (SSN 764); STSCM Chris Conry, chief of the boat, USS Boise; and Ed Kracker, the oldest submarine-qualified WWII Submarine Veteran in the Hampton Roads area, honors colors during the annual Submarine Veterans of World War II Memorial Service May 22 in Norfolk.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 By Clainetta JeffersonNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child and Youth Education Services School Liaison Office Summer is just around the corner and it is a great time for high school students to begin gathering information about college. e Kings Bay Youth Sponsorship Program is hosting its annual college tour the week of June 2 to 6. High school students of active duty and retired service members and Department of Defense contractors, who have completed their sophomore or junior years, are invited to join this exciting ve-day, four-night tour of 10 colleges and universities around the state of Georgia. is tour is not about attending a Georgia college, but rather it is about helping students know what to look for in a college, whether large or small, private or public, in a small city or larger metropolitan area. e truth is that most high school students do not visit college campuses or wait until too late in the high school years to make informed decisions. Now is the time to get in on this great deal. Funded by the Georgia Governors Oce and Children and Families, this unbelievable opportunity is being oered to eligible teenagers for only $175. ere are only 24 seats available and they will go quickly. Register deadline is Friday, May 30. Get started now. Any questions may be directed to the Child and Youth Education Services oce at kingsbayslo@navy.mil or by calling (912) 573-8986.Pre-Kindergarten registration beginse Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child Development Center will have open registration for the 2014 15 Georgia Bright From e Start Pre-K Program from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., ursday, June 12 at the Child Development Center, Building 0152, 655 Wahoo Ave. Georgias Pre-K Program is a lottery-funded educational program for Georgias four year olds to prepare children for kindergarten Children four years of age on or before Sept. 1, 2014 of the upcoming school year who are Georgia residents are eligible to attend Georgias Pre-K Program. Georgias Pre-K is voluntary for families and for providers. is program will be a 6.5 hour instructional day with extended daycare services available for before and after care. is program is oered on a rstcome, rst-served basis and a waiting list will be started once all spaces are lled. You will need to provide proof of age eligibility and a Georgia resident to register for Pre-K. Acceptable proofof-age includes birth certicate, passport, hospital record of live birth, green card, pink card or Federal I-94 card. Acceptable proof of residency includes a lease, utility bill or letter from a shelter or employer. For additional information about enrolling a child in Georgias Pre-K Program, contact the CDC at (912) 573-3888. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.Kids Fishing Clinic at Ft. Clinche Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park has a Kids Fishing Clinic Saturday, May 31, to teach lessons on knot tying, shing ethics, tackle, habitat, casting and more. e clinic is open to ages ve to 15 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. e rst 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. A free hot dog lunch will be provided. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwater shing. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274.St. Marys offers music seriese next Starry Nights, Music in the Park free series is 6 to 8 p.m. June 21 at the St. Marys Waterfront Park amphitheater featuring e Just Jazz Quartet. Future bands are No Known Cure July 19, e Just Jazz Quartet returns Aug. 16 and Back From the Brink Sept. 20. Additional Music in the Park dates will be June 28, July 12, Aug. 9 and Sept. Fish Head will begin these dates. For more information, call the St. Marys Welcome Center at (912) 882-4000.Maritime jobs June 4 in JaxA Military to Maritime career event is 1 to 5 p.m., June 4, for current and former military personnel interested in transitioning into a maritime-related eld. e free event will be at the JAXPORT cruise terminal. For more information, contact the American Maritime Partnership, (202) 661-3740, or e-mail info at Americanmaritimepartnership.com. Advance registration is recommended. To register online, visit http://bit.ly/military2maritime.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.RC model air show May 31Kings Bay RC Modelers will have an air show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, May 31 at Oakwell RC Aireld, at the intersection of Clarks Blu and Oakwell roads. Demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for more and updated information. Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of community, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! College Tour deadline is May 30 School Liaison Ocer Gum disease easily preventableQuestion: What is gum disease, and how do you get it? Answer: Gum disease, one of the most common problems seen by dentists, is the swelling or soreness of the gums the soft tissue around your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colorless lm that forms on teeth. If not removed, the bacteria can build up and infect gums, teeth and the supporting bone. Q: What are some of the signs and risk factors associated with gum disease? A: Signs of gum disease are not always easily seen, and can sometimes be painless. Early signs of gum disease include red, bleeding gums. Other signs include gums that have pulled away from the teeth, changes in the way teeth t together when biting, pus appearing between teeth and gum or constant bad breath or bad taste in mouth. Common risk factors are smoking, the most signifi cant, hormonal changes in girls and women, diabetes, medications and heredity. Q: How is gum disease treated? A: e rst priority is to control infection. Gum disease treatment can range from nonsurgical therapies to surgery, to restore supportive tissues, and treatment decisions are based on the extent of the disease. However, any type of treatment will require good daily teeth and gum hygiene care at home. Q: Is gum disease preventable? A: While common, gum disease is preventable. To keep teeth and gums healthy, brush teeth twice a day with uoride toothpaste, oss regularly to remove plaque from between teeth, get routine dental check-ups and dont smoke. By taking these precautions, you can greatly reduce your chances of developing gum disease in the future. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. is column was written by Lt. Cmdr. William Boggess, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West dentist. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, send it to jaxpublicaairs@med. navy.mil. Ask the Doc By Lt. Cmdr. Wm. Boggess NBHC Key West From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment FacilityEach summer heat injuries claim many victims among our dog and cat population. Normal body temperature of dogs and cats typically range from 100 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit, slightly higher than humans. Heat injuries range from heat stress body temperature greater than 106 degrees F to heat stroke body temperature greater than 108 degrees F. is is almost always preventable. Most often, heat injuries occur when owners leave their pets in an enclosed, parked car or leave the pet outside without access to shade and water. As we know, the South gets very hot in the summer, and the heat index can rise over 100 degrees any day. Pets are even more susceptible than humans to heat stroke in cars, as dogs, cats and other animals cannot produce whole body sweat and rely solely on panting and sweat from their feet to reduce body temperature. Temperatures inside a hot, parked car can reach lethal levels within minutes. When the outside temperature is 70 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature inside the car can exceed 120 degrees, even when the windows are partially open. is also can happen when pets exercise too much in the heat and are denied shade and fresh water to help keep them cool. Additionally, if you and your pet recently moved to the South, ensure that pets slowly get acclimated to the summer heat. Certain types of dogs are more sensitive to heat, especially obese dogs and brachycephalic, or shortnosed, breeds, like pugs and bulldogs. Use extreme caution when these dogs are exposed to heat. Keep in mind that just as with humans, if pets have even one episode of any heat injuries, they are even more at risk for future heat injuries. Symptoms of heat injuries include heavy panting, weakness, excessive drooling, vomiting and/or diarrhea, and can rapidly progress to collapse, coma and death. If your pet is experiencing these symptoms, you must quickly reduce the body temperature by moving to a cool area out of the sun and soaking the animal with cool water tap water, not ice water and immediate seek veterinary treatment. Without treatment, body temperatures can continue to rise to 109 degrees or greater, at which irreversible brain damage, organ failure and death can occur. NSB Veterinarian Helping your pet avoid heat injury Pet safetyTips for keeping your pet safe from this potentially lethal disease are as follows. Never leave your pet or child in a parked car! Only exercise your pet during the coolest times of the day. Provide plenty of clean, cool water and shade for outdoor pets. Provide adequate ventilation with screened, open windows, air conditioning, or fans for indoor pets. Gradually acclimate your pet to the outdoor heat. As with humans, this is especially important for very young, very old, obese and sick or debilitated animals. Again, never leave your pet or child in a parked car!

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By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Servicee Defense Department is calling on Congress to authorize another round of base realignments and closures because of excess capacity that is cutting into funding for troop readiness and other higher priority needs, a senior DOD ocial said. We cannot aord to waste money on infrastructure that essentially taxes the warghters for the readiness funds they need, John Conger, the acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installations and environment, told American Forces Press Service. e DOD is asking for another BRAC round in 2017. For the last three years, he said, DOD has requested BRAC authority and Congress has rejected it every time. As time goes on, our budget problems get worse, our force structure reductions get more signicant and more near term, Conger said. e reception for BRAC on the Hill was chilly. I understand why Congress isnt excited about this, Conger said. Setting aside parochial concerns they have talked about the cost of the last BRAC round. Announced in 2005, the last BRAC round cost $35 billion to accomplish a huge sum compared to previous rounds, Conger said. It will save on a recurring basis $4 billion a year. Congress asserts it doesnt save enough. Conger maintains it is unfair to focus on that round since roughly half of its recommendations dealt with changes for transformational purposes. is included consolidating similar functions and moving people, he said, where it made sense for them to be. ose recommendations cost $29 billion to execute and only resulted in $1 billion in savings, Conger said. e rest of the recommendations in the 2005 round were intended to save money. ey cost $6 billion and resulted in $3 billion per year in recurring savings. Conger says studies show a BRAC round in 2017 would cost $6 billion to implement. en, recurring savings would be on the order of $2 billion per year. e Seabees and their equipment are also staples at parades and auto shows throughout the area along with the annual Haunted House they host. Serving the military community on NSB since March 1995, the Seabees have completed various projects to enhance the facilities, grounds and mission readiness of the base. Some of these projects included the remodeling of the Navy Federal Credit Union, several upgrades to Trident Lakes Golf course, construction of rest room facilities near playgrounds, building a motorcycle training facility, grounds enhancements at Lake D, plus building watch towers, ammunition magazines, laydown yards and parking lots, along with several more projects that increased mission capabilities and quality of life on the installation. During the 19 years of quality construction onboard NSB, the Seabees have saved the Navy more than $100 million in labor costs for base projects and have proven themselves as highly reliable when called upon for critical and time sensitive jobs. ey have helped provide assistance during storm recovery eorts, disaster preparedness drills and have provided equipment to help secure the installation during the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Post Sept. 11 operational security of the base has stayed a part of the Seabees mission, as they have provided support for countless security training drills and have provided grounds, facilities and equipment to aid with the training of military working dogs. e Seabees also played a key role in the expansion of the security fence line, which included spreading concertina wire along two-and-one-quarter miles of patrol roads and the installing six maintenance gates around the installation. e Seabees have been an integral part of the communities on and around NSB Kings Bay for the past 19 years and they will certainly be missed when they leave the base later this year. So as you enjoy many of the great facilities here, if you see a Seabee, take some time and say, ank you. e Seabees have helped make the base and local community a better place to live, work and play. Navy photoSeabees assigned to Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 build a playground during 2010.SeabeesFrom Page 1 DOD eyes closing more installations Conger THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Photos by EM1 Mark Treen and PA1 Lauren JorgensenMay 17 was a day to celebrate at the St. Marys Waterfront Park. Coast Guard Community proclamation & picnicSt. Marys Council Member Jim Gant reads the proclamation declaring Camden County as a Coast Guard Community. Commanding Officer Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay Cmdr. Steve Love expresses his apprecia tion to the community for their support. Navy Band Jacksonville played songs to celebrate. Camden County is the nations first Coast Guard community. The St. Marys waterfront was dressed for the occasion.We will forever be the rst Coast Guard community, McNeill said. ere may be more in the future, but well always be the rst. While 15 other cities around the country have earned the congressional designation as Coast Guard cities, Camden County is the rst region to earn the distinction and includes the cities of Kingsland, St. Marys and Woodbine.CamdenFrom Page 1

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 5 The line for food was long but worth the wait. Volunteers, like the Navy Leagues Liz Rieling, helped serve 1,000 community members. A Coast Guard 33-foot patrol boat was docked at St. Marys for tours of the deck and cabin. From left, Michaela Batten holds Charlotte as Staff Sgt. Trent Batten dishes up the barbecue sandwiches. Kings Bay Division Navy League Cadets Caleb Picard and Gavin Jelinek were at the end of the line serving ice cold sweet tea. For service members Camden County is a great place to raise a family, because it is a military friendly place. ME2 Joshua Clabby can attest to this. So can his wife, Meghan, and daughters, clockwise from right, Shianne, Abagale and Savannah.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your chil dren? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet June 3, 10, 17 and 24. No pre-registration required.Pre-marital workshop offered June 4 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are con templating marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 2 to 6. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 11A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., June 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshops coming soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 10. For more information, call 573-4513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Transition GPS Capstone Event upcomingNAVADMIN 187-13 mandates that all service members leaving military service attend a CAPSTONE event to demonstrate completion of all required Career Readiness Standards. Service members are introduced to Career Readiness Standards during their initial pre-separation counseling, and then again during attendance to the Transition Goal, Plan, Success five-day workshop. During the workshop attendees work on their Individual Transition Plan and begin to gather the documents and evidence to bring to their CAPSTONE event. After completion of the Transition GPS workshop, service members continue to work on their individual Career Readiness Standards items, seeking assistance from their Command Career Counselor, Fleet and Family Support Center or other agencies identified during the Transition GPS workshop. Ninety days prior to their actual separation date, service members attend their CAPSTONE event, bringing with them all evidence necessary to show completion of each Career Readiness Standards. If a service member needs additional assistance they will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. Upon completion of the CAPSTONE event, the service members Commanding Officer signs the members ITP Checklist, DD Form 2958, signifying that the Service Member is Career Ready and has met all of their individual CRS or have received appropriate assistance in meeting those CRS. Fleet and Family Support Center, Kings Bay, holds a CAPSTONE event monthly. Interested Service members should call (912)5734513 for more information, or have their Command Career Counselors make a reservation for them to attend. This event will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 13.Want to be an Ombudsman? Training session comingThis workshop educates persons with a desire to be a Command Ombudsman, but unsure of what the position will entail. Participants will be educated by defining what an Ombudsman is, learn positive and needed characteristics, and the roles and responsibilities expected of them. This workshop is offered 9 a.m. to noon June 4. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 to register. Financial planning for deployment June 5This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a comprehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 5. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 9 to 13. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 12. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 16 to 20. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 23. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Savings and Investing workshop upcomingThis two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on how to start an investment portfolio for as little as $25 a month. Learn how to begin investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and more. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., June 17. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is sponsored by Commander, Navy Installations Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide information, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without advanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of hazards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative government resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emergency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emergency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emergency Preparedness Town Hall meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emergency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4

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Sign up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration is at the customer service counter in the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at registration. No refunds. Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-weeks. Private lessons available for $75 with ve 1-on-1 lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or 5733990 for more details. Arrive on time, bring sunscreen and towels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Intramural Indoor Summer Volleyball Registration is ongoing. Play begins June 9 with a 5 p.m. captains meeting June 4 at the Fitness Center. Fee is $100. Parent & Child Golf Tournament Saturday, June 14, Trident Lakes starts with 11 a.m. registration, 11:30 a.m. lunch and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $30 or $20 for 9 holes. Sign up at the Pro Shop Customer Service counter. (912) 573-8475. Trident Lakes shing Open 6 to 8 a.m., May 30 and 31. For details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Mother and Son Beach Party June 14 inside the Triplex Conference Center. Tickets at ITT are $15 for adult and 12 and older, $12 for children 3 to 11. Food 5 to 7 p.m., music and more until 8 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Dive-In Movies Saturday, June 21 at the Kings Bay Pool, MWR will show Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2, rated PG. Showtime is dusk, about 8:30 p.m. Bring your oaties and enjoy the free entry to the pool. Call (912) 573-3001 for more details. Fathers Day at RackN-Roll Dads bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., June 15. For details, call (912) 573-9492. Triplex is coming e rebranding of Bldg.1039 is almost complete and Triplex could be up and running as early as June 1. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/kingsbaydominos Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is sup ported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and un der, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Additional kids movies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bever ages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kindergarten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up began April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student let ter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide or ders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Junior Golf Camp For ages 12 to 17 at Trident Lakes, June 2 to 6 and July 21 to 25. Camp is $150 per person and is limited to 16 golfers per camp. This is a full day. Be prepared for sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chip ping, putting, drivers and situations. Bring your own packed lunch. Sign up early, sessions fill quickly. (912) 573-8475. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to startNavy photo by EM1 Mark TreenAngry Birdz, left, topped the Wildcats for the 2014 Kings Bay Intramural Spring Coed Softball title. 2014 Spring Mens Intramural champs were JCs Crew, right, topping Shop 38 to finish the season undefeated. 4v4 Flag FootballTeam W L 1, Trident Refit Facility 4 0 2, N.W.A. 1 0 3, Eliminators 3 1 4, Team Chive 2 2 5, MCSFB Avengers 2 5Upcoming Indoor Volleyball registration is open. The captains meeting is June 4 and play begins June 9. Intramural Sports Just for kids you so much for being here today. We are humbled by your presence. But more importantly, thank you for the contributions you and your families made and continue to make to our country. You established the standards we strive to maintain today. Today as we take the time to remember submarine heroes of the past, I wanted to emphasize the word heroes. Too often we forget what the word means, and I believe it means something dierent to all of us. So today, I ask that you all take a moment and consider what the word hero means to you. Again, thank you all for coming and I hope you enjoy the ceremony. Stewart then announced the ceremonial wreath would be presented by WWII submarine veteran Ed Kracker to Cmdr. Scott Luers, commanding ofcer, of the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764). While underway, Luers and his crew will inter the wreath at sea to honor the fallen submariners. Kracker is the oldest submarine-qualied WWII submarine veteran in the Hampton Roads area. He got his submarine qualications on the Balao-class submarine USS Bang (SS 385) in 1944. Retired U.S. Navy Capt. Kent Siegel, the last commanding ocer of the Tench-class diesel-electric submarine USS Pickerel (SS 524), was scheduled to be the guest speaker at the ceremony because the submarine was being inducted into the Submarine Hall of Fame. Dick Helm, a retired U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. who served briey with Siegel as his engineer, read his speech. I regret that I could not be with you today, Helm read. Cmdr. Stewart, I appreciate your invitation in oering remarks for the Hall of Fame induction for USS Pickerel. I extend my gratitude to the Submarine Veterans of the Hampton Roads Base who elected Pickerel to be inducted at the Submarine Learning Facility. As the last commanding ocer before our boats transfer to the Italian Navy in August of 1972, I am honored to represent the hundreds of ne submariners who served in Pickerel from 1949 to 1972. In her 33 years of operation Pickerel had an illustrious history. All of us from the commanding ocers to the most junior hot-bunking Sailors who loved our boat thank you for this honor. I want to wish the submarine veterans a successful and enjoyable future in Norfolk. Following the ceremony, Pickerel became the 16th submarine inducted into the Submarine Hall of Fame. Pickerel was commissioned April 4, 1949 and decommissioned Aug. 18, 1972. Selection into the Hall of Fame is merited by the submarines contribution to national security, and is conducted by the Hampton Roads Chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. organization. Sub VetsFrom Page 1 A CFC participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 7

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Sing along now, Schools out for summer! Vacation is on peoples minds. Id like to go up to Illinois and see my daughter, granddaughter and son-in-law, but I really cant swing it. My doctor has been trying to get me to have a colonoscopy, and my week off would be a good time. But what kind of a vacation would that be? Probably not going to happen. Option 3: Maybe Ill go to Charleston and visit friends who broke a lamp at my house during a party last winter. And break one of their lamps.What are your summer vacation plans?Alice Simmons Retired Navy Tallahassee, Fla. Im going on two. One is in Tampa and the other at Disney. BM2 Bryant Gooch Maritime Force Protection Unit Durham, N.C. Im being stationed in Puerto Rico. Thats my summer vacation. QM1 Darkemu Canmu Port Ops Staten Island, N.Y. I just plan on continuing my college education and really dont have any other plans. STSSA Jason Anderson USS Alaska Blue New Orleans Im going home to New Orleans to see my mom, dad, family and friends. Shirley Alexander Family member Quitman, Ga. Im going to Disneyworld with my kids and grandkids. Nicole Donaldson Exchange employee Yulee, Fla. Im going to Atlanta to see my mother-in-law and my husband and Im going to St. Augustine for a spa day. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCommunity Outreach Greg McCarty and Scheduling Coordinator Ralph Jimenez of Florida Safe Inc. demonstrate what happens to you after a traumatic accident to emphasize the need to wear seat belts and to not be distracted while you drive during a safety stand down at the Chapel at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Every injury and its treatment was described in detail while a volunteer played the role of a helpless victim. Safety Stand Down Courtesy photoMA3 William Roberts was recognized as the Military Service Member of the Month, May 15, by the Camden County Chambers of Commerce for his outstanding community volunteer work. He is a member of Bravo 1st Co. in Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. May honoree American Forces Press ServiceRetired Marine Corps Cpl. William Kyle Carpenter will receive the Medal of Honor for his conspicuous gallantry in Afghanistan from President Barack Obama at a June 19 White House ceremony, according to a White House news release issued May 19. Carpenter will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions on Nov. 21, 2010, while serving as an automatic rieman with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force Retired Marine to get MOH Carpenter See MOH, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014 By MC2 Laurie DexterNavy Public Affairs Support Element West, Det. Hawaiiree-time Olympic medalist Kelly Clark, three-time Olympic medalist Steven Holcomb and two-time Olympic medalist Andrew Weibrecht visited Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, May 9, during a United Service Organizations tour of Oahu. During the tour, the Olympians went aboard the Ticonderoga-class guidedmissile cruiser USS Chosin (CG 65) for a meet and greet with the Sailors. One of the Sailors got to meet her childhood hero and inspiration. Ive been snowboarding since I was 7 years old, said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Danielle Howard. Ive watched Kelly Clark for years and I cant believe Im meeting her while being in the Navy. Ive watched her since I was little and shes probably the reason why I snowboard today. According to Clark, inspiration and morale is what its all about. Ive been inspired, to say the least, and thats really what I hope to achieve in snowboarding, Clark said. I want to make sure I am inspiring people to be their best. Its amazing to hear that maybe someone would dare to dream and be inspired by what Ive done. American 300 Tours Founder and Managing Director Robi Powers explained a comparable connection between the Olympians and service members. Olympians and armed forces members work under the same premises: duty, sacrice, commitment, honor and integrity, in everything they do, said Powers. What we have found is that by bringing Olympians out, were really just bringing individuals from a parallel universe. e time away from home, the commitment to training, the ability to take directions from coaches, is so parallel to what our armed forces do. After their visit aboard USS Chosin, the Olympians conducted a meet and greet with members of the Air Force and observed demonstrations at the joint-services military working dog kennels. e Olympians also participated in a Fitness and Wellness Fair at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Fitness Center. e activities at the fair included a re truck pull, bench press competition, aerobic workouts, health evaluations and informational booths from various organizations. e USO plans and creates events around the world designed to lift the spirits of Americas troops and their families. A non-prot, congressionally chartered, private organization, the USO relies on individuals, organizations and corporations to support its activities. e USO is not part of the U.S. government, but is recognized by the Department of Defense, Congress and President of the United States, who serves as Honorary Chairman of the USO. ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. W eekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Pirates Cove Galley menus Navy photo by MC1 Daniel BarkerOlympic athletes Steven Holcomb, left, Kelly Clark and Andrew Weibrecht sign autographs at the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Fitness Center.Olympic trio visits ships

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By Staff Sgt. John JacksonMarine Expeditionary Brigade AfghanistanMultiple mounted patrols totaling 174 tactical vehicles with approximately 700 service members entered Camp Leathernecks North Gate during the early morning hours and throughout the day, May 5. Tactical vehicles driving through a gate on the Marine Corps centralHelmand base is a regular occurrence; however, this was a signicant occasion for Marines, coalition forces and their Afghan counterparts. e armored vehicles were returning from Sangin, Afghanistan, an infamous battleground in northern Helmand province, and a village that will be remembered in Marine Corps and British history. e Battle for Sangin During September 2010, there was a reorganization of ground forces throughout Helmand province. A more than 1,000-strong British Battle Group based in the northern portion of the province transferred security responsibility of Sangin District to U.S. service members. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, who had been ghting alongside British service members since May 2010, took command. Sangin is a small city of approximately 14,000 that sits on the Helmand River roughly 60 miles northeast of Helmand provinces capital of Lashkar Gah. It was infamous for Taliban inuence and played a signicant role in the poppy cultivation and opium trade in southern Afghanistan. More than 100 British troops were killed in the region, which accounts for approximately 25 percent of their fatalities throughout Afghanistan. A month after the Marines took charge in Sangin, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, arrived to begin their six-month deployment in an area at the time known as the most dangerous place in Afghanistan. From October 2010 until the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines deployment concluded during April 2011, 25 of the battalions Marines were killed in action, with more than 200 injured. Despite their losses, the Darkhorse Marines were able to improve security in the area. Marines operated out of more than 35 bases in the Sangin area since 2010. Forward Operating Base Nolay housed the 2nd Brigade headquarters as well as a team of approximately 40 Marine Corps advisors, while FOB Sabit Qadam was home to ANA infantry soldiers and a company of infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines. On May 5, Marines at both remaining FOBs said goodbye to their Afghan counterparts and left the two bases as well as the security of the region in the hands of the capable and credible Afghans. e MAGTF retrograde Beginning during the late hours of May 4, Marines at FOB Nolay and FOB Sabit Qadam began to load their vehicles and drive out the gates for the nal time. Prior to a long convoy down a highway once riddled with improvised explosive devices, Marines across Marine Expeditionary Brigade Afghanistan as well as soldiers with the 215th Corps worked together to plan and prepare for a successful retrograde. Aircrews with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 466, a Marine Corps Air Station Miramar-based CH-53 Super Stallion squadron, began ying equipment and personnel out of northern Helmand weeks prior to the nal departure. Marines with 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion left two days prior to the retrograde to ensure the route Marines would use to return to Camp Leatherneck was cleared of any IEDs. Infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, posted security along the route to ward o any would-be attackers looking to strike one last time. And Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 7 arrived at both remaining FOBs a day before the retrograde to load up lastminute gear and equipment to be driven back to Camp Leatherneck in central Helmand. In addition to Marine assets throughout the Marine Air Ground Task Force, ANA soldiers from the 215th Corps 2nd and 3rd Brigades also provided layered security throughout the region and along the route. ey also sent a team of soldiers to clear the route Marines took. Success of Sangin e success in Sangin has not only been seen in the city, but heard around Camp Leatherneck following the Marines return from the region. Marines like Sgt. Troy Garza, a squad leader with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, who was in Sangin during the most intense ghting the Marines saw in northern Helmand. Garza previously served with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, during 2010 and 2011. He remembers the long days of patrolling, the high kinetics in the region and the intense reghts. However, during this deployment, Garza and his Charley Company Marines only saw outside the connes of their small forward operating base while standing a security post. eir ANA soldiers were patrolling the region and keeping Sangin secure. Many Marines with 1st Battalion, 7th Marines and the 2-215 Security Force Assistance Advisor Team tell similar stories of the dierence four years has made in Sangin. Another sign of success in the city nestled on the Helmand River was the tremendous turnout of local citizens for the April 5 elections. Afghanistan held its third democratic election and the rst one where current President Hamid Karzais name was not on the ballot. During the previous 2009 election, only 177 votes were cast. is year an estimated 5,000 votes were cast in the Sangin District, according to the Independent Election Commission of Afghanistan. Not only did the locals come out to vote, they came out knowing their countrys own security forces were keeping the polling cites secure and safe, a testament to the change in the local populaces condence in the Afghan National Security Forces. Always remembered Despite the Marines departure from FOB Nolay and FOB Sabit Qadam for the nal time May 5, Sangin will forever be etched in Marine Corps history. For four years Marines fought tirelessly to rid the city of enemy ghters and not allow insurgents a safe haven in Sangin. More than 50 Marines paid the ultimate sacrice ghting for Sangin and hundreds were seriously wounded. Marines had bittersweet feelings when arriving back to Camp Leatherneck after the more than 60-kilometer journey. ey were happy to be leaving the area that claimed the lives and limbs of so many of their brothers-in-arms, but sad to leave their newfound brothers of the ANA and Afghan National Police. May 5 marked the end of an era for Marines in northern Helmand province, but started a new chapter for the Afghan National Security Forces and the local Sangin civilians, and the Marines are condent the soldiers and police will continue to succeed in Sangin just as they did.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Frances JohnsonCpl. Andrew Harris, a UH-1Y Huey crew chief with Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 369, performs a weapons check before an aerial assault support mission for ground convoys in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 3. Marines prep to leave SanginMarine Corps photo by Sgt. Francis JohnsonA Marine Corps ground convoy safely maneuvers a route in support of retrograde operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 3. (Forward), in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, according to the release. In July 2013, Carpenter was medically retired from the Marine Corps as a corporal due to his wounds, the release said. He is currently a full-time student at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. Carpenter will be the eighth living recipient to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq or Afghanistan, according to the release. On Nov. 21, 2010, Taliban insurgents initiated an attack on Carpenters squad, part of Company F, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment. Carpenter, the squad automatic rieman for his re team, and Lance Cpl. Nicholas Eufrazio were holding a rooftop security position when a hand grenade was thrown their way. Without hesitation, Carpenter reacted, rushing toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his brotherin-arms from its blast. e grenade detonated with Carpenters body taking the majority of the blast. Carpenter lay on the rooftop, barely clinging to life; his fellow Marine also severely wounded. A seless action and a hellish tragedy happened in the blink of an eye, leaving both Carpenter and Eufrazio with painstaking recoveries. Carpenter suered severe injuries from the blast. Much of his jaw was rebuilt and he lost his right eye; he sustained countless shattered bones throughout his body and a collapsed right lung. He endured a strenuous recovery process at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md. After two and a half years, Carpenter was medically retired from the Marine Corps on July 30, 2013. I look back and Im actually very appreciative I had those two and a half years because those years put things in perspective more than a whole lifetime of things could if I wasnt there, Carpenter said. Carpenters mind and emotions were not left unscarred either. e hardest part was dealing with letting others help, he said. Going from toting a machinegun in Afghanistan to using a bed pan, and I cant even put my own socks on that was hard to kind of suck it up, Carpenter said. Although the recovery process seemed endless and small tasks required assistance, Carpenter overcame the odds and has a new outlook on life from the entire tragedy, he said. He is grateful for all the help and support he received. Ive just been very fortunate that Ive had not only my family, but friends, Marines and the community of South Carolina, Carpenter said, Early on in my recovery, the entire United States seemed to be supportive. Letters ooded in from all over the place, so from the second I woke up in the hospital, Ive always had a great team and great people. Ive been very fortunate. Even with such a great honor bestowed on him, he remains humble. As many reghts and instances where theres been opportunity, Marines have stepped up to the plate not only in Iraq and Afghanistan but since the beginning of our country, Carpenter said So I truly feel like Im on an even playing eld. Looking back at his time in the Corps, Carpenters fondest memories are being deployed with his fellow Marines in Afghanistan. To him, nothing will compare to months without a shower, sleeping in the dirt and being with 50 of his best friends. If I look at it that way, Im very thankful for Afghanistan and it really means a lot to me, Carpenter said. I wouldnt trade it for anything in the world. Carpenter was born in Flowood, Miss., on Oct. 17, 1989, and graduated from W. Wyman King Academy, Batesburg, S.C., in 2008, the release said. In February 2009, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at Recruiting Station Columbia, South Carolina, and completed his basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, later that year. According to the release, Carpenters personal awards include a Purple Heart Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, and Combat Action Ribbon. e Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the armed forces who distinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; engaged in military operations involving conict with an opposing foreign force; or serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. e meritorious conduct must involve great personal bravery or self-sacrice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his or her comrades and must have involved risk of life. ere must be incontestable proof of the performance of the meritorious conduct, and each recommendation for the award must be considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.MOHFrom Page 9 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 29, 2014

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