The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00348


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Full Text

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Camden Navy League honoredLocal council named Outstanding by national organizationFrom The Navy Leaguee CamdenKings Bay Council has been recognized as an Outstanding Council by the national Navy League of the United States for 2013. Of the more than 250 councils world-wide, only 14 received this designation. is achievement is a testament to the outstanding work of the ocers and board of directors as we strive to fulll the councils mission of serving the men and women of the sea services and their families, said council President David Burch. It also recognizes the strong support of our members who attend our events and respond with open hearts, and wallets, when we ask for their support to meet our goals. Each of the councils are judged on their performance in eight areas: Support of the sea services; Membership retention; Membership growth; Community education activities; Youth activities; Council activities; Public aairs activities; and, legislative activities. Selection of Outstanding, Meritorious and Honorable Mention councils are made by a committee after review of each councils annual report. We plan on continuing our record of excellence in the years ahead and welcome any and all community members who wish to join our council and help us full our mission, Burch said. e council oers many different volunteer opportunities in areas such as membership recruitment and retention; liaison to the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard commands stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys; communications and public relations; and special projects such as Operation Paperback, Toys for Tots, VA Medical Center visits; and, the annual Sea Services Awards Banquet. Individuals interested in joining the Navy League should contact council membership NH Jax, Kings Bay clinic salute sta membersBy Keats ReynoldsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs AssistantOn May 1, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer proclaimed May 4 to 10 as Public Service Recognition Week throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. It is an opportunity to thank the almost 650 civilian men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support sta. Now more than ever, our federal employees are being asked to do more with less, Shaer said. Yet, they continue to press forward and support readiness and quality, patient-centered carefrom healing patients to ensuring we have the supplies needed to do so. e theme for PSRW 2014 is Proud to Serve. e NH Jacksonville civil service team demonstrates this daily by the attentiveness they show to the approximately 67,000 enrolled patients across the command. Even through the furlough period of 2013, the federal workforce put service above self to ensure that medical care at the hospital and branch health clinics did not waiver. When someone becomes part of the U.S. Civil Service, they not only accept a job but an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. Federal workers, like our military members, come from many dierent walks of life Up Periscope Whats cooking for National Barbecue Month Page 9 Leathernecks Military Child feted at MCSFBn Page 8 3 stars CNIC makes rounds at NSB Kings Bay Pages 4, 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See League, Page 3 From left Mary Gill with her daughter, Gwendolyn, Fleet and Family New Parent Support Specialist Julie Mooney, Commissary Director Andy Anderson, Kings Bay Executive Officer Cmdr. Ed Callahan Nicole McKnight with daughter, (in front of table) Payton and Camden Medical nurse Lisa Freeland.Photo by EM1 Mark Treen Service lauds community for supporting families, personnel of two unitsBy PA1 Lauren JorgensonCoast Guard Public Affairs Detachment JacksonvilleMembers of the Camden County community and the Coast Guard came together Friday to recognize and celebrate Camden Countys ofcial designation as the nations rst Coast Guard Community. e Coast Guard Cities program allows the Coast Guard to formally recognize those cities which have made special eorts to acknowledge the professional work of the Coast Guard men and women assigned to their area and have made Coast Guardsmen and their families feel at home in their home away from home. While 15 other cities have been designated by Congress as Coast Guard cities, Camden County is the rst county to be named a Coast Guard Community. Camden County comprises Kingsland, St. Marys, Kings Bay and Woodbine, and is home to Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay and Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay. e Camden Partnership hosted a luncheon at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, during which the Coast Guard proclamation was read and presented. A Camden County Coast Guard Community Celebration Day proclamation was also read, designating May 17, 2014, as Coast Guard Community Celebration Day for all of Camden County. Commissary, Fleet and Family get parents thinking fruit, veggiesBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsNew parents and their children from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay gathered at the Commissary April 22 to get a rst-hand look at nutrition and healthy eating as part of the Fleet and Family Support Centers New Parenting Support Class. At the Commissary, tables lined with fresh fruit and colorful vegetables were prepared for the guests to enjoy while promoting how important it is for children to eat a well-balanced diet. Our group went for a walk with the children and ended at the Commissary as a eld trip with the children, said Julie Moonie, FFSC New Parent Support Specialist. e commissary provided healthy snacks to the group as part of commissarys Month of the Military Childs showcase of fruits and veggies for little heroes. Mary Gill, a navy spouse and member of the par enting class, said its important for parents to start children eating fruits and vegetables at a young age. Its the best way, and it keeps them healthier, she said. e New Parent Support Home Visita tion Program, provided by the Fleet and Family Support Center, oers expectant or new parents support and guidance in their homes or through oce visits at the FFSC. e focus of the program is on developing nurturing parenting skills, to teach child development and to connect families with needed resources. One of the services the NPSHVP oers is a New Moms and Dads Group every Tuesday from 1000 to noon at the FFCS, Mooney said. is is an opportunity for parents of young children to share experiences and ideas. It is also an opportunity for children to meet new friends in a play group setting. Mooney said the nal service oered by the NPSHVP is an Expectant Families Workshop that is oered every other month at the FFSC. See BHC, Page 3 Getting kids their proper nutrition Coast Guard photo by PA1 Lauren Jorgensen Coast Guard Rear Adm. Steven Poulin, right, with St. Marys Mayor John F. Morrissey displays the official proclamation naming Camden County a Coast Guard Community Friday, April 25. Coast Guard, county linked This is an opportunity for parents of young children to share experiences and ideas. Julie Moonie FFSC New Parent SupportBHC observing Public Service Week Navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenBHC Nurse Della Poponea gives a shot to ET3 Andrew Perea, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) Gold. Radiation Health Technician Christopher Barberc scans HM2 Joshua Gannon. See Nutrition, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 By Lt. Kym MurphyLegal Assistance Attorney, Pensacola Legal Assistance Office, RLSO SEIf you have debt, you should be aware of your rights and the rules that debt collectors have to follow when trying to collect a debt from you under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. e FDCPA was mainly designed to eliminate abusive, deceptive, and unfair collection practices by debt collectors. Under the FDCPA, a debt collector is someone who regularly collects debts owed to others. is includes collection agencies, lawyers who collect debts on a regular basis, and companies that buy delinquent debts and then try to collect them. e FDCPA specically covers debt you incurred for personal, family, or household purposes. is means things like a personal credit card account, an auto loan, a medical bill and your mortgage, but it doesnt cover debts you incurred to run a business. Once youve gured out that your debt qualies under the FDCPA, and that the person/ company trying to collect from you is regulated by the FDCPA, then you know that that person/ company has to play by the following rules: 1) Communications. A debt collector may not communicate with you or your spouse at any unusual time (before 0800 or after 2100 in your time zone) or at any place that is inconvenient to you. is includes your place of employment. Furthermore, if the debt collector knows you have hired an attorney, then all contact has to be with your attorney and not you. If you refuse to pay a debt or request that the debt collector stops contacting you in writing, then the debt collector must cease all further communication. 2) Validation of debts. A debt collector must provide you with certain basic information within ve days of rst contacting you. is information specically includes the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, that you have 30 days to dispute the debt before it is assumed valid, that if you dispute in writing they will send you a verication of the debt, and that if the original creditor is dierent from the current creditor (for example, your debt was sold), then you can request in writing to know the identity of the original creditor. 3) Prohibited practices. A debt collector may not harass, oppress, or abuse any person. is speci cally includes using obscene or profane language, threatening violence, repeatedly calling your phone or not identifying them selves. Also, a debt collector may not use any false, deceptive, or misleading representations. is includes claiming to work for the government, claiming to be an attorney, using a fake name or an inaccurate representation of what you owe. Last, a debt col lector may not use unfair means to collect a debt from you. is means that a debt collector can not collect any additional inter est not permitted by law, ask for a postdated check, call you collect or use a postcard to contact you. You can submit a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau at www.consumerfinance.gov/complaint/ or with the Better Business Bureau at www.bbb.org/. You also can report any problems to your state Attorney Generals Oce or you can sue them in court. If you would like more information or would like to nd the legal assistance oce closest to you, please contact us at any of our oces listed at www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.8th Air Force speaker at MOAAJohn Telgener of the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum in Savannah will be the guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Organization of America dinner-meeting beginning at 5:30 p.m., May 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road. Cost for meal is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Major Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net by May 16.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Benefits for military children setChildren of Fallen Patriots Foundation provides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. CFPF has four upcoming events May 13 is Children of Fallen Patriots Day. Jacksonville Suns will be honoring a CFPF family; May 17 is Jacksonville Sharks Military Appreciation Night. e Sharks will be honoring a CFPF family; May 18 is the X Beach Charity Challenge. CFPF will benet from the proceeds; May 25 the Jacksonville Suns will be auctioning o their camouage Navy jerseys after the game. For details, visit www.fallenpatriots.org.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of community, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! Know your rights regarding debt Navy Jag From the Kings Bay Employer Committee e Kings Bay Employer Committee is taking applications for a $500 college scholarship from high school seniors in Camden County. e deadline to apply for the Tracy L. Foreman Scholarship is Monday, May 12. e scholarship is funded by an employer committee endowment established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employment marketing representative at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center. Kings Bay Employer Committee President Al Daniels of Dominos donated $500 for this years scholarship award. e scholarship will be awarded to a graduating senior, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited institution of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants also must be working part-time or serve a documented internship for a minimum of 10 hours per week. e scholarships are non-renewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarship, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores and a 2-to-3 page essay. e essay theme is how to use education and training to develop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a member of the employer committees scholarship subcommittee, at rbaldwin@camden.k12.ga.us or (912) 729-4790. Applications for the scholarships are available at the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center, 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys, and the Camden County High School Guidance Oce. For additional information, contact the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. To learn more about career opportunities, connect with us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, which can be conveniently accessed at www.employgeorgia.com.Scholarships deadline is May 12 KB Employer Committee From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentDepartment heads and building managers must assign an individual to inspect monthly the extinguishers in each of their facilities. Home owners can do this too. Check these details during a monthly re extinguisher inspection Conrm the extinguisher is visible, unobstructed, and in its designated location. Verify the locking pin is intact and the tamper seal is unbroken. Examine the extinguisher for obvious physical damage, corrosion, leakage or clogged nozzle. Conrm the pressure gauge or indicator is in the operable range or position, and lift the extinguisher to ensure it is still full. Make sure the operating instructions on the nameplate are legible and facing outward. Initial and date the back of the tag. If you need an inspection tag, you can contact your local safety oce or print it from the re departments Subase internet page. Report missing, damaged or used extinguishers immediately to the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Prevention Oce, Building 1041 or call (912) 573-9998.Stamp out smoking firesCareless smoking is the leading cause of re deaths in our country. Do you know what causes these re deaths? Carelessly discarded smoking materials from hot ashes dumped into the garbage to a cigarette falling on to a couch cushion. Carelessly discarded smoking materials kills hundreds of people every year. ese types of res are too common. With a little attention you can prevent these res and save lives. Remind friends and family members to follow these safety tips. Never smoke in bed. Always use large, oversized ashtrays. Make sure ashes are cold before dumping ashtrays into the garbage. Check for cigarettes or ashes that may have fallen between couch and chair cushions after a party. For more information, contact the Kings Bay Fire Prevention Team at (912) 573-9998. Check re extinguishers monthly Kings Bay FFSC

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Vice President Greg Glaz at (912) 673-7977. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. e councils ocers are President Dave Burch, Immediate Past President Hunt ornhill, VP Legislative Aairs Dave Reilly; VP Public Relations Barrett King, VP Programs Tim Bryant, VP Operations Georgia Stilson, VP Membership Greg Glaz, VP Youth Programs Barbara Johns, Judge Advocate Sam Colville, Secretary Cheryl Aston, Treasurer Gull Weaver, Chaplain Mike Huber and Council Historian Debra Morin. Additional information can be found on the council website at kingsbaynavyleague.org/. LeagueFrom Page 1Courtesy photoCamden-Kings Bay Navy League Council, from left, Dave Reilly, Hunt Thornhill, Barrett King, Dave Burch, Sam Colville, Tim Bryant, Georgia Stilson, Greg Glaz, Barbara Johns and Cheryl Aston. Not shown Gull Weaver, Mike Huber and Debra Morin. Some of the topics covered during that workshop included basic baby care, safe sleeping practices, care and home safety, crying and colic, bonding with baby, early child development, and community and military resources. For more information about NPSHVP contact Julie Mooney at (912) 5734893. and fulll many dierent missions. Together, they unite to uphold the pledge to serve and protect the U.S. government. In her proclamation to the command, Capt. Shaffer recalled of her time as NH Jacksonville commanding ocer and expressed her gratitude for the public service workers who continue to put service above self. It has been an honor and a privilege to be your commanding ocer these past two years and as I will soon pass on the command to another, Ill take comfort in knowing that youour civil service employees play critical roles in the continuity of great care across Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation, Shaer said. Your hard work does not go unnoticed, and I want you to know that I am proud to serve with you. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for cancer, developing solutions to address energy and climate crises, serving alongside warghters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. government is the best in the world. For more information on ways to celebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw. org. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 67,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. BHCFrom Page 1 NutritionFrom Page 1 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceClaims of a lack of coordination inside the Defense Department made by anonymous ocials in media reports regarding the handling of a recent proof-of-life video of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are completely false, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. ey mischaracterize the ongoing close coordination and teamwork within this department and with other U.S. government agencies, Warren said. Bergdahl has been missing for too long, the colonel added. ere should be no doubt that the department is using all the military, intelligence and diplomatic tools at its disposal to bring him home safely. Bergdahl, now 28, was found missing from his duty station in eastern Afghanistan June 30, 2009, and was declared missing/ captured three days later. He is believed to be held by members of the Haqqani network. I can tell you, across the spectrum, diplomatically, militarily, even from an intelligence perspective, weve never lost focus on Bowe Bergdahl and on trying to get him home, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said during a January 16 news conference, held the day after the proof-of-life video was released. It is important to underscore that the reason Sgt. Bergdahl remains a captive is because hes being held by terrorists, not because of a lack of eort or coordination by the United States government, Warren said. Anyone who does leak this level of detail, in my opinion, does not have the interests or safety of Bowe Bergdahl in mind, he added. BergdahlDOD: Bergdahl is not forgotten THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Public Works Construction Manager Lt. Robert Clark briefs French. Trident Refit Facility Commanding Officer Capt. Larry Hill answers questions. Clark points out corrosion repairs being done. CNIC tours current construction projects and additionally visited various facilities aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. CNIC tours Kings BayVice Adm. William D. French, Commander, Navy Installations Command visits Morale, Welfare and Recreations The Sports Zone on board Naval Submarine base Kings Bay April 25.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 5 Navy photos by EM1 Mark Treen One stop on the tour was the water front, where French and Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, director of Strategic Systems Programs, center and Cmd. Shawn Follum of Public Works, right, discuss improvements. French discusses the benefits of the bases automated infrastructure using Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. Lt. Matthew King NAVFAC Production Officer, Wayne Blackburn, Utilities System Operator Base Operations Services Contractor, and Commanding Officer Naval Submarine Base Capt. Harvey Guffey listen to a question. The CNIC claps thank you after The Youth Centers pre-school class students sing My Country Tis of Thee. French speaks with Charlie Smith Jr. after lunch with the Camden Partnership. Clockwise from above, Tony Cartagena, Balfour Beatty Kings Bay Community Manager, and Paula Cook, Area Community Manager discusses renovations; Cmdr. Stephen Love, Maritime Force Protection Unit Commanding Officer, talk at the Coast Guard Community recognition lunch; MWR Director Bob Spinnenweber shows the CNIC and CNIC Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth the Fitness Center.

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Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration will be taken at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the customer service counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at time of registration. No refunds. Pre-season is May 5 to 8 and May 12 to 15; Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-week sessions. Private lessons are available for $75 with ve one-on-one lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or x3990 for more details. Arrive on time for class, bring sunscreen andtowels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Summer Splash 2014 From noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 24 free entry at the Fitness Center pool with fun games, music, prizes and the Build-A-Boat competition. Food will be available for purchase. Special thanks to the sponsors of this event: Navy Federal Credit Union & USAA. (No endorsement implied) (912) 573-3001. Americas Armed Forces Kids Run Check-in is 8:30 to 8:45 a.m. Saturday, May 17 at the Fitness Complex. Entry is free. Its open to all military youth ages 5 to 13. Register on-line at www.americaskidsrun.org. Call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 for details. Movie Under e Stars Saturday, May 17 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing e Lego Movie, rated PG. Showtime is at dusk, approximately 8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor theater. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Navy Adventures Unleashed Walking Dead Es cape Run in Jacksonville Sat urday, May 17 at Ever bank Field Stadium is the Zombie Obstacle Event. Reg ister on website for 8:15 p.m. wave to participate with the survivors of Team Kings Bay at www. thewalkingdeadescape. com/faq. Pre-register for transportation at Big EZ by May 16 for $5. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is sup ported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Happy Mothers Day from Rack-N-Roll Lanes All moms bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., Sunday, May 11. Shoe rental is not included. Regular game prices for everyone else. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies for May are Happy Feet 2 May 10 and 11, Coudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 May 17 and 18, and Walking with Dinosaurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Additional kids movies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kinder garten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up be gins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for ac tive duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/ pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Break fast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 8 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 9,172 2, NAS Jax 8,739.5 3, NASP 7,084 4, Mayport 6,871.5 5, Key West 6,128.5 6, NAVSTA Gitmo 4,591 7, New Orleans 4,214.5 7, NASP Corry 4,029 9, JTF Gitmo 2,240 Individuals Average 1, Leon Platt KB 205.23 2, Dan Blakeslee KB 200.60 3, T. Lowrance NAS J 196.98 4, Rob Daugherty KB 195.00 5, C. Washington NAS J 194.71 6, Shaun Spitler NAS J 193.75 7, Chris Oglsby NO 191.00 8, Kyler Ascue KW 188.56 9, Keith Williams KB 187.46 10, Todd Whitehead NG 186.83 Navy Team Bowling Periscope file photoSign up for childrens swim lessons now at the Kings Bay Fitness Center pool. Intramural Sports Ave. Joes Bowling FinalTeam W L Pins1, Ray & Ryan 9 3 4,906 2, My Spare Lady 8 4 2,653 3, The Kings 8 4 2,319 4, B&J Express 7 5 4,432 5, Two Cliffs 7 5 4,016 6, Roll Tide or Nah 7 5 3,561 7, Fire Fighters 7 5 3,225 8, Bs Knees 7 5 2,417 9, Spare Us 6 6 3,775 10, Balls of Steel 5 7 4,180 11, RockyBowlwinkle 4 8 3,478 12, Nutty Buddies 3 9 2,796 13, Wonder Twins 3 9 3,148Mens SoftballTeam W L T1, Jcs Crew 8 0 0 2, West Virginia 5 0 0 3, Shop 38 7 2 0Coed SoftballTeam W L T1, Angry Birds 6 1 0 1, Shop 38 6 1 0 3, Softball Busters 4 3 0 4-versus-4 Flag Football started May 5, but teams can still register. MWR Intramural Sports photoAverage Joes Bowling Champion Ray & Ryan. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors need to take charge of their own careers, educate themselves, and understand that detailers are their advocates, Navy ocials said recently. No one cares any more about your career than you do. Make yourself smart and knowledgeable on the latest NAVADMINS and any changes or updates to the MILPERSMAN, said Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Tom Jones, lead Mass Communication Specialist detailer. You can nd those on NPCs website. Be an informed consumer. Sailors communicate their desires to detailers through the Career Management System Interactive Detailing. CMS-ID is a web-based tool that enables enlisted Sailors to research and apply for jobs and communicate their career goals to career counselors and detailers. Sailors can log into CMS-ID at www.cmsid.navy.mil/. Remember to communicate with your detailer and keep your information in CMS-ID up-to-date and current, including communicating your preferences what are you looking to do and where are you looking to serve in your next assignment, Jones said. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. e detailing process is constantly under review and enhancements are made when necessary. NAVADMIN 058/14 was recently released that aects the detailing process. Detailers wont assign Sailors to adver tised jobs until after the close of the CMSID application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMSID any time after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected. When a detailer has selected a Sailor for a billet, a notication is sent to that Sailor, through CMS/ID, to the email addresses provided in a Sailors personal contact information prole. ats why its so important that Sailors to keep their CMS-ID prole updated, Jones said.Detailers detail detailing 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, May 12 and 19. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet May 13, 20 and 27. No pre-registration required.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 5 to 9 p.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for May 14A job search workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., May 14. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training requirement. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 14 and 8 a.m. to noon May 28. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, May 22 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items includ ing skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, May 21. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 15. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 10 to 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is 1 to 4 p.m., May 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a normal part of everyday personal financial manage ment for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop provides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 6 to 8 p.m., May 20. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Develop a spending plan training scheduledDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This singlesession workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan with your spouse. This workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 5734513 for more information or to register.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506 Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is sponsored by Commander, Navy Installations Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide information, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without advanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of hazards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative government resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emergency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emergency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emergency Preparedness Town Hall meeting from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emergency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 7

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Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay had an ice cream social and took a command-style photo April 23 for family members.Photos by India Winslow Month of the Miltary Child 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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Im a little confused. Its National Barbecue Month but when I look at the National Barbecue Association website it shows people doing what I call grilling. All the pictures have meat with barbecue sauce on it. So for simplicitys sake, I simply asked what do you like to put on the grill? Personally, I have these great brats from a meat market in Jacksonville. Theyre fat and about 8or 9-inches long. Im going to boil them in beer and then double wrap them in thick cut bacon. Hooray for May, its National Barbecue MonthET3 Stephen Franz Trident Refit Facility Sumiton, Ala. Hamburgers and hot dogs, the classics. MASN Matthew Wilson Security Force Battalion Buffalo, N.Y. I personally like steaks, a New York strip I think. Trevis Bromer Retired Army Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Ribs. I marinate them overnight and smoke them on the grill. Tiffany Bromer Family member Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. I usually like jerked pork shoulder. MT2 Osvaldo Serna Trident Training Facility Laredo, Texas Fajitas. I just put skirt steak with lemon on the grill. MA2 Sarah Bausch Subase Shawnee, Kan. Theres so many delicious things. Ill go with pork butt for pulled pork. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho DoD photo by MC1 Daniel HintonGen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, gets food at a base dining hall during his visit to Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, May 1. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Servicee Afghan election last month marked a turning point for Afghanistans national security forces, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said at Bagram Aireld, Afghanistan, May 2. e success of the April 5 presidential election boosted the condence of members of the Afghan force, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said following a meeting with senior U.S. leaders. It was Dempseys second visit here in as many months. I wanted to come over this time because I had read about the elections and Id heard about how well the [Afghan forces] had performed, he said during an interview. I wanted to learn more about what that really means. e chairman said one of the generals he spoke with used a sports analogy to describe what U.S. forces in Afghanistan did the day of the election. American forces, the general told him, got up, got ready, warmed up and then sat on the bench. ey didnt have to get into the game. Stated another way, the Afghan security forces managed the entire thing, the chairman said. ey transported the ballots, they protected the polling places, they fought o the attempts of the Taliban to disrupt it. So for me that election seems to be a turning point in the condence of the [Afghan security forces]. e Afghan forces proved they could peak for a momentous occasion, the chairman said. ey were able to plan, they were able to prepare, they were able to execute a big momentous event, he added. Afghan forces should be proud of the achievement, Dempsey said. I think where they still require work is in the mundane the day-to-day things of paying and feeding and resupplying and maintaining, he said. Afghan forces have proved they can ght. No one questions that. But the en -Election turning pointSee Dempsey, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 By MC1 Tim ComerfordNaval History and Heritage Commands Communication Outreach DivisionIt is widely accepted that modern photography was born when it was rst introduced commercially in 1839. Since then countless images have snapped of Navy actions and Sailors around the world in times of crisis, conict, strife and need. Archiving a small portion of that American body of work is the job of the Naval History and Heritage Commands Photo Archive, which includes in its inventory imagery dating as far back as the Civil War-era and extending through to the mid-1990s. We are estimating somewhere in the neighborhood of one million individual photographs, said Lisa Crunk, lead archivist for NHHCs three photo archivists. We have never done a count because we dont have an actual database that can do that yet. Were anticipating our new digital asset management system in June. at system will allow us to catalog all of the photographs. e Navys Photographic collection captures some amazing scenes from maritime history, from age-old example of Navy life before the turn of the 20th century in Old Salts of USS Hartford in 1877 to a picture of SBD Dauntless dive bombers from USS Hornet (CV-8) approaching the burning Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma to photogrpahs of former presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, James E. Carter or George H.W. Bush, at sea, in the air or at play in their uniforms. ere really there are no photographs that are more popular than any other, Crunk said. ough there are subjects that have more interest the subject that has the most interest is World War II. Beyond simply cataloging the collection another major challenge for the photo archive team is that many of the images dont have accompanying caption information Approximately a quarter of a million have descriptions, Crunk said. e rest have very limited or no descriptions. Located on the second oor of NHHCs Building 57 on the Washington Navy Yard, the photo archive is more reminiscent of a government ling room than a library. e front of the archive, recently updated, holds 800 to 900 one-half cubic foot archival quality metal edge boxes stacked on shelves reaching about 8-feet high. at L collection boxes, labeled with the letter L, varying subjects, ling numbers and including more than 100,000 photographs line the room, leaving a little space for the two desks where youll nd the commands three photo archivists hard at work. e archive hosts ve more distinct collections. e NH collection, the NARA (National Archives and Records Administration), the NRNL Collection, the U collection and the S collection, Crunk said. e NH collection goes to the early 1970s. e NRNL collection is mostly pre-World War I and about 120,000 photographs. e NARA collection is copies of 40,000 photos also held at NARA. Whats left are the S collection and the U collection. e U and S collections are donated materials from private individuals Sailors, former Sailors and their families that have found their way to us. at is what we are doing right now, getting a better sense of those large donated collections. And thats where NHHCs photo archive holds an advantage over the National Archives. We dier from the National Archives in that we do take private donations rather than ocial records, Crunk said. e majority of NHHCs collection of photos comes from private donations. We get a lot of great photographs from retirees, Crunk said. ey have sent their image collections, their photo albums and scrap books, to us. ose donations are something that the archivists are just now getting a grasp on. Connected to the box-lled front of the archive, two additional rooms are lled with ve-drawer ling cabinets as well as more shelving for oversized boxes and anything that cannot t comfortably into the cabinets. is is where the majority of NHHCs collection of photos is housed. We dont really have a sense of how large they are, Crunk said. at is what we are doing right now, getting a better sense of that large donated collection. But the U and S collections will most likely never get the attention that the NH and NARA collections have, with individual captions for each photo. We go through them every day and we are nding these great collections that have never been seen before beyond the sta that originally collected them 10, 20 or 30 years ago. But, I doubt that we will ever go to item level and catalog every single photograph of those collections, Crunk said. We will probably do it at the collection level. at means the private individual donor. So if Joe Smith donates a collection and his collection includes 100 photographs, we will describe the collection, but we wont describe every single photo. It takes a tremendous amount of time, eort and the ability to enter it into the collection management system. e reason it takes so long is that the photos in the collection often have no information associated with them. While they do try to track down information on some of the images, each one represents a fairly challenging research project. If it is a recent donation, we will speak with the donor, Crunk said. We try and get as much information as possible before we even receive it. If is a part of the current collection and there is no paperwork that has descriptive information, it gets tricky. If its a ship we can generally gure out what ship it is, that leads us to the timeframe. We have historians on sta and we sometimes ask them to help us date the photos and help with description. It can take as little as a day, or up to a few weeks. ough computers have made it easier to get NHHCs historic photos online, very little of the archive is available through that medium. Our website has about 26,000 item level images, Crunk said. ose are mainly from the NARA collection and the NH collection, we havent gotten the chance to get to those other collections before. With the advent of the NHHCs new website, rolling out this summer, the archivists are preparing the donated collections for the public. We are getting them ready to be potentially digitized and at least writing some sort of description so that the public knows that we have them, Crunk said. Also the archivists will be receiving a Digital Asset Management system to help with cataloging. When we receive the new DAM system we will be entering all the metadata the donor information, a scope and content note about the collection, a description, date ranges and keywords. en you can do searches on it. It will revolutionize how we organize, nd materials and how the public sees it, because it is all linked to the website. Right now, we type up index cards and le them by subject, Crunk said. For those wishing to submit photos to the photo archive, the archivists recommend getting in touch with them by phone or email. Let us know that you have a donation, and tell us what it is about, Crunk said. We will get back with you and let you know if that ts our collecting policy. eir policy is relatively simple. Photos must be Navy specic and in decent condition. You may have tears or wrinkles. at we can repair. If it is torn in two or so badly damaged that we cannot unroll it or it has severe water damage we may not accept it. For the most part though, if it has to do with Navy life we will accept it. If it is a Sailor in uniform or on leave with his buddies, there is a cultural interest there, Crunk said. To contact NHHCs photo archive call (202) 433-2765 or email nhhcphotoarchive@navy.mil. e Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. naval history and heritage. It provides the knowledge foundation for the Navy by maintaining historically relevant resources and products that reect the Navys unique and enduring contributions through our nations history, and supports the Fleet by assisting with and delivering professional research, analysis, and interpretive services. NHHC is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Operational Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archeology, Navy histories, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated colorized photo shows the protected cruiser USS Boston during the Spanish-American War. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated file photo of the battleship Iowa (BB 1) shows sailors waving to people on a boat. History and Heritage photo archive growingNavy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated photo shows Sailors of USS Charleston (C-2) manning one of the ships guns during the Spanish-American War.

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By Blago TashevTraining and Education Company, Marine Corps Base QuanticoCrimea, an autonomous republic in Ukraine, became the focus of attention in early 2014 when mass protests in central and western Ukraine forced the pro-Moscow president of the country to ee to Russia. Russia-backed forces in Crimea then took control of the republic and in a hastily organized referendum, the Russian ethnic majority in the region voted to join Russia. e Russian government quickly annexed the republic. Crimea is home to 2 million people. Ethnic Russians make up the majority of the population, but there are also signicant Ukrainian and Tatar minorities. e Tatars used to dominate the region before Russians and Ukrainians began to settle there in the late 18th century. Crimea was part of the Ottoman Empire until the late 18th century, when Russia conquered the region. In 1954 under Soviet rule, Crimea was transferred from Russia to Ukraine. After the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Crimea became part of independent Ukraine, although the region enjoyed a degree of autonomy in the new state. While Ukraine has been an independent country since 1991, many in Russia regret the disintegration of the Soviet Union in general, and the loss of Crimea in particular. Russia sees the annexation of Crimea in early 2014 as justice restored; the move was hugely popular in Russia. Crimea is a strategically located peninsula in the Black Sea. e area is home to both Ukraines and Russias Black Sea eets (Russia and Ukraine had a leasing agreement allowing Russia to keep military installations in Crimea). After the annexation in early 2014, Ukraine lost access to all its military installations in the region and Ukrainian military personnel left the peninsula. As a result of Moscows ambition to increase its political and military inuence in the world, Russia is in the process of expanding and modernizing its Black Sea Fleet. e eet allows Russia to project power in the Mediterranean Sea, the Middle East and as far as the Indian Ocean. e annexation of Crimea has consequences for the wider region and relations between Russia and the West. Ukraine has a large Russian minority (more than 17 percent of the populaFrom Defense Media Activity Navye Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus addressed Sailors and Marines during a live, global all hands call April 29. Mabus answered ques tions about the budget, deployment schedules and pay and allowances among other things during the broadcast held at the Defense Media Activity. Mabus emphasized the Navys unique presence, citing that the Navy is where it needs to be, when it needs to be there, not just at the right time, but all the time. We do this by focusing on four things, Mabus said. People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships. During the broadcast, Mabus took questions from those gathered at DMA, from around the eet via e-mail, from those tuned in to a live chat on the Internet, and pre-recorded video. Popular topics ranged from deployment lengths and budget requirements to female hair regulations and equipment. One Sailor asked about weapon systems currently being tested, and when the Navy and Marine Corps may see those systems. Mabus said the Navy and Marine Corps are already seeing these weapon systems out in the eet. e Navy is putting a laser weapon on board USS Ponce (LPD 15) to see how it does in a maritime environment. ey are also testing rail guns on high speed vessels and USS Zumwalt has a brand new gun system that is very long range and amazingly accurate. Were going to get out the most advanced things weve got as quickly as we can, added Mabus. Mabus also elded questions regarding retirement policy in regards to pay. Mabus said that the notion is that whatever policy was in place when a service member enlisted will be the policy they retire under, regardless of changes that occur while they are serving. When asked about incentives to keep those with special certications and clearances from exiting the Navy, Mabus talked about Selective Reenlistment Bonuses, but also focused on the service aspect and the good Sailors and Marines do for their country by choosing to stay in the military. He added that although some do move on to pur sue a career outside of the military, there are current ly record recruiting and retention rates in the Navy. Unanswered questions in regard to providing the same housing and allowances for single Sailors and Marines as is provided to married Sailors and Marines, and the warrant ocer program being opened to additional ratings will be researched and answered later in an article for All Hands Magazine online (www.ah.mil.) e call will be available for viewing at the Every Day in the Navy gallery on www.navy.mil.Navy photo by MC1 Mark LogicoSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus conducts a live worldwide all hands call at Defense Media Activity Fort Meade, Md. Navy secretary conducts global all hands call Mabus Photo by CIA World Fact BookCrimea, an autonomous republic in Ukraine, became the focus of attention in early 2014 when mass protests in central and western Ukraine forced the pro-Moscow president of the country to flee to Russia. Russia-backed forces in Crimea then took control of the republic and in a hastily organized referendum, the Russian ethnic majority in the region voted to join Russia. The Russian government quickly annexed the republic.Marines keeping eye on CrimeaSee Crimea, Page 13 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 11

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. W eekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 13 Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Sullivan LaramieMarines with 2nd Supply Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group take Meals, Cold Weather during the drawdown of Cold Response 14 at Evenes, Norway, March 19. MREs adapted for winter By Lance Cpl. Sullivan LaramieMarine Forces Europe and AfricaELVEGAARDSMOEN, Norway -When Marines in the eld are hungry, they turn to brown packages with snacks and dehydrated entrees inside. Meals, Ready to Eat have been staples of eld life in the military since they replaced Meals, Combat Issue in 1981. For service members in cold environments, however, regular MREs arent enough. MREs can only withstand low temperatures to a certain point. After that, service members require something most have never seen: Meals, Cold Weather. Clad in white instead of the usual brown packaging, MCWs contain meals with more calories and additional drink mixes to encourage hydration in climates that require more energy per day, but where many people prefer not to drink. For men and women who ght in every clime and place, the frigid environment of the arctic weather during Cold Response 14, a Norwegian-led multinational exercise, is one such location. [MCWs] are better than regular MREs, they just arent as expedient, said Sgt. Sean N. Davis, a Bowling Green, Ohio, native and food service specialist with the battalion. ey last longer and they wont freeze in the cold, but you need to boil water. e MCWs are similar in some respects to the eld rations, or FRs, used by the Norwegian armed forces such as the high calorie count and the water requirement for rehydrating the entree in each meal. FRs are pretty much the same as the [MCWs], said Sgt. Ole G. Tinghaug, an Arendal, Norway native and ambulance team leader with Host Nation Support Battalion. ey come linked together with breakfast, lunch and dinner, though. Its the same concept, but with dierent food. MCWs are bigger, with more food in them, and I like those. Cold Response 14 brought together nearly 16,000 servicemembers from 16 dierent nations in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle, from March 10 to 21 to build allied military capacity and interoperability in a high-intensity, coldweather training environment. e meals have dierent menu choices, which allow service members to have a variety of options throughout their exercises and deployments. While MREs, MCWs and FRs may not be a Marine, soldier or sailors rst choice, they will sustain him or her enough to stay in the ght. By J.D. Leipold Army News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle J. White said that when he accepts the Medal of Honor from President Barack Obama at the White House on May 13, he will do so in honor of the ve soldiers and one Marine who gave their lives in the defense of freedom and the American way of life. White spoke at a press conferenceApril 24 at the National Guard Center in Charlotte, N.C., near where he now lives. White was just 20 when he was deployed to Afghanistan. On Nov. 9, 2007, his 14man unit and squad of Afghan soldiers were brutally ambushed on three sides by Taliban ghters on a path descending from the village of Aranas into a valley. On May 13th when Im awarded the Medal of Honor, I will tell their stories and preserve their memories they will not be forgotten, the now-27-year-old Seattle native told the press and bloggers. Their sacrifice and the sacrices of so many others are what motivate me to wake up each and every day to be the best I can. Everything I do in my life is done to make them proud. White was asked how strong the memory of the battle is now, after almost seven years, during which time he attained a bachelors degree and became an investment analyst for a major bank. I would say for the rst couple of years, memories were more vivid than today, he said. As time goes on certain things you think about less and less, but at any given moment I can close my eyes and hear the sounds and smell the gunpowder in the air; but six-and-a-half years later, I dont think about it as much as I used to. He did share that there were two things he can always visualize as if it were yesterday when he looked up from applying a tourniquet to wounded Marine Sgt. Phillip Bocks to see then-Spc. Kain Schilling take an enemy round to his left leg. White rushed to his buddy and for the second time that day applied a second tourniquet to Schilling, the only one he had left, his own belt. White will receive the Medal of Honor for his disregard of his own life while trying to save the lives of a Marine and two fellow soldiers after his team of 14 U.S. soldiers and squad of Afghan National Army soldiers were set up and ambushed by a much larger and more heavily armed Taliban force, who engaged in a three-prong attack from elevated ground. He will become the seventh living recipient of the nations highest military decoration for conspicuous gallantry and valor during actions in Iraq or Afghanistan.White remembers squad White tion) and many fear Russia may attempt to annex other Ukrainian territories inhabited by ethnic Russians. is fear is reinforced by the willingness of many ethnic Russians in Ukraine to consider joining Russia. Other countries in the region, including in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, fear the presence of Russian minorities in their states also exposes them to Russian aggression. As an attempt to deter Moscow, the United States and its European allies imposed limited economic and political sanctions against Russia. In addition, NATO has developed plans to increase military presence in members of the Alliance along the border with Russia. Many leaders have also urged European governments to end their dependence on Russia for energy needs and to reverse the long trend of declining European defense budgets. ere also are calls to treat Russia as a potential opponent that is willing to break international law and norms, and is actively working against Western interests. Editors note: is piece was created at the Center for Advanced Operational Culture Learning.e center islocated on Marine Corps Base Quantico and provides regional, culture and language training programs for Marines of all ranks. For more information about CAOCL visit https://www.tecom.usmc.mil/caocl/Site Pages/Home.aspxCrimeaFrom Page 11

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 When the Nazis landed in Ponte Vedra Beach From the Federal Bureau of InvestigationEditors note: is is the rst in a two-part series about Nazi saboteurs in America during World War II. Shortly after midnight on the morning of June 13, 1942, four men landed on a beach near Amagansett, Long Island, New York from a German submarine, clad in German uniforms and bringing ashore enough explosives, primers, and incendiaries to support an expected twoyear career in the sabotage of American defenserelated production. On June 17, 1942, a similar group landed on Ponte Vedra Beach, near Jacksonville, Florida, equipped for a similar career in industrial disruption. e purpose of the invasions was to strike a major blow for Germany by bringing the violence of war to our home ground through destruction of Americas ability to manufacture vital equipment and supplies and transport them to the battlegrounds of Europe; to strike fear into the American civilian population; and to diminish the resolve of the United States to overcome our enemies. By June 27, 1942, all eight saboteurs had been arrested without having accomplished one act of destruction. Tried before a military commission, they were found guilty. One was sentenced to life imprisonment, another to 30 years, and six received the death penalty, which was carried out within a few days. e magnitude of the euphoric expectation of the Nazi war machine may be judged by the fact that, in addition to the large amount of material brought ashore by the saboteurs, they were given $175,200 in United States currency to nance their activities. On apprehension, a total of $174,588 was recovered by the FBI the only positive accomplishment of eight trained saboteurs in those two weeks was the expenditure of $612 for clothing, meals, lodging, and travel, as well as a bribe of $260. So shaken was the German intelligence service that no similar sabotage attempt was ever again made. e German naval high command did not again allow a valuable submarine to be risked for a sabotage mission. On September 1, 1939, World War II opened in Europe with the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany. e United States remained neutral until drawn into the world conict by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. War was declared against Japan by the United States on December 8, 1941; and, on the 11th, Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. During the early months of the war, the major contributions of the United States to oppose the Nazi war machine involved industrial production, equipment, and supplies furnished to those forces actively defending themselves against the German armed forces. at industrial eort was strong enough to generate frustration, perhaps indignation, among the Nazi high command; and the order was given, allegedly by Hitler himself, to mount a serious eort to reduce American production. German intelligence settled on sabotage as the most eective means of diminishing our input. In active charge of the project was Lieutenant Walter Kappe, attached to Abwehr-2 (Intelligence 2) who had spent some years in the United States prior to the war and had been active in the GermanAmerican Bund and other eorts in the United States to propagandize and win adherents for Nazism among German Americans and German immigrants in America. Kappe was also an ofcial of the Ausland Institute, which, prior to the war, organized Germans abroad into the Nationalsozialistiche Deutshe Arbeiterpartei, the NSDAP or Nazi Party, and during the conict, Ausland kept track of and in touch with persons in Germany who had returned from abroad. Kappes responsibility concerned those who had returned from the United States. Early in 1942, he contacted, among others, those who ultimately under took the mission to the United States. Each con sented to the task, appar ently willingly, although unaware of the specic assignment. Most of the potential saboteurs were taken from civilian jobs, but two were in the German army. e trainees, about 12 in all, were told of their specic mission only when they entered a sabotage school established near Berlin which instructed them in chemistry, incendiaries, explosives, timing devices, secret writing and concealment of identity by blending into an American background. e intensive training included the practical use of the techniques under realistic conditions. Subsequently, the saboteurs were taken to aluminum and magnesium plants, railroad shops, canals, locks, and other facilities to familiarize them with the vital points and vulnerabilities of the types of targets they were to attack. Maps were used to locate those American targets, spots where railroads could be most eectively disabled, the principal aluminum and magnesium plants, and important canals, water ways and locks. All instruc tions had to be memo rized. On May 26, 1942, the rst group of four saboteurs left by submarine from the German base at Lorient, France, and on May 28, the next group of four departed the same base. Each was destined to land at points on the Atlantic Coast of the United States familiar to the leader of that group. Four men, led by George John Dasch, age 39, landed on a beach near Amagansett, Long Island, New York, about 12:10 a.m., June 13, 1942. Accompanying Dasch were Ernest Peter Burger, 36; Heinrich Harm Heinck, 35; and Richard Quirin, 34. On June 17, 1942, the other group landed at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, south of Jacksonville. e leader was Edward John Kerling, age 33; with Werner iel, 35; Herman Otto Neubauer, 32; and Herbert Hans Haupt, 22. Both groups landed wearing complete or partial German uniforms to ensure treatment as prisoners of war rather than as spies if they were caught in the act of landing. Navy History & Heritage Command photoNazi saboteurs were delivered to American shores in New York and Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida by a U Boat like this one. Kerling Thiel Neubauer Haupt ablers maintenance, logistics and intelligence are lacking. I think where they need our assistance for some period of time is at the institutional level, so all of this that theyve accomplished becomes sustainable over time, the chairman said, acknowledging that this will take time. Producing an intelligence analyst who has the intuitive knowledge of whats important and, just as important, who needs it, is a tasking years in the making. Having personnel who can maintain trucks or helicopters in a country with literacy problems is a long pole in the tent of Afghan forces. While it will take time, that doesnt mean we have to be out there walking the paths in their foothills or through their villages, Dempsey said. is is about helping them develop systems. ats really what our recommendation has been for the post-2014 presence. e chairman said he cannot shed any light on when President Barack Obama will announce his decision on the U.S. post-2014 footprint a question seemingly on the lips of every service member at this sprawling base. Weve made our recommendations, he said. Weve rened them based on changes on the ground, such as the successful elections. e decision will involve not only whats in U.S. interests, but the interests of NATO, because this is a NATO mission. Would I like a decision sooner rather than later? Of course, he continued. ere is some uncertainty in the ranks. Young men and women who serve, and their families, would like to know whether they are going to deploy or not deploy, or for how long they are going to deploy. For now, the mission goes on, and whats more important than what happens in 2015 is making sure eorts in 2014 count, the chairman said. e real strong theme today in Afghanistan is we need to make 2014 matter, he said. We need to use it. e bilateral security agreement remains crucial to the post-2014 U.S. presence. We could make a conditional decision meaning if we get a BSA, here is what we will do, Dempsey said. But clearly, we need a willing partner to have a sustained and somewhat enduring presence here. e BSA is critical. While the Afghan security forces did well in the election, it was the culmination of 12 years of eort, by young American men and women who came to Afghanistan because the United States had been attacked by al-Qaida operating out of Afghanistan, the chairman noted. From that moment forward, weve had a very clear eye on what we had to accomplish and that is the defeat of alQaida, the disruption of that network and the establishment of a stable nation that would no longer be a safe haven for alQaida, he said.DempseyFrom Page 9

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Camden Navy League honoredLocal council named Outstanding by national organizationFrom The Navy Leaguee CamdenKings Bay Council has been recognized as an Outstanding Council by the na tional Navy League of the United States for 2013. Of the more than 250 councils world-wide, only 14 received this designation. is achievement is a testament to the outstanding work of the ocers and board of di rectors as we strive to fulll the councils mission of serving the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families, said council President David Burch. It also recognizes the strong support of our members who attend our events and respond with open hearts, and wallets, when we ask for their support to meet our goals. Each of the councils are judged on their performance in eight ar eas: Support of the sea services; Membership retention; Membership growth; Community education ac tivities; Youth activities; Council activities; Public aairs activities; and, legislative activities. Selection of Outstanding, Mer itorious and Honorable Mention councils are made by a commit tee after review of each councils annual report. We plan on continuing our record of excellence in the years ahead and welcome any and all community members who wish to join our council and help us full our mission, Burch said. e council oers many dif ferent volunteer opportunities in areas such as membership recruitment and retention; liaison to the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard commands stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys; communications and public re lations; and special projects such as Operation Paperback, Toys for Tots, VA Medical Center vis its; and, the annual Sea Services Awards Banquet. Individuals interested in joining the Navy League should contact council membership NH Jax, Kings Bay clinic salute sta membersBy Keats ReynoldsNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs AssistantOn May 1, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer proclaimed May 4 to 10 as Public Service Recognition Week throughout its six facilities in Florida and Georgia. It is an oppor tunity to thank the almost 650 civilian men and women who serve as physicians, nurses and support sta. Now more than ever, our federal employ ees are being asked to do more with less, Shaer said. Yet, they continue to press for ward and support readiness and quality, pa tient-centered carefrom healing patients to ensuring we have the supplies needed to do so. e theme for PSRW 2014 is Proud to Serve. e NH Jacksonville civil service team demonstrates this daily by the attentiveness they show to the approximately 67,000 en rolled patients across the command. Even through the furlough period of 2013, the federal workforce put service above self to ensure that medical care at the hospital and branch health clinics did not waiver. When someone becomes part of the U.S. Civil Service, they not only accept a job but an oath to support and defend the Constitu tion of the United States. Federal workers, like our military mem bers, come from many dierent walks of life Up Periscope Whats cooking for National Barbecue Month Page 9 Leathernecks Military Child feted at MCSFBn Page 8 3 stars CNIC makes rounds at NSB Kings Bay Pages 4, 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See League, Page 3 From left Mary Gill with her daughter, Gwendolyn, Fleet and Family New Parent Support Specialist Julie Mooney, Commissary Director Andy Anderson, Kings Bay Executive Officer Cmdr. Ed Callahan Nicole McKnight with daughter, (in front of table) Payton and Camden Medical nurse Lisa Freeland.Photo by EM1 Mark Treen Service lauds community for supporting families, personnel of two unitsBy PA1 Lauren JorgensonCoast Guard Public Affairs Detachment JacksonvilleMembers of the Camden County community and the Coast Guard came together Friday to recognize and celebrate Camden Countys of cial designation as the nations rst Coast Guard Community. e Coast Guard Cities program allows the Coast Guard to formally recognize those cities which have made special eorts to acknowledge the professional work of the Coast Guard men and women assigned to their area and have made Coast Guardsmen and their families feel at home in their home away from home. While 15 other cities have been designated by Congress as Coast Guard cities, Camden County is the rst county to be named a Coast Guard Community. Camden County comprises Kingsland, St. Marys, Kings Bay and Woodbine, and is home to Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit Kings Bay and Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Kings Bay. e Camden Partnership hosted a luncheon at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, during which the Coast Guard proclamation was read and presented. A Camden County Coast Guard Community Celebration Day proc lamation was also read, designating May 17, 2014, as Coast Guard Com munity Celebration Day for all of Camden County. Commissary, Fleet and Family get parents thinking fruit, veggiesBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsNew parents and their children from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay gath ered at the Commissary April 22 to get a rst-hand look at nutrition and healthy eating as part of the Fleet and Family Support Centers New Parenting Support Class. At the Commissary, tables lined with fresh fruit and colorful vegetables were prepared for the guests to enjoy while promoting how important it is for children to eat a well-balanced diet. Our group went for a walk with the children and ended at the Commissary as a eld trip with the children, said Ju lie Moonie, FFSC New Parent Support Specialist. e commissary provided healthy snacks to the group as part of commissarys Month of the Military Childs showcase of fruits and veggies for little heroes. Mary Gill, a navy spouse and member of the par enting class, said its important for parents to start children eating fruits and vegetables at a young age. Its the best way, and it keeps them healthier, she said. e New Parent Support Home Visita tion Program, provided by the Fleet and Family Support Center, oers expectant or new parents support and guidance in their homes or through oce visits at the FFSC. e focus of the program is on devel oping nurturing parenting skills, to teach child development and to connect families with needed resources. One of the services the NPSHVP oers is a New Moms and Dads Group every Tuesday from 1000 to noon at the FFCS, Mooney said. is is an opportunity for parents of young children to share ex periences and ideas. It is also an opportunity for children to meet new friends in a play group setting. Mooney said the nal service oered by the NPSHVP is an Expectant Families Workshop that is oered every other month at the FFSC. See BHC, Page 3 Getting kids their proper nutrition Coast Guard photo by PA1 Lauren Jorgensen Coast Guard Rear Adm. Steven Poulin, right, with St. Marys Mayor John F. Morrissey displays the official proclamation naming Camden County a Coast Guard Community Friday, April 25. Coast Guard, county linked This is an opportunity for parents of young children to share experiences and ideas. Julie Moonie FFSC New Parent SupportBHC observing Public Service Week Navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenBHC Nurse Della Poponea gives a shot to ET3 Andrew Perea, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) Gold. Radiation Health Technician Christopher Barberc scans HM2 Joshua Gannon. See Nutrition, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 By Lt. Kym MurphyLegal Assistance Attorney, Pensacola Legal Assistance Office, RLSO SEIf you have debt, you should be aware of your rights and the rules that debt collectors have to follow when trying to collect a debt from you under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. e FDCPA was mainly designed to eliminate abusive, de ceptive, and unfair collection practices by debt collectors. Un der the FDCPA, a debt collector is someone who regularly col lects debts owed to others. is includes collection agencies, lawyers who collect debts on a regular basis, and companies that buy delinquent debts and then try to collect them. e FDCPA specically covers debt you incurred for personal, family, or household purposes. is means things like a person al credit card account, an auto loan, a medical bill and your mortgage, but it doesnt cover debts you incurred to run a busi ness. Once youve gured out that your debt qualies under the FDCPA, and that the person/ company trying to collect from you is regulated by the FDCPA, then you know that that person/ company has to play by the following rules: 1) Communications. A debt collector may not communicate with you or your spouse at any unusual time (before 0800 or af ter 2100 in your time zone) or at any place that is inconvenient to you. is includes your place of employment. Furthermore, if the debt collector knows you have hired an attorney, then all contact has to be with your attorney and not you. If you refuse to pay a debt or request that the debt collec tor stops contacting you in writ ing, then the debt collector must cease all further communica tion. 2) Validation of debts. A debt collector must provide you with certain basic information within ve days of rst contacting you. is information specically in cludes the amount of the debt, the name of the creditor you owe, that you have 30 days to dispute the debt before it is as sumed valid, that if you dispute in writing they will send you a verication of the debt, and that if the original creditor is dier ent from the current creditor (for example, your debt was sold), then you can request in writing to know the identity of the original creditor. 3) Prohibited practices. A debt collector may not harass, oppress, or abuse any person. is speci cally includes using obscene or profane language, threatening violence, repeatedly calling your phone or not identifying them selves. Also, a debt collector may not use any false, deceptive, or misleading representations. is includes claiming to work for the government, claiming to be an attorney, using a fake name or an inaccurate representation of what you owe. Last, a debt col lector may not use unfair means to collect a debt from you. is means that a debt collector can not collect any additional inter est not permitted by law, ask for a postdated check, call you collect or use a postcard to contact you. You can submit a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau at www.con sumerfinance.gov/complaint/ or with the Better Business Bu reau at www.bbb.org/. You also can report any problems to your state Attorney Generals Oce or you can sue them in court. If you would like more infor mation or would like to nd the legal assistance oce closest to you, please contact us at any of our oces listed at www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.8th Air Force speaker at MOAAJohn Telgener of the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum in Savannah will be the guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers Organization of America dinner-meeting be ginning at 5:30 p.m., May 20 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road. Cost for meal is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Major Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net by May 16.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Benefits for military children setChildren of Fallen Patriots Foundation pro vides college scholarships and educational counseling to military children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. CFPF has four up coming events May 13 is Children of Fallen Patriots Day. Jacksonville Suns will be hon oring a CFPF family; May 17 is Jacksonville Sharks Military Appreciation Night. e Sharks will be honoring a CFPF family; May 18 is the X Beach Charity Challenge. CFPF will benet from the proceeds; May 25 the Jacksonville Suns will be auctioning o their camouage Navy jerseys after the game. For details, visit www.fallenpatriots.org.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of com munity, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! Know your rights regarding debt Navy Jag From the Kings Bay Employer Committee e Kings Bay Employer Com mittee is taking applications for a $500 college scholarship from high school seniors in Camden County. e deadline to apply for the Tracy L. Foreman Scholarship is Monday, May 12. e scholarship is funded by an employer committee endowment established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employ ment marketing representative at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center. Kings Bay Employer Committee President Al Daniels of Dominos donated $500 for this years scholar ship award. e scholarship will be awarded to a graduating senior, including homeschoolers, who live in Cam den County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited insti tution of higher education. In addi tion to attending school, applicants also must be working part-time or serve a documented internship for a minimum of 10 hours per week. e scholarships are non-renewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarship, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores and a 2-to-3 page essay. e essay theme is how to use education and training to develop or support a new busi ness or industry in the Kings Bay area. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a member of the employer committees scholarship subcommittee, at rbaldwin@cam den.k12.ga.us or (912) 729-4790. Applications for the scholarships are available at the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center, 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys, and the Camden Coun ty High School Guidance Oce. For additional information, contact the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. To learn more about career op portunities, connect with us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, which can be conveniently accessed at www.employgeorgia.com.Scholarships deadline is May 12 KB Employer Committee From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentDepartment heads and building managers must assign an individual to inspect monthly the extin guishers in each of their facili ties. Home owners can do this too. Check these details during a monthly re extin guisher in spection Conrm the extinguisher is vis ible, unobstructed, and in its desig nated location. Verify the locking pin is intact and the tamper seal is unbroken. Examine the extinguisher for obvious physical damage, corrosion, leakage or clogged nozzle. Conrm the pressure gauge or indicator is in the operable range or position, and lift the extinguisher to ensure it is still full. Make sure the operating instruc tions on the nameplate are legible and facing outward. Initial and date the back of the tag. If you need an inspection tag, you can contact your local safety oce or print it from the re departments Subase internet page. Report missing, damaged or used extinguishers immediately to the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Prevention Oce, Building 1041 or call (912) 573-9998.Stamp out smoking firesCareless smoking is the leading cause of re deaths in our country. Do you know what causes these re deaths? Carelessly discarded smoking materials from hot ashes dumped into the garbage to a ciga rette falling on to a couch cushion. Carelessly discarded smoking materials kills hundreds of people every year. ese types of res are too common. With a little attention you can prevent these res and save lives. Remind friends and family mem bers to follow these safety tips. Never smoke in bed. Always use large, oversized ashtrays. Make sure ashes are cold before dumping ashtrays into the garbage. Check for cigarettes or ashes that may have fallen between couch and chair cushions after a party. For more information, contact the Kings Bay Fire Prevention Team at (912) 573-9998. Check re extinguishers monthly Kings Bay FFSC

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Vice President Greg Glaz at (912) 673-7977. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the com mands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. e councils ocers are President Dave Burch, Im mediate Past President Hunt ornhill, VP Legis lative Aairs Dave Reilly; VP Public Relations Bar rett King, VP Programs Tim Bryant, VP Opera tions Georgia Stilson, VP Membership Greg Glaz, VP Youth Programs Barbara Johns, Judge Advocate Sam Colville, Secretary Cheryl Aston, Treasurer Gull Weaver, Chaplain Mike Huber and Council Historian Debra Morin. Additional information can be found on the coun cil website at kingsbayna vyleague.org/. LeagueFrom Page 1Courtesy photoCamden-Kings Bay Navy League Council, from left, Dave Reilly, Hunt Thornhill, Barrett King, Dave Burch, Sam Colville, Tim Bryant, Georgia Stilson, Greg Glaz, Barbara Johns and Cheryl Aston. Not shown Gull Weaver, Mike Huber and Debra Morin. Some of the topics cov ered during that workshop included basic baby care, safe sleeping practices, care and home safety, crying and colic, bond ing with baby, early child development, and community and military resources. For more information about NPSHVP contact Julie Mooney at (912) 5734893. and fulll many dierent missions. Together, they unite to uphold the pledge to serve and protect the U.S. government. In her proclamation to the command, Capt. Shaf fer recalled of her time as NH Jacksonville com manding ocer and ex pressed her gratitude for the public service workers who continue to put ser vice above self. It has been an hon or and a privilege to be your commanding ocer these past two years and as I will soon pass on the command to another, Ill take comfort in knowing that youour civil service employees play critical roles in the continuity of great care across Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation, Shaer said. Your hard work does not go unnoticed, and I want you to know that I am proud to serve with you. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for cancer, developing solutions to address energy and climate crises, serv ing alongside warghters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. government is the best in the world. For more information on ways to celebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw. org. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities lo cated across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles pa tient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 67,000 are enrolled with a primary care man ager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. BHCFrom Page 1 NutritionFrom Page 1 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceClaims of a lack of coordination inside the Defense Department made by anonymous ocials in media reports regarding the handling of a recent proof-of-life video of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are completely false, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. ey mischaracterize the ongoing close coordination and teamwork within this department and with other U.S. government agencies, Warren said. Bergdahl has been missing for too long, the colonel added. ere should be no doubt that the department is using all the military, intelligence and diplomatic tools at its disposal to bring him home safely. Bergdahl, now 28, was found miss ing from his duty station in eastern Afghanistan June 30, 2009, and was declared missing/ captured three days later. He is believed to be held by members of the Haqqani network. I can tell you, across the spectrum, diplomatically, militarily, even from an intelligence perspective, weve never lost focus on Bowe Bergdahl and on trying to get him home, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said during a January 16 news conference, held the day after the proof-of-life video was released. It is important to underscore that the reason Sgt. Bergdahl remains a captive is because hes being held by terrorists, not because of a lack of eort or coordination by the United States government, Warren said. Anyone who does leak this level of detail, in my opin ion, does not have the interests or safety of Bowe Berg dahl in mind, he added. BergdahlDOD: Bergdahl is not forgotten THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 Public Works Construction Manager Lt. Robert Clark briefs French. Trident Refit Facility Commanding Officer Capt. Larry Hill answers questions. Clark points out corrosion repairs being done. CNIC tours current construction projects and additionally visited various facilities aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. CNIC tours Kings BayVice Adm. William D. French, Commander, Navy Installations Command visits Morale, Welfare and Recreations The Sports Zone on board Naval Submarine base Kings Bay April 25.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 5 Navy photos by EM1 Mark Treen One stop on the tour was the water front, where French and Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, director of Strategic Systems Programs, center and Cmd. Shawn Follum of Public Works, right, discuss improvements. French discusses the benefits of the bases automated infrastructure using Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. Lt. Matthew King NAVFAC Production Officer, Wayne Blackburn, Utilities System Operator Base Operations Services Contractor, and Commanding Officer Naval Submarine Base Capt. Harvey Guffey listen to a question. The CNIC claps thank you after The Youth Centers pre-school class students sing My Country Tis of Thee. French speaks with Charlie Smith Jr. after lunch with the Camden Partnership. Clockwise from above, Tony Cartagena, Balfour Beatty Kings Bay Community Manager, and Paula Cook, Area Community Manager discusses renovations; Cmdr. Stephen Love, Maritime Force Protection Unit Commanding Officer, talk at the Coast Guard Community recognition lunch; MWR Director Bob Spinnenweber shows the CNIC and CNIC Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth the Fitness Center.

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Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration will be taken at the customer ser vice counter inside the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the customer service counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at time of registration. No refunds. Pre-season is May 5 to 8 and May 12 to 15; Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-week sessions. Private lessons are available for $75 with ve one-on-one lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or x3990 for more details. Arrive on time for class, bring sunscreen andtowels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Summer Splash 2014 From noon to 4 p.m., Sat urday, May 24 free entry at the Fitness Center pool with fun games, music, prizes and the Build-A-Boat competi tion. Food will be available for purchase. Special thanks to the sponsors of this event: Navy Federal Credit Union & USAA. (No endorsement implied) (912) 573-3001. Americas Armed Forces Kids Run Check-in is 8:30 to 8:45 a.m. Saturday, May 17 at the Fitness Com plex. Entry is free. Its open to all military youth ages 5 to 13. Register on-line at www.americaskidsrun.org. Call Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202 for details. Movie Under e Stars Saturday, May 17 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing e Lego Movie, rated PG. Showtime is at dusk, approximately 8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor theater. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Navy Adventures Unleashed Walking Dead Es cape Run in Jacksonville Sat urday, May 17 at Ever bank Field Stadium is the Zombie Obstacle Event. Reg ister on website for 8:15 p.m. wave to participate with the survivors of Team Kings Bay at www. thewalking deadescape. com/faq. Pre-register for transportation at Big EZ by May 16 for $5. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is sup ported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Happy Mothers Day from Rack-N-Roll Lanes All moms bowl free 1 to 8 p.m., Sunday, May 11. Shoe rental is not included. Regular game prices for everyone else. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break Movies for May are Happy Feet 2 May 10 and 11, Coudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 May 17 and 18, and Walking with Dinosaurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., Saturday and Sunday and school breaks or holidays. The schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. Additional kids movies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for kinder garten through age 12, May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up be gins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for ac tive duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/ pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Break fast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 8 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 9,172 2, NAS Jax 8,739.5 3, NASP 7,084 4, Mayport 6,871.5 5, Key West 6,128.5 6, NAVSTA Gitmo 4,591 7, New Orleans 4,214.5 7, NASP Corry 4,029 9, JTF Gitmo 2,240 Individuals Average 1, Leon Platt KB 205.23 2, Dan Blakeslee KB 200.60 3, T. Lowrance NAS J 196.98 4, Rob Daugherty KB 195.00 5, C. Washington NAS J 194.71 6, Shaun Spitler NAS J 193.75 7, Chris Oglsby NO 191.00 8, Kyler Ascue KW 188.56 9, Keith Williams KB 187.46 10, Todd Whitehead NG 186.83 Navy Team Bowling Periscope file photoSign up for childrens swim lessons now at the Kings Bay Fitness Center pool. Intramural Sports Ave. Joes Bowling FinalTeam W L Pins1, Ray & Ryan 9 3 4,906 2, My Spare Lady 8 4 2,653 3, The Kings 8 4 2,319 4, B&J Express 7 5 4,432 5, Two Cliffs 7 5 4,016 6, Roll Tide or Nah 7 5 3,561 7, Fire Fighters 7 5 3,225 8, Bs Knees 7 5 2,417 9, Spare Us 6 6 3,775 10, Balls of Steel 5 7 4,180 11, RockyBowlwinkle 4 8 3,478 12, Nutty Buddies 3 9 2,796 13, Wonder Twins 3 9 3,148Mens SoftballTeam W L T1, Jcs Crew 8 0 0 2, West Virginia 5 0 0 3, Shop 38 7 2 0Coed SoftballTeam W L T1, Angry Birds 6 1 0 1, Shop 38 6 1 0 3, Softball Busters 4 3 0 4-versus-4 Flag Football started May 5, but teams can still register. MWR Intramural Sports photoAverage Joes Bowling Champion Ray & Ryan. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsSailors need to take charge of their own careers, educate themselves, and under stand that detailers are their advocates, Navy ocials said recently. No one cares any more about your career than you do. Make yourself smart and knowledgeable on the latest NAVAD MINS and any changes or updates to the MILPERSMAN, said Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Tom Jones, lead Mass Communication Specialist de tailer. You can nd those on NPCs web site. Be an informed consumer. Sailors communicate their desires to detailers through the Career Management System Interactive Detailing. CMS-ID is a web-based tool that enables enlisted Sailors to research and apply for jobs and communicate their career goals to career counselors and detailers. Sailors can log into CMS-ID at www.cmsid.navy.mil/. Remember to communicate with your detailer and keep your information in CMS-ID up-to-date and current, including communicating your preferences what are you looking to do and where are you looking to serve in your next assignment, Jones said. Detailers will always attempt to ll bil lets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, Fleet readiness require ments are the guiding factor in lling bil lets. e detailing process is constantly under review and enhancements are made when necessary. NAVADMIN 058/14 was recently released that aects the detailing process. Detailers wont assign Sailors to adver tised jobs until after the close of the CMSID application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMSID any time after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected. When a detailer has selected a Sailor for a billet, a notication is sent to that Sailor, through CMS/ID, to the email ad dresses provided in a Sailors personal contact information prole. ats why its so important that Sailors to keep their CMS-ID prole updated, Jones said.Detailers detail detailing 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, May 12 and 19. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet May 13, 20 and 27. No pre-registration required.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and termi nology, and gives tools to access instal lation and local community resources. The workshop is 5 to 9 p.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for May 14A job search workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., May 14. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportu nities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family mem bers of relocating civil service per sonnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training require ment. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 14 and 8 a.m. to noon May 28. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, May 22 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items includ ing skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, May 21. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and bene fits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., May 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all com mand representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 15. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 10 to 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is 1 to 4 p.m., May 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in mak ing informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a normal part of everyday personal financial manage ment for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour work shop provides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 6 to 8 p.m., May 20. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Develop a spending plan training scheduledDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This singlesession workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan with your spouse. This workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 5734513 for more information or to register.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506 Fleet & Family Support Center workshops From Fleet and Family Support Center Kings BayReady Navy is the Navys Emergency Preparedness Program and is spon sored by Commander, Navy Installa tions Command. Ready Navy is designed for you, the Navy community, to provide informa tion, tools, and resources that empower the Navy family to more aptly prepare for, react and recover when faced with any emergency, with or without ad vanced warning. Ready Navy covers an array of haz ards individuals may encounter, ranging from hurricanes and earthquakes to terrorist attacks. e material, tips and recommendations provided by Ready Navy are closely aligned with those oered to the public by Ready. gov and other authoritative govern ment resources to include the Federal Emergency Management Agency the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. You are an essential partner in emer gency preparedness. By exploring the links on the Ready Navy site (www.ready.navy.mil), you will: be informed of potential hazards and what to do before, during, and after an emergency understand the steps to make an emergency plan that includeswhat to do, where to go, and what to take with you learn to build a kit to support basic needs for a minimum of three days access tools and resources to help you and your family prepare for emer gency situations that could arise at any time with no warning Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay will be hosting an Emer gency Preparedness Town Hall meet ing from 6 to 8 p.m., June 3 and from 10 a.m. to noon June 4 at the NSB Kings Bay auditorium. Installation and local community emergency preparedness agencies will provide preparedness brief. For more information and to sign-up contact FFSC at 573-4513. Navy graphicBe informed before, during, and after an incident; make a written family emer gency plan; and build an emergency supply kit good for at least three days.Ready Navy meetings June 3, 4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 7

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Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay had an ice cream social and took a command-style photo April 23 for family members.Photos by India Winslow Month of the Miltary Child 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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Im a little confused. Its National Barbecue Month but when I look at the National Barbecue Association website it shows people doing what I call grilling. All the pictures have meat with barbecue sauce on it. So for simplicitys sake, I simply asked what do you like to put on the grill? Personally, I have these great brats from a meat market in Jacksonville. Theyre fat and about 8or 9-inches long. Im going to boil them in beer and then double wrap them in thick cut bacon. Hooray for May, its National Barbecue MonthET3 Stephen Franz Trident Refit Facility Sumiton, Ala. Hamburgers and hot dogs, the classics. MASN Matthew Wilson Security Force Battalion Buffalo, N.Y. I personally like steaks, a New York strip I think. Trevis Bromer Retired Army Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Ribs. I marinate them overnight and smoke them on the grill. Tiffany Bromer Family member Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. I usually like jerked pork shoulder. MT2 Osvaldo Serna Trident Training Facility Laredo, Texas Fajitas. I just put skirt steak with lemon on the grill. MA2 Sarah Bausch Subase Shawnee, Kan. Theres so many deli cious things. Ill go with pork butt for pulled pork. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho DoD photo by MC1 Daniel HintonGen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, gets food at a base dining hall during his visit to Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan, May 1. By Jim Garamone American Forces Press Servicee Afghan election last month marked a turning point for Afghanistans national security forces, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said at Bagram Aireld, Af ghanistan, May 2. e success of the April 5 presidential election boosted the condence of members of the Afghan force, Army Gen. Mar tin E. Dempsey said following a meeting with senior U.S. leaders. It was Dempseys second visit here in as many months. I wanted to come over this time because I had read about the elections and Id heard about how well the [Afghan forces] had performed, he said during an interview. I wanted to learn more about what that really means. e chairman said one of the generals he spoke with used a sports analogy to describe what U.S. forces in Afghanistan did the day of the election. American forces, the general told him, got up, got ready, warmed up and then sat on the bench. ey didnt have to get into the game. Stated another way, the Afghan se curity forces managed the entire thing, the chairman said. ey transported the ballots, they protected the polling places, they fought o the attempts of the Taliban to disrupt it. So for me that election seems to be a turning point in the con dence of the [Afghan security forces]. e Afghan forces proved they could peak for a momentous occasion, the chairman said. ey were able to plan, they were able to prepare, they were able to execute a big momentous event, he added. Afghan forces should be proud of the achievement, Dempsey said. I think where they still require work is in the mundane the day-to-day things of paying and feeding and resupplying and maintaining, he said. Afghan forces have proved they can ght. No one questions that. But the en -Election turning pointSee Dempsey, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 By MC1 Tim ComerfordNaval History and Heritage Commands Communication Outreach DivisionIt is widely accepted that modern photography was born when it was rst intro duced commercially in 1839. Since then countless images have snapped of Navy actions and Sailors around the world in times of crisis, con ict, strife and need. Archiving a small portion of that Amer ican body of work is the job of the Naval History and Heritage Commands Photo Archive, which includes in its inventory imagery dating as far back as the Civil War-era and extending through to the mid-1990s. We are estimating somewhere in the neighborhood of one million individual photographs, said Lisa Crunk, lead ar chivist for NHHCs three photo archivists. We have never done a count because we dont have an actual database that can do that yet. Were anticipating our new digital asset management system in June. at system will allow us to catalog all of the photographs. e Navys Photographic collection captures some amazing scenes from maritime history, from age-old example of Navy life before the turn of the 20th century in Old Salts of USS Hartford in 1877 to a picture of SBD Dauntless dive bombers from USS Hornet (CV-8) approaching the burning Japanese heavy cruiser Mikuma to photogrpahs of for mer presidents John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, James E. Carter or George H.W. Bush, at sea, in the air or at play in their uniforms. ere really there are no photographs that are more popular than any other, Crunk said. ough there are subjects that have more interest the subject that has the most interest is World War II. Beyond simply cataloging the collec tion another major challenge for the photo archive team is that many of the images dont have accompanying cap tion information Approximately a quarter of a million have descriptions, Crunk said. e rest have very limited or no descriptions. Located on the second oor of NHHCs Building 57 on the Washington Navy Yard, the photo archive is more reminis cent of a government ling room than a library. e front of the archive, recently up dated, holds 800 to 900 one-half cubic foot archival quality metal edge boxes stacked on shelves reaching about 8-feet high. at L collection boxes, labeled with the letter L, varying subjects, ling numbers and including more than 100,000 photographs line the room, leaving a little space for the two desks where youll nd the commands three photo archivists hard at work. e archive hosts ve more distinct collections. e NH collection, the NARA (National Archives and Re cords Administration), the NRNL Col lection, the U collection and the S col lection, Crunk said. e NH collection goes to the early 1970s. e NRNL collec tion is mostly pre-World War I and about 120,000 photographs. e NARA collec tion is copies of 40,000 photos also held at NARA. Whats left are the S collection and the U collection. e U and S collections are donated materials from private individuals Sailors, former Sailors and their families that have found their way to us. at is what we are doing right now, getting a better sense of those large donated collections. And thats where NHHCs photo ar chive holds an advantage over the Na tional Archives. We dier from the National Archives in that we do take private donations rath er than ocial records, Crunk said. e majority of NHHCs collection of photos comes from private donations. We get a lot of great photographs from retirees, Crunk said. ey have sent their image collections, their photo al bums and scrap books, to us. ose donations are something that the archivists are just now getting a grasp on. Connected to the box-lled front of the archive, two additional rooms are lled with ve-drawer ling cabinets as well as more shelving for oversized boxes and anything that cannot t comfortably into the cabinets. is is where the majority of NHHCs collection of photos is housed. We dont really have a sense of how large they are, Crunk said. at is what we are doing right now, getting a better sense of that large donated collection. But the U and S collections will most likely never get the attention that the NH and NARA collections have, with individual captions for each photo. We go through them every day and we are nding these great collections that have never been seen before beyond the sta that originally collected them 10, 20 or 30 years ago. But, I doubt that we will ever go to item level and catalog every single photograph of those collections, Crunk said. We will probably do it at the collection level. at means the private individual donor. So if Joe Smith donates a collection and his collection includes 100 photographs, we will describe the collection, but we wont describe ev ery single photo. It takes a tremendous amount of time, eort and the ability to enter it into the collection management system. e reason it takes so long is that the photos in the collection often have no in formation associated with them. While they do try to track down infor mation on some of the images, each one represents a fairly challenging research project. If it is a recent donation, we will speak with the donor, Crunk said. We try and get as much information as possible be fore we even receive it. If is a part of the current collection and there is no paper work that has descriptive information, it gets tricky. If its a ship we can generally gure out what ship it is, that leads us to the timeframe. We have historians on sta and we sometimes ask them to help us date the photos and help with descrip tion. It can take as little as a day, or up to a few weeks. ough computers have made it eas ier to get NHHCs historic photos online, very little of the archive is available through that medium. Our website has about 26,000 item lev el images, Crunk said. ose are mainly from the NARA collection and the NH collection, we havent gotten the chance to get to those other collections before. With the advent of the NHHCs new website, rolling out this summer, the ar chivists are preparing the donated collec tions for the public. We are getting them ready to be po tentially digitized and at least writing some sort of description so that the pub lic knows that we have them, Crunk said. Also the archivists will be receiving a Digital Asset Management system to help with cataloging. When we receive the new DAM sys tem we will be entering all the meta data the donor information, a scope and content note about the collection, a description, date ranges and keywords. en you can do searches on it. It will rev olutionize how we organize, nd materials and how the public sees it, because it is all linked to the website. Right now, we type up index cards and le them by sub ject, Crunk said. For those wishing to submit photos to the photo archive, the archivists rec ommend getting in touch with them by phone or email. Let us know that you have a donation, and tell us what it is about, Crunk said. We will get back with you and let you know if that ts our collecting policy. eir policy is relatively simple. Photos must be Navy specic and in decent con dition. You may have tears or wrinkles. at we can repair. If it is torn in two or so bad ly damaged that we cannot unroll it or it has severe water damage we may not ac cept it. For the most part though, if it has to do with Navy life we will accept it. If it is a Sailor in uniform or on leave with his buddies, there is a cultural interest there, Crunk said. To contact NHHCs photo archive call (202) 433-2765 or email nhhcphotoar chive@navy.mil. e Naval History and Heritage Com mand, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preserva tion, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. naval history and heritage. It provides the knowledge foundation for the Navy by maintaining historically relevant re sources and products that reect the Navys unique and enduring contribu tions through our nations history, and supports the Fleet by assisting with and delivering professional research, analysis, and interpretive services. NHHC is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Operational Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archeology, Navy histories, nine muse ums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated colorized photo shows the protected cruiser USS Boston during the Spanish-American War. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated file photo of the battleship Iowa (BB 1) shows sailors waving to people on a boat. History and Heritage photo archive growingNavy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated photo shows Sailors of USS Charleston (C-2) manning one of the ships guns during the Spanish-American War.

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By Blago TashevTraining and Education Company, Marine Corps Base QuanticoCrimea, an autonomous republic in Ukraine, became the focus of attention in early 2014 when mass protests in central and western Ukraine forced the pro-Moscow president of the country to ee to Russia. Russia-backed forces in Crimea then took control of the republic and in a hastily organized referendum, the Russian ethnic majority in the region vot ed to join Russia. e Russian govern ment quickly annexed the republic. Crimea is home to 2 million people. Ethnic Russians make up the majority of the population, but there are also signicant Ukrainian and Tatar minorities. e Tatars used to dominate the region before Russians and Ukrainians began to settle there in the late 18th century. Crimea was part of the Ottoman Empire until the late 18th century, when Russia conquered the re gion. In 1954 under Soviet rule, Crimea was trans ferred from Russia to Ukraine. After the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Crimea became part of independent Ukraine, al though the region enjoyed a degree of autonomy in the new state. While Ukraine has been an independent country since 1991, many in Russia regret the disintegration of the Soviet Union in gener al, and the loss of Crimea in particular. Russia sees the annexation of Crimea in early 2014 as justice restored; the move was hugely popular in Russia. Crimea is a strategically located peninsula in the Black Sea. e area is home to both Ukraines and Russias Black Sea eets (Russia and Ukraine had a leasing agreement allowing Russia to keep military installations in Crimea). After the annexation in early 2014, Ukraine lost access to all its military installations in the region and Ukrainian military personnel left the peninsula. As a result of Moscows ambition to increase its political and military inuence in the world, Rus sia is in the process of ex panding and modernizing its Black Sea Fleet. e eet allows Russia to project power in the Mediterranean Sea, the Middle East and as far as the Indian Ocean. e annexation of Crimea has consequences for the wider region and relations between Russia and the West. Ukraine has a large Rus sian minority (more than 17 percent of the populaFrom Defense Media Activity Navye Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus ad dressed Sailors and Marines during a live, global all hands call April 29. Mabus answered ques tions about the budget, deployment schedules and pay and allowances among other things during the broadcast held at the De fense Media Activity. Mabus emphasized the Navys unique presence, citing that the Navy is where it needs to be, when it needs to be there, not just at the right time, but all the time. We do this by focus ing on four things, Mabus said. People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships. During the broadcast, Mabus took questions from those gathered at DMA, from around the eet via e-mail, from those tuned in to a live chat on the Internet, and pre-re corded video. Popular topics ranged from deployment lengths and budget requirements to female hair regulations and equipment. One Sailor asked about weapon systems currently being tested, and when the Navy and Marine Corps may see those systems. Mabus said the Navy and Marine Corps are al ready seeing these weap on systems out in the eet. e Navy is putting a la ser weapon on board USS Ponce (LPD 15) to see how it does in a maritime envi ronment. ey are also testing rail guns on high speed ves sels and USS Zumwalt has a brand new gun system that is very long range and amazingly accurate. Were going to get out the most advanced things weve got as quickly as we can, added Mabus. Mabus also elded questions regarding retirement policy in regards to pay. Mabus said that the notion is that whatever policy was in place when a service member enlisted will be the policy they re tire under, regardless of changes that occur while they are serving. When asked about in centives to keep those with special certications and clearances from ex iting the Navy, Mabus talked about Selective Re enlistment Bonuses, but also focused on the ser vice aspect and the good Sailors and Marines do for their country by choosing to stay in the military. He added that although some do move on to pur sue a career outside of the military, there are current ly record recruiting and retention rates in the Navy. Unanswered questions in regard to providing the same housing and allow ances for single Sailors and Marines as is pro vided to married Sailors and Marines, and the war rant ocer program being opened to additional ratings will be researched and answered later in an article for All Hands Maga zine online (www.ah.mil.) e call will be available for viewing at the Every Day in the Navy gallery on www.navy.mil.Navy photo by MC1 Mark LogicoSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus conducts a live worldwide all hands call at Defense Media Activity Fort Meade, Md. Navy secretary conducts global all hands call Mabus Photo by CIA World Fact BookCrimea, an autonomous republic in Ukraine, became the focus of attention in early 2014 when mass protests in central and western Ukraine forced the pro-Moscow president of the country to flee to Russia. Russia-backed forces in Crimea then took control of the republic and in a hastily organized referendum, the Russian ethnic majority in the region voted to join Russia. The Russian government quickly annexed the republic.Marines keeping eye on CrimeaSee Crimea, Page 13 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 11

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 13 Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Sullivan LaramieMarines with 2nd Supply Battalion, Combat Logistics Regiment 25, 2nd Marine Logistics Group take Meals, Cold Weather during the drawdown of Cold Response 14 at Evenes, Norway, March 19. MREs adapted for winter By Lance Cpl. Sullivan LaramieMarine Forces Europe and AfricaELVEGAARDSMOEN, Norway -When Marines in the eld are hungry, they turn to brown packages with snacks and dehydrated entrees inside. Meals, Ready to Eat have been staples of eld life in the military since they re placed Meals, Combat Issue in 1981. For service members in cold environments, however, regular MREs arent enough. MREs can only withstand low temperatures to a certain point. After that, service members require something most have never seen: Meals, Cold Weather. Clad in white instead of the usual brown packaging, MCWs contain meals with more calories and additional drink mixes to encourage hydration in climates that require more energy per day, but where many people prefer not to drink. For men and women who ght in ev ery clime and place, the frigid environ ment of the arctic weather during Cold Response 14, a Norwegian-led multinational exercise, is one such location. [MCWs] are better than regular MREs, they just arent as expedient, said Sgt. Sean N. Davis, a Bowling Green, Ohio, native and food service specialist with the battalion. ey last longer and they wont freeze in the cold, but you need to boil water. e MCWs are similar in some respects to the eld rations, or FRs, used by the Norwegian armed forces such as the high calorie count and the water requirement for rehydrating the entree in each meal. FRs are pretty much the same as the [MCWs], said Sgt. Ole G. Tinghaug, an Arendal, Norway native and ambulance team leader with Host Nation Support Battalion. ey come linked together with breakfast, lunch and dinner, though. Its the same concept, but with dierent food. MCWs are bigger, with more food in them, and I like those. Cold Response 14 brought together nearly 16,000 servicemembers from 16 dierent nations in northern Norway, above the Arctic Circle, from March 10 to 21 to build allied military capacity and interoperability in a high-intensity, coldweather training environment. e meals have dierent menu choic es, which allow service members to have a variety of options throughout their ex ercises and deployments. While MREs, MCWs and FRs may not be a Marine, soldier or sailors rst choice, they will sustain him or her enough to stay in the ght. By J.D. Leipold Army News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle J. White said that when he accepts the Medal of Hon or from President Barack Obama at the White House on May 13, he will do so in honor of the ve soldiers and one Marine who gave their lives in the defense of freedom and the American way of life. White spoke at a press conferenceApril 24 at the National Guard Center in Charlotte, N.C., near where he now lives. White was just 20 when he was deployed to Af ghanistan. On Nov. 9, 2007, his 14man unit and squad of Afghan soldiers were bru tally ambushed on three sides by Taliban ght ers on a path descending from the village of Aranas into a valley. On May 13th when Im awarded the Medal of Honor, I will tell their stories and preserve their memories they will not be forgotten, the now-27-year-old Seattle native told the press and bloggers. Their sacrifice and the sacrices of so many others are what motivate me to wake up each and every day to be the best I can. Everything I do in my life is done to make them proud. White was asked how strong the memory of the battle is now, after almost seven years, during which time he attained a bach elors degree and became an investment analyst for a major bank. I would say for the rst couple of years, memories were more vivid than today, he said. As time goes on certain things you think about less and less, but at any given moment I can close my eyes and hear the sounds and smell the gunpowder in the air; but six-and-a-half years later, I dont think about it as much as I used to. He did share that there were two things he can always visualize as if it were yesterday when he looked up from applying a tourniquet to wounded Marine Sgt. Phillip Bocks to see then-Spc. Kain Schilling take an enemy round to his left leg. White rushed to his buddy and for the second time that day applied a second tour niquet to Schilling, the only one he had left, his own belt. White will receive the Medal of Honor for his disregard of his own life while trying to save the lives of a Marine and two fellow soldiers after his team of 14 U.S. soldiers and squad of Afghan National Army soldiers were set up and ambushed by a much larger and more heavily armed Taliban force, who engaged in a three-prong attack from elevated ground. He will become the sev enth living recipient of the nations highest military decoration for conspicuous gallantry and valor during actions in Iraq or Afghanistan.White remembers squad White tion) and many fear Russia may attempt to annex other Ukrainian territories inhabited by ethnic Russians. is fear is reinforced by the willingness of many ethnic Russians in Ukraine to consider joining Russia. Other countries in the region, includ ing in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, fear the presence of Russian minorities in their states also exposes them to Russian aggression. As an attempt to deter Moscow, the United States and its European allies imposed limited economic and political sanctions against Russia. In addition, NATO has developed plans to increase military presence in members of the Alliance along the border with Rus sia. Many leaders have also urged Europe an governments to end their dependence on Russia for energy needs and to reverse the long trend of declining European defense budgets. ere also are calls to treat Russia as a potential opponent that is willing to break international law and norms, and is actively working against Western inter ests. Editors note: is piece was created at the Center for Advanced Operational Cul ture Learning.e center islocated on Marine Corps Base Quantico and provides regional, culture and language training programs for Marines of all ranks. For more information about CAOCL visit https://www.tecom.usmc.mil/caocl/Site Pages/Home.aspxCrimeaFrom Page 11

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014 When the Nazis landed in Ponte Vedra Beach From the Federal Bureau of InvestigationEditors note: is is the rst in a two-part series about Nazi saboteurs in America during World War II. Shortly after midnight on the morning of June 13, 1942, four men landed on a beach near Amagansett, Long Island, New York from a German submarine, clad in German uni forms and bringing ashore enough explosives, primers, and incendiaries to support an expected twoyear career in the sabo tage of American defenserelated production. On June 17, 1942, a similar group landed on Ponte Vedra Beach, near Jacksonville, Florida, equipped for a similar career in industrial disruption. e purpose of the inva sions was to strike a ma jor blow for Germany by bringing the violence of war to our home ground through destruction of Americas ability to manu facture vital equipment and supplies and trans port them to the battle grounds of Europe; to strike fear into the American civilian population; and to diminish the re solve of the United States to overcome our enemies. By June 27, 1942, all eight saboteurs had been arrested without having accomplished one act of destruction. Tried before a military commission, they were found guilty. One was sen tenced to life imprison ment, another to 30 years, and six received the death penalty, which was car ried out within a few days. e magnitude of the euphoric expectation of the Nazi war machine may be judged by the fact that, in addition to the large amount of material brought ashore by the saboteurs, they were given $175,200 in United States currency to nance their activities. On apprehension, a to tal of $174,588 was recov ered by the FBI the only positive accomplishment of eight trained saboteurs in those two weeks was the expenditure of $612 for clothing, meals, lodg ing, and travel, as well as a bribe of $260. So shaken was the Ger man intelligence service that no similar sabotage attempt was ever again made. e German naval high command did not again allow a valuable submarine to be risked for a sabotage mission. On September 1, 1939, World War II opened in Europe with the invasion of Poland by Nazi Ger many. e United States remained neutral until drawn into the world conict by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on De cember 7, 1941. War was declared against Japan by the United States on Decem ber 8, 1941; and, on the 11th, Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. During the early months of the war, the major con tributions of the United States to oppose the Nazi war machine involved industrial production, equipment, and supplies furnished to those forces actively defending themselves against the German armed forces. at industrial eort was strong enough to gen erate frustration, perhaps indignation, among the Nazi high command; and the order was given, alleg edly by Hitler himself, to mount a serious eort to reduce American produc tion. German intelligence settled on sabotage as the most eective means of diminishing our input. In active charge of the project was Lieutenant Walter Kappe, attached to Abwehr-2 (Intelligence 2) who had spent some years in the United States prior to the war and had been active in the GermanAmerican Bund and other eorts in the United States to propagandize and win adherents for Nazism among German Americans and German immigrants in America. Kappe was also an of cial of the Ausland Institute, which, prior to the war, organized Germans abroad into the National sozialistiche Deutshe Ar beiterpartei, the NSDAP or Nazi Party, and during the conict, Ausland kept track of and in touch with persons in Germany who had returned from abroad. Kappes responsibility concerned those who had returned from the United States. Early in 1942, he contacted, among others, those who ultimately under took the mission to the United States. Each con sented to the task, appar ently willingly, although unaware of the specic as signment. Most of the potential saboteurs were taken from civilian jobs, but two were in the German army. e trainees, about 12 in all, were told of their spe cic mission only when they entered a sabotage school established near Berlin which instructed them in chemistry, incen diaries, explosives, timing devices, secret writing and concealment of identity by blending into an Ameri can background. e in tensive training included the practical use of the techniques under realistic conditions. Subsequently, the saboteurs were taken to aluminum and magnesium plants, railroad shops, canals, locks, and other facilities to familiarize them with the vital points and vulnerabilities of the types of targets they were to at tack. Maps were used to locate those American tar gets, spots where railroads could be most eectively disabled, the principal aluminum and magnesium plants, and important canals, water ways and locks. All instruc tions had to be memo rized. On May 26, 1942, the rst group of four saboteurs left by submarine from the German base at Lorient, France, and on May 28, the next group of four departed the same base. Each was destined to land at points on the At lantic Coast of the United States familiar to the lead er of that group. Four men, led by George John Dasch, age 39, landed on a beach near Amagansett, Long Island, New York, about 12:10 a.m., June 13, 1942. Accompanying Dasch were Ernest Peter Burger, 36; Heinrich Harm Heinck, 35; and Richard Quirin, 34. On June 17, 1942, the other group landed at Ponte Vedra Beach, Flor ida, south of Jacksonville. e leader was Edward John Kerling, age 33; with Werner iel, 35; Herman Otto Neubauer, 32; and Herbert Hans Haupt, 22. Both groups landed wearing complete or par tial German uniforms to ensure treatment as pris oners of war rather than as spies if they were caught in the act of landing. Navy History & Heritage Command photoNazi saboteurs were delivered to American shores in New York and Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida by a U Boat like this one. Kerling Thiel Neubauer Haupt ablers maintenance, logistics and intelligence are lacking. I think where they need our assistance for some period of time is at the institutional level, so all of this that theyve accomplished becomes sustainable over time, the chairman said, acknowledging that this will take time. Producing an intelligence analyst who has the intuitive knowledge of whats important and, just as important, who needs it, is a tasking years in the mak ing. Having personnel who can maintain trucks or helicopters in a country with lit eracy problems is a long pole in the tent of Afghan forces. While it will take time, that doesnt mean we have to be out there walking the paths in their foothills or through their villages, Dempsey said. is is about helping them develop systems. ats really what our recommendation has been for the post-2014 presence. e chairman said he cannot shed any light on when President Barack Obama will announce his decision on the U.S. post-2014 footprint a question seem ingly on the lips of every service mem ber at this sprawling base. Weve made our recommendations, he said. Weve rened them based on changes on the ground, such as the successful elec tions. e decision will involve not only whats in U.S. interests, but the interests of NATO, because this is a NATO mission. Would I like a decision sooner rather than later? Of course, he continued. ere is some uncertainty in the ranks. Young men and women who serve, and their families, would like to know wheth er they are going to deploy or not deploy, or for how long they are going to deploy. For now, the mission goes on, and whats more important than what happens in 2015 is making sure eorts in 2014 count, the chairman said. e real strong theme today in Afghanistan is we need to make 2014 matter, he said. We need to use it. e bilateral security agreement re mains crucial to the post-2014 U.S. pres ence. We could make a conditional decision meaning if we get a BSA, here is what we will do, Dempsey said. But clearly, we need a willing partner to have a sustained and somewhat enduring presence here. e BSA is critical. While the Afghan security forces did well in the election, it was the culmi nation of 12 years of eort, by young American men and women who came to Afghanistan because the United States had been attacked by al-Qaida operating out of Afghanistan, the chairman noted. From that moment forward, weve had a very clear eye on what we had to accomplish and that is the defeat of alQaida, the disruption of that network and the establishment of a stable nation that would no longer be a safe haven for alQaida, he said.DempseyFrom Page 9

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 8, 2014