The Kings Bay periscope

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00350


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8-team tourney for Navy Base Team title underwayBy Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorTeam Kings Bay won the Southeast Zone in the inaugural Navy Bowling Base Team Championships. e team began competition in an eight-team eld with ve other zone champions and three at-large teams Tuesday evening at Rack-N-Roll lanes on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Results were not available at press time. e competition matches scores at different lanes throughout the Navy. Should Kings Bay advance with a top four score among the eld of eight, it would bowl again next week in a seeded, head-to-head competition. A win there would move the team into the championship matchup during the week of June 1 to 7. Team Kings Bay won the nine-team Southeast Zone, based on the Southeast Region, with 11,726.5 points to runner-up Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles 11,209.5. ree Kings Bay bowlers, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, MCC Dan Blakeslee and ET2 Rob Daugherty burned up the Southeast, placing 1-2-4 in zone averages. MCC Alvin Rodriguez, MTC Keith Williams, FTC Dave Messmer and YN2 Eric Day rounded out the zone champions. From Arlington National CemeteryArlington National Cemetery is hosting a series of special events from May through June designed to honor the traditions, remember the sacrice and explore the history of the cemetery as it commemorates its 150th anniversary. e commemoration period began with a wreath laying ceremony May 13 at the gravesite of Army Pvt. William Christman, who was the rst military burial at Arlington, and concludes with a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on June 15, the day Arlington ofcially became a national cemetery. On a Virginia hillside rising above the Potomac River and overlooking Washington, D.C., stands Arlington House. e 19th-century mansion seems out of place amid the more than 250,000 military grave sites that stretch out around it. When construction began in 1802, the estate was not intended to be a national cemetery. e mansion, which was intended as a living memorial to George Washington, was owned and constructed by the rst presidents adopted grandson, George Washington Parke Custis, son of John Parke Custis who himself was a child of Martha Washington by her rst marriage and a ward of George Washington. Arlington won out as a name over Mount Washington, which is what George Washington Parke Custis intended calling the 1,100-acre tract of land that he had inherited at the death of his father when he was 3. Arlington was the name of the Custis family ancestral estate in the Virginia tidewater area. George Washington Parke Custis and his wife, Mary Lee Fitzhugh, whom he had married in 1804, lived in Arlington House were buried together on the property after their deaths in 1857 and 1853, respectively. On June 30, 1831, Custis only child, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, married her childhood friend and distant cousin, Robert E. Lee. Lee was the son of former three-term Virginia Governor Henry Light Horse Harry Lee and was himself a graduate of West Point. Kings Bays e Dolphin Store donates $7,000 to scholarship foundationFrom The Dolphin StoreIn May 2014, e Dolphin Store sta was proud to contribute $7,000 toward the organizations Dolphin Scholarship Fund, its largest donation to date. e Kings Bay Dolphin Store, located at the Naval Submarine Base Library, 918 USS James Madison Road, is a non-prot store with 100 percent of the proceeds donated to e Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. We take this opportunity to thank all of our Kings Bay customers for their support, said Michelle Meyer, advisory for e Dolphin Store. Dolphin Scholarship Foundation awards annual college scholarships to submarine families. Over the last ve years, e Dolphin Store has donated $23,000 to Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. e Dolphin Store is a one-stop shop for all submarine, Navy, and military related items and gifts. e store oers unique, hard-to-nd items. Regular store hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to noon every rst and third Saturday of the month. e store also opens for appointments. Call (912) 573-6102 for more information. Like e Dolphin Store on Facebook at www.facebook.com/kbdolphinstore for up-to-date information. Also, see Facebook for summer hours. Up Periscope The meaning of Memorial Day Page 9 Field Day Kings Bay volunteers help at school Page 9 Our times Military conflict from to present Pages 4, 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Team Kings Bays Triple Threat. From left, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, 208.18 average, MMC Dan Blakeslee, 202.82, and ET2 Rob Daugherty, 198.03, finished 1-2-4 in Southeast Zone bowling, leading the team to the zone title in the first year of MWRs Navy Bowling Base Team Championships.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenSee Dolphin, Page 3 See Arlington, Page 6Courtesy photoFrom left, Dolphin Store volunteers Jessica Holton, Samantha Anderson, Melanie Weerheim, Jenn Rorstrom, Michele Mayer and Jean Wines. Team Kings Bay wins Southeast Arlington marks 150th yearStore sta raises barArlington National Cemetery photoMore than a quarter million graves mark the nations oldest military cemetery at Arlington.Once home to Robert E. Lee, Union buried Civil War dead in Arlington House lawnSee Team, Page 3Blakeslee All-Navy team champ By Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorKings Bay MCC Dan Blakeslee earned All-Navy honors and led the Navy team to the intra-service mens team championship last week at the all-military bowling championships at Ft. Lewis-McCord in Tacoma, Wash. Blakeslee bowled the teams high series as the Navy beat the other service teams for the Mens Team Championship. He also helped the Navy men to a second-place in team All Events bowling. He nished third in a eld of 16 during the trials to make the All-Navy team. Kings Bay teammate ET2 Rob Daugherty placed eighth in the eld of 16, falling short of making All-Navy. See Blakeslee, Page 3 U.S. aids in search for girls16-member team sent to help nd missing Nigerian studentsBy Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceA total of 16 military personnel from U.S. Africa Command have joined the interdisciplinary team led by the State Department at the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria, to help in nding hundreds of kidnapped girls, a Pentagon spokesman said. Members of the extremist group Boko Haram abducted more than 200 girls from the Government Secondary boarding school in the town of Chibok on the night of April 14. Several countries, including the United States, have oered help. On May 6, President Barack Obama said on NBCs Today program that the immediate priority is nding the girls, and then the world must address the broader problem of organizations like Boko Haram that can cause such havoc in peoples day-to-day lives. At the Pentagon, Army Col. Steve Warren said the group of 16 military personnel includes experts in communications, logistics, civil aairs, operations and intelligence. Obama See Nigeria, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian ClinicAs we are right in the swing of Permanent Change of Station season, it is important to think about what you are going to do with your furry family members. Many service members and their families intend to bring their pets overseas, but it is important to follow all requirements. If you receive even tentative orders for an OCONUS assignment, call the vet clinic right away at (912) 573-0755. Some countries require a quarantine period of up to six months, while others require specic documentation relating to vaccinations, microchipping and blood tests. If you call the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian Clinic well in advance, the sta can help to make sure that your pets meet all of the requirements. Taking pets overseas without completing the requirements can results in quarantines of up to six months and cost thousands of dollars. If you have any questions, feel free to contact the clinic. Clinic sta also recommends starting research into the requirements of the country to which you are traveling. You can start on the USDA-APHIS website www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/. You should also reference the airline requirements as most of them have specications regarding the kennel, food and water availability, and more. VA offers new online GI Bill comparison toole Department of Veterans Affairs has a new website which makes it easier For Sailors trying to decide how to best use their Post-9/11 GI Bill to calculate benets and learn more about approved colleges, universities and other training programs. e GI Bill Comparison Tool website at http://benets.va.gov/ gibill/comparison provides key information about college aordability and brings together information from more than 17 dierent online sources and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA benets at each school. e Post-9/11 GI Bill is a comprehensive education benet created by Congress in 2008. In general, veterans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001 are eligible. Since 2009, VA has distributed over $30 billion in the form of tuition and other education-related payments to more than one million veterans, service members and their families, and to the universities, colleges and trade schools they attend.From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy Exchanges offering WiFi servicee Navy Exchange Service Command announced that customers can now stay connected and even check their e-mail when shopping the NEX, thanks to free Wi-Fi services being provided at more than 50 selling locations worldwide. e landscape of retail is changing and more customers are using their smartphones to shop, nd product information and even product reviews, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, Store Operations. Oering free WiFi is another customer service we provide as part of the NEX shopping experience.Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.Kids Fishing Clinic at Ft. Clinche Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park has a Kids Fishing Clinic Saturday, May 31, to teach lessons on knot tying, shing ethics, tackle, habitat, casting and more. e clinic is open to ages ve to 15 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. e rst 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. A free hot dog lunch will be provided. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwater shing. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274.St. Marys offers music seriese next Starry Nights, Music in the Park free series is 6 to 8 p.m. June 21 at the St. Marys Waterfront Park amphitheater featuring e Just Jazz Quartet. Future bands are No Known Cure July 19, e Just Jazz Quartet returns Aug. 16 and Back From the Brink Sept. 20. Additional Music in the Park dates will be June 28, July 12, Aug. 9 and Sept. Fish Head will begin these dates. For more information, call the St. Marys Welcome Center at (912) 882-4000.Maritime jobs June 4 in JaxA Military to Maritime career event is 1 to 5 p.m., June 4, for current and former military personnel interested in transitioning into a maritime-related eld. e free event will be at the JAXPORT cruise terminal. For more information, contact the American Maritime Partnership, (202) 661-3740, or e-mail info at Americanmaritimepartnership.com. Advance registration is recommended. To register online, visit http://bit.ly/military2maritime.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Benefits for military children setChildren of Fallen Patriots Foundation provides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. CFPF has four upcoming events May 25 the Jacksonville Suns will be auctioning o their camouage Navy jerseys after the game. For details, visit www. fallenpatriots.org.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of community, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! Jacksonville Assistance Office, RLSO SEWhen it comes to renting property, remember Ben Franklins adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Most common problems can be prevented or minimized with just a few hours of care while selecting and moving into a property. If this step is neglected, it may be too late to x issues without losing many more hours and hundreds or even thousands of dollars. To protect yourself, follow the tips below. 1. Understand your contractual obligations. Your obligations as a tenant (a person renting real property) should be described in your rental contract. ey typically include paying rent by a certain date, registering vehicles parked on the premises, minimizing noise and disruption to other tenants, performing basic maintenance and upkeep, etc. If you do not perform these obligations, you may be evicted from the premises and charged unpaid rent for the rest of the contract term. Before signing the contract, ensure you understand your obligations. 2. Ensure the contract does not include a waiver of rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. e SCRA gives you the right to terminate a rental contract if you or your active-duty spouse receives permanent change of station orders or orders to deploy for at least 90 days. It prevents you from having to continue paying rent on a property that you had to move out of. You can voluntarily give up this right, by signing a contract including a waiver of SCRA protections. Make sure your contract does not include this waiver. 3. Complete a move-in inspection with the landlord. While the property is still empty of furniture, complete a move-in inspection with the landlord. Note all damages and discrepancies on a piece of paper, and have the landlord sign/date the sheet conrming agreement with the inspection results. Be thorough. Test switches, appliances, electrical outlets, windows, etc. A good move-in inspection will discourage the landlord from trying to charge you for property damage when you nally move out. 4. Get help. Make an appointment with a legal assistance attorney to review the lease. If you have any questions about a rental agreement, please contact your nearest Region Legal Service Oce to set up an appointment with a legal assistance attorney. Oce locations can be found online at www.jag.navy.mil/legal_services/legal_services_locator_rlso. htm. e attorney will assist you with fully understanding not only the contract but also state-specic rental laws and protections that may apply.Take care when entering a lease Navy JAG Remember pets when PCS planning Potpouri By MCC Jayme PastoricCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public Affairse Center for Personal and Professional Development headquarters celebrated 40 years of the Navy Voluntary Education, May 14. Sta and current and former VOLED pioneers joined together to celebrate the anniversary of the program at CPPD headquarters, located at Naval Air Station Oceana Dam Neck Annex. e Navys VOLED program was ocially launched May 14, 1974. Since then, thousands of Sailors have taken advantage of educational opportunities leading to a professional credential and/or a college degree. Because of the VOLED teams dedication, Sailors like me have attained their educational dreams and created a better, brighter tomorrow for themselves and future generations, said CPPD Commanding Ofcer Capt. John Newcomer. Our Sailors successes are the Navys successes and have a direct link to Navy mission readiness and accomplishment. Guest speakers from the Navy VOLED team, past and present, were recognized by Newcomer for their dedication to the VOLED mission and the Sailors it supports. Kenn Smith joined the Navy VOLED team in 1975 and spoke about how VOLED has grown over the years. rough an arrangement with Adm. Grace Hopper, I was able to bring the rst computer to Navy Campus in 1985, said Smith, referring to the organizations original name of Navy Campus for Achievement that changed in 1999 to the Navy College Program. NCP is currently administered by the VOLED directorate of CPPD. Looking at Navy College oces today, I am in awe of the research capabilities and nontraditional education opportunities Sailors have, he said. Director of Navy Voluntary Education Ernest DAntonio spoke passionately about the VOLED team that works tirelessly to help Sailors achieve their life-long educational and credentialing goals. For 40 years, Navy VOLED as an institution has helped hundreds of thousands of Sailors achieve an education and develop critical thinking skills, said DAntonio. We support our purpose and the ones who are our mission its the Sailor who is the heart of my organization. e ceremony concluded with awards celebrating the many successes of VOLED team members and a cake cutting by Newcomer and VOLED trailblazer Sandra Barnes, accompanied by Kathy Jones, the daughter of former Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy (MCPON) Robert J. Walker, third MCPON of the Navy and VOLED champion. Navy VOLED has experienced many changes through its 40 years, said Newcomer. One thing that hasnt changed is the teams mission to equip Sailors with strong analytical skills through quality educational opportunities, and provide great educational counseling and outstanding customer support.Navy Voluntary Education hits 40 Navy CPPD

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If you are interested in volunteering at the store, contact the store managers, Jessica Holton and Samantha Anderson at dskbmanager@gmail.com. All volunteers are welcome and the store has a play area for those volunteers with children. eir role is to assess the situation, advise and assist the Nigerian government in their eorts to respond to this crisis situation, and nd the young women kid napped by Boko Haram, the colonel added. A majority of the group members were sta ocers and personnel from the embassys Oce of Security Cooperation, whose mission is to enhance the long-term bilateral defense relationship between Nigeria and the United States. e rest came into the country from outside Africa, he said. e Oce of Security Cooperation in Nigeria is the largest in Africa, Warren said. We have a total of 50 or 60 military personnel assigned to the embassy there as part of the country team, the colonel added, and 16 now are devoted to the interdisciplinary team to nd the girls. e Defense Depart ment has no plans at this point, he said, to put more personnel into the country.NigeriaFrom Page 1 DolphinFrom Page 1 For Platt, the zone title was somewhat anticlimactic. I knew four weeks ago nobody in the Southeast was going to catch us, he said. Platt and others have followed the other zone scores. He seemed optimistic about Team Kings Bays chances in the tournament. ere are some teams in the Southwest that have put up similar numbers to ours, Platt said But we still have the top two aver ages in all of the zones. Blakeslee agreed with Platts assessment. I think we have a pretty good chance, he said. We have a solid team here at Kings Bay. Forty-eight teams started the season, representing 60 Navy bowling centers worldwide. Southeast Zone secretary John Duncan, of NAS Jacksonville, said he was happy with the rst year of the Navy-wide competition. It went well this year, Duncan said. It will be interesting to see next year how this grows and evolves. Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, the top bowler on the All-Navy champion last year, was unable to attend the trials. For Blakeslee, stationed on USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (Blue), it was his third trip to the All-Navy trials and his second time making the All-Navy Team. Blakeslee also nished third in Doubles, teamed with Coast Guard PO1 Chris Leftwich, who is stationed in Topeka, Kan., and fourth in individual All Events. He also competed in mixed doubles. I had a pretty good week, he said. I was leading All Events the for the rst 12 games, dropped to second after 18 and nished fourth. I couldnt get it together to bring home the title. But, this is the best (All-Navy) outing Ive had. Im a little disappointed about not bringing home All Events, but overall, Im pretty happy with what I did. Daughertys eighthplace nish in the trials was a repeat of his attempt to make the team the year before. My nish was the same Navy Bowling Base Team ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Final Team Points 1, Naval Sub Base Kings Bay 11,726.5 2, Naval Air Station Jax 11,209.5 3, Naval Air Station Pensacola 8,856.6 4, Naval Station Mayport 7,950 5, Naval Air Station Key West 7,834 6, Naval Station Gitmo 5,795.5 7, Naval Air Station Corry 5,521.5 8, Naval Air Station New Orleans 5,425 9, Joint Task Force Gitmo 2,800 Top 6 Mens averages Bowler Average 1, Leon Platt, NSB Kings Bay 208.18 2, Dan Blakeslee, NSB Kings Bay 202.82 3, Clinton Washington, NAS Jax 199.5 4, Rob Daugherty, NSB Kings Bay 198.03 5, Shaun Spitler, NAS Jax 195.15 6, Tommy Lowrance, NAS Jax 195.06TeamFrom Page 1 as last year. But I felt like I learned a lot, he said. is year was much tougher. It was a very difcult pattern. Nobody in the whole eld from the Army, Navy or any service bowled a 200 game. BlakesleeFrom Page 1 Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Marines from the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, Charlie Co., cover each other with 5.56 mm M16A2 assault rifles as they prepare to enter one of Saddam Husseins palaces in Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. A Marine with Golf Co., 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, waits for other Marines while participating in a Security and Stabilization Operation in Fallujah, Al Anbar Province, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. A destroyed Iraqi truck that came under attack during Operation Desert Storm in Iraq during 1991. Marines of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force move across the Saudi desert back to their camp following a training exercise during Operation Desert Shield in 1991. staging area in Zupanja, Croatia during Operation Joint Endeavor in 1995. Marines from Task Force Mogadishu run for cover as sniper shots are fired from undisclosed areas during Operation Restore Hope in 1992. The U.S. Military since 1945 Army Pfc. Ryan B. Stuart provides security for Afghan forces in the Kharwar district in Afghanistans Logar province on Jan. 11. Stuart is assigned to the 10th Mountain Divisions Company D, 2nd Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, Task Force. U.S. and Afghan forces recovered two weapons caches and detained four people during the two-day operation. DoD photo by Army Sgt. Cooper T. Cash All photos from Department of Defense

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 5 President Lyndon B. Johnson meets troops in Vietnam, 1966. Fighting with the 2nd Inf. Div. north of the Chongchon River, Sfc. Major Cleveland, weapons squad leader, points out communist-led North Korean position to his machine gun crew, Nov. 20, 1950. Force RF-101 Voodoo aircraft photographs a Russian ship loaded with missiles while the aircraft itself casts a shadow in Port Casilda, Cuba, Nov. 6, 1962. The Navy blockaded the island during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Berlin Wall separated communist-controlled East Germany from isolated city in 1948 and 1949. Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 509th Infantry, parachute from a C-130E Hercules into a drop zone outside the city to conduct operations in support of Operation Just Cause in 1989. prepare two RH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters for participation in Operation Evening Light, a 1980 rescue mission to Iran.

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By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceUncertainty on the defense budget must end, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta told North Carolina reporters recently. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said that unless the situation changes, U.S. service members may be sent into harms way inadequately prepared. When reporters asked how the military can do more with less, the chairman said that is not his approach. We really cant ask the kids to do more with less, he said. We can do less with less, but not less well. is, the chairman explained, means the military must take the resources available and apply them across the many accounts that demand resources, such as manpower, infrastructure, modernization, training and readiness. In the old clich, its really not rocket science, he said. We have a pretty good understanding of how to balance our budget. If were not able to balance it, then we run the risk of failing in our most sacred obligation, which is never sending a man or woman into harms way unless they are the best-trained and best-equipped and best-led. Each of the services made tough decisions in crafting the budget request, Dempsey said, noting that the request boils down to three things: certainty, exibility and time. We need certainty -we cant keep doing this one year at a time, he said. e lack of certainty is felt in North Carolina at places such as Fort Bragg, Pope Air Force Base and Camp Lejeune, he said. Flexibility also is vital, Dempsey said. Weve got to be able to retire systems we no longer need or that can accomplish the mission in other ways, he added. And weve got to be able to get rid of some excess infrastructure. We estimate that we have about 20 percent excess infrastructure in terms of bases, camps and stations. And the military needs more time to adapt to the new scal climate, the chairman told reporters. Weve got to spread this out, he said. To ask the department to reduce its budget by a trillion dollars over 10 years is extraordinarily irresponsible, frankly. If we go to the full level of the Budget Control Act, we will put the nation at unacceptable risk. e Budget Control Act requires sequestration-level spending cuts to resume in scal year 2016. e cuts will ruin readiness, Dempsey said. If they dont act this year on our recommendations for pay, compensation and health care, then the bill will be about $4 billion that will be passed back to the military and we will have to nd within the budget $4 billion, the chairman said. When we are told we cant reduce infrastructure, we cant retire weapons systems, we cant change pay, compensation, health care, whats left is readiness and modernization, he continued. So we are going to have to raid our readiness accounts and our modernization account. JCS Chairman backs VAs ShinsekiDempsey says budget uncertainties must end By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceEmbattled Veterans Aairs Sec retary Eric K. Shinseki is one of the most decent human beings who ever wore the uniform or who led the nations Army, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said. Speaking with reporters in Durham, North Carolina, where he delivered the commencement address at Duke University, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said Shinseki, who retired as Army chief of sta in 2003, is leading the Department of Veterans Aairs with integrity and transparence and energy. e secretary has been under re for a backlog of cases in the VA system and, most recently, over allegations that a Phoenix VA facility covered up the deaths of 40 veterans who were on a wait list for medical care. Some senators and veterans groups have called for Shinsekis resignation. Dempsey said the Defense Department and VA have been working closely together to address problems as service members transition to being veterans. e two departments are trying to work to make the transition from active care to veterans care much more uid, much more responsive, much more seamless, he said. Weve made progress, but we havent made enough progress. Leaders in both agencies understand the scope of the problems and what needs to be done to correct them, the chairman said. Dempsey employed the interview as an opportunity to express his condence in Shinseki. I know there is a series of investigations ongoing now, and I have condence that if anyone can help us make this enterprise that ows from DOD to Veterans Affairs, it is him, he said. And I hope he is given the chance to do it. Shinseki Dempsey In 1846 Lee served in the Mexican War under Gen. Wineld Scott, and in 1852 he was appointed superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, his alma mater. After his father-in-law died in 1857, Lee returned to Arlington to serve as executor of the estate. Under the terms of her fathers will, Mary Anna Custis Lee was given the right to inhabit and control the house for the rest of her life. Custis will also stipulated that upon Mary Annas death, full title would pass to her eldest son, George Washington Custis Lee. Contrary to popular belief, Robert E. Lee never owned the estate. Lee did serve as custodian of the property, which had fallen into disrepair. By 1859, Lee had returned the property and its holdings to protability and good order. Lee and his wife lived at Arlington House until 1861, when Virginia ratied an alliance with the Confederacy and seceded from the Union. Lee, who had been named a major general for the Virginia military forces in April 1861, feared for his wifes safety and anticipated the loss of their family inheritance. In May 1861, Lee wrote to Mary Anna saying: War is inevitable, and there is not telling when it will burst around you ... You have to move and make arrangements to go to some point of safety which you must select ... Keep quiet while you remain, and in your preparations ... May God keep and preserve you and have mercy on all our people. Following the ratication of secession by Virginia, federal troops crossed the Potomac and took up positions around Arlington. Following the occupation, military installations were erected at several locations around the 1,100acre estate, including Fort Whipple (now Fort Myer) and Fort McPherson (now Section 11). Lee deeply regretted the loss of his home. During the early stages of the war, foreseeing the probable loss of his home and belongings, Lee wrote to his wife about Arlington: It is better to make up our minds to a general loss. ey cannot take away the remembrance of the spot, and the memories of those that to us rendered it sacred. at will remain to us as long as life will last, and that we can preserve. Lee continued to feel re sponsible for the estate and earnestly hoped that the slaves who were left behind would be educated and freed, according to the pro visions of George Washing ton Parke Custis will. e property was conscated by the federal gov ernment when property taxes levied against Arlington estate were not paid in person by Mrs. Lee. e property was oered for public sale Jan. 11, 1864, and was purchased by a tax commissioner for government use, for war, military, charitable and educational purposes. Arlington National Cemetery was established by Brig. Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs, who commanded the garrison at Arlington House, appropriated the grounds June 15, 1864, for use as a military cemetery. His intention was to render the house uninhabitable should the Lee family ever attempt to return. A stone and masonry burial vault in the rose garden, 20 feet wide and 10 feet deep, and containing the remains of 1,800 Bull Run casualties, was among the rst monuments to Union dead erected under Meigs orders. Meigs himself was later buried within 100 yards of Arlington House with his wife, father and son. e federal government dedicated a model community for freed slaves, Freedmans Village, near the current Memorial Amphitheater, on Dec. 4, 1863. More than 1,100 ArlingtonFrom Page 1 See Arlington, Page 8Arlington National Cemetery photoArlington House at Arlington National Cemetery was once the home to Robert E. Lee and family. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet Ma 27. No pre-registration required.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for get ting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. freed slaves were given land by the government, where they farmed and lived during and after the Civil War. Neither Robert E. Lee, nor his wife, as title holder, ever attempted to publicly recover control of Arlington House. ey were buried at Washington University later renamed Washington and Lee University where Lee had served as president. e couple never returned to the home. After Gen. Lees death in 1870, George Washington Custis Lee brought an action for ejectment in the Circuit Court of Alex andria today Arlington County, Va. Custis Lee, as eldest son of Gen. and Mrs. Lee, claimed that the land had been ille gally conscated and that, according to his grandfathers will, he was the legal owner. In 1882, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, returned the property to Custis Lee, stating that it had been conscated without due process. In 1883, Congress purchased the property from Lee for $150,000. It became a military reservation and Freedmans Village ceased to exist. However, the gravesites that were once part of the village remained on the grounds of the reservation. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is sponsored by Commander, Navy Installations Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide information, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without advanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of hazards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative government resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emergency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emergency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emergency Preparedness Town Hall meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emergency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4 ArlingtonFrom Page 6 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Memorial Day has its roots in our costliest war, the Civil War. The South and North both claim its origin. For many years, it was known as Decoration Day, a day to decorate with flowers the graves of the war dead. During the 1880s, the name changed from Decoration Day to Memorial Day. It wasnt until 1967 that Memorial Day become a Federal holiday. The day was changed from the traditional May 30 to the last Monday in May, to create a three-day weekend.What does Memorial Day mean to you?STS2 Preston Standridge USS Florida Blue Helen, Ga. Remembering everyone who fought and died and to pay respect to their families. Nancy DeLong Family member Wadsworth, Ohio Its a wonderful reminder that freedom is not free and a way to honor those who have sacrificed their lives. Patrolman Anthony Bolds Mayport Police James Island, S.C. Our remembering and honoring those who sacrificed their lives for the freedom we now have. MMFN Kingsley Egerton USS Florida Gold Decatur, Ga. It makes me proud to be an American knowing I live in a free country that people fought and died for so I can prosper. Amanda Liguore Family member Canfield, Ohio Its a day of reflection on things that have been sacrificed for and the good thats become of it. Patrolman Steve Reis Mayport Police Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. To me, its the freedom that everyone fought for so we can live in a free country today. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photos by EM1 Mark Treen Eighteen Sailors and Marines from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay volunteered their Friday, May 16 to help St. Marys Elementary Schools Field Day. Service members helped set up the field and helped at each event to make sure the students had a good time. St. Marys Field Day By Lt. Timothy HawkinsSubmarine Group 2 Public AffairsMore than 40 midshipmen from the Spanish Navy visited Sailors at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., May 12, to learn about the U.S. submarine force. e group drove three hours north from New York City two days after their training ship a four-masted topsail, steel-Spanish sailors visit GrotonSee Groton, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 9

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Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration is at the customer service counter in the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at registration. No refunds. Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the twoweeks. Private lessons available for $75 with ve 1-on-1 lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or 573-3990 for more details. Arrive on time, bring sunscreen and towels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Intramural Indoor Summer Volleyball Registration is ongoing. Play begins June 9 with a 5 p.m. captains meeting June 4 at the Fitness Center. Fee is $100. Parent & Child Golf Tournament Saturday, June 14, Trident Lakes starts with 11 a.m. registration, 11:30 a.m. lunch and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $30 or $20 for 9 holes. Sign up at the Pro Shop Customer Service counter. (912) 573-8475. Trident Lakes shing Open 6 to 8 a.m., May 30 and 31. For details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Mother and Son Beach Party June 14 inside the Triplex Conference Center. Tickets at ITT are $15 for adult and 12 and older, $12 for children 3 to 11. Food 5 to 7 p.m., music and more until 8 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Summer Splash 2014 From noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 24 free entry at the Fitness Center pool with fun games, music, prizes and the Build-A-Boat competition. Food will be available for purchase. Special thanks to the sponsors of this event: Navy Federal Credit Union & USAA. (No endorsement is implied) Call (912) 5733001 for more information. Fathers Day at Rack-N-Roll Dads bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., June 15. For details, call (912) 573-9492. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies for May are Walking with Dinosaurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Kids movies will be shown during summer break starting May 22. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kinder garten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up be gan April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for ac tive duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide or ders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family in come. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Junior Golf Camp For ages 12 to 17 at Trident Lakes, June 2 to 6 and July 21 to 25. $150 per person. Provide your own lunch. Call (912) 573-8475. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenThe Americas Armed Forces Kids Run was May 17 at the NSB Fitness Complex. ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. 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By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama at a White House ceremony May 13, making him the sixth living Army recipient and the 14th from all services to earn the medal in either Iraq or Afghanistan. Obama opened his remarks in the East Room by paying tribute not just to White, but to what he referred to as the /11 generation, all those young citizens who came forth after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States to volunteer their service knowing fully well what the cost could be. For more than 12 years, with our nation at war, the men and women of our armed forces have known the measure of danger that comes with military service, he said. But year after year, tour after tour, they have displayed a seless willingness to incur it by stepping forward, by volunteering, by serving and sacricing greatly to keep us all safe. Today, our troops are coming home, he added, saying that by years end the war in Afghanistan will be over. And, today, we pay tribute to a soldier who embodies the courage of his generation a young man who was a freshman in high school when the Twin Towers fell, and who just ve years later became an elite paratrooper with the legendary 173rd Airborne the Sky Soldiers. e president recounted the Nov. 9, 2007, ambush out side the village of Aranas in Afghanistans Nuristan prov ince, in which ve soldiers and a Marine would perish, as Whites unit of 13 Americans and a squad of Afghan soldiers descended into what was called Ambush Alley. Suddenly, the chatter of AK-47s and the smoke trails of rocket-propelled grenades lit up the valley, sending shat tered shards and chunks of red-hot metal and rock ying. With nowhere to escape the three-pronged onslaught but down a steep decline, White, 1st Lt. Matthew Ferrara, Spc. Kain Schilling, Marine Corps Sgt. Phillip Bocks and an interpreter were left stranded as the rest of the unit slid 160 feet down the mountain. en a specialist, the 20-year-old White emptied one 30-round clip from his M-4, but as he went to slide another into place, an RPG screamed in nearby. It was just lights out, he said later. White saw his buddy Schilling trying to stay in the shade of what Schilling later recalled as the smallest tree on earth. Schilling had been wounded severely in his right upper arm, so White sprinted to Schilling, applied a tourniquet, then saw Bocks. After four sprints and attempts to pull Bocks to cover, White nally was successful, and he began administering rst aid. He applied a tourniquet, but it was too late. Bocks wounds had been too severe, and he passed away. When White looked up, he saw Schilling take another round, this time to his left leg. Again, he sprinted to Schilling. Out of tourniquets, he used his belt and was able to once again stop the bleeding. While the battle continued, White saw his lieutenant lying face-down. He ran to Ferrara, but found he was dead. As White once recalled in an interview, he had accepted that he and Schilling werent going to make it through this reght. Its just a matter of time before Im dead, White had said. I gured if thats going to happen, I might as well help while I can. White next secured a radio, as both his and Schillings had been destroyed by small-arms re. He relayed a situational report and called for mortars, artillery, air strikes and helicopter guns runs. For the second time that day, an explosion scrambled my brains a little bit there, concussed White. A friendly 120-mm mortar round had fallen short of. Struggling to keep Schilling and himself from falling asleep, White eventually was able to lay out a landing zone and assist the ight medic in hoisting all the wounded aboard. Only then did he allow himself to be medically evacuated. Today, nearly seven years later, White and the other survivors of the Battle of Aranas wear a stainless steel wristband made by one of the units soldiers. Each is etched with the names of those who didnt come home: 1st Lt. Matthew C. Ferrara, Sgt. Jeery S. Mersman, Spc. Sean K.A. Langevin, Spc. Lester G. Roque, Pfc. Joseph M. Lancour and Marine Corps Sgt. Phillip A. Bocks. Kyle, members of Chosen Company, you did your duty, and now its time for America to do ours, Obama said. You make us proud, and you motivate all of us to be the best we can be as Americans, as a nation. Following the ceremony, White oered his thoughts to the media: I wear this medal for my team. I also wear a piece of metal around my wrist. It was given to me by another survivor of the 9 November ambush; he wears an identical one, he said. is has made it even more precious than the medal just placed around my neck. On it are the names of six fallen brothers; they are my heroes.Army photo by J.D. Leipold Former Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White receives the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama for his life-saving actions during a Nov. 9, 2007, Taliban ambush in Afghanistan. Navy photoSpanish submariners visiting Naval Submarine Base Groton arrived on the training vessel Juan Sebastian de Elcano. hulled schooner called BE Juan Sebastian de Elcano docked for a goodwill visit. Navy coordinator Aluin Morales, Submarine Group 2, said the exchange was worthwhile because it fosters and continues to grow the relationship with our NATO ally. Spains naval ocersin-training started visiting Groton annually in 2011. is years visit included a submarine force orientation brieng and tour of training facilities. I didnt know you all change crews on some of your submarines, said Midshipman 1st Class Ignacio Grueiro when asked what he learned. Grueiro referred to a dual-crew concept that maximizes the time ballistic-missile and guidedmissile submarines spend operating overseas. e concept was a common topic of interest for the visiting midshipmen. Grueiro said he was familiar with many aspects of the U.S. Navy, but the dual-crew concept for Ohio-class submarines was new to him. I dont believe we could do that in our Navy, he said. We cant maintain our ships at sea for as long as you do, or change an entire crew while forward deployed like some of your subs. e ship is named for a Basque explorer who became the rst sea captain to circumnavigate the world in 1522.GrotonFrom Page 9White receives Medal of Honor American Forces Press ServiceJustice Department ocials announced an enforcement action May 13 against the nations largest servicer of federal and private student loans, which was found to be systematically violating the legal rights of U.S. service members. Sallie Mae also known as Sallie Mae Bank and Navient Solutions is ordered to pay $96.6 million in restitution and penalties, ocials said, adding that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation also reached a settlement with the companies that addresses allegations of student loan servicing misconduct. I commend Attorney General Eric Holder, FDIC Chairman Martin Gruenberg, and the sta at the Department of Justice and FDIC for taking action to protect student loan borrowers, said Holly Petraeus, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau assistant director, who leads the CFPBs Oce of Servicemember Aairs. I have been concerned for some time about the way that military personnel are treated by their student loan servicers, Petraeus said in a statement. e men and women serving this country should receive quality customer service and the legal protections aorded to them. Instead, Sallie Mae gave service members the runaround and denied them the interestrate reduction required by law. is behavior is unacceptable. And its particularly troubling from a company that benets so generously from federal contracts. A 2012 CFPB report found that service members faced serious hurdles in accessing their student loan benets, including the provisions of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act that cap the interest rate on pre-existing student loans and other consumer credit products at 6 percent while the service member is on active duty, CFPB ocials said. Servicers were not providing them with clear and accurate information about their loan repayment options. Ocials noted that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau began accepting student loan complaints in March 2012, and added that service members who have an issue with their servicers should submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. 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8-team tourney for Navy Base Team title underwayBy Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorTeam Kings Bay won the Southeast Zone in the inaugural Navy Bowling Base Team Championships. e team began competition in an eight-team eld with ve other zone champions and three at-large teams Tuesday evening at Rack-N-Roll lanes on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Results were not available at press time. e competition matches scores at dif ferent lanes throughout the Navy. Should Kings Bay advance with a top four score among the eld of eight, it would bowl again next week in a seeded, head-to-head competition. A win there would move the team into the championship matchup during the week of June 1 to 7. Team Kings Bay won the nine-team Southeast Zone, based on the Southeast Region, with 11,726.5 points to runner-up Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles 11,209.5. ree Kings Bay bowlers, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, MCC Dan Blakeslee and ET2 Rob Daugherty burned up the Southeast, placing 1-2-4 in zone averages. MCC Alvin Rodriguez, MTC Keith Wil liams, FTC Dave Messmer and YN2 Eric Day rounded out the zone champions. From Arlington National CemeteryArlington National Cemetery is hosting a series of special events from May through June designed to honor the tradi tions, remember the sacrice and explore the history of the cemetery as it commemorates its 150th anniversary. e commemoration period began with a wreath laying cer emony May 13 at the gravesite of Army Pvt. William Christ man, who was the rst military burial at Ar lington, and concludes with a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on June 15, the day Arlington of cially became a national cem etery. On a Virginia hillside rising above the Potomac River and overlooking Washington, D.C., stands Arlington House. e 19th-century mansion seems out of place amid the more than 250,000 military grave sites that stretch out around it. When construction began in 1802, the estate was not intend ed to be a national cemetery. e mansion, which was intended as a living memo rial to George Washington, was owned and constructed by the rst presidents adopted grand son, George Washington Parke Custis, son of John Parke Cus tis who himself was a child of Martha Washington by her rst marriage and a ward of George Washington. Arlington won out as a name over Mount Washington, which is what George Washington Parke Custis intended calling the 1,100-acre tract of land that he had inherited at the death of his father when he was 3. Ar lington was the name of the Custis family ancestral estate in the Virginia tidewater area. George Washington Parke Custis and his wife, Mary Lee Fitzhugh, whom he had mar ried in 1804, lived in Arlington House were buried together on the property after their deaths in 1857 and 1853, respectively. On June 30, 1831, Custis only child, Mary Anna Randolph Custis, married her childhood friend and distant cousin, Robert E. Lee. Lee was the son of for mer three-term Virginia Gover nor Henry Light Horse Harry Lee and was himself a graduate of West Point. Kings Bays e Dolphin Store donates $7,000 to scholarship foundationFrom The Dolphin StoreIn May 2014, e Dolphin Store sta was proud to contribute $7,000 toward the organizations Dolphin Scholarship Fund, its largest donation to date. e Kings Bay Dolphin Store, located at the Naval Submarine Base Library, 918 USS James Madison Road, is a non-prot store with 100 percent of the proceeds donated to e Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. We take this opportunity to thank all of our Kings Bay customers for their support, said Michelle Meyer, advisory for e Dolphin Store. Dolphin Scholarship Foundation awards annual college schol arships to submarine families. Over the last ve years, e Dolphin Store has donated $23,000 to Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. e Dolphin Store is a one-stop shop for all submarine, Navy, and military related items and gifts. e store oers unique, hard-to-nd items. Regular store hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to noon every rst and third Satur day of the month. e store also opens for appointments. Call (912) 573-6102 for more information. Like e Dolphin Store on Facebook at www.facebook.com/kbdolphinstore for up-to-date information. Also, see Face book for summer hours. Up Periscope The meaning of Memorial Day Page 9 Field Day Kings Bay volunteers help at school Page 9 Our times Military conflict from to present Pages 4, 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Team Kings Bays Triple Threat. From left, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, 208.18 aver age, MMC Dan Blakeslee, 202.82, and ET2 Rob Daugherty, 198.03, finished 1-2-4 in Southeast Zone bowling, leading the team to the zone title in the first year of MWRs Navy Bowling Base Team Championships.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenSee Dolphin, Page 3 See Arlington, Page 6Courtesy photoFrom left, Dolphin Store volunteers Jessica Holton, Samantha Anderson, Melanie Weerheim, Jenn Rorstrom, Michele Mayer and Jean Wines. Team Kings Bay wins Southeast Arlington marks 150th yearStore sta raises barArlington National Cemetery photoMore than a quarter million graves mark the nations oldest military cemetery at Arlington.Once home to Robert E. Lee, Union buried Civil War dead in Arlington House lawnSee Team, Page 3Blakeslee All-Navy team champ By Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorKings Bay MCC Dan Blakeslee earned All-Navy honors and led the Navy team to the intra-service mens team championship last week at the all-military bowling championships at Ft. Lewis-McCord in Tacoma, Wash. Blakeslee bowled the teams high se ries as the Navy beat the other service teams for the Mens Team Champion ship. He also helped the Navy men to a second-place in team All Events bowl ing. He nished third in a eld of 16 during the trials to make the All-Navy team. Kings Bay teammate ET2 Rob Daugherty placed eighth in the eld of 16, falling short of making All-Navy. See Blakeslee, Page 3 U.S. aids in search for girls16-member team sent to help nd missing Nigerian studentsBy Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceA total of 16 military personnel from U.S. Africa Command have joined the interdisciplinary team led by the State Department at the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria, to help in nding hundreds of kidnapped girls, a Pentagon spokes man said. Members of the extremist group Boko Haram abduct ed more than 200 girls from the Government Secondary board ing school in the town of Chibok on the night of April 14. Several countries, including the United States, have oered help. On May 6, President Barack Obama said on NBCs Today program that the immediate priority is nding the girls, and then the world must address the broader problem of organizations like Boko Haram that can cause such havoc in peoples day-to-day lives. At the Pentagon, Army Col. Steve Warren said the group of 16 military personnel includes ex perts in communications, logis tics, civil aairs, operations and intelligence. Obama See Nigeria, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian ClinicAs we are right in the swing of Per manent Change of Station season, it is important to think about what you are going to do with your furry fam ily members. Many service members and their families intend to bring their pets overseas, but it is important to fol low all requirements. If you receive even tentative or ders for an OCONUS assignment, call the vet clinic right away at (912) 573-0755. Some countries require a quarantine period of up to six months, while others require spe cic documentation relating to vac cinations, microchipping and blood tests. If you call the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinarian Clinic well in advance, the sta can help to make sure that your pets meet all of the requirements. Taking pets overseas without completing the requirements can results in quarantines of up to six months and cost thousands of dollars. If you have any questions, feel free to contact the clinic. Clinic sta also recommends starting research into the requirements of the country to which you are traveling. You can start on the USDA-APHIS website www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/. You should also reference the air line requirements as most of them have specications regarding the kennel, food and water availability, and more. VA offers new online GI Bill comparison toole Department of Veterans Af fairs has a new website which makes it easier For Sailors trying to decide how to best use their Post-9/11 GI Bill to calculate benets and learn more about approved colleges, universities and other training programs. e GI Bill Comparison Tool web site at http://benets.va.gov/ gibill/comparison provides key information about college aordability and brings together infor mation from more than 17 dierent online sources and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA benets at each school. e Post-9/11 GI Bill is a compre hensive education benet created by Congress in 2008. In general, veterans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001 are eligible. Since 2009, VA has distributed over $30 billion in the form of tuition and other education-related payments to more than one million veterans, service members and their families, and to the universities, col leges and trade schools they attend.From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsNavy Exchanges offering WiFi servicee Navy Exchange Service Command announced that customers can now stay connected and even check their e-mail when shopping the NEX, thanks to free Wi-Fi ser vices being provided at more than 50 selling locations worldwide. e landscape of retail is changing and more customers are us ing their smartphones to shop, nd product information and even product reviews, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, Store Operations. Oering free WiFi is another customer service we provide as part of the NEX shopping experience.Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.Kids Fishing Clinic at Ft. Clinche Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park has a Kids Fishing Clinic Saturday, May 31, to teach les sons on knot tying, shing ethics, tackle, habi tat, casting and more. e clinic is open to ages ve to 15 and will be held on the Atlantic Fishing Pier at Fort Clinch State Park. e rst 500 kids will take home their own rod and reel combo. A free hot dog lunch will be provided. Bring your family to enjoy a fun day of saltwa ter shing. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274.St. Marys offers music seriese next Starry Nights, Music in the Park free series is 6 to 8 p.m. June 21 at the St. Marys Waterfront Park amphitheater featuring e Just Jazz Quartet. Future bands are No Known Cure July 19, e Just Jazz Quartet returns Aug. 16 and Back From the Brink Sept. 20. Additional Music in the Park dates will be June 28, July 12, Aug. 9 and Sept. Fish Head will begin these dates. For more information, call the St. Marys Welcome Center at (912) 882-4000.Maritime jobs June 4 in JaxA Military to Maritime career event is 1 to 5 p.m., June 4, for current and former military personnel interested in transitioning into a maritime-related eld. e free event will be at the JAXPORT cruise terminal. For more in formation, contact the American Maritime Partnership, (202) 661-3740, or e-mail info at Americanmaritimepartnership.com. Advance registration is recommended. To register on line, visit http://bit.ly/military2maritime.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Benefits for military children setChildren of Fallen Patriots Foundation pro vides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. CFPF has four up coming events May 25 the Jacksonville Suns will be auctioning o their camouage Navy jerseys after the game. For details, visit www. fallenpatriots.org.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of com munity, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! Jacksonville Assistance Office, RLSO SEWhen it comes to renting proper ty, remember Ben Franklins adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Most common problems can be prevented or minimized with just a few hours of care while selecting and moving into a property. If this step is neglected, it may be too late to x issues without losing many more hours and hundreds or even thousands of dollars. To protect yourself, follow the tips below. 1. Understand your contractual obligations. Your obligations as a tenant (a person renting real prop erty) should be described in your rental contract. ey typically in clude paying rent by a certain date, registering vehicles parked on the premises, minimizing noise and dis ruption to other tenants, performing basic maintenance and upkeep, etc. If you do not perform these obliga tions, you may be evicted from the premises and charged unpaid rent for the rest of the contract term. Before signing the contract, ensure you understand your obligations. 2. Ensure the contract does not include a waiver of rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. e SCRA gives you the right to terminate a rental contract if you or your active-duty spouse receives permanent change of station orders or orders to deploy for at least 90 days. It prevents you from having to continue paying rent on a property that you had to move out of. You can voluntarily give up this right, by signing a contract including a waiv er of SCRA protections. Make sure your contract does not include this waiver. 3. Complete a move-in inspec tion with the landlord. While the property is still empty of furniture, complete a move-in inspection with the landlord. Note all damages and discrepancies on a piece of paper, and have the landlord sign/date the sheet conrming agreement with the inspection results. Be thorough. Test switches, appliances, electri cal outlets, windows, etc. A good move-in inspection will discourage the landlord from trying to charge you for property damage when you nally move out. 4. Get help. Make an appointment with a legal assistance attorney to review the lease. If you have any questions about a rental agreement, please contact your nearest Region Legal Service Oce to set up an appointment with a legal assistance attorney. Oce locations can be found on line at www.jag.navy.mil/legal_ser vices/legal_services_locator_rlso. htm. e attorney will assist you with fully understanding not only the contract but also state-specic rent al laws and protections that may ap ply.Take care when entering a lease Navy JAG Remember pets when PCS planning Potpouri By MCC Jayme PastoricCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public Affairse Center for Personal and Pro fessional Development headquar ters celebrated 40 years of the Navy Voluntary Education, May 14. Sta and current and former VOLED pioneers joined together to celebrate the anniversary of the program at CPPD headquarters, located at Naval Air Station Oceana Dam Neck Annex. e Navys VOLED program was ocially launched May 14, 1974. Since then, thousands of Sailors have taken advantage of educational opportunities leading to a profes sional credential and/or a college degree. Because of the VOLED teams dedication, Sailors like me have at tained their educational dreams and created a better, brighter tomorrow for themselves and future genera tions, said CPPD Commanding Of cer Capt. John Newcomer. Our Sailors successes are the Navys suc cesses and have a direct link to Navy mission readiness and accomplish ment. Guest speakers from the Navy VOLED team, past and present, were recognized by Newcomer for their dedication to the VOLED mis sion and the Sailors it supports. Kenn Smith joined the Navy VOLED team in 1975 and spoke about how VOLED has grown over the years. rough an arrangement with Adm. Grace Hopper, I was able to bring the rst computer to Navy Campus in 1985, said Smith, refer ring to the organizations original name of Navy Campus for Achievement that changed in 1999 to the Navy College Program. NCP is cur rently administered by the VOLED directorate of CPPD. Looking at Navy College oces today, I am in awe of the research capabilities and nontraditional education opportunities Sailors have, he said. Director of Navy Voluntary Edu cation Ernest DAntonio spoke pas sionately about the VOLED team that works tirelessly to help Sailors achieve their life-long educational and credentialing goals. For 40 years, Navy VOLED as an institution has helped hundreds of thousands of Sailors achieve an education and develop critical thinking skills, said DAntonio. We support our purpose and the ones who are our mission its the Sailor who is the heart of my organization. e ceremony concluded with awards celebrating the many suc cesses of VOLED team members and a cake cutting by Newcomer and VOLED trailblazer Sandra Barnes, accompanied by Kathy Jones, the daughter of former Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy (MCPON) Robert J. Walker, third MCPON of the Navy and VOLED champion. Navy VOLED has experienced many changes through its 40 years, said Newcomer. One thing that hasnt changed is the teams mission to equip Sailors with strong analytical skills through quality education al opportunities, and provide great educational counseling and out standing customer support.Navy Voluntary Education hits 40 Navy CPPD

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If you are interested in volunteering at the store, contact the store manag ers, Jessica Holton and Samantha Anderson at dsk bmanager@gmail.com. All volunteers are wel come and the store has a play area for those volunteers with children. eir role is to assess the situation, advise and assist the Nigerian government in their eorts to respond to this crisis situation, and nd the young women kid napped by Boko Haram, the colonel added. A majority of the group members were sta ocers and personnel from the embassys Oce of Security Cooperation, whose mission is to enhance the long-term bi lateral defense relationship between Nigeria and the United States. e rest came into the country from outside Africa, he said. e Oce of Security Cooperation in Nigeria is the largest in Africa, War ren said. We have a total of 50 or 60 military personnel assigned to the embassy there as part of the country team, the colonel added, and 16 now are devoted to the interdisciplinary team to nd the girls. e Defense Depart ment has no plans at this point, he said, to put more personnel into the country.NigeriaFrom Page 1 DolphinFrom Page 1 For Platt, the zone title was somewhat anticlimactic. I knew four weeks ago nobody in the Southeast was going to catch us, he said. Platt and others have followed the other zone scores. He seemed opti mistic about Team Kings Bays chances in the tour nament. ere are some teams in the Southwest that have put up similar numbers to ours, Platt said But we still have the top two aver ages in all of the zones. Blakeslee agreed with Platts assessment. I think we have a pret ty good chance, he said. We have a solid team here at Kings Bay. Forty-eight teams start ed the season, represent ing 60 Navy bowling cen ters worldwide. Southeast Zone secretary John Duncan, of NAS Jacksonville, said he was happy with the rst year of the Navy-wide compe tition. It went well this year, Duncan said. It will be interesting to see next year how this grows and evolves. Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, the top bowler on the All-Navy champion last year, was unable to attend the trials. For Blakeslee, stationed on USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) (Blue), it was his third trip to the All-Navy trials and his second time mak ing the All-Navy Team. Blakeslee also nished third in Doubles, teamed with Coast Guard PO1 Chris Leftwich, who is stationed in Topeka, Kan., and fourth in individual All Events. He also com peted in mixed doubles. I had a pretty good week, he said. I was lead ing All Events the for the rst 12 games, dropped to second after 18 and n ished fourth. I couldnt get it together to bring home the title. But, this is the best (All-Navy) outing Ive had. Im a little disap pointed about not bringing home All Events, but overall, Im pretty happy with what I did. Daughertys eighthplace nish in the trials was a repeat of his attempt to make the team the year before. My nish was the same Navy Bowling Base Team ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Final Team Points 1, Naval Sub Base Kings Bay 11,726.5 2, Naval Air Station Jax 11,209.5 3, Naval Air Station Pensacola 8,856.6 4, Naval Station Mayport 7,950 5, Naval Air Station Key West 7,834 6, Naval Station Gitmo 5,795.5 7, Naval Air Station Corry 5,521.5 8, Naval Air Station New Orleans 5,425 9, Joint Task Force Gitmo 2,800 Top 6 Mens averages Bowler Average 1, Leon Platt, NSB Kings Bay 208.18 2, Dan Blakeslee, NSB Kings Bay 202.82 3, Clinton Washington, NAS Jax 199.5 4, Rob Daugherty, NSB Kings Bay 198.03 5, Shaun Spitler, NAS Jax 195.15 6, Tommy Lowrance, NAS Jax 195.06TeamFrom Page 1 as last year. But I felt like I learned a lot, he said. is year was much tougher. It was a very dif cult pattern. Nobody in the whole eld from the Army, Navy or any ser vice bowled a 200 game. BlakesleeFrom Page 1 Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC participant provided as a public service. Please visit JDRF.org today. A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Marines from the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, Charlie Co., cover each other with 5.56 mm M16A2 assault rifles as they prepare to enter one of Saddam Husseins palaces in Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. A Marine with Golf Co., 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, waits for other Marines while participating in a Security and Stabilization Operation in Fallujah, Al Anbar Province, Iraq, dur ing Operation Iraqi Freedom. A destroyed Iraqi truck that came under attack during Operation Desert Storm in Iraq during 1991. Marines of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force move across the Saudi desert back to their camp following a training exercise during Operation Desert Shield in 1991. staging area in Zupanja, Croatia during Operation Joint Endeavor in 1995. Marines from Task Force Mogadishu run for cover as sniper shots are fired from undisclosed areas during Operation Restore Hope in 1992. The U.S. Military since 1945 Army Pfc. Ryan B. Stuart provides security for Afghan forces in the Kharwar district in Afghanistans Logar province on Jan. 11. Stuart is assigned to the 10th Mountain Divisions Company D, 2nd Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, Task Force. U.S. and Afghan forces recovered two weapons caches and detained four people during the two-day operation. DoD photo by Army Sgt. Cooper T. Cash All photos from Department of Defense

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 5 President Lyndon B. Johnson meets troops in Vietnam, 1966. Fighting with the 2nd Inf. Div. north of the Chongchon River, Sfc. Major Cleveland, weapons squad leader, points out communist-led North Korean position to his machine gun crew, Nov. 20, 1950. Force RF-101 Voodoo aircraft photographs a Russian ship loaded with missiles while the aircraft itself casts a shadow in Port Casilda, Cuba, Nov. 6, 1962. The Navy blockaded the island dur ing the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Berlin Wall separated communist-controlled East Germany from isolated city in 1948 and 1949. Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 509th Infantry, parachute from a C-130E Hercules into a drop zone outside the city to conduct operations in support of Operation Just Cause in 1989. prepare two RH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters for participation in Operation Evening Light, a 1980 rescue mission to Iran.

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By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceUncertainty on the defense budget must end, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta told North Carolina reporters recently. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said that unless the sit uation changes, U.S. service members may be sent into harms way inadequately prepared. When reporters asked how the military can do more with less, the chairman said that is not his approach. We really cant ask the kids to do more with less, he said. We can do less with less, but not less well. is, the chairman explained, means the military must take the re sources available and apply them across the many accounts that de mand resources, such as manpower, infrastructure, modernization, train ing and readiness. In the old clich, its really not rocket science, he said. We have a pretty good un derstanding of how to balance our budget. If were not able to balance it, then we run the risk of failing in our most sacred obligation, which is never sending a man or woman into harms way unless they are the best-trained and best-equipped and best-led. Each of the services made tough decisions in craft ing the budget request, Dempsey said, noting that the request boils down to three things: certainty, exibility and time. We need certainty -we cant keep doing this one year at a time, he said. e lack of certainty is felt in North Carolina at places such as Fort Bragg, Pope Air Force Base and Camp Lejeune, he said. Flexibility also is vital, Dempsey said. Weve got to be able to retire systems we no longer need or that can accomplish the mission in other ways, he added. And weve got to be able to get rid of some excess infrastruc ture. We estimate that we have about 20 percent excess infrastructure in terms of bases, camps and stations. And the military needs more time to adapt to the new scal climate, the chairman told reporters. Weve got to spread this out, he said. To ask the department to reduce its budget by a trillion dollars over 10 years is ex traordinarily irresponsible, frankly. If we go to the full level of the Budget Control Act, we will put the nation at unacceptable risk. e Budget Control Act requires sequestration-level spending cuts to resume in scal year 2016. e cuts will ruin readiness, Dempsey said. If they dont act this year on our recommendations for pay, compensation and health care, then the bill will be about $4 billion that will be passed back to the military and we will have to nd within the budget $4 billion, the chairman said. When we are told we cant reduce infrastructure, we cant retire weapons systems, we cant change pay, com pensation, health care, whats left is readiness and modernization, he continued. So we are going to have to raid our readiness accounts and our modernization account. JCS Chairman backs VAs ShinsekiDempsey says budget uncertainties must end By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceEmbattled Veterans Aairs Sec retary Eric K. Shinseki is one of the most decent human beings who ever wore the uniform or who led the nations Army, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said. Speaking with reporters in Dur ham, North Carolina, where he delivered the commencement address at Duke University, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said Shinseki, who retired as Army chief of sta in 2003, is leading the Department of Veterans Aairs with integrity and transparence and energy. e secretary has been under re for a backlog of cases in the VA system and, most recently, over allegations that a Phoenix VA facility covered up the deaths of 40 vet erans who were on a wait list for medical care. Some senators and veterans groups have called for Shinsekis resignation. Dempsey said the Defense Department and VA have been work ing closely together to address problems as service members transition to being veterans. e two departments are try ing to work to make the transition from active care to veterans care much more uid, much more re sponsive, much more seamless, he said. Weve made progress, but we havent made enough prog ress. Leaders in both agencies under stand the scope of the problems and what needs to be done to cor rect them, the chairman said. Dempsey employed the inter view as an opportunity to express his condence in Shinseki. I know there is a series of inves tigations ongoing now, and I have condence that if anyone can help us make this enterprise that ows from DOD to Veterans Af fairs, it is him, he said. And I hope he is given the chance to do it. Shinseki Dempsey In 1846 Lee served in the Mexican War under Gen. Wineld Scott, and in 1852 he was appointed superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, his alma mater. After his father-in-law died in 1857, Lee returned to Arlington to serve as ex ecutor of the estate. Under the terms of her fathers will, Mary Anna Custis Lee was given the right to inhabit and con trol the house for the rest of her life. Custis will also stipulated that upon Mary Annas death, full title would pass to her eldest son, George Washington Custis Lee. Contrary to popular belief, Robert E. Lee never owned the estate. Lee did serve as custodian of the property, which had fallen into disrepair. By 1859, Lee had returned the property and its holdings to prot ability and good order. Lee and his wife lived at Arlington House until 1861, when Virginia ratied an alliance with the Confederacy and seceded from the Union. Lee, who had been named a major general for the Virginia military forces in April 1861, feared for his wifes safety and an ticipated the loss of their family inheritance. In May 1861, Lee wrote to Mary Anna saying: War is inevitable, and there is not telling when it will burst around you ... You have to move and make arrangements to go to some point of safety which you must select ... Keep quiet while you remain, and in your preparations ... May God keep and preserve you and have mercy on all our people. Following the ratication of secession by Virginia, federal troops crossed the Potomac and took up positions around Arlington. Following the occupation, military installations were erected at several locations around the 1,100acre estate, including Fort Whipple (now Fort Myer) and Fort McPherson (now Section 11). Lee deeply regretted the loss of his home. During the early stages of the war, foreseeing the probable loss of his home and be longings, Lee wrote to his wife about Arlington: It is better to make up our minds to a general loss. ey cannot take away the remembrance of the spot, and the memo ries of those that to us ren dered it sacred. at will remain to us as long as life will last, and that we can preserve. Lee continued to feel re sponsible for the estate and earnestly hoped that the slaves who were left behind would be educated and freed, according to the pro visions of George Washing ton Parke Custis will. e property was conscated by the federal gov ernment when property taxes levied against Arlington estate were not paid in person by Mrs. Lee. e property was oered for public sale Jan. 11, 1864, and was purchased by a tax commissioner for government use, for war, military, charitable and educational purposes. Arlington National Cemetery was established by Brig. Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs, who commanded the garrison at Arlington House, appropriated the grounds June 15, 1864, for use as a military cemetery. His intention was to ren der the house uninhabit able should the Lee family ever attempt to return. A stone and masonry burial vault in the rose garden, 20 feet wide and 10 feet deep, and containing the remains of 1,800 Bull Run casualties, was among the rst monuments to Union dead erected under Meigs orders. Meigs himself was later buried within 100 yards of Arlington House with his wife, father and son. e federal government dedicated a model community for freed slaves, Freedmans Village, near the current Memorial Amphitheater, on Dec. 4, 1863. More than 1,100 ArlingtonFrom Page 1 See Arlington, Page 8Arlington National Cemetery photoArlington House at Arlington National Cemetery was once the home to Robert E. Lee and family. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet Ma 27. No pre-registration required.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for get ting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can fur nish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five par ticipants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in mak ing informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. freed slaves were given land by the gov ernment, where they farmed and lived during and after the Civil War. Neither Robert E. Lee, nor his wife, as title holder, ever attempted to publicly recover control of Arlington House. ey were buried at Washington University later renamed Washington and Lee University where Lee had served as president. e couple never returned to the home. After Gen. Lees death in 1870, George Washington Custis Lee brought an action for ejectment in the Circuit Court of Alex andria today Arlington County, Va. Custis Lee, as eldest son of Gen. and Mrs. Lee, claimed that the land had been ille gally conscated and that, according to his grandfathers will, he was the legal owner. In 1882, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision, returned the property to Custis Lee, stating that it had been con scated without due process. In 1883, Congress purchased the property from Lee for $150,000. It became a military res ervation and Freedmans Village ceased to exist. However, the gravesites that were once part of the village remained on the grounds of the reservation. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is spon sored by Commander, Navy Installa tions Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide informa tion, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without ad vanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of haz ards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative govern ment resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emer gency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emer gency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emer gency Preparedness Town Hall meet ing from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emer gency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4 ArlingtonFrom Page 6 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014

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Memorial Day has its roots in our costliest war, the Civil War. The South and North both claim its origin. For many years, it was known as Decoration Day, a day to decorate with flowers the graves of the war dead. During the 1880s, the name changed from Decoration Day to Memorial Day. It wasnt until 1967 that Memorial Day become a Federal holiday. The day was changed from the traditional May 30 to the last Monday in May, to create a three-day weekend.What does Memorial Day mean to you?STS2 Preston Standridge USS Florida Blue Helen, Ga. Remembering everyone who fought and died and to pay respect to their families. Nancy DeLong Family member Wadsworth, Ohio Its a wonderful reminder that freedom is not free and a way to honor those who have sacrificed their lives. Patrolman Anthony Bolds Mayport Police James Island, S.C. Our remembering and honoring those who sac rificed their lives for the freedom we now have. MMFN Kingsley Egerton USS Florida Gold Decatur, Ga. It makes me proud to be an American knowing I live in a free country that people fought and died for so I can prosper. Amanda Liguore Family member Canfield, Ohio Its a day of reflection on things that have been sac rificed for and the good thats become of it. Patrolman Steve Reis Mayport Police Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. To me, its the freedom that everyone fought for so we can live in a free country today. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photos by EM1 Mark Treen Eighteen Sailors and Marines from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay volunteered their Friday, May 16 to help St. Marys Elementary Schools Field Day. Service members helped set up the field and helped at each event to make sure the students had a good time. St. Marys Field Day By Lt. Timothy HawkinsSubmarine Group 2 Public AffairsMore than 40 midship men from the Spanish Navy visited Sailors at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., May 12, to learn about the U.S. submarine force. e group drove three hours north from New York City two days after their training ship a four-masted topsail, steel-Spanish sailors visit GrotonSee Groton, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 22, 2014 9

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Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration is at the customer service coun ter in the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at registration. No refunds. Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Ses sion 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the twoweeks. Private lessons available for $75 with ve 1-on-1 lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or 573-3990 for more details. Arrive on time, bring sunscreen and towels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Intramural Indoor Summer Volleyball Registration is ongoing. Play begins June 9 with a 5 p.m. captains meeting June 4 at the Fitness Cen ter. Fee is $100. Parent & Child Golf Tournament Saturday, June 14, Trident Lakes starts with 11 a.m. regis tration, 11:30 a.m. lunch and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $30 or $20 for 9 holes. Sign up at the Pro Shop Customer Service counter. (912) 573-8475. Trident Lakes shing Open 6 to 8 a.m., May 30 and 31. For details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Mother and Son Beach Party June 14 inside the Triplex Conference Center. Tickets at ITT are $15 for adult and 12 and older, $12 for children 3 to 11. Food 5 to 7 p.m., music and more until 8 p.m. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-4564. Summer Splash 2014 From noon to 4 p.m., Sat urday, May 24 free entry at the Fitness Center pool with fun games, music, prizes and the Build-A-Boat competi tion. Food will be available for purchase. Special thanks to the sponsors of this event: Navy Federal Credit Union & USAA. (No endorsement is implied) Call (912) 5733001 for more information. Fathers Day at Rack-N-Roll Dads bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., June 15. For details, call (912) 573-9492. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies for May are Walking with Dinosaurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Kids movies will be shown during summer break starting May 22. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kinder garten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up be gan April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for ac tive duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide or ders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family in come. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Junior Golf Camp For ages 12 to 17 at Trident Lakes, June 2 to 6 and July 21 to 25. $150 per person. Provide your own lunch. Call (912) 573-8475. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenThe Americas Armed Forces Kids Run was May 17 at the NSB Fitness Complex. ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sand wiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. 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By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Barack Obama at a White House ceremony May 13, making him the sixth living Army recipient and the 14th from all services to earn the medal in either Iraq or Afghanistan. Obama opened his remarks in the East Room by pay ing tribute not just to White, but to what he referred to as the /11 generation, all those young citizens who came forth after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States to volunteer their service knowing ful ly well what the cost could be. For more than 12 years, with our nation at war, the men and women of our armed forces have known the measure of danger that comes with military service, he said. But year after year, tour after tour, they have dis played a seless willingness to incur it by stepping forward, by volunteering, by serving and sacricing greatly to keep us all safe. Today, our troops are coming home, he added, say ing that by years end the war in Afghanistan will be over. And, today, we pay tribute to a soldier who embodies the courage of his generation a young man who was a freshman in high school when the Twin Towers fell, and who just ve years later became an elite paratrooper with the legendary 173rd Airborne the Sky Soldiers. e president recounted the Nov. 9, 2007, ambush out side the village of Aranas in Afghanistans Nuristan prov ince, in which ve soldiers and a Marine would perish, as Whites unit of 13 Americans and a squad of Afghan soldiers descended into what was called Ambush Alley. Suddenly, the chatter of AK-47s and the smoke trails of rocket-propelled grenades lit up the valley, sending shat tered shards and chunks of red-hot metal and rock ying. With nowhere to escape the three-pronged onslaught but down a steep decline, White, 1st Lt. Matthew Ferr ara, Spc. Kain Schilling, Marine Corps Sgt. Phillip Bocks and an interpreter were left stranded as the rest of the unit slid 160 feet down the mountain. en a specialist, the 20-year-old White emptied one 30-round clip from his M-4, but as he went to slide an other into place, an RPG screamed in nearby. It was just lights out, he said later. White saw his buddy Schilling trying to stay in the shade of what Schilling later recalled as the smallest tree on earth. Schilling had been wounded severely in his right upper arm, so White sprinted to Schilling, ap plied a tourniquet, then saw Bocks. After four sprints and attempts to pull Bocks to cover, White nally was successful, and he began adminis tering rst aid. He applied a tourniquet, but it was too late. Bocks wounds had been too severe, and he passed away. When White looked up, he saw Schilling take another round, this time to his left leg. Again, he sprinted to Schilling. Out of tourniquets, he used his belt and was able to once again stop the bleeding. While the battle continued, White saw his lieutenant lying face-down. He ran to Ferrara, but found he was dead. As White once recalled in an interview, he had accepted that he and Schilling werent going to make it through this reght. Its just a matter of time before Im dead, White had said. I gured if thats going to happen, I might as well help while I can. White next secured a radio, as both his and Schillings had been destroyed by small-arms re. He relayed a situational report and called for mortars, artillery, air strikes and helicopter guns runs. For the second time that day, an explosion scrambled my brains a little bit there, concussed White. A friendly 120-mm mortar round had fallen short of. Struggling to keep Schilling and himself from fall ing asleep, White eventually was able to lay out a land ing zone and assist the ight medic in hoisting all the wounded aboard. Only then did he allow himself to be medically evacuated. Today, nearly seven years later, White and the other survivors of the Battle of Aranas wear a stainless steel wristband made by one of the units soldiers. Each is etched with the names of those who didnt come home: 1st Lt. Matthew C. Ferrara, Sgt. Jeery S. Mersman, Spc. Sean K.A. Langevin, Spc. Lester G. Roque, Pfc. Joseph M. Lancour and Marine Corps Sgt. Phillip A. Bocks. Kyle, members of Chosen Company, you did your duty, and now its time for America to do ours, Obama said. You make us proud, and you motivate all of us to be the best we can be as Americans, as a nation. Following the ceremony, White oered his thoughts to the media: I wear this medal for my team. I also wear a piece of metal around my wrist. It was given to me by another survivor of the 9 November ambush; he wears an identical one, he said. is has made it even more precious than the medal just placed around my neck. On it are the names of six fallen brothers; they are my heroes.Army photo by J.D. Leipold Former Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White receives the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama for his life-saving actions during a Nov. 9, 2007, Taliban ambush in Afghanistan. Navy photoSpanish submariners visiting Naval Submarine Base Groton arrived on the training vessel Juan Sebastian de Elcano. hulled schooner called BE Juan Sebastian de Elcano docked for a goodwill visit. Navy coordinator Aluin Morales, Submarine Group 2, said the exchange was worthwhile because it fosters and continues to grow the relationship with our NATO ally. Spains naval ocersin-training started visiting Groton annually in 2011. is years visit included a submarine force orien tation brieng and tour of training facilities. I didnt know you all change crews on some of your submarines, said Midshipman 1st Class Ig nacio Grueiro when asked what he learned. Grueiro referred to a dual-crew concept that maximizes the time ballistic-missile and guidedmissile submarines spend operating overseas. e concept was a common topic of interest for the vis iting midshipmen. Grueiro said he was familiar with many aspects of the U.S. Navy, but the dual-crew concept for Ohio-class submarines was new to him. I dont believe we could do that in our Navy, he said. We cant maintain our ships at sea for as long as you do, or change an entire crew while for ward deployed like some of your subs. e ship is named for a Basque explorer who became the rst sea cap tain to circumnavigate the world in 1522.GrotonFrom Page 9White receives Medal of Honor American Forces Press ServiceJustice Department ocials an nounced an enforcement action May 13 against the nations largest servicer of federal and private student loans, which was found to be systematically violating the legal rights of U.S. service members. Sallie Mae also known as Sallie Mae Bank and Navient Solutions is ordered to pay $96.6 million in restitution and penalties, ocials said, adding that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation also reached a settlement with the com panies that addresses allegations of student loan servicing misconduct. I commend Attorney General Eric Holder, FDIC Chairman Martin Gruenberg, and the sta at the Department of Justice and FDIC for taking action to protect student loan bor rowers, said Holly Petrae us, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau assis tant director, who leads the CFPBs Oce of Ser vicemember Aairs. I have been concerned for some time about the way that military personnel are treated by their student loan servicers, Petraeus said in a state ment. e men and women serving this country should receive quality customer service and the legal protections aorded to them. Instead, Sallie Mae gave service mem bers the runaround and denied them the interestrate reduction required by law. is behavior is unacceptable. And its par ticularly troubling from a company that benets so generously from federal contracts. A 2012 CFPB report found that service mem bers faced serious hurdles in accessing their student loan benets, including the provisions of the Ser vicemembers Civil Relief Act that cap the interest rate on pre-existing student loans and other con sumer credit products at 6 percent while the service member is on active duty, CFPB ocials said. Servicers were not providing them with clear and accurate informa tion about their loan repayment options. Ocials noted that the Consumer Finan cial Protection Bureau began accepting student loan complaints in March 2012, and added that service members who have an issue with their servicers should submit a complaint to the Con sumer Financial Protection Bureau. 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