The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00347


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Nurse on call over phoneBy Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Beginning May 2, a new, 24/7 Nurse Advice Line is available. Call 800-TRICARE (800-874-2273) and select option 1 for help with urgent care, day or nightincluding holidays. A registered nurse assesses symptoms, can direct patients to care, and assist with self-care. Nurses can advise parents about childrens medical issues, as well. e Nurse Advice Line is staed by nurses who give medical advice and customer service sta who verify TRICARE eligibility. If needed, sta can Camden Navy League salutes 25 Kings Bay personnel May 8From the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United Statese Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will honor the 25 top Sailors, Coast Guardsmen and a Marine stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and at the Coast Guards Maritime Safety and Security Team in St. Marys, at its May 8 Sea Services Awards Banquet. e banquet, the councils sig nature event of the year, gives recognition to the honorees for their accomplishments and is an opportunity for the entire community to show appreciation to these incredible individuals for their hard work, dedication and service to our nation and our com munity throughout the year. e special guest speaker at the banquet will beMaster Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Michael D. Stevens. e event takes place ursday, May 8, at Magnolias in the Kings Bay Conference Center on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. A reception begins at 6 p.m. followed by dinner and the program at 7 p.m. e public is invited to attend along with the regular membership. All attendees must send advance dinner payment at $25 per person and the names of individuals in their group to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e deadline to receive reservations is Monday, May 5. To access the base for the meeting, all attendees must show either an active duty or retired military ID, a Kings Bay Navy League photo ID available only to Camden Kings Bay Council members, or submit in advance a consent form and undergo a background check. Up Periscope Finish this sentence I always wanted ... Page 9 Keep off! Park on the grass, youll pay the price Page 3 Like a fish Sign up now for youth swim lessons Page 72009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Nurse, Page 3 Stevens guest speaker Stevens On 10th anniversary of seless act that saved lives, earned Medal of HonorBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMarines and Sailors of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Marine Corps Security Force Battalion came together April 22 to commemorate and honor the life of fallen Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, who died in battle 10 years ago paying the ultimate sacrice. We have a responsibility as Marines to honor those heroes who have gone before us such as Cpl. Dunham, who made the ultimate sacrice for his fellow Marines, Sgt. Maj. Marc Chabot said. It is our responsibility to carry on his legacy. On April 14, 2004, while manning a checkpoint in Karabilah, Iraq, an insurgent approached Dunham and started an altercation, choking the corporal. Two Marines responded to the scue and began helping their comrade. Dunhams last words were, No, no. Watch his hands. e insurgent dropped a grenade. Dunham took o his helmet, dropped to the ground and covered the grenade with his helmet and his body to shield his brothers. All three Marines were seriously Dunham Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger salutes with the color guard of Sgt. Benford Henry, Cpl. Timothy Schewe, Cpl. Jacob Myers, MA2 James Bailey and MA3 Ryan Miserendino, honoring the memory of Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, April 22 at Dunham Barracks on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. More photos inside on Pages 4 and 5.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Submarine BallUSS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Blue) takes home the award for best centerpiece, below, at the 114th Submarine Ball April 26 at the Hyatt Regency in Jacksonville.Courtesy photos See Dunham, Page 7 See League, Page 7 Marines honor Dunhams memory Commander, Navy Installations Command, Vice Adm. William D. French, walks with Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer, Capt. Harvey Guffey, near Pirates Cove Galley during his base tour April 25. The CNIC visited the Emergency Operation Center, Dry Dock, Explosive Handling Warf 2, Fire Station 1, The Big EZ Liberty Center, Magnolias, Unaccompanied Housing Barracks, Fitness Center, Commissary, Navy Exchange, Base Chapel, Fleet and Family Support Center, Child and Youth Services facilities and Family Housing. While at Magnolias, the CNIC attended a luncheon with the Camden County Partnership.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By LN2 Kevin P. Van GorderNavy Judge Advocate Generals officeAs a victim of a crime, one should not fear retaliation, be forced to remain silent, or feel removed from the legal process. Oftentimes, victims and witnesses of crimes suer emotionally, physically, and socially. e goal of the Department of Defense is to mitigate, if not eliminate, the hardships that victims and witnesses experience. As part of this eort, Region Legal Service Oces oer legal assistance to those who have been adversely affected by crime. RLSO legal assistance services cover civil legal matters including, but not limited to, domestic disputes, child custody and support obligations, landlord-tenant issues, identity theft, and rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. For example, if you are a victim or witness of domestic violence, a legal assistance attorney can assist you with the divorce process. If your spouse is a servicemember and not providing support for dependents, RLSO can assist with getting commandor court-ordered support. Identity theft victims can be assisted with ghting o creditors, repairing damaged credit, and preventing future losses. Additionally, RLSO legal assistance sta oer counseling to ensure victims and witnesses are aware of other rights and services available. Depending on the situation, these rights may include the right to be notied of court proceedings and to be present at most public hearings, the right to expedited transfer, the right to transitional compensation, and most importantly, the right to be treated with dignity and respect. If the assistance a victim or witness desires is best provided by a different resource, the RLSO will make referrals to a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response victim advocate, Naval Criminal Investigative Service agent, Family Advocacy Program advisor, Victim Legal Counsel or a Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society representative. RLSOs world-wide oer a range of support services to victims and witnesses as they navigate the legal process. If you have been victimized or have been a witness to a crime and have questions about your rights or assistance available, visit a RLSO in your area. Oce locations can be found using the Legal Assistance Ofce Locator Tool at http://www.jag. navy.mil. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentHeres a reminder from the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department: Move right for sirens and lights. When the Fire Department is called to an emergency it is important that we respond quickly and safely. If you are driving down the road and see the lights and sirens of an emergency vehicle in your rearview mirror, move to the right and stop to allow emergency vehicles to move easily down the road. Once the emergency vehicles have passed merge back into trac when it is safe to begin driving. Every time re engines or aid cars are called to an emergency, re ghters are giving their all to help others. Do your part as a driver to help re ghters do their job as quickly and safely as possible.Gateway Inn traininge Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Manager Training Workshop ReadySet-Grow was April 1 through April 4 at the MWR Magnolia Conference Center, Kings Bay. CNIC, Southeast Region leadership and sta along with NGIS Managers from across the country and overseas locations such as Greece, Japan, and Guam were in attendance. Bruce Grenier, CNIC eet readiness director and Tamara Davis, CNIC Navy Lodging programs director were guest speakers. e workshop covered nancial management, accreditation standards, sales and marketing, leadership and human resources. It culminated in an open forum discussion and case study presentation on April 4. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. The Players sets military job faire Players will welcome active duty, Reserve, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 3, to participate in its third-annual military job fair, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition. Its free and open to military personnel, veterans and military spouses who are seeking employment. ere will be 50 companies on hand, all with open hiring opportunities. Free career counseling and resume-writing assistance will be provided, as well as information on local educational institutions with veterans programs.NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipBalfour Beatty Communities is accepting scholarship application from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communities and plan to attend accredited educational/technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www. bbcommunitiesfoundation.org/scholarships. aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Shrimp Festival begins May 1 e 51st Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival runs ursday, May 1 through Sunday, May 4, in downtown Fernandina Beach, Fla. For more information, visit www.shrimpfestival.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 5734719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Fire Department issues reminder Potpourri Assistance oers for crime victims From Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support CenterKings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center is oering a new and improved educational experience on parenting. is six-session class is facilitated by two licensed clinical social workers, Sallie Galyean, the child counselor and Mary Jenssen, a clinical counselor and FAP case manager. Both of these facilitators have experience working with military families and the common struggles parents encounter. e rotating class schedule allows participants to join at any time, choose a particular class topic to attend, make up a class or take a refresher class throughout the next session cycle. e interactive sessions promote an informal and stimulating educational experience. e following is information regarding each of the class topics: 1, Ages & Stages involves ages and stages of physical and sexual development from birth to age 18. 2, Parenting Styles & Co-parenting discusses parenting styles and coparenting, as well as struggles with divorce, blended and extended families. 3, Child Abuse & Domestic Violence teaches parents about the effects of domestic violence and child abuse on children as well as how to cope and resources to assist families. 4, Dealing with Misbehavior explores the misbehavior of children, why they do what they do and how parents can appropriately respond to negative behavior. 5, Communication: It Goes Both Ways helps parents learn to communicate with their children, spouse and family in a positive way. 6, Structure & Safety covers the benets of routines, ways to help families bond, as well as helpful information to safeguard your family and maintain a healthy home environment. Classes are held at FFSC 9 to 11:30 a.m., Mondays. Each participant will receive a certicate of completion for each session attended. When all six parenting sessions have been attended, the participant receives a certicate for completion for the course. ere is so much valuable information in this class, but you wont know until you sign up. Call FFSC at 573-4512 and ask to sign up for the next Parenting Class, or ask to speak with one of the facilitators who can provide you with more details. FFSC oers new Parenting Class Kings Bay FFSC Navy Jag From the Kings Bay Employer Committee e Kings Bay Employer Committee is taking applications for a $500 college scholarship from high school seniors in Camden County. e deadline to apply for the Tracy L. Foreman Scholarship is Monday, May 12. e scholarship is funded by an employer committee endowment established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employment marketing representative at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center. Kings Bay Employer Committee President Al Daniels of Dominos donated $500 for this years scholarship award. e scholarship will be awarded to a graduating senior, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited institution of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants also must be working part-time or serve a documented internship for a minimum of 10 hours per week. e scholarships are non-renewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarship, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores and a 2-to-3 page essay. e essay theme is how to use education and training to develop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a member of the employer committees scholarship subcommittee, at rbaldwin@camden.k12.ga.us or (912) 729-4790. Applications for the scholarships are available at the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center, 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys, and the Camden County High School Guidance Oce. For additional information, contact the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. To learn more about career opportunities, connect with us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, which can be conveniently accessed at www.employgeorgia.com.Scholarships deadline is May 12 KB Employer Committee

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Parking on grass at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay damages it, other vegetation and sometimes base property. Now its a hazard to adults and kids walking in thesemakeshift parking lots. Of particular danger is the road leading the youth soccer fields by the track. This road is off limits for parking, just like every other grass area, because it causes a hazard as cars travel that road with no visibility of kids in and around the cars. Photo by EM1 Mark Treen No parking on grass at NSBInfant immunization crucial By Mary BuskohlCoultonImmunizations Supervisory Nurse Specialist, Naval Hospital JacksonvilleNational Infant Immunization Week is April 26 to May 3. is annual observance promotes the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccinepreventable diseases. Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety often confuse parents. e bottom line: vaccines save lives. Each year, thousands of children become ill from diseases that could have been prevented by basic childhood immunizations, said Mary Buskohl-Coulton, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles immunizations supervisory nurse specialist. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-eective public health tools available for preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases. By law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration conducts years of testing before a vaccine is licensed, and once licensed the vaccine is continually monitored for safety and eectiveness. Like any medication, vaccines can cause side eects, but the benets of vaccines far outweigh possible side eects for almost all children. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. e elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are powerful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can save families time and money. Children with vaccinepreventable diseases may not be allowed to attend school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable diseases require hospitalization that could result in permanent disabilities, causing a nancial burden. Immunizing infants can also protect future generations. Birth defects associated with rubella are no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm future generations. If vaccinations were to stop, the protection that has been built through years of vaccinations would cease to exist. Gradually, more and more people would become infected with disease, spread diseases to others and many may die. is would essentially undo the progress made over the years with the elimination of diseases. Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of todays vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent. ese diseases can be especially serious for infants and young children. at is why it is important to follow recommended immunization schedules to protect them by providing immunity early in life, before exposure to potentially lifethreatening diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases still circulate around the world, including in the U.S. Continued vaccination is necessary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks. Even when rare in the U.S., diseases can be brought into the country, putting unvaccinated children at risk. Just recently within the U.S. there have been two disease increases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Forty-nine states and District of Columbia reported pertussis increases in 2012 compared to 2011, with 48,277 cases including 20 deaths. e incidence rate among infants exceeded that of all other age groups, with the majority of deaths occurring among infants younger than three-months of age. In 2013, data showed a higher than normal number of measles cases nationally and in individual states, including an outbreak of 58 cases in New York City the largest reported outbreak of measles in the U.S. since 1996. Currently, the U.S. has the safest, most eective vaccine supply in its history. Its long-standing vaccine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. And as new information and science become available, the system will continue to be updated and improved. Immunization is a shared responsibility. Families, health care professionals and public health ocials must continue to work together to help protect the entire community. Parents are encouraged to talk to their childs primary care manager to ensure that their infant is up-to-date on immunizations. Remember to vaccinate. Its the single best way to be protected. For more information on vaccinations call Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays immunization clinic at 912-573-8250 or go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines. NBHC Kings Bays immunization clinic is open Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Navy photo by Jacob SippelCorpsman Christian Snyder, assigned to Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Maternal Infant Unit, sterilizes the skin of 11-month old Cameron Kee prior to administering an annual influenza vaccination.connect the patient with the military treatment facility for an urgent-care appointment, or make a referral to urgent care in the TRICARE network. e Nurse Advice Line works together with our Medical Home Port teams existing resources our local appointment lines and secure e-mail to connect you to the care you need, when you need it, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer. Appointment lines remain the same. At Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, call (912) 573-6450, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. NBHC Kings Bay is open extended hours, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays to ursdays and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Patients can securely email their doctor for nonurgent issues, with RelayHealth. Sign up at www. relayhealth.com or the command website. To see photos of the doctors at NBHC Kings Bay, go to the command website, click on Medical Home Port and select a Black or Maroon Team). NH Jacksonville is an early adapter of the Nurse Advice Line, which is rolling out across the military health system in the U.S. this spring. Most TRICARE beneciaries are eligible to use the Nurse Advice Line including TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Remote for Active Duty Family Members, TRI CARE Standard and Extra, TRICARE Young Adult, TRI CARE For Life, TRICARE Reserve Select and TRICARE Retired Reserve. NurseFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Top left, Lance Cpl. William Manning places dog tags and, top center, Lance Cpl. Jackson Allen places a helmet. Above, Cpl. Andrew J. Fleming salutes Dunham during the ceremony at Dunham Barracks marking the 10-year anniversary of his death. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay April 22, 2014 Remembering Cpl. DunhamEvery level of the quad of Dunham Barracks was lined with MCFSBn Sailors and Marines. Distinguished guests, Sailors and Marines watch the ceremo ny honoring Dunham. MCSFBn Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. Kevin L. Moody, and Sergeant Major Marc R. Chabot salute. Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger returns the salute. Right, Lance Cpl. William Manning carries the boots.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 5 CWO4 Richard Walker reads the Cpl. Dunhams Medal of Honor citation. The memorial board was constructed by Sgt. Steven T. Knowles. A cross with body armor and Kevlar stands at the entrance to Dunham Barracks. Left, Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger stands by a memorial board honoring Dunham. Above, the Sergeant Major sounds off, Corporal Jason L. Dunham, squad leader, 4th platoon, Company K, 3rd Battalion 7th Marines. Wounded in action on 14 April 2004, against enemy forces in Karabilah Iraq. He succumbed to his wounds on 22 April 2004 at Naval Medical Center Bethesda. Left, Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger stands stalwart. Right, the Rifle Detail prepares to fire a 21-Gun Salute. From left, Cpl. Jeffrey A. Parker, Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Stroud III, Lance Cpl. William L. Wright, Lance Cpl. Vicarrio L. Ward, Lance Cpl. Michael A. Martin Jr., and Lance Cpl. Jacob M. Flately. Not pictured, Lance Cpl. Joel D. Cowart and Staff Sgt. Jeffrey W. Ferry.

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, May 5, 12 and 19. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet May 6, 13, 20 and 27. No pre-registration required.Job search workshop scheduled for April 9A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 7. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Maay 5 to 9. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 19 to 23. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 5 to 9 p.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for May 14A job search workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., May 14. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportunities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training requirement. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 14 and 8 a.m. to noon May 28. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, May 22 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 15. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, May 21. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Maay 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Advanced FRG Training workshop scheduledThis bi-monthly class is offered to educate FRG officers about changes to the OPNAVINST, answer questions that they or their group is having and network with other FRGs to share best practices. This training will be 6 to 8 p.m. May 6. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 10 to 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, May 7. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 15. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a normal part of everyday personal financial manage ment for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop provides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 6 to 8 p.m., May 20. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Develop a spending plan training scheduledDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This singlesession workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan together with your spouse. This workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet public affairse Sailors assigned to U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet have capably planned dozens of maritime security operations, security cooperation activities and contingency operations in the past few years. Meanwhile, they have beneted from an atmosphere of genuine support for sta members who want to keep their lives in balance while achieving professional and personal goals. e evidence of this work-life balance is in a command climate survey completed in late 2013. In every area, from organizational eectiveness to group cohesion and equal opportunity trends, the command scored higher than the averages for the Navy and the Department of Defense. It was so positive we had to dig for not necessarily negatives but we had to dig for issues, said Chief Information Systems Technician Shannen Kippers, the Command Managed Equal Opportunity Program manager, who managed the survey and associated records searches, focus groups and interviews. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, who became the 4th Fleet commander in mid2012, set the tone with a brieng he delivered to new arrivals. Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Jolene Lovett of Atlanta recalled that, in her brieng, Harris stressed the importance of training and education. He was encouraging everyone, at every step to move to the next level, said Lovett, who earned her Information Dominance Warfare qualication at 4th Fleet and is scheduled to attend the Advanced Maritime Operational Intelligence Course this year. Continuing to learn, taking leave and demonstrating conspicuous courtesy are command priorities for each Sailor and civilian. rough most of her career, Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Katina Davis, of Folkston and St. Marys, Ga., had been single. I was always the one taking duties for someone, she said, on holidays or when her ships returned from deployments. In late 2012, Davis learned she was pregnant with her rst child, to whom she gave birth in December. Davis, who has plastered her desk with photos of her daughter, still likes going to work, she said. She also looks forward to going home at the end of the day, and she feels support up and down the chain of command for her new responsibilities. Of the nine commands to which she has been assigned so far, is command is at the very top, Davis said. Lt. Maili Neverosky, a surface warfare ocer from Bakerseld, Calif., and her husband, who is also a surface warfare ofcer, have three children. SWO life was hard on their family. It didnt seem like sustainable lifestyle, she said. So, in 2008, she left active duty. A year ago, Neverosky joined the Navy Reserve; a few months later, she took active duty orders to 4th Fleet, where she plans surface missions and has qualied as a battle watch captain. On a typical day, she goes to the base gym, where she is likely to see a senior leader or two. To her, thats a good sign. Neverosky said shed be happy to extend her 4th Fleet assignment. Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration will be taken at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the customer service counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at time of registration. No refunds. Pre-season is May 5 to 8 and May 12 to 15; Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-week sessions. Private lessons are available for $75 with ve one-on-one lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or x3990 for more details. Arrive on time for class, bring sunscreen andtowels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Movie Under e Stars Saturday, May 17 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing e Lego Movie, rated PG. Showtime is at dusk, approximately 8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor theater. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. NAU Walking Dead Escape Run in Jacksonville Which one are you, survivor, walker or watcher? Figure it out Saturday, May 17 at Everbank Field Stadium at the Zombie Obstacle Event with NAU. Register on website for 8:15 p.m. wave to participate with the survivors of Team Kings Bay at www.thewalkingdeadescape.com/faq. Pre-register for transportation at Big EZ by May 16 for only $5. Call NAU for more details at (912) 5738972. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning on May 5. e captains meeting was April 30. Non-refundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 non-active duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and un der, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for May are Pearcy Jackson: Sea of Mont ers May 3 and 4, Happy Feet 2 May 10 and 11, Coudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 May 17 and 18, and Walk ing with Dino saurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Sat urday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkings bay page. Additional kids mov ies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bever ages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack pro vided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 7 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 8,183 2, NAS Jax 7,509.5 3, NASP 6,151 4, Mayport 5,923.58 5, Key West 5,357 6, NAVSTA Gitmo 3,750 7, NASP Corry 3,699.5 8, New Orleans 3,511.5 9, JTF Gitmo 1,965 Individuals Average 1, Leon Platt KB 205.95 2, Dan Blakeslee KB 203.79 3, C. Washington NAS J 194.52 4, Rob Daugherty KB 194.36 5, T. Lowrance NAS J 192.06 6, Chris Oglsby NO 190.43 7, Shaun Spitler NAS J 190.07 8, Kyler Ascue KW 185.60 9, C. Kiwatowsski NASP 186.67 10, Roger Byrd Mayport 185.67 Navy Team Bowling Periscope file photoSign up for childrens swim lessons now at the Kings Bay Fitness Center pool. wounded. Eight days later Dunham died from his wounds at Bethesda Naval Hospital. He was 22 years old. He represents the Marine Corps in general, Lance Cpl. Tanner Johnston said. He represents brotherhood and the willingness to lay down your life for each other. ere are numerous examples of Marines jumping on grenades and taking bullets for each other, but its the thing that Marines, Navy and other service members do every day outside of combat also. e day started with a tribute run in the early morning and ended by rendering colors and presenting the Fallen Soldier Battle Cross at the Dunham Barracks, which appropriately were named after the hero. During the opening ceremony John 15:13 was aptly quoted, Greater love has no one than this: to lay down ones life for ones friends. Dunham was one of many service members who made the ultimate sacrice while saving his brothers-at-arms. Due to his heroic and seless act on April 14, 2004, his family was award ed his Medal of Honor by President George W. Bush Jan. 11, 2007. Consent forms are available on the councils website, and must be completed, witnessed and submitted to Kings Bay Security no later than May 1. Attendees submitting a consent form to attend this meeting will have their names on a guest list at both base gates. Questions about accessing the Kings Bay can be directed to Council President Dave Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. More information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org.DunhamFrom Page 1LeagueFrom Page 1 Navy photo Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Katina Davis, of Folkston and St. Marys, Ga., in her office.Fleet successes credited to Sailors THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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Ive always wanted to water ski, snow ski, go on a cruise, go to the World Series, the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, March Madness, catch a marlin, snow board, time travel, write a novel, a screenplay, win the lottery, drive in the Daytona 500, fly a plane, be an astronaut, walk on the moon, win the decathlon, stay in a lodge, own a boat, own a pool, own the car I wanted not the car I needed, win on Jeopardy, visit Australia and never, ever, have to eat my spinach. Here are others.Finish the sentence, Ive always wanted to ...CS3 Chris Cleveland USS Tennessee Blue Mansfield, Texas Go overseas. I havent been overseas at all. Lance Cpl. Jorge Aquirre Security Force Battalion Miami Everything Ive wanted I have in my wife and my child. MT1 Christopher Leedy USS West Virginia Gold Chambersburg, Pa. Travel through Europe with my wife. Casie Nation AFGE Representative Leesburg, Fla. Since I was young Ive always wanted to be the first woman President of the United States. ET2 Stephen Krause USS Georgia Gold Stow, Ohio Be able to stop time. Lance Cpl. Joshua Haskell Security Force Battalion McComb, Miss. Travel the world more. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Elissa creates a bird feeder that was made completely from recyclables and earthfriendly for feathered friends as a remembrance of Balfour Beattys Earth Day celebration. April 22 marked the anniversary of the environmental movement, which got its start in the 1970s. As the years progress and technology advances, it is necessary to teach our younger generations how important it is to take care of the earth so that they can continue the cycle.Photo by Kari Saurez Copy by MC2 Ashley Hedrick Earth DayNavy commands hold Earth Day From Chief of Naval Operations Energy & Environmental Readiness Division Public AffairsNavy commands across the globe celebrated Earth Day April 22 and throughout the month of April by participating in local activities that showcase their ongoing commitment to the environment as they support the Navys national security mission. Earth Day, which was rst celebrated in April of 1970, began as a grassroots movement that raised public awareness of the fragility of natural ecosystems and encouraged people to make individual commitments to protect the planet. e Navys 2014 theme for Earth Day, Global Reach Local Action, re minds Sailors, civilians, and family members that as a result of the Navys global presence, they have many opportunities to make positive changes for the environment and for energy use in their communities. e Navy began installing equipment on our ships to safely manage our waste stream at sea and protect the environment See Earth, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Staff Sgt. Jake Barreiro51st Fighter Wing Public AffairLike a lot ofchildren growing up in the s and s, Chris Balcom liked to watch TV for fun and entertainment. But on one occasion, Chris wasnt watching passively, or for joy or entertainment. As he watched, his heart wrenched. Chris was watching the repatriation of American prisoners of war and missing in action looking for his father. On May 15, 1966, at 9:50 a.m., Capt. Ralph Balcoms plane was seen ascending into the clouds about 10 miles southwest of Dong Hoi, Vietnam. Afterward, Ralph lost voice contact with his ight, and didnt return to base before his F-105 underchiefs fuel should have run out. When a search and recovery party found no trace of Ralph or his plane, he was declared missingin-action. Serving in Vietnam as a pilot for the 421st Tactical Fighter Squadron, Ralph left behind his wife, Marian, their 7-yearold daughter, Tracy, and 4-year-old son, Chris. More than 47 years have passed. Marian has remarried, Tracy is 54, and Chris, 51, has three children of his own. Suering with the burden of this sacrice for four decades, a recent gesture has shown the Balcoms theyre not alone, and will always be part of theAir Forcefamily. It was coincidence that Ralphs old unit, now known as the 421st Fighter Squadron, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, and Marine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom, Chriss son, stationed in Hawaii, would be deployed to Korea at the same time. When Lt. Col. David Shoemaker, 421st FS commander, heard the grandson of a fallen Black Widow the squadrons moniker was going to be in the area, he worked fast to get a chance for Jake to get a tour of the squadrons deployed station here. Jake spent March 2526, with his grandfathers unit. It was a no brainer to try to get Jake out here, Shoemaker said. It means everything to us. is is important. Our heritage, our legacy and taking care of families, thats what our unit and the military is about. We thought we were the only ones who remembered him, Chris said. To nd out that Lt. Col. Shoemaker and the 421st remember and honor him made my whole family happy. We are so grateful that they respect the sacrice of their fallen brother. Its a truly noble thing theyre doing by honoring his legacy. Deployed with his squadron since January, Shoemaker learned about Jakes deployment toKorea from Chris, and quickly reached out to Jakes leadership to arrange a visit. Jake, a 21-year-old eld artillery cannonier, said he knew nothing about the arrangementand was shocked to hear from his rst sergeant that he would be going to visit his grandfathers old squadron. Words cant describe how excited I was to hear that, he said. My grandfathers life, and what he did, has been a huge part of our lives. Im incredibly honored that the 421st reached out and wanted to meet me. Its an honor not lost on Jakes family. Since the end of the war, weve had no contact with anyone who knew my father, Chris said. We carried his memory and honored him within our family. We had no idea it was reciprocated by the squadron until now. Its like a gift to us, and we nd it comforting to know that we were not alone in this after all. Its my fathers last squadron so it will always be a special place for us. For the visit, Jake was given a comprehensive tour of the 421st FSs operations and shown several aircraft including the U-2, A-10 underbolt II and F-16 Fighting Falcon. While the airplanes were amazing, and something hell never forget, Jake said the real highlight of his stay was the people of the 421st FS, who treated him like family. Im impressed, Jake said. All of them, from the commander, to the pilots, to the enlisted, when they saw me, they stopped whatever they were doing and showed a genuine interest in me and my family. Initially, Jake was unsure of what to expect, and felt nervous about spending time with strangers whose only connection to him was his grandfathers Vietnam service, but after his trip, Jake said he feels like a member of the Black Widow family. What amazed me was I didnt think people out there cared like I did, like my family did, Jake said. e fact that other people do and are genuinely interested in my familys history means everything to us. Too young to remember his father before he left for Vietnam, Chris remembers watching the repatriation of American POWs on TV, anxiously hoping and waiting to see his fathers face. e worst part (growing up) was the uncertainty, Chris said. Was he alive or dead? If he was alive, what hell on earth was he enduring? Would we ever see him again? Nobody can really understand what this is like unless theyve lived it. Its a wound that will never heal. One of the worst days of my life was Feb. 12, 1973, Operation Homecoming, Chris said. When the Hanoi POWs came home, watching each man walk down the stairs o the plane, straining to see his face, hoping against hope that my father would be next, but it never came to be. For seven years we lived with not knowing if he was alive or dead. He was lost on May 15, 1966, but to us, he died Feb. 12, 1973. e inuence of Ralphs sacrice extends to his unseen grandchildren as well. Jake, who wears a POW/ MIA bracelet with his grandfathers name on it, said he learned early in life about Ralphs service. My dad used to have two ight suits in his closet, a big one and small one, Jake said. I used to go in there and put the small one on. e small one was given to my dad from my grandfather. I was 4 years old and thats when I began to understand the history of what he did in Vietnam and what it meant.Marine pays tribute to missing grandfatherAir Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jake BarreiroMarine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom watches an F-16 take off March 26, 2014, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Balcoms grandfather, Col. Ralph Balcom, served as a fighter pilot in Vietnam, but has been missing in action since May 15, 1966. Courtesy photoCapt. Ralph Balcom, his wife, Marian, his daughter, Tracy, and his son, Chris, in a family photo. Ralph Balcom was lost in Vietnam more than 47 years ago. See Missing, Page 11Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Donald R. AllenLt. Cmdr. Kelly Larson, left, and Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Edward Lopez test a Togolese villager for malaria during an Africa Partnership Station health fair. Navy takes aim at malaria By Lt. Jennifer WrightNavy Entomology Center of Excellence Public Affairse Navy Entomology Center of Excellence and Navy Medical Research Unit No. 3 partnered with the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research to present a Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course to members of the Armed Forces of Liberia, April 9 to 18. is course was part of a larger initiative to assist in building and maintaining health capacity in Liberia. e U.S. Navy rst became engaged with the AFL in 2003 during Operation Sheltering Sky when 44 of 225 Marines became infected with malaria while ashore. Funded by the DoD Global Emerging Infection Systems, the course was designed to build skills within AFL Preventive Medicine Unit personnel leading to the reduction of malaria among AFL members. Twenty students participated in the interactive course that culminated in a joint residual insecticide spray of the AFL barracks. e goal of this capacity building mission was to train the trainers by providing an intense two week course on integrated pest management which will then be taught by the AFL preventative medicine team to other members of the AFL and Liberian community, said Joseph Diclaro, NAMRU-3 Entomology Department Head. Most importantly this training allows us to add sustainable value to the AFL that will not just have a one time aect but that the preventative medicine ocers can take ownership of themselves. is mission is an excellent example of the benets of collaboration, said Capt. Eric Homan, NECE Ocer in Charge. NECE, NAMRU-3, LIBR and OOL under AFRICOM all worked to make this happen using our diverse expertise to come to gether and create an innovative new cur riculum for use in the AFRICOM region. ese sorts of unique training opportunities not only increase jointness with our allies but also benet the readiness of our Navy instructors as well, said Lt. Yans, NECE instructor. is training provided us with new tools towards understanding collaborative operations with our African counterparts as well a broader cultural awareness that is critical for successful OCONUS missions. As Operation Onward Liberia winds down it is critical that we enable the AFL to operate independently and give them the proper tools for success, said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Crystal Goeddelan an OOL mentor who participated in the class. e participants used the information provided during the two week course to coordinate and successfully execute the treatment of over 200 barracks and will independently spray the remaining AFL barracks providing preventative medicine support to over 1000 soldiers and their families. By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceMeasures to battle the insidious crime of sexual assault must start at the top, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said April 21 during a visit to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. Hagel met with the sta and received a brieng on the Safe Helpline set up three years ago for sexual assault victims in the Defense Department. Hagel acknowledged parallel issues of sexual assault and harassment in the civilian sector, but praised the recent milestones of the military-centric Safe Helpline, lauding its services to more than 300,000 people who have sought information about the crime. Any big problem in society that is resolved has to begin at the top ... every leader in the military is focused on this, Hagel said. So it is important that our people in the military institution know that the secretary of defense is very focused on stopping sexual assault in the military. And more than 22,000 people have sought one-on-one sexual assault assistance and crisis support securely and anonymously through the Safe Helplines online chat, telephone and texting helplines. Notably, dozens of multi-colored sticky notes with brief messages of gratitude and optimism from survivors adorn the walls of the call center. is is really the dening dynamic of what youre doing, Hagel said. You are changing the world for the better. In remarks to the sta, the secretary re-emphasized that sexual assault is a serious crime both in the military and society at large, with no easy solution at hand. Our people in the military come from society; we re ect society, Hagel said. Youve got to inculcate your people so that they have personal responsibility for their own behavior and conduct. We know weve got a big challenge out there. Hagel said DoD leaders try to bring trust, condence and credibility into the departments sexual assault reporting system. It takes a lot of courage to take on a perceived system [that] has to go down to every level of leadership in our military, he said. e networks sta members briefed the secretary on Safe Helplines multi-faceted resources, which also include a mobile application, a peer support service and a texting referral service, said Jennifer Marsh, RAINNs vice president for victim services. We know that the survivors are diverse, and we needed to pull out content for male survivors, for example, Marsh said. One of the most visited pages on the website is Understanding Sexual Assault, so people are coming here to get information, and it may not be necessarily immediately follow an assault. It may be a few years out, and they may not understand why theyre having trouble sleeping [or] why theyre depressed. Marsh said coming to the site can validate and normalize such emotions, which hopefully will spur a survivor to engage in a chat session or telephone call. For transitioning service members, RAINN staers said, they realize the inherent stress of going into the civilian realm and have taken special considerations as a result. It brings up all those stress reactions they felt during the time of their assault, Marsh said. So if we were able to provide them with information regarding housing, employment assistance and some of those vicarious issues that may be their primary stressors, we are helping to address the long-term eects of the sexual assault. e site is user-friendly and designed to bring multiple resources to one source for all service member survivors, Marsh explained. Its exciting, innovative and unparalleled in the civilian realm, she added. But Marsh acknowledged the need for service members to connect to their peers. And though RAINN sta members realized people were using other online chats, she said, they sought to create a more enhanced and secure experience. We used an online, hotline platform so no transcripts, no [Internet protocol] address, and we created this peer support service thats moderated by a licensed clinician. Marsh also noted that a second sta member reviews each participants group chat post before it reaches the main group with a brief delay to ensure there is no personally identifying information or abusive language. e connections weve seen on that are pretty powerful, she said. Our licensed clinicians, the moderators, said its some of the best group work that theyve done. She said that bringing male and female survivors together to talk out their experiences has produced great results overall. HagelDOD targets sexual assault

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Chris remembers the ight suits too, and that his father left for war the day after his third birthday. My father made me an exact duplicate of his ight suit, made to t a 3-yearold, Chris said. Its blue with all the zippers, a 421st squadron patch, an F-105 ud patch, even rst lieutenant bars on the shoulders. I wore it a few times, and its a keepsake that will stay with me forever. Its a permanent reminder of him and what he loved to do. Its a tangible link to him when everything else we have of him is intangible. Ata dinner in Ralphs honor, Shoemaker toasted the fallen Airman, something he does regularly with the unit in remembrance of their fallen brother from the Vietnam War. Ralph Balcom is the kind of man I want all my guys to be like, the kind of man I want to be like, Shoemaker said during the toast. is hits so close to home with us because we know that could have been any of us up there. But this is a family, and if you dont take care of your family, then what is the rest of it for? Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jake Barreiro Lt. Col. David Shoemaker, 421st Fighter Squadron commander, Marine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom, and other members of the 421st FS raise their glasses in a toast to Col. Ralph Balcom, a fallen Vietnam War 421st FS pilot, March 26, 2014, in Pyeongtaek, Republic of Korea. MissingFrom Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Shawn MillerNaval District Washington Public AffairsNearly a century after rst enlisting as yeoman during World War I, women are reaching new heights and continuing to make history across nearly every rank and occupation in the Navy. roughout March, the Navy joined the nation in celebrating Womens History Month and honoring generations of women in uniform who exemplify character, courage and commitment. Womens History Month provides a special opportunity to share and celebrate the rich history of womens contributions in the history of our nation, said Dr. Regina Akers, a historian at Naval History and Heritage Command. Since Sept. 11, 2001, more women have served in uniform than at any time since World War II, with more than 200,000 women across all military branches deploying in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, nearly 70,000 women make up 18 percent of the total Navy force throughout active and Reserve components. Its really the varied backgrounds and experience, knowledge and training that make our Navy better, Akers said of diversitys role in the force. Last year saw a variety of rsts for Navy women. In January 2013, the Secretary of Defense and Joint Chiefs of Sta rescinded the 1994 direct ground combat denition and assignment rule, which removed barriers to certain military jobs based on gender. Later in the year, Vice Adm. Nanette Derenzi became the rst female Judge Advocate General of the Navy, and Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar became the rst woman to command Navy Region Northwest after successfully serving as chief of sta for Commander, Navy Installations Command. Four women currently serve as Fleet or Force Master Chief Petty Of ficers, the highest enlisted rank in the Navy. The historic rsts continue into 2014, as Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was recently nominated for promotion and a position as vice chief of naval operations. She is slated to be promoted later this year, and will be the rst African-American and rst woman to serve in the position. e contributions of our Navy women, and women in general, during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have further ex panded opportunities for women and has qualied them for promotions and career choices that might not have been available at the start of the war, Akers said. Each generation of women in the military, from the foundations in the Nurse Corps in 1908 until now, has widened the path to success and increased womens chances to work in elds unavailable to women in previous eras, on and o the battleeld, Akers added. Everyone is not on the battleeld, but that does not lessen the contributions one may be making supporting those who are or treating those who are injured, Akers said of those women who ll vital support roles outside combat zones. Todays generation of women in uni form continue to reach new milestones, building upon a rich history of service members dating back more than a centu ry. For the generations to come, Akers said young people today can set high goals by looking up to women breaking barriers. Dream big, Akers said. Dont limit yourself. Bolivar DeRenziWomen reach new heights By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press Servicee special bond between Americans and South Koreans serves to strengthen U.S. commitment to the countrys security in the face of aggression, President Barack Obama told troops April 26 during a visit to South Korea. Speaking to U.S. troops in Yongsan, South Korea, the president noted the two nations arent just allies, but friends. is alliance is special, forged on the battleeld, Obama said. It has been fortied by the common values and mutual interest and mutual respect of our peoples. e United States and Korea are more than allies. We are friends, he said. Obama said the foundation of trust, security and stability that allows both nations to thrive economically and socially is made possible by the service and sacrice of U.S. service members and diplomats. You are the tip of the spear on freedoms frontier, he said. You carry high the legacy left by all those who fought and served here. And to the family members, both here in South Korea and awaiting your return back home, Obama said, I thank you for your service as well. e president lauded the audience for their service and said this alliance is the linchpin of security and stability in the Asia Pacic. Because of that service and the service of generations before them, Obama said, the U.S. still stands with its founding principles shining, and nations around the world that once knew nothing but the bitter taste of fear now know the blessings of freedom. Obama said during his visit he and South Korean President Park Gen-Hye received a brieng from U.S. Forces Korea commander, Army Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, and signed the guest book on top of a table where the Korean War Armistice was signed. Both of those moments drove home the truth that, after more than 60 years, our alliance is as strong as it has ever been and as effective as it has ever been, he said. Nowhere is that more evident than in the professionalism and the interoperability of the two nations militaries, Obama said. ats because our forces on duty here, American and Korean, are highly trained, closely coordinated, t to ght tonight and every other night, he said. In addition to dealing with the threat from North Korea, this is also an alliance that represents the incredible bonds between peoples, Obama said. e president noted that in 1950, just ve years after the end of World War II, Communist armies rst crossed the 38th Parallel. At the time, many Americans couldnt place Korea on a map, he said. But we knew, as much as we had already given, as weary as we were of war, that we had a stake in what happened here on the Korean Peninsula. America had to roll back the tide of Communism and stand with its South Korean friends, Obama said. In September, the Americans arrived and the alliance landed in a surprise attack. And all told, nearly 1.8 million Americans would join the ght those next few years, he said. In dangerous and brutal conditions, nearly 37,000 Americans would give their last full measure of devotion on this faraway soil, but not without pushing the invading armies back across the line they had dared to cross, Obama said. e president said the Republic of Koreas security is a hard-earned, longdefended victory for that nation, which has risen from occupation and ruin, and become one of the most vibrant and open democracies in the world. Obama said when U.S. veterans see the progress in the Republic of Korea, they can say with pride their eorts and their sacrice was worth it. ey see the real results of what theyve done a South Korea that is a world leader and a true partner in Asian security and stability, he said. None of this was an accident, Obama added. Freedom, democracy and progress are not accidents, but priorities that have to be fought for, he said. Youre part of that legacy, he said. ey must be won. And theyve got to be tended to constantly and defended without fail. And here, on freedoms frontier, they are, by every man and woman who has served and stood sentinel on this divided peninsula. Obama noted the stark contrast in the Republic of Korea and its neighbor to the north. e 38th Parallel now exists as much as a contrast between worlds as it does a border between nations; he said, between a society thats open and one that is closed; between a democracy that is growing and a pariah state that would rather starve its people than feed their hopes and dreams. ats not the result of war, Obama said, but of the path that North Korea has taken, a path of confrontation and provocation that includes pursuing the worlds most dangerous weapons. I want to be clear, he said. e commitment that the United States of America has made to the Navy Photo by MC2 Chris ChurchU.S. Forces Korea service members stand behind Commander-in-Chief, President Barack Obama, during his speech at Army Garrison Yongsan, South Korea April 26.Obama visits South Korea See Korea, Page 14

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 13 Army trains in BalticBy Claudette Roulo American Forces Press ServiceA company-sized element of the U.S. Armys 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team about 150 soldiers was to arrive in Poland April 23 to begin a bilateral infantry exercise with Polish troops, the Pentagon press secretary said. In the coming days, about 450 additional soldiers from the Vicenza, Italy-based 173rd ABCT will arrive for similar exercises in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said. e exercises are the rst in a series of expanded U.S. land force training activities in the Baltic region scheduled to take place this year and possibly into next year, he said. Russias aggression in Ukraine has renewed our resolve to strengthening NATOs defense plans and capabilities, and to demonstrate our continued commitment to collective defense in reinforcing our NATO allies in Central and Eastern Europe, Kirby said. e troops will be in place in all four countries by April 28, he said, noting that the exercises will last about a month. But then we will rotate fresh troops in for more exercises, the admiral added. e intent is to develop a persistent rotational presence through the exercises, Kirby explained. Discussions are ongoing about expanding the bilateral exercises into other countries in the region, he said. Discussions regarding the establishment of combined exercises involving other NATO member and partner countries also are taking place, Kirby said. It doesnt have to be either/or, he said. I think were looking for a broad swath of ways that we can help reassure our allies and partners, and it doesnt all have to be through the alliance. Since Russias aggression in Ukraine began, the admiral said, the United States has been constantly looking for ways to reassure its allies and partners of the nations commitment to the collective defense principles in Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty. ese bilateral exercises were conceived in part to do just that, Kirby said. e message to the people of Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, is that the United States takes seriously our obligations under Article 5 of the NATO alliance, even though these arent NATO exercises, he said. Its a very tangible representation of our commitment to our security obligations in Europe, and we encourage our NATO partners to likewise look for opportunities of their own to do this same kind of thing for one another, the admiral continued. If theres any message to Moscow, Kirby said, its the same as that being sent to the people of the Baltic region: We take our obligations very, very seriously on the continent of Europe. e exercises are more than symbolic, the admiral said. e commitment to putting troops on the ground for an extended period and conducting exercises is not insignicant, he noted. ese are countries that we routinely operate with, Kirby said. ese are units that the 173rd have worked with before, in all four countries. So they know each other. is isnt the rst time that the 173rd has done exercises with these countries. So theres a relationship there. e situation remains tense along Ukraines eastern border, he said. Nothing weve seen out of Moscow, nothing weve seen out of Russia or their armed forces is deescalating the tension [or] is making things any more stable in Ukraine or on the continent of Europe, the admiral said. What would be very helpful is if they removed their forces o that border and took concrete actions to respect the sovereignty of Ukraine, he said. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said that the events in Ukraine have had the eect of consolidating the alliance and giving it a sharper view of itself and its future, Kirby said. NATO is a very strong alliance, more relevant now than its ever been. Secretary Hagel was pretty clear with the military leadership that he wanted to look for a wide range of opportunities through which we could continue to reassure our partners in Europe, the admiral said. Elsewhere in the region, the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook is wrapping up its rotation in the Black Sea, Kirby said. e Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Taylor returned to the Black Sea today after completing repairs in Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, and will assume the reassurance mission from the Donald Cook, Navy ocials said.Army photoThe 173rd Airborne Brigades Spc. Bradley Chanady jumps from a 34-foot tower at Mann Field, Fort Benning, Ga. By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press Servicee Defense Department is continuing to support the international search mission for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. e total cost of the search to date is $11.4 million, Warren said. is gure includes $4,200 per ight hour for the two P-8 Poseidon aircraft involved in the search, he added. e plane and its 239 passengers disappeared March 8 on a ight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. e costs break down as follows, Warren said: $4.6 million in operations and maintenance funds; $3.2 million in overseas humanitarian disaster and civic aid funds; and $3.6 million for underwater search equipment and support. e P-8s continue conducting aerial search operations, and the Bluen-21 au tonomous underwater vehicle completed its twelfth search mission, the colonel said. Bluen-21 has now completed more than 90 percent of a focused underwater search ... Unfortunately, no contacts of interest have been found, he said. e department has received no requests for additional underwater search assets, Warren said. e Military Sealift Command dry cargo ship USNS Cesar Chavez joined the task force April 10 to provide logistical support. Chavez is the Navys newest combat logistics force ship, and is operated by a crew of 125 civil service mariners. e ship also has a complement of 11 U.S. Navy personnel, who provide operational support and supply coordination, a Navy news release said.Navy photo by MC2 Eric A. PastorLt. j.g. Kyle Atakturk, left, and Lt. j.g. Nicholas Horton, naval aviators assigned to Patrol Squadron 16, pilot a P-8A Poseidon during a mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Air liner remains missing

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Cpl. Sarah CherryMarine Corps Air Station BeaufortRetired Sta Sgt. Robert Waldrop, now 91 years old and living in St. Helena Island, S.C., vividly remembers details of his experience during World War II. Have you ever seen airliners go across with their condensation trails? Can you picture half a thousand four-engine aircraft all leaving a condensation trail? said Waldrop, speaking of the aircraft of his former unit, the Eighth Air Force of the Army Air Corps. Its an awesome sight; one of the most awesome sights there was. Such a sight wasnt rare in those early months of 1944. World War II was in full swing. Eight dierent days in January and early February saw more than ve hundred B-17s and B-24s taking o into European skies, with the most being 863 on January 29 leaving for Frankfurt, Germany. A B-17 waist gunner from Fort Wayne, Indiana, he climbed into the plane for his fth mission headed toward Frankfurt, Germany. Hed been in the Army Air Corps for two years. At the time, the service members were expected to carry out 25 missions before being relieved, with the option to do more. When you returned from a mission, if you returned, you could have ice cream or a shot of whiskey, Waldrop said. He said he would get ice cream with some light teasing from his peers. He deliberately left his service pistol behind. Getting shot down with a rearm was an immediate death sentence by German soldiers. e guys thatd been flying, they said dont take that on a mission, Waldrop said. Youd think youd carry it on a mission. One of the biggest hazards of ying those missions was the anti-aircraft [weapons] and, of course, the German pilots. ey had some good, good pilots and good airplanes, Waldrop said. e plane is hit, Feb. 4, 1944. Ill never forget that date. My boots came o when my chute opened. We couldnt wear lacedup boots, because your feet would freeze up there, he said. [e Germans] probably had binoculars on me the whole way down. ey had time to watch me and wait for me. He landed in Germanoccupied France, bootless with a sprained ankle. German soldiers quickly found him and detained him as a prisoner of war. When I rst came down, I sprained my left leg real bad, Waldrop said. I didnt break it, thank goodness. But they had to help me, or carry me, or push me. He was taken to a jail where he said German soldiers would stop by simply to stare at him. eyd come up to the strong door and look through the window, he said. [ey must have been thinking] Hes something else, we got a guy, we got an American! During his experience as a prisoner of war, he was transferred from camp to camp on coal ships and trucks, marched for hundreds of miles, and kept in various prison camps. Hygiene conditions were poor, and prisoners were counted daily. It was a normal routine to take a head count twice a day, Waldrop said. A German sergeant, previously wounded on the Russian front, would take down the count with pencil and paper. He said they called him Big Stoop. Guys in the back row would shift around, so hed never get the same count twice. e German soldiers guarding the prisoners would put a stop to the shuing around and miscounting by xing bayonets as a threat. During the night, prisoners were locked in with a bar across the door. In the morning, the prisoners would hear the bar being removed. One morning, one of the guys a couple barracks down pushed on the door and it was open, so he thinks its okay to go out. We had one main latrine clear down at the end of the compound. He went clear across to the end of the compound and on the way back, one of the guards shot him, Waldrop said. He bled to death is really what happened because nobody could get to him. e Germans allowed a funeral detail, and despite the lack of an American ag the prisoners made do with what they had. rough the Red Cross we had some boxes of colored chalk and some of the guys took the colored chalk and put some rags together and made a ag as best as they could for his funeral, he said. It was sad. Towards the end of the war, the prisoners were moved far and often, marching hundreds of miles. Some places we stopped close to villages, the civilians would put water out along the street, Waldrop said. We couldnt stop, but as we walked past we would scoop some up in our tins. Waldrop fell behind with several other prisoners, and was taken to yet another prison camp. ey were liberated by British commandos that he said looked like theyd slit your throat if you blinked. e sort you wouldnt want to see ghting against you. I was glad they were on our side, he said. He was given a physical and returned to the United States in a hospital ship. He arrived in New York, and later returned to his hometown of Fort Wayne, Indiana. After leaving military service, Waldrop served in and retired from the police force. Waldrops experience and his attitude toward his past are a strong example of perseverance, inner strength and, perhaps most of all, carrying tragedies of the past lightly. Ive been so fortunate over the years, really lucky, he said.WW II airman recalls days as German prisonerDOD photoA B-17 Flying Fortress makes a bombing run during World War II. Waldrop over 30 years ago, and our bases have developed robust programs to protect natural resources and keep the air, water, and soil clean, said Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division. Were also pursuing energy initiatives that focus on enhancing capability and resiliency, but many of those energy eorts also have a side benet of being good for the environment. Earth Day is a prime time to let people know that we have taken and will continue to take our environmental stewardship responsibility seriously. Among the Earth Day related activities planned or ongoing this year at naval commands are environmental presentations at local schools; exhibit events with government agencies, and non-governmental organizations; 5K runs; beach clean-ups; energy awareness training/ competitions; recycling events; solar power demos; environmental fairs and facility nature tours; and tree plantings. security of the Republic of Korea only grows stronger in the face of aggression. Our alliance does not waver with each bout of their attention-seeking, Obama said. It just gains the support of the rest of the world. e president said North Koreas continued pursuit of nuclear weapons is a path that leads only to more isolation. Its not a sign of strength, Obama said. Anybody can make threats, move an army or show o a missile, he said. at doesnt make you strong, he said. It does not lead to security, opportunity, or respect. ose things dont come through force. ey have to be earned. Real strength, Obama said, is allowing an open and participatory democracy where people can choose their own leaders and their own destiny. Additionally, he said, real strength is allowing a vibrant society where people can think, pray and speak their minds as they please, and there are free and open markets building a thriving middle class and lifting millions of people out of poverty. We dont use our military might to impose these things on others, Obama said. But we will not hesitate to use our military might to defend our allies and our way of life. Like all nations on Earth, Obama said, North Korea and its people have a choice continue down a lonely road of isolation, or join the rest of the world in seeking a future of greater opportunity, security, and greater respect. is future, he noted, already exists for the citizens on the southern end of the Korean Peninsula. If [North Koreans] choose this path, Obama said, America and the Republic of Korea and the rest of the world will help them build that future. But if they do not, they should know that the commitment of the United States of America to the security and defense of the Republic of Korea has not wavered once in more than 60 years, he said. It never has and it never will. KoreaFrom Page 12EarthFrom Page 9

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Nurse on call over phoneBy Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Deputy Public Affairs Officer Beginning May 2, a new, 24/7 Nurse Advice Line is available. Call 800-TRICARE (800-874-2273) and select option 1 for help with urgent care, day or nightincluding holidays. A registered nurse assesses symp toms, can direct patients to care, and assist with self-care. Nurses can advise parents about childrens medical is sues, as well. e Nurse Advice Line is staed by nurses who give medical advice and customer service sta who verify TRI CARE eligibility. If needed, sta can Camden Navy League salutes 25 Kings Bay personnel May 8From the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United Statese Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will honor the 25 top Sail ors, Coast Guardsmen and a Marine stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and at the Coast Guards Maritime Safety and Security Team in St. Marys, at its May 8 Sea Services Awards Banquet. e banquet, the councils sig nature event of the year, gives recognition to the honorees for their accomplishments and is an opportunity for the entire community to show appreciation to these incredible individuals for their hard work, dedication and service to our nation and our com munity throughout the year. e special guest speaker at the banquet will beMaster Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Michael D. Stevens. e event takes place ursday, May 8, at Magnolias in the Kings Bay Conference Center on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. A reception begins at 6 p.m. followed by dinner and the program at 7 p.m. e public is invited to attend along with the regular membership. All attendees must send ad vance dinner payment at $25 per person and the names of indi viduals in their group to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e deadline to receive reserva tions is Monday, May 5. To access the base for the meet ing, all attendees must show either an active duty or retired military ID, a Kings Bay Navy League pho to ID available only to Camden Kings Bay Council members, or submit in advance a consent form and undergo a background check. Up Periscope Finish this sentence I always wanted ... Page 9 Keep off! Park on the grass, youll pay the price Page 3 Like a fish Sign up now for youth swim lessons Page 72009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Nurse, Page 3 Stevens guest speaker Stevens On 10th anniversary of seless act that saved lives, earned Medal of HonorBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMarines and Sailors of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Marine Corps Security Force Battalion came together April 22 to commemorate and honor the life of fallen Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, who died in battle 10 years ago paying the ulti mate sacrice. We have a responsibility as Marines to honor those heroes who have gone before us such as Cpl. Dun ham, who made the ul timate sacrice for his fellow Marines, Sgt. Maj. Marc Chabot said. It is our responsibility to carry on his legacy. On April 14, 2004, while manning a checkpoint in Karabilah, Iraq, an insur gent approached Dunham and started an altercation, choking the corporal. Two Marines responded to the scue and began helping their comrade. Dunhams last words were, No, no. Watch his hands. e insurgent dropped a grenade. Dunham took o his helmet, dropped to the ground and covered the grenade with his helmet and his body to shield his brothers. All three Marines were seriously Dunham Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger salutes with the color guard of Sgt. Benford Henry, Cpl. Timothy Schewe, Cpl. Jacob Myers, MA2 James Bailey and MA3 Ryan Miserendino, honoring the memory of Marine Cpl. Jason Dunham, April 22 at Dunham Barracks on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. More photos inside on Pages 4 and 5.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Submarine BallUSS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Blue) takes home the award for best center piece, below, at the 114th Submarine Ball April 26 at the Hyatt Regency in Jacksonville.Courtesy photos See Dunham, Page 7 See League, Page 7 Marines honor Dunhams memory Commander, Navy Installations Command, Vice Adm. William D. French, walks with Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer, Capt. Harvey Guffey, near Pirates Cove Galley during his base tour April 25. The CNIC visited the Emergency Operation Center, Dry Dock, Explosive Handling Warf 2, Fire Station 1, The Big EZ Liberty Center, Magnolias, Unaccompanied Housing Barracks, Fitness Center, Commissary, Navy Exchange, Base Chapel, Fleet and Family Support Center, Child and Youth Services facilities and Family Housing. While at Magnolias, the CNIC attended a luncheon with the Camden County Partnership.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By LN2 Kevin P. Van GorderNavy Judge Advocate Generals officeAs a victim of a crime, one should not fear retaliation, be forced to re main silent, or feel removed from the legal process. Oftentimes, victims and witnesses of crimes suer emotionally, physi cally, and socially. e goal of the Department of De fense is to mitigate, if not eliminate, the hardships that victims and wit nesses experience. As part of this eort, Region Legal Service Oces oer legal assistance to those who have been adversely af fected by crime. RLSO legal assistance services cover civil legal matters including, but not limited to, domestic dis putes, child custody and support obligations, landlord-tenant issues, identity theft, and rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. For example, if you are a victim or witness of domestic violence, a legal assistance attorney can assist you with the divorce process. If your spouse is a servicemem ber and not providing support for dependents, RLSO can assist with getting commandor court-ordered support. Identity theft victims can be assisted with ghting o credi tors, repairing damaged credit, and preventing future losses. Additionally, RLSO legal assis tance sta oer counseling to ensure victims and witnesses are aware of other rights and services available. Depending on the situation, these rights may include the right to be notied of court proceedings and to be present at most public hearings, the right to expedited transfer, the right to transitional compensation, and most importantly, the right to be treated with dignity and respect. If the assistance a victim or wit ness desires is best provided by a dif ferent resource, the RLSO will make referrals to a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response victim advocate, Naval Criminal Investigative Service agent, Family Advocacy Program advisor, Victim Legal Counsel or a Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society representative. RLSOs world-wide oer a range of support services to victims and witnesses as they navigate the legal process. If you have been victimized or have been a witness to a crime and have questions about your rights or assistance available, visit a RLSO in your area. Oce locations can be found using the Legal Assistance Of ce Locator Tool at http://www.jag. navy.mil. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentHeres a reminder from the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department: Move right for sirens and lights. When the Fire Department is called to an emergency it is important that we respond quickly and safely. If you are driving down the road and see the lights and sirens of an emergency vehicle in your rear view mirror, move to the right and stop to allow emergency vehicles to move easily down the road. Once the emergency vehicles have passed merge back into trac when it is safe to begin driving. Every time re engines or aid cars are called to an emergency, re ghters are giving their all to help others. Do your part as a driver to help re ghters do their job as quickly and safely as possible.Gateway Inn traininge Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Manager Training Workshop ReadySet-Grow was April 1 through April 4 at the MWR Magnolia Conference Center, Kings Bay. CNIC, Southeast Region leadership and sta along with NGIS Managers from across the country and overseas locations such as Greece, Japan, and Guam were in attendance. Bruce Grenier, CNIC eet readiness director and Tamara Davis, CNIC Navy Lodging programs di rector were guest speakers. e workshop covered nancial man agement, accreditation standards, sales and marketing, leadership and human resources. It culminated in an open forum discussion and case study presentation on April 4. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. The Players sets military job faire Players will welcome active duty, Reserve, retired military, veterans, and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 3, to participate in its third-an nual military job fair, in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition. Its free and open to military personnel, veterans and military spouses who are seeking employ ment. ere will be 50 companies on hand, all with open hiring opportunities. Free career counseling and resume-writing assistance will be provided, as well as information on local educational institutions with veterans pro grams.NSB pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipBalfour Beatty Communities is accepting scholarship application from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communities and plan to attend accred ited educational/technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www. bbcommunitiesfoundation.org/scholarships. aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Shrimp Festival begins May 1 e 51st Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival runs ursday, May 1 through Sunday, May 4, in downtown Fernandina Beach, Fla. For more information, visit www.shrimpfestival.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 5734719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Fire Department issues reminder Potpourri Assistance oers for crime victims From Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support CenterKings Bay Fleet and Family Sup port Center is oering a new and improved educational experience on parenting. is six-session class is facilitated by two licensed clinical social work ers, Sallie Galyean, the child coun selor and Mary Jenssen, a clinical counselor and FAP case manager. Both of these facilitators have experience working with military families and the common struggles parents encounter. e rotating class schedule al lows participants to join at any time, choose a particular class topic to attend, make up a class or take a refresher class throughout the next session cycle. e interactive ses sions promote an informal and stimulating educational experience. e following is information re garding each of the class topics: 1, Ages & Stages involves ages and stages of physical and sexual devel opment from birth to age 18. 2, Parenting Styles & Co-parenting discusses parenting styles and coparenting, as well as struggles with divorce, blended and extended fam ilies. 3, Child Abuse & Domestic Violence teaches parents about the ef fects of domestic violence and child abuse on children as well as how to cope and resources to assist fami lies. 4, Dealing with Misbehavior ex plores the misbehavior of children, why they do what they do and how parents can appropriately respond to negative behavior. 5, Communication: It Goes Both Ways helps parents learn to commu nicate with their children, spouse and family in a positive way. 6, Structure & Safety covers the benets of routines, ways to help families bond, as well as helpful in formation to safeguard your family and maintain a healthy home environment. Classes are held at FFSC 9 to 11:30 a.m., Mondays. Each participant will receive a certicate of completion for each session attended. When all six par enting sessions have been attended, the participant receives a certicate for completion for the course. ere is so much valuable infor mation in this class, but you wont know until you sign up. Call FFSC at 573-4512 and ask to sign up for the next Parenting Class, or ask to speak with one of the fa cilitators who can provide you with more details. FFSC oers new Parenting Class Kings Bay FFSC Navy Jag From the Kings Bay Employer Committee e Kings Bay Employer Com mittee is taking applications for a $500 college scholarship from high school seniors in Camden County. e deadline to apply for the Tracy L. Foreman Scholarship is Monday, May 12. e scholarship is funded by an employer committee endowment established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employ ment marketing representative at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center. Kings Bay Employer Committee President Al Daniels of Dominos donated $500 for this years scholar ship award. e scholarship will be awarded to a graduating senior, including homeschoolers, who live in Cam den County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited insti tution of higher education. In addi tion to attending school, applicants also must be working part-time or serve a documented internship for a minimum of 10 hours per week. e scholarships are non-renewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarship, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores and a 2-to-3 page essay. e essay theme is how to use education and training to develop or support a new busi ness or industry in the Kings Bay area. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a member of the employer committees scholarship subcommittee, at rbaldwin@cam den.k12.ga.us or (912) 729-4790. Applications for the scholarships are available at the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center, 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys, and the Camden Coun ty High School Guidance Oce. For additional information, contact the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. To learn more about career op portunities, connect with us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, which can be conveniently accessed at www.employgeorgia.com.Scholarships deadline is May 12 KB Employer Committee

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Parking on grass at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay damages it, other vegetation and sometimes base property. Now its a hazard to adults and kids walking in thesemakeshift parking lots. Of particular danger is the road leading the youth soccer fields by the track. This road is off limits for parking, just like every other grass area, because it causes a hazard as cars travel that road with no visibility of kids in and around the cars. Photo by EM1 Mark Treen No parking on grass at NSBInfant immunization crucial By Mary BuskohlCoultonImmunizations Supervisory Nurse Specialist, Naval Hospital JacksonvilleNational Infant Immunization Week is April 26 to May 3. is annual observance promotes the importance of protecting infants and toddlers from vaccinepreventable diseases. Myths and misinformation about vaccine safety often confuse parents. e bottom line: vaccines save lives. Each year, thousands of children become ill from diseases that could have been prevented by basic childhood im munizations, said Mary Buskohl-Coulton, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles im munizations supervisory nurse specialist. Vaccines are among the most suc cessful and cost-eective public health tools avail able for preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases. By law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration conducts years of test ing before a vaccine is li censed, and once licensed the vaccine is continually monitored for safety and eectiveness. Like any medication, vaccines can cause side eects, but the benets of vaccines far outweigh possible side eects for al most all children. Vaccines can protect infants and children from 14 diseases. And thanks to vaccines, some diseases are almost gone in the U.S. e elimination of polio and smallpox in the U.S. are powerful examples of why we vaccinate. Immunization can save families time and money. Children with vaccinepreventable diseases may not be allowed to attend school or daycare. Some vaccine-preventable dis eases require hospitalization that could result in permanent disabilities, causing a nancial bur den. Immunizing infants can also protect future generations. Birth defects associated with rubella are no longer seen in the U.S. By continuing to vaccinate now, some of todays diseases will no longer be around to harm future generations. If vaccinations were to stop, the protection that has been built through years of vaccinations would cease to exist. Gradually, more and more people would become infected with disease, spread diseases to others and many may die. is would essentially undo the progress made over the years with the elimination of diseases. Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of to days vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent. ese diseases can be es pecially serious for infants and young children. at is why it is im portant to follow recom mended immunization schedules to protect them by providing immunity early in life, before expo sure to potentially lifethreatening diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases still circulate around the world, including in the U.S. Continued vaccination is necessary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks. Even when rare in the U.S., diseases can be brought into the country, putting unvaccinated children at risk. Just recently within the U.S. there have been two disease increases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Forty-nine states and Dis trict of Columbia reported pertussis increases in 2012 compared to 2011, with 48,277 cases including 20 deaths. e incidence rate among infants exceeded that of all other age groups, with the major ity of deaths occurring among infants younger than three-months of age. In 2013, data showed a higher than normal number of measles cases nationally and in individual states, including an out break of 58 cases in New York City the largest reported outbreak of mea sles in the U.S. since 1996. Currently, the U.S. has the safest, most eective vaccine supply in its histo ry. Its long-standing vac cine safety system ensures that vaccines are as safe as possible. And as new information and science become avail able, the system will con tinue to be updated and improved. Immunization is a shared responsibility. Families, health care professionals and public health ocials must continue to work together to help protect the entire community. Parents are encouraged to talk to their childs pri mary care manager to ensure that their infant is up-to-date on immuniza tions. Remember to vac cinate. Its the single best way to be protected. For more information on vaccinations call Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays immunization clinic at 912-573-8250 or go to www.cdc.gov/vac cines. NBHC Kings Bays immunization clinic is open Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Navy photo by Jacob SippelCorpsman Christian Snyder, assigned to Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Maternal Infant Unit, sterilizes the skin of 11-month old Cameron Kee prior to administering an annual influenza vaccination.connect the patient with the military treatment facility for an urgent-care appoint ment, or make a referral to urgent care in the TRICARE network. e Nurse Advice Line works together with our Medical Home Port teams existing resources our local appointment lines and secure e-mail to connect you to the care you need, when you need it, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer. Appointment lines remain the same. At Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, call (912) 573-6450, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. NBHC Kings Bay is open extended hours, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays to ursdays and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Patients can securely email their doctor for nonurgent issues, with Relay Health. Sign up at www. relayhealth.com or the command website. To see photos of the doc tors at NBHC Kings Bay, go to the command website, click on Medical Home Port and select a Black or Ma roon Team). NH Jacksonville is an early adapter of the Nurse Advice Line, which is rolling out across the military health system in the U.S. this spring. Most TRICARE beneciaries are eligible to use the Nurse Advice Line including TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Remote for Active Duty Family Members, TRI CARE Standard and Extra, TRICARE Young Adult, TRI CARE For Life, TRICARE Reserve Select and TRICARE Retired Reserve. NurseFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Top left, Lance Cpl. William Manning places dog tags and, top center, Lance Cpl. Jackson Allen places a helmet. Above, Cpl. Andrew J. Fleming salutes Dunham during the ceremony at Dunham Barracks marking the 10-year anniversary of his death. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay April 22, 2014 Remembering Cpl. DunhamEvery level of the quad of Dunham Barracks was lined with MCFSBn Sailors and Marines. Distinguished guests, Sailors and Marines watch the ceremo ny honoring Dunham. MCSFBn Commanding Officer, Lt. Col. Kevin L. Moody, and Sergeant Major Marc R. Chabot salute. Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger returns the salute. Right, Lance Cpl. William Manning carries the boots.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 5 CWO4 Richard Walker reads the Cpl. Dunhams Medal of Honor citation. The memorial board was constructed by Sgt. Steven T. Knowles. A cross with body armor and Kevlar stands at the entrance to Dunham Barracks. Left, Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger stands by a memorial board honoring Dunham. Above, the Sergeant Major sounds off, Corporal Jason L. Dunham, squad leader, 4th platoon, Company K, 3rd Battalion 7th Marines. Wounded in action on 14 April 2004, against enemy forces in Karabilah Iraq. He succumbed to his wounds on 22 April 2004 at Naval Medical Center Bethesda. Left, Gunnery Sgt. James Saint Leger stands stalwart. Right, the Rifle Detail prepares to fire a 21-Gun Salute. From left, Cpl. Jeffrey A. Parker, Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Stroud III, Lance Cpl. William L. Wright, Lance Cpl. Vicarrio L. Ward, Lance Cpl. Michael A. Martin Jr., and Lance Cpl. Jacob M. Flately. Not pictured, Lance Cpl. Joel D. Cowart and Staff Sgt. Jeffrey W. Ferry.

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, May 5, 12 and 19. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. The group will meet May 6, 13, 20 and 27. No pre-registration required.Job search workshop scheduled for April 9A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 7. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Maay 5 to 9. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 19 to 23. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and termi nology, and gives tools to access instal lation and local community resources. The workshop is 5 to 9 p.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for May 14A job search workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., May 14. The Family Employment Readiness Program gives assistance, information and referrals on employ ment and education resource opportu nities. Services are available to family members of military personnel, retiring and separating military, and family mem bers of relocating civil service per sonnel. Appointments are required. Call 573-4513 to register.SAPR Advanced Training, Refresher offeredThe Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training require ment. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 14 and 8 a.m. to noon May 28. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshops CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The work shop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, May 22 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., May 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 15. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, May 21. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 16. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and bene fits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Maay 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Advanced FRG Training workshop scheduledThis bi-monthly class is offered to edu cate FRG officers about changes to the OPNAVINST, answer questions that they or their group is having and network with other FRGs to share best practices. This training will be 6 to 8 p.m. May 6. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 10 to 16. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, May 7. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all com mand representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 15. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar May 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 28. It can help you focus on identify ing the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can fur nish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five par ticipants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. program May 28The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in mak ing informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., May 28. Registration is required. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a normal part of everyday personal financial manage ment for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour work shop provides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 6 to 8 p.m., May 20. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Develop a spending plan training scheduledDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This singlesession workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan together with your spouse. This workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., May 21. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 for more information or to register.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014

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From U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet public affairse Sailors assigned to U.S. Naval Forces South ern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet have capably planned dozens of mari time security operations, security cooperation ac tivities and contingency operations in the past few years. Meanwhile, they have beneted from an atmo sphere of genuine support for sta members who want to keep their lives in balance while achieving professional and personal goals. e evidence of this work-life balance is in a command climate survey completed in late 2013. In every area, from organizational eectiveness to group cohesion and equal opportunity trends, the command scored higher than the averages for the Navy and the Department of Defense. It was so positive we had to dig for not neces sarily negatives but we had to dig for issues, said Chief Information Sys tems Technician Shannen Kippers, the Command Managed Equal Oppor tunity Program manager, who managed the survey and associated records searches, focus groups and interviews. Rear Adm. Sinclair Har ris, who became the 4th Fleet commander in mid2012, set the tone with a brieng he delivered to new arrivals. Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Jolene Lovett of Atlanta recalled that, in her brieng, Harris stressed the importance of training and education. He was encouraging everyone, at every step to move to the next level, said Lovett, who earned her Information Dominance Warfare qualication at 4th Fleet and is scheduled to attend the Advanced Maritime Operational Intelligence Course this year. Continuing to learn, tak ing leave and demonstrat ing conspicuous courtesy are command priorities for each Sailor and civil ian. rough most of her career, Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Katina Davis, of Folkston and St. Marys, Ga., had been single. I was always the one taking duties for someone, she said, on holidays or when her ships re turned from deployments. In late 2012, Davis learned she was pregnant with her rst child, to whom she gave birth in December. Davis, who has plastered her desk with photos of her daughter, still likes going to work, she said. She also looks forward to going home at the end of the day, and she feels support up and down the chain of command for her new responsibilities. Of the nine commands to which she has been as signed so far, is com mand is at the very top, Davis said. Lt. Maili Neverosky, a surface warfare ocer from Bakerseld, Calif., and her husband, who is also a surface warfare of cer, have three children. SWO life was hard on their family. It didnt seem like sus tainable lifestyle, she said. So, in 2008, she left active duty. A year ago, Neverosky joined the Navy Reserve; a few months later, she took active duty orders to 4th Fleet, where she plans surface missions and has qualied as a battle watch captain. On a typical day, she goes to the base gym, where she is likely to see a senior leader or two. To her, thats a good sign. Neverosky said shed be happy to extend her 4th Fleet assignment. Sign-up now for swim lessons for the kids at the Kings Bay Pool. Registration will be taken at the customer ser vice counter inside the Fitness Complex. Descriptions of skills taught in each level are available at the customer service counter to assist in selecting proper class level for the child. Payment is due at time of registration. No refunds. Pre-season is May 5 to 8 and May 12 to 15; Session 1 is June 2 to 5 and June 9 to 12; Session 2 is June 16 to 19 and June 23 to 26; Session 3 is July 7 to 10 and July 14 to 18 and Session 4 is July 21 to 24 and July 28 to 31. Cost is $40 for eight group lessons over the two-week sessions. Private lessons are available for $75 with ve one-on-one lessons. Call (912) 573-3001 or x3990 for more details. Arrive on time for class, bring sunscreen andtowels, have your child use the bathroom before class and, if applicable, make sure your child is wearing swim diapers or tight-tting pants if not potty trained. Movie Under e Stars Saturday, May 17 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing e Lego Movie, rated PG. Showtime is at dusk, approximately 8:30 p.m. Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor the ater. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. NAU Walking Dead Escape Run in Jackson ville Which one are you, survivor, walker or watcher? Figure it out Saturday, May 17 at Ever bank Field Stadium at the Zombie Obstacle Event with NAU. Register on website for 8:15 p.m. wave to participate with the survivors of Team Kings Bay at www.thewalkingdeadescape.com/faq. Pre-register for transpor tation at Big EZ by May 16 for only $5. Call NAU for more details at (912) 5738972. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Regis tration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning on May 5. e captains meeting was April 30. Non-refundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 non-active duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and fam ily friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and un der, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for May are Pearcy Jackson: Sea of Mont ers May 3 and 4, Happy Feet 2 May 10 and 11, Coudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 May 17 and 18, and Walk ing with Dino saurs May 24 and 25. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Sat urday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkings bay page. Additional kids mov ies will be shown during summer break from school starting May 22. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bever ages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack pro vided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Swim lessons to start Just for kids Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 7 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 8,183 2, NAS Jax 7,509.5 3, NASP 6,151 4, Mayport 5,923.58 5, Key West 5,357 6, NAVSTA Gitmo 3,750 7, NASP Corry 3,699.5 8, New Orleans 3,511.5 9, JTF Gitmo 1,965 Individuals Average 1, Leon Platt KB 205.95 2, Dan Blakeslee KB 203.79 3, C. Washington NAS J 194.52 4, Rob Daugherty KB 194.36 5, T. Lowrance NAS J 192.06 6, Chris Oglsby NO 190.43 7, Shaun Spitler NAS J 190.07 8, Kyler Ascue KW 185.60 9, C. Kiwatowsski NASP 186.67 10, Roger Byrd Mayport 185.67 Navy Team Bowling Periscope file photoSign up for childrens swim lessons now at the Kings Bay Fitness Center pool. wounded. Eight days later Dunham died from his wounds at Bethesda Naval Hospital. He was 22 years old. He represents the Ma rine Corps in general, Lance Cpl. Tanner John ston said. He represents brotherhood and the willingness to lay down your life for each other. ere are numerous examples of Marines jumping on gre nades and taking bullets for each other, but its the thing that Marines, Navy and other service mem bers do every day outside of combat also. e day started with a tribute run in the early morning and ended by rendering colors and pre senting the Fallen Soldier Battle Cross at the Dun ham Barracks, which ap propriately were named after the hero. During the opening cer emony John 15:13 was apt ly quoted, Greater love has no one than this: to lay down ones life for ones friends. Dunham was one of many service members who made the ultimate sacrice while saving his brothers-at-arms. Due to his heroic and seless act on April 14, 2004, his family was award ed his Medal of Honor by President George W. Bush Jan. 11, 2007. Consent forms are available on the coun cils website, and must be completed, witnessed and submitted to Kings Bay Se curity no later than May 1. Attendees submitting a consent form to attend this meeting will have their names on a guest list at both base gates. Ques tions about accessing the Kings Bay can be directed to Council President Dave Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. More information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org.DunhamFrom Page 1LeagueFrom Page 1 Navy photo Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Katina Davis, of Folkston and St. Marys, Ga., in her office.Fleet successes credited to Sailors THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 7

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Ive always wanted to water ski, snow ski, go on a cruise, go to the World Series, the Super Bowl, the NBA Finals, March Madness, catch a marlin, snow board, time travel, write a novel, a screenplay, win the lottery, drive in the Daytona 500, fly a plane, be an astronaut, walk on the moon, win the decathlon, stay in a lodge, own a boat, own a pool, own the car I wanted not the car I needed, win on Jeopardy, visit Australia and never, ever, have to eat my spinach. Here are others.Finish the sentence, Ive always wanted to ...CS3 Chris Cleveland USS Tennessee Blue Mansfield, Texas Go overseas. I havent been overseas at all. Lance Cpl. Jorge Aquirre Security Force Battalion Miami Everything Ive wanted I have in my wife and my child. MT1 Christopher Leedy USS West Virginia Gold Chambersburg, Pa. Travel through Europe with my wife. Casie Nation AFGE Representative Leesburg, Fla. Since I was young Ive always wanted to be the first woman President of the United States. ET2 Stephen Krause USS Georgia Gold Stow, Ohio Be able to stop time. Lance Cpl. Joshua Haskell Security Force Battalion McComb, Miss. Travel the world more. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Elissa creates a bird feeder that was made completely from recyclables and earthfriendly for feathered friends as a remem brance of Balfour Beattys Earth Day celebration. April 22 marked the anniversary of the environmen tal movement, which got its start in the 1970s. As the years progress and technology advances, it is necessary to teach our younger generations how important it is to take care of the earth so that they can con tinue the cycle.Photo by Kari Saurez Copy by MC2 Ashley Hedrick Earth DayNavy commands hold Earth Day From Chief of Naval Operations Energy & Environmental Readiness Division Public AffairsNavy commands across the globe celebrated Earth Day April 22 and throughout the month of April by participating in local ac tivities that showcase their ongoing commitment to the environment as they support the Navys national security mission. Earth Day, which was rst celebrated in April of 1970, began as a grass roots movement that raised public awareness of the fragility of natural eco systems and encouraged people to make individual commitments to protect the planet. e Navys 2014 theme for Earth Day, Global Reach Local Action, re minds Sailors, civilians, and family members that as a result of the Navys global presence, they have many opportunities to make positive changes for the environment and for energy use in their com munities. e Navy began installing equipment on our ships to safely manage our waste stream at sea and protect the environment See Earth, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Staff Sgt. Jake Barreiro51st Fighter Wing Public AffairLike a lot ofchildren growing up in the s and s, Chris Balcom liked to watch TV for fun and en tertainment. But on one occasion, Chris wasnt watching passively, or for joy or en tertainment. As he watched, his heart wrenched. Chris was watching the repatriation of American prisoners of war and miss ing in action looking for his father. On May 15, 1966, at 9:50 a.m., Capt. Ralph Balcoms plane was seen ascending into the clouds about 10 miles southwest of Dong Hoi, Vietnam. Afterward, Ralph lost voice contact with his ight, and didnt return to base before his F-105 underchiefs fuel should have run out. When a search and re covery party found no trace of Ralph or his plane, he was declared missingin-action. Serving in Vietnam as a pilot for the 421st Tac tical Fighter Squadron, Ralph left behind his wife, Marian, their 7-yearold daughter, Tracy, and 4-year-old son, Chris. More than 47 years have passed. Marian has remarried, Tracy is 54, and Chris, 51, has three children of his own. Suering with the bur den of this sacrice for four decades, a recent ges ture has shown the Balcoms theyre not alone, and will always be part of theAir Forcefamily. It was coincidence that Ralphs old unit, now known as the 421st Fighter Squadron, at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, and Marine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom, Chriss son, stationed in Hawaii, would be deployed to Korea at the same time. When Lt. Col. David Shoemaker, 421st FS commander, heard the grandson of a fallen Black Widow the squadrons moniker was going to be in the area, he worked fast to get a chance for Jake to get a tour of the squadrons deployed station here. Jake spent March 2526, with his grandfathers unit. It was a no brainer to try to get Jake out here, Shoemaker said. It means everything to us. is is important. Our heritage, our legacy and taking care of families, thats what our unit and the military is about. We thought we were the only ones who remem bered him, Chris said. To nd out that Lt. Col. Shoemaker and the 421st remember and honor him made my whole family happy. We are so grateful that they respect the sacri ce of their fallen brother. Its a truly noble thing theyre doing by honoring his legacy. Deployed with his squadron since January, Shoemaker learned about Jakes deployment toKorea from Chris, and quick ly reached out to Jakes leadership to arrange a visit. Jake, a 21-year-old eld artillery cannonier, said he knew nothing about the arrangementand was shocked to hear from his rst sergeant that he would be going to visit his grandfathers old squadron. Words cant describe how excited I was to hear that, he said. My grand fathers life, and what he did, has been a huge part of our lives. Im incredibly honored that the 421st reached out and wanted to meet me. Its an honor not lost on Jakes family. Since the end of the war, weve had no contact with anyone who knew my father, Chris said. We carried his memory and honored him within our family. We had no idea it was reciprocated by the squadron until now. Its like a gift to us, and we nd it comforting to know that we were not alone in this after all. Its my fathers last squadron so it will always be a special place for us. For the visit, Jake was given a comprehensive tour of the 421st FSs op erations and shown sev eral aircraft including the U-2, A-10 underbolt II and F-16 Fighting Falcon. While the airplanes were amazing, and something hell never forget, Jake said the real highlight of his stay was the people of the 421st FS, who treated him like family. Im impressed, Jake said. All of them, from the commander, to the pi lots, to the enlisted, when they saw me, they stopped whatever they were doing and showed a genuine in terest in me and my fam ily. Initially, Jake was un sure of what to expect, and felt nervous about spend ing time with strangers whose only connection to him was his grandfathers Vietnam service, but after his trip, Jake said he feels like a member of the Black Widow family. What amazed me was I didnt think people out there cared like I did, like my family did, Jake said. e fact that other people do and are genuinely in terested in my familys his tory means everything to us. Too young to remember his father before he left for Vietnam, Chris remem bers watching the repatriation of American POWs on TV, anxiously hoping and waiting to see his fathers face. e worst part (growing up) was the uncer tainty, Chris said. Was he alive or dead? If he was alive, what hell on earth was he enduring? Would we ever see him again? Nobody can really un derstand what this is like unless theyve lived it. Its a wound that will never heal. One of the worst days of my life was Feb. 12, 1973, Operation Homecoming, Chris said. When the Hanoi POWs came home, watching each man walk down the stairs o the plane, straining to see his face, hoping against hope that my father would be next, but it never came to be. For seven years we lived with not knowing if he was alive or dead. He was lost on May 15, 1966, but to us, he died Feb. 12, 1973. e inuence of Ralphs sacrice extends to his unseen grandchildren as well. Jake, who wears a POW/ MIA bracelet with his grandfathers name on it, said he learned early in life about Ralphs service. My dad used to have two ight suits in his clos et, a big one and small one, Jake said. I used to go in there and put the small one on. e small one was given to my dad from my grandfather. I was 4 years old and thats when I began to under stand the history of what he did in Vietnam and what it meant.Marine pays tribute to missing grandfatherAir Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jake BarreiroMarine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom watches an F-16 take off March 26, 2014, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Balcoms grandfather, Col. Ralph Balcom, served as a fighter pilot in Vietnam, but has been missing in action since May 15, 1966. Courtesy photoCapt. Ralph Balcom, his wife, Marian, his daughter, Tracy, and his son, Chris, in a family photo. Ralph Balcom was lost in Vietnam more than 47 years ago. See Missing, Page 11Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Donald R. AllenLt. Cmdr. Kelly Larson, left, and Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Edward Lopez test a Togolese villager for malaria during an Africa Partnership Station health fair. Navy takes aim at malaria By Lt. Jennifer WrightNavy Entomology Center of Excellence Public Affairse Navy Entomology Center of Excellence and Navy Medical Research Unit No. 3 partnered with the Liberian Insti tute for Biomedical Research to present a Public Health Pest and Vector Control Course to members of the Armed Forces of Liberia, April 9 to 18. is course was part of a larger initia tive to assist in building and maintaining health capacity in Liberia. e U.S. Navy rst became engaged with the AFL in 2003 during Operation Sheltering Sky when 44 of 225 Marines became infected with malaria while ashore. Funded by the DoD Global Emerging Infection Systems, the course was de signed to build skills within AFL Preven tive Medicine Unit personnel leading to the reduction of malaria among AFL members. Twenty students participated in the interactive course that culminated in a joint residual insecticide spray of the AFL barracks. e goal of this capacity building mis sion was to train the trainers by provid ing an intense two week course on integrated pest management which will then be taught by the AFL preventative medi cine team to other members of the AFL and Liberian community, said Joseph Diclaro, NAMRU-3 Entomology Depart ment Head. Most importantly this training allows us to add sustainable value to the AFL that will not just have a one time aect but that the preventative medicine ocers can take ownership of them selves. is mission is an excellent example of the benets of collaboration, said Capt. Eric Homan, NECE Ocer in Charge. NECE, NAMRU-3, LIBR and OOL under AFRICOM all worked to make this happen using our diverse expertise to come to gether and create an innovative new cur riculum for use in the AFRICOM region. ese sorts of unique training oppor tunities not only increase jointness with our allies but also benet the readiness of our Navy instructors as well, said Lt. Yans, NECE instructor. is training provided us with new tools towards understanding collaborative operations with our African counterparts as well a broader cultural awareness that is critical for successful OCONUS missions. As Operation Onward Liberia winds down it is critical that we enable the AFL to operate independently and give them the proper tools for success, said Hos pital Corpsman 1st Class Crystal Goeddelan an OOL mentor who participated in the class. e participants used the information provided during the two week course to coordinate and successfully execute the treatment of over 200 barracks and will independently spray the remaining AFL barracks providing preventative medicine support to over 1000 soldiers and their families. By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceMeasures to battle the insidious crime of sex ual assault must start at the top, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said April 21 during a visit to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. Hagel met with the sta and received a brieng on the Safe Helpline set up three years ago for sexual assault victims in the De fense Department. Hagel acknowledged parallel issues of sexual assault and harassment in the civilian sector, but praised the recent mile stones of the military-cen tric Safe Helpline, lauding its services to more than 300,000 people who have sought information about the crime. Any big problem in so ciety that is resolved has to begin at the top ... ev ery leader in the military is focused on this, Hagel said. So it is important that our people in the mil itary institution know that the secretary of defense is very focused on stopping sexual assault in the military. And more than 22,000 people have sought one-on-one sexual as sault assistance and cri sis support securely and anonymously through the Safe Helplines online chat, telephone and tex ting helplines. Notably, dozens of multi-colored sticky notes with brief messages of gratitude and optimism from survivors adorn the walls of the call center. is is really the de ning dynamic of what youre doing, Hagel said. You are changing the world for the better. In remarks to the sta, the secretary re-empha sized that sexual assault is a serious crime both in the military and society at large, with no easy solution at hand. Our people in the military come from society; we re ect society, Hagel said. Youve got to inculcate your people so that they have personal responsibility for their own behavior and conduct. We know weve got a big challenge out there. Hagel said DoD leaders try to bring trust, con dence and credibility into the departments sexual assault reporting system. It takes a lot of courage to take on a perceived sys tem [that] has to go down to every level of leadership in our military, he said. e networks sta members briefed the sec retary on Safe Helplines multi-faceted resources, which also include a mobile application, a peer support service and a tex ting referral service, said Jennifer Marsh, RAINNs vice president for victim services. We know that the sur vivors are diverse, and we needed to pull out content for male survivors, for ex ample, Marsh said. One of the most visited pages on the website is Under standing Sexual Assault, so people are coming here to get information, and it may not be necessarily immediately follow an as sault. It may be a few years out, and they may not understand why theyre hav ing trouble sleeping [or] why theyre depressed. Marsh said coming to the site can validate and normalize such emotions, which hopefully will spur a survivor to engage in a chat session or telephone call. For transitioning service members, RAINN sta ers said, they realize the inherent stress of going into the civilian realm and have taken special consid erations as a result. It brings up all those stress reactions they felt during the time of their assault, Marsh said. So if we were able to provide them with information regarding housing, employment assistance and some of those vicarious issues that may be their primary stressors, we are helping to address the long-term eects of the sexual as sault. e site is user-friendly and designed to bring multiple resources to one source for all service member survivors, Marsh explained. Its exciting, innovative and unparalleled in the civilian realm, she added. But Marsh acknowledged the need for service members to connect to their peers. And though RAINN sta members realized people were using other on line chats, she said, they sought to create a more enhanced and secure ex perience. We used an online, hotline platform so no transcripts, no [Internet protocol] address, and we created this peer support service thats moderated by a licensed clinician. Marsh also noted that a second sta member re views each participants group chat post before it reaches the main group with a brief delay to ensure there is no personally identifying information or abusive language. e connections weve seen on that are pretty powerful, she said. Our licensed clinicians, the moderators, said its some of the best group work that theyve done. She said that bringing male and female survivors together to talk out their experiences has produced great results overall. HagelDOD targets sexual assault

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Chris remembers the ight suits too, and that his father left for war the day after his third birthday. My father made me an exact duplicate of his ight suit, made to t a 3-yearold, Chris said. Its blue with all the zippers, a 421st squadron patch, an F-105 ud patch, even rst lieutenant bars on the shoulders. I wore it a few times, and its a keep sake that will stay with me forever. Its a perma nent reminder of him and what he loved to do. Its a tangible link to him when everything else we have of him is intangible. Ata dinner in Ralphs honor, Shoemaker toasted the fallen Airman, something he does regularly with the unit in remem brance of their fallen brother from the Vietnam War. Ralph Balcom is the kind of man I want all my guys to be like, the kind of man I want to be like, Shoemaker said during the toast. is hits so close to home with us because we know that could have been any of us up there. But this is a family, and if you dont take care of your family, then what is the rest of it for? Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sand wiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jake Barreiro Lt. Col. David Shoemaker, 421st Fighter Squadron commander, Marine Corps Cpl. Jake Balcom, and other members of the 421st FS raise their glasses in a toast to Col. Ralph Balcom, a fallen Vietnam War 421st FS pilot, March 26, 2014, in Pyeongtaek, Republic of Korea. MissingFrom Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Shawn MillerNaval District Washington Public AffairsNearly a century after rst enlisting as yeoman during World War I, women are reaching new heights and continuing to make history across nearly every rank and occupation in the Navy. roughout March, the Navy joined the nation in celebrating Womens His tory Month and honoring generations of women in uniform who exemplify char acter, courage and commitment. Womens History Month provides a special opportunity to share and cele brate the rich history of womens contributions in the history of our nation, said Dr. Regina Akers, a historian at Naval His tory and Heritage Command. Since Sept. 11, 2001, more women have served in uniform than at any time since World War II, with more than 200,000 women across all military branches deploying in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, nearly 70,000 women make up 18 percent of the total Navy force throughout active and Reserve components. Its really the varied backgrounds and experience, knowledge and training that make our Navy better, Akers said of di versitys role in the force. Last year saw a variety of rsts for Navy women. In January 2013, the Secretary of Defense and Joint Chiefs of Sta re scinded the 1994 direct ground combat denition and assignment rule, which removed barriers to certain military jobs based on gender. Later in the year, Vice Adm. Nanette Derenzi became the rst female Judge Advocate General of the Navy, and Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar became the rst woman to command Navy Region Northwest after successfully serving as chief of sta for Commander, Navy Installations Command. Four women currently serve as Fleet or Force Master Chief Petty Of ficers, the highest enlisted rank in the Navy. The historic rsts continue into 2014, as Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was recently nominat ed for promotion and a position as vice chief of naval operations. She is slated to be promoted later this year, and will be the rst African-American and rst wom an to serve in the position. e contributions of our Navy women, and women in general, during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have further ex panded opportunities for women and has qualied them for promotions and career choices that might not have been available at the start of the war, Akers said. Each generation of women in the mili tary, from the foundations in the Nurse Corps in 1908 until now, has widened the path to success and increased womens chances to work in elds unavailable to women in previous eras, on and o the battleeld, Akers added. Everyone is not on the battleeld, but that does not lessen the contributions one may be making supporting those who are or treating those who are in jured, Akers said of those women who ll vital support roles outside combat zones. Todays generation of women in uni form continue to reach new milestones, building upon a rich history of service members dating back more than a centu ry. For the generations to come, Akers said young people today can set high goals by looking up to women breaking barriers. Dream big, Akers said. Dont limit yourself. Bolivar DeRenziWomen reach new heights By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press Servicee special bond be tween Americans and South Koreans serves to strengthen U.S. com mitment to the countrys security in the face of ag gression, President Barack Obama told troops April 26 during a visit to South Korea. Speaking to U.S. troops in Yongsan, South Korea, the president noted the two nations arent just allies, but friends. is alliance is special, forged on the battleeld, Obama said. It has been fortied by the common values and mutual interest and mutual respect of our peoples. e United States and Korea are more than allies. We are friends, he said. Obama said the founda tion of trust, security and stability that allows both nations to thrive economically and socially is made possible by the service and sacrice of U.S. ser vice members and diplo mats. You are the tip of the spear on freedoms frontier, he said. You carry high the legacy left by all those who fought and served here. And to the family members, both here in South Korea and awaiting your return back home, Obama said, I thank you for your service as well. e president lauded the audience for their ser vice and said this alliance is the linchpin of security and stability in the Asia Pacic. Because of that service and the service of genera tions before them, Obama said, the U.S. still stands with its founding princi ples shining, and nations around the world that once knew nothing but the bitter taste of fear now know the blessings of freedom. Obama said during his visit he and South Korean President Park Gen-Hye received a brieng from U.S. Forces Korea com mander, Army Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, and signed the guest book on top of a table where the Korean War Armistice was signed. Both of those moments drove home the truth that, after more than 60 years, our alliance is as strong as it has ever been and as ef fective as it has ever been, he said. Nowhere is that more evident than in the pro fessionalism and the in teroperability of the two nations militaries, Obama said. ats because our forces on duty here, Amer ican and Korean, are high ly trained, closely coordinated, t to ght tonight and every other night, he said. In addition to dealing with the threat from North Korea, this is also an alli ance that represents the incredible bonds between peoples, Obama said. e president noted that in 1950, just ve years af ter the end of World War II, Communist armies rst crossed the 38th Parallel. At the time, many Americans couldnt place Korea on a map, he said. But we knew, as much as we had already given, as weary as we were of war, that we had a stake in what happened here on the Ko rean Peninsula. America had to roll back the tide of Communism and stand with its South Korean friends, Obama said. In September, the Amer icans arrived and the alli ance landed in a surprise attack. And all told, nearly 1.8 million Americans would join the ght those next few years, he said. In dangerous and brutal conditions, nearly 37,000 Americans would give their last full measure of devotion on this faraway soil, but not without pushing the invading armies back across the line they had dared to cross, Obama said. e president said the Republic of Koreas securi ty is a hard-earned, longdefended victory for that nation, which has risen from occupation and ruin, and become one of the most vibrant and open democracies in the world. Obama said when U.S. veterans see the progress in the Republic of Korea, they can say with pride their eorts and their sac rice was worth it. ey see the real re sults of what theyve done a South Korea that is a world leader and a true partner in Asian security and stability, he said. None of this was an accident, Obama added. Freedom, democracy and progress are not accidents, but priorities that have to be fought for, he said. Youre part of that leg acy, he said. ey must be won. And theyve got to be tended to constantly and defended without fail. And here, on freedoms frontier, they are, by every man and woman who has served and stood sentinel on this divided peninsula. Obama noted the stark contrast in the Republic of Korea and its neighbor to the north. e 38th Parallel now exists as much as a contrast between worlds as it does a border between na tions; he said, between a society thats open and one that is closed; between a democracy that is growing and a pariah state that would rather starve its people than feed their hopes and dreams. ats not the result of war, Obama said, but of the path that North Ko rea has taken, a path of confrontation and provocation that includes pur suing the worlds most dangerous weapons. I want to be clear, he said. e commitment that the United States of America has made to the Navy Photo by MC2 Chris ChurchU.S. Forces Korea service members stand behind Commander-in-Chief, President Barack Obama, during his speech at Army Garrison Yongsan, South Korea April 26.Obama visits South Korea See Korea, Page 14

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 13 Army trains in BalticBy Claudette Roulo American Forces Press ServiceA company-sized ele ment of the U.S. Armys 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team about 150 soldiers was to ar rive in Poland April 23 to begin a bilateral infantry exercise with Polish troops, the Pentagon press secretary said. In the coming days, about 450 additional soldiers from the Vicenza, It aly-based 173rd ABCT will arrive for similar exercises in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said. e exercises are the rst in a series of expanded U.S. land force training activities in the Baltic region scheduled to take place this year and possi bly into next year, he said. Russias aggression in Ukraine has renewed our resolve to strengthening NATOs defense plans and capabilities, and to dem onstrate our continued commitment to collective defense in reinforcing our NATO allies in Central and Eastern Europe, Kirby said. e troops will be in place in all four countries by April 28, he said, noting that the exercises will last about a month. But then we will rotate fresh troops in for more exercises, the admiral added. e intent is to develop a persistent rotational presence through the ex ercises, Kirby explained. Discussions are ongoing about expanding the bi lateral exercises into other countries in the region, he said. Discussions regarding the establishment of com bined exercises involving other NATO member and partner countries also are taking place, Kirby said. It doesnt have to be either/or, he said. I think were looking for a broad swath of ways that we can help reassure our allies and partners, and it doesnt all have to be through the alliance. Since Russias aggres sion in Ukraine began, the admiral said, the United States has been constantly looking for ways to reas sure its allies and partners of the nations commit ment to the collective de fense principles in Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty. ese bilateral exercises were conceived in part to do just that, Kirby said. e message to the people of Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, is that the United States takes seriously our obligations under Article 5 of the NATO alliance, even though these arent NATO exercises, he said. Its a very tangible representation of our commitment to our security obligations in Europe, and we encourage our NATO partners to likewise look for opportunities of their own to do this same kind of thing for one another, the admiral contin ued. If theres any message to Moscow, Kirby said, its the same as that being sent to the people of the Baltic region: We take our obligations very, very seri ously on the continent of Europe. e exercises are more than symbolic, the admiral said. e commitment to put ting troops on the ground for an extended period and conducting exercises is not insignicant, he noted. ese are countries that we routinely operate with, Kirby said. ese are units that the 173rd have worked with before, in all four countries. So they know each other. is isnt the rst time that the 173rd has done exercis es with these countries. So theres a relationship there. e situation remains tense along Ukraines eastern border, he said. Nothing weve seen out of Moscow, nothing weve seen out of Russia or their armed forces is deescalating the tension [or] is making things any more stable in Ukraine or on the continent of Europe, the admiral said. What would be very helpful is if they removed their forces o that border and took concrete actions to respect the sovereignty of Ukraine, he said. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said that the events in Ukraine have had the eect of consoli dating the alliance and giving it a sharper view of itself and its future, Kirby said. NATO is a very strong alliance, more relevant now than its ever been. Secretary Hagel was pretty clear with the military leadership that he wanted to look for a wide range of opportunities through which we could continue to reassure our partners in Europe, the admiral said. Elsewhere in the region, the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook is wrap ping up its rotation in the Black Sea, Kirby said. e Oliver Hazard Per ry-class frigate USS Taylor returned to the Black Sea today after completing re pairs in Naval Support Ac tivity Souda Bay, Greece, and will assume the reas surance mission from the Donald Cook, Navy ocials said.Army photoThe 173rd Airborne Brigades Spc. Bradley Chanady jumps from a 34-foot tower at Mann Field, Fort Benning, Ga. By Claudette Roulo American Forces Press Servicee Defense Department is continuing to support the international search mis sion for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said April 24. e total cost of the search to date is $11.4 million, Warren said. is gure includes $4,200 per ight hour for the two P-8 Poseidon aircraft involved in the search, he added. e plane and its 239 passengers dis appeared March 8 on a ight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. e costs break down as follows, War ren said: $4.6 million in operations and main tenance funds; $3.2 million in overseas humanitar ian disaster and civic aid funds; and $3.6 million for underwater search equipment and support. e P-8s continue conducting aerial search operations, and the Bluen-21 au tonomous underwater vehicle completed its twelfth search mission, the colonel said. Bluen-21 has now completed more than 90 percent of a focused underwater search ... Unfortunately, no contacts of interest have been found, he said. e department has received no re quests for additional underwater search assets, Warren said. e Military Sealift Command dry car go ship USNS Cesar Chavez joined the task force April 10 to provide logistical support. Chavez is the Navys newest combat logistics force ship, and is operated by a crew of 125 civil service mariners. e ship also has a complement of 11 U.S. Navy personnel, who provide opera tional support and supply coordination, a Navy news release said.Navy photo by MC2 Eric A. PastorLt. j.g. Kyle Atakturk, left, and Lt. j.g. Nicholas Horton, naval aviators assigned to Patrol Squadron 16, pilot a P-8A Poseidon during a mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Air liner remains missing

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014 By Cpl. Sarah CherryMarine Corps Air Station BeaufortRetired Sta Sgt. Robert Waldrop, now 91 years old and living in St. Helena Is land, S.C., vividly remembers details of his experi ence during World War II. Have you ever seen air liners go across with their condensation trails? Can you picture half a thou sand four-engine aircraft all leaving a condensa tion trail? said Waldrop, speaking of the aircraft of his former unit, the Eighth Air Force of the Army Air Corps. Its an awesome sight; one of the most awe some sights there was. Such a sight wasnt rare in those early months of 1944. World War II was in full swing. Eight dierent days in January and early February saw more than ve hundred B-17s and B-24s taking o into European skies, with the most being 863 on January 29 leaving for Frankfurt, Germany. A B-17 waist gunner from Fort Wayne, Indi ana, he climbed into the plane for his fth mission headed toward Frankfurt, Germany. Hed been in the Army Air Corps for two years. At the time, the service members were expected to carry out 25 missions before being relieved, with the option to do more. When you returned from a mission, if you re turned, you could have ice cream or a shot of whiskey, Waldrop said. He said he would get ice cream with some light teasing from his peers. He deliberately left his service pistol behind. Getting shot down with a rearm was an immediate death sentence by Ger man soldiers. e guys thatd been flying, they said dont take that on a mis sion, Waldrop said. Youd think youd carry it on a mission. One of the biggest haz ards of ying those mis sions was the anti-aircraft [weapons] and, of course, the German pilots. ey had some good, good pilots and good airplanes, Waldrop said. e plane is hit, Feb. 4, 1944. Ill never forget that date. My boots came o when my chute opened. We couldnt wear lacedup boots, because your feet would freeze up there, he said. [e Ger mans] probably had bin oculars on me the whole way down. ey had time to watch me and wait for me. He landed in Germanoccupied France, boot less with a sprained ankle. German soldiers quickly found him and detained him as a prisoner of war. When I rst came down, I sprained my left leg real bad, Waldrop said. I didnt break it, thank goodness. But they had to help me, or carry me, or push me. He was taken to a jail where he said German soldiers would stop by simply to stare at him. eyd come up to the strong door and look through the window, he said. [ey must have been thinking] Hes some thing else, we got a guy, we got an American! During his experience as a prisoner of war, he was transferred from camp to camp on coal ships and trucks, marched for hun dreds of miles, and kept in various prison camps. Hygiene conditions were poor, and prisoners were counted daily. It was a normal rou tine to take a head count twice a day, Waldrop said. A German sergeant, previously wounded on the Russian front, would take down the count with pencil and paper. He said they called him Big Stoop. Guys in the back row would shift around, so hed never get the same count twice. e German soldiers guarding the prisoners would put a stop to the shuing around and mis counting by xing bayonets as a threat. During the night, pris oners were locked in with a bar across the door. In the morning, the prison ers would hear the bar be ing removed. One morning, one of the guys a couple barracks down pushed on the door and it was open, so he thinks its okay to go out. We had one main latrine clear down at the end of the compound. He went clear across to the end of the compound and on the way back, one of the guards shot him, Waldrop said. He bled to death is really what happened because nobody could get to him. e Germans allowed a funeral detail, and despite the lack of an American ag the prisoners made do with what they had. rough the Red Cross we had some boxes of col ored chalk and some of the guys took the colored chalk and put some rags together and made a ag as best as they could for his funeral, he said. It was sad. Towards the end of the war, the prisoners were moved far and often, marching hundreds of miles. Some places we stopped close to villages, the civilians would put water out along the street, Waldrop said. We couldnt stop, but as we walked past we would scoop some up in our tins. Waldrop fell behind with several other prisoners, and was taken to yet another prison camp. ey were liberated by British commandos that he said looked like theyd slit your throat if you blinked. e sort you wouldnt want to see ght ing against you. I was glad they were on our side, he said. He was given a physi cal and returned to the United States in a hospital ship. He arrived in New York, and later returned to his hometown of Fort Wayne, Indiana. After leaving military service, Waldrop served in and retired from the police force. Waldrops experience and his attitude toward his past are a strong ex ample of perseverance, inner strength and, perhaps most of all, carrying trag edies of the past lightly. Ive been so fortu nate over the years, really lucky, he said.WW II airman recalls days as German prisonerDOD photoA B-17 Flying Fortress makes a bombing run during World War II. Waldrop over 30 years ago, and our bases have developed robust programs to protect natural resources and keep the air, water, and soil clean, said Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Di vision. Were also pursuing energy initiatives that focus on enhancing capability and resiliency, but many of those energy eorts also have a side benet of being good for the environment. Earth Day is a prime time to let people know that we have taken and will continue to take our environmental stewardship responsibil ity seriously. Among the Earth Day related activities planned or ongoing this year at naval commands are environmental presentations at local schools; exhibit events with government agencies, and non-governmental organizations; 5K runs; beach clean-ups; energy awareness training/ competitions; recycling events; solar power demos; environmental fairs and facility nature tours; and tree plantings. security of the Republic of Korea only grows stronger in the face of aggression. Our alliance does not waver with each bout of their attention-seeking, Obama said. It just gains the support of the rest of the world. e president said North Koreas continued pursuit of nuclear weapons is a path that leads only to more isolation. Its not a sign of strength, Obama said. Anybody can make threats, move an army or show o a missile, he said. at doesnt make you strong, he said. It does not lead to security, opportunity, or respect. ose things dont come through force. ey have to be earned. Real strength, Obama said, is allowing an open and participatory democ racy where people can choose their own leaders and their own destiny. Additionally, he said, real strength is allowing a vibrant society where people can think, pray and speak their minds as they please, and there are free and open markets build ing a thriving middle class and lifting millions of peo ple out of poverty. We dont use our military might to impose these things on others, Obama said. But we will not hesi tate to use our military might to defend our allies and our way of life. Like all nations on Earth, Obama said, North Ko rea and its people have a choice continue down a lonely road of isolation, or join the rest of the world in seeking a future of greater opportunity, security, and greater respect. is future, he noted, already exists for the citi zens on the southern end of the Korean Peninsula. If [North Koreans] choose this path, Obama said, America and the Republic of Korea and the rest of the world will help them build that future. But if they do not, they should know that the commitment of the Unit ed States of America to the security and defense of the Republic of Korea has not wavered once in more than 60 years, he said. It never has and it never will. KoreaFrom Page 12EarthFrom Page 9

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 1, 2014