The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-03-2014 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00346


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NSB has SAPR trainingMarch 26 two-session workshop covered drugs, alcohol tooBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastLive Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault was the mes sage during a Fleet Forces Command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response workshop at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 26. e SAPR workshop was a precursor to the beginning of the annual Sexual Assault Awareness Month which began April 1. e afternoon session was an all hands Happy Hour comedy performance presented by professional comedian Bernie McGrenahan. NSB Kings Bay Executive Of cer, Cmdr. Edward Callahan, said performance was enter taining and a powerful message to get help for any problems you have. McGrenahan uses comedy to get the attention of the au dience, he said. rough his personal experiences, there are resources to help prevent this from happening to you. If you feel you are being overwhelmed, there is a lifeline out there, many people and resources that care about your well-being. Fleet Forces Commander, Adm. Bill Gortney, said he be lieves if action is not taken to prevent sexual assault, it can destroy our professional values and compromise eet readi ness. My steadfast commitment is that I will not accept sexual as sault or related behaviors within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Gortney said. Strong leader ship is required to ensure that aggressive and sustained mea sures are taken to prevent sexual assault and to provide prompt, adequate care for the victims. e workshop provided command leaders, SAPR representa tives and advocates with training, education and Started in 1963, SUBSAFE Program has compiled an excellent recordFrom Team Submarine Public Affairse Naval Sea Systems Commands Submarine Safety Program was awarded the 2013 Secretary of the Navy Safety Award in the Emerging Center of Excellence cat egory, March 20. e Safety Excellence Awards were established in 2002 and is the Department of the Navys premier trib ute to commands and programs that promote the safety of Sailors, Marines and civilians, and protect aircraft, ships and facilities from mishap. e winner of the Emerging Center of Excellence cate gory is determined by an organization exhibiting prom ising innovative programs, positive trends and obstacles overcome. e SUBSAFE program has had a tremendous impact over the past 50 years on the safety of the U.S. Naval Sub marine Force, said Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley, deputy commander for Undersea Warfare. SUBSAFE codies submarine design and safety requirements and processes, while provid ing a framework for cer tifying critical systems for unrestricted submerged operations. From 1915 to early 1963, the Navy lost 16 submarines due to noncombat related incidents, an average of one submarine every three years. All told, these accidents took the lives of 454 submariners. On April 10, 1963, the attack submarine USS resher (SSN 593) suered uncontrolled ooding during a postshipyard availability and was lost along with 129 sub mariners and civilians, marking the single largest noncombat related loss-of-life incident in the Submarine Forces history. After reshers sinking, the Navy created the SUBSAFE pro gram, with the goal of providing maximum reasonable assurance of hull integrity to pre clude ooding and of the operability and integrity of critical sys tems and components to control and recover from a ooding casualty should Up Periscope Your spare time ... what do you like to do? Page 9 Look back Secretary Mabus tour at NSB Kings Bay Page 4 Olympics Youtb Center Pre-K students get active Page 52009 CHINFO Award Winner SUBSAFE earns SECNAV Safety Award Our submarines are among the most complicated machines in the world ... Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley Undersea WarfareClockwise from bottom left, Team Kings Bay bowlers MCC Alvin Rodriguez, MTC Keith Williams, FTC Dave Mesmer, YN2 Eric Day, MMC Dan Blakeslee, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt and ET2 Rob Daugherty. Not pictured, ET2 Austin Boone.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenKings Bay bowlers primed for successCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See SAPR, Page 6 O to a hot start, team sets goal of winning Southeast in Navy-wide competitionBy Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorMorale, Welfare and Recreations Intramural Sports program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay provides plenty of competition for commands here. eres softball, ag football, soccer and basketball among others. But Kings Bay has one team doesnt compete within the connes of the base. Its Team Kings Bay, the base bowling team that competes in the rst-year Navy Bowling Base Team Championships. e Navy-wide league was the idea of Washington-based Commander Navy Installation Commands Bowling Program Manager Ron Hodgen. e teams compete at their home bowling centers, but the scores are matched up with other teams in their bowling zone. We started on this two years ago. is is the rst such league in the world, Hodgen said. e Navy has 60 bowling centers around the world, in dierent states and countries. Com petition though is limited by distances between bases. I visualized all of the bowling program as one giant center. Instead of 60 centers, we have Weve got some good bowlers. We definitely can win the (zone). Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt USS Florida (SSGN 728) Gold Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCary Grinold, Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays sexual assault forensic examination provider, reviews SAFE room check list and training procedures with sexual assault prevention and response team members HM2 Andrea Saenz, left, and HM1 Calvanna Major. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay recognizes April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month themed Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual As sault by encouraging aware ness and prevention through education and outreach. We all play a role in the ght against sexual assaultwith the commitment to eliminate it from our ranks, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles commanding of cer. We must rst foster a professional command climate that encourages sexual assault victims to report these crimes, and hold perpetrators account able. If we work together, we can create a culture that does not tolerate sexual assault. Sexual assault is dened as any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent. According to the U.S. De partment of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, an average of 237,868 sexual as saults occur each year about one every two minutes. About 60 percent go unreported. e Department of Defense See SUBSAFE, Page 6 See Bowling, Page 3Awareness of sexual assault in spotlight Callahan See Aware, Page 2

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Safe Helpline provides many steps to reduce the risk. Common sense, situational awareness and trusting ones instincts are key. Other tips include consume alcohol only in moderation; communicate limits and expecta tions clearly with others; inform close friends when going on a date with a new person; walk only in light ed areas if its dark; and have a plan for someone to call for help. One of the most eec tive methods of prevent ing sexual assault is active bystander intervention. e three components to active bystander in tervention are recognizing when to intervene, considering whether the situation needs attention and deciding if there is a responsibility to act. e active bystander approach encourages people to identify situations that might lead to a sexual as sault and then safely inter vene to prevent an assault from occurring. Remember, everyone has the right to say no, even if they rst say yes. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911. To report a sexual assault, call the DoD Safe Helpline at (877) 995-5247, NSB Kings Bay duty SAPR Victim Ad vocate at (912) 674-6827, NSB Kings Bay SARC at (912) 467-1979 or Naval Air Station Jacksonville duty SAPR Victim Advocate at (904) 910-9075. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities lo cated across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jackson villes patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 63,000 are enrolled with a prima ry care manager at one of its facilities. By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval ResearchHunches are 50-50 propositions, but Navy researchers want to know if those facing the unexpected in the heat of battle can be trained to guess right more often than not, according to a new research eort announced March 27. In February, the Oce of Naval Research hosted leading experts in neural, cognitive and behavioral science to synchronize their studies of intuition and translate their ndings into applications for military per sonnel and rst responders. ough the research invites com parisons to a sixth sense or Spider man, what researchers hope to learn has nothing to do with the supernat ural or superheroes. Ultimately, this is about Sail ors and Marines being able to har ness their gut instincts in situations where they need to act quickly, said Dr. Peter Squire, program ocer for human performance, training and education in ONRs Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combatting Terrorism Department. But rst, we have to understand what gives rise to this so-called sixth sense. Can we model it? Is there a way to improve it through training? Sailors and Marines dont always have the luxury to take a lot of time to gure out their next move. ey must rely on intuition and a rapid, unconscious interpretation of their surroundings. In addition to the recent meeting that brought together representa tives from other military services, industry and university laboratories, ONR has embarked on a four-year basic research program to enhance intuitive decision making through implicit learning. A team of scientists will study fac tors such as memory and percep tion to better understand how decisions are made and whether there are ways to improve premonition through training. Detecting roadside bombs while in a moving vehicle; sensing im pending danger based on some thing unusual at local cafe; deciding whether that object just launched o the coast is a missile or airliner these are just a few of many scenar ios where there isnt a lot of time to make a decision. A seasoned Warghter develops a gut instinct through experience, said Lt. Cmdr. Brent Olde, ONR Warf ighter Performance Departments division deputy for human and bio-engineered systems. If we can characterize this intuitive decisionmaking process and model it, then the hope is to accelerate the acqui sition of these skills through simulation and scenarios; thus, providing our Sailors and Marines with years of experience in a matter of days and greatly improving their ability to By Lt. Chao PanNavy Judge Advocate Generals Corpse rift Savings Plan is a dened-contribution plan available to civilian and military employees of the United States government, akin to the 401(k) plans found in the private sector. TSP recently rolled out a new Roth option for civilian and mili tary members. is article will ex plain the dierences between the Roth TSP and traditional TSP op tions, and how the TSP interacts with other retirement plans, such as individual retirement arrangements. e fundamental dierence be tween the Roth TSP and the traditional TSP is that contributions to a Roth TSP are taxed as income in the tax year in which the contributions were earned and are gener ally not taxed upon withdrawal at retirement, while contributions to a traditional TSP are not taxed in the tax year in which the contributions were earned (they are deductible), but are taxed upon withdrawal at retirement. Traditional TSP Lets say Petty Ocer Second Class Jones has no dependents and has a taxable of income of $25,000 per year. If he contributes $6,000 to a traditional TSP, hell only be taxed on $19,000 of income that year mi nus any other deductions and ex emptions hes eligible for. When he withdraws the funds in retirement after age 59, however, the with drawals will be considered ordinary income and a tax bill will become due. He may start making withdrawals before age 59, but it may be subject to penalties. Roth TSP If PO2 Jones decided to make a Roth TSP contribution, however, hed make contributions on an aftertax basis. e $6,000 he originally set aside for his contribution would be reduced to $5,100 (the tax man takes out 15 percent since hes in the 15 percent marginal income tax brack et), but when he begins withdrawing at age 59, he wont get another tax bill. Which one is right for me? Ultimately, the main reason to prefer one account over another is an investors marginal tax rate at the time of contribution and at the time of withdrawal (retirement). If an investor is in a high tax brack et today, he may want to reduce his taxable income through contribu tions to his traditional TSP. is is especially true if he expects to be in a lower tax bracket in retirement. Remember, the higher a taxpayers income, the higher the marginal tax bracket hell generally nd him self in. If an investor is young and just starting out his career, however, a Roth TSP may be more tempting. All else being equal, SN Jones is probably paying less in taxes than PO2 Jones or CPO Jones, so SN Jones probably wouldnt get as much ben et from a lower taxable income to day. e Roth TSP is also a good option if an investor believes that tax rates will rise in the future. Likewise, its a bad option if an investor believes that tax rates will generally fall in the future. Based on the above, it is likely that while one option may be better for SN Jones, another may make more sense for Capt. Jones. Mixing it up If an investor does not know which way tax rates will go, what his tax rate will be in retirement, or anything else about the future, he can invest in both the traditional TSP and the Roth TSP. For instance, he can invest money in his traditional TSP one year and the next year switch his contributions over to his Roth TSP. Contribution limits For the TSP, contributions can usually only be made as a deduction from current pay. In total, an individual can only contribute $17,500 per year into a TSP account for tax year 2013 ($23,000 if the individual is at least age 50). is limit generally applies across TSP, 401(k) and 403(b) ac counts. For example, an individual under 50 can contribute $10,000 towards his Roth TSP and $7,500 towards his 401(k) in the same tax year assuming he has a second job that allows it, but cannot contribute $17,500 towards his Roth TSP and $17,500 to wards his 401(k). is limit does not include any employer match. A small note about IRAS With all this talk of TSP, it is impor tant to note that there is a dierence between the TSP and IRAs. While both come in traditional and Roth avors, it is important to keep in mind that these are separate accounts. e annual contribution limit for an IRAs is currently $5,500 or $6,500 if the investor is age 50 or older. is limit is in addition to the limits above for TSP/401(k)/403(b). is means that an individual under age 50 can contribute both $17,500 to his traditional TSP ac count and an additional $5,500 to his Roth IRA in the same tax year. For more information, go to your local legal assistance oce or visit www.tsp.gov/planparticipation/ eligibility/traditionalRothContribu tions.shtml. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928. Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniver sary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Op erations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@com cast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of com munity, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating se niors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded at www.kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. Additional information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.ONR researches your sixth sense Oce of Naval Research Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League How to keep more of your money Navy JAG AwareFrom Page 1 See ONR, Page 7

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Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTeam Kings Bay bowler MMC Alvin Rodriguez of NSSC takes his turn at Rack-N-Roll lanes.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenYN2 Eric Day lines up his ball on his approach. one ... with 480 lanes. Its the only sports program where there is no travel, but everybody gets to compete. Hodgen said to have a true competition, all the lanes need to be in the same condition with the same applied oil and pattern. Modern technology has created machinery that can do just that. We have lane machines that can verify the same bowling conditions at each site, he said. Hodgen set up ve bowling zones, based on Navy Regions. Right now there are 48 teams in those regions, stretching across the United States to Diego Garcia, Japan, Europe, Guam, Hawaii and Guantanamo Bay. Along with Team Kings Bay, Southeast Zone mens teams competing are Naval Air Station Key West, NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, NAS Pensacola, NAS Corry, also in Pensacola, NS Guantanamo Bay, Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay and NAS New Or leans. In addition, there are womens teams competing at NAS Jax, Mayport, NS Pensacola and Gitmo. John Duncan, food and beverage manager at NAS Jax, is the secretary for the zone. Its pretty neat, Duncan said. Im having fun seeing all the scores and coaching the team here. Its been a real blast so far. Ann Myhre, Kings Bays Rack-N-Roll Lanes manager, and assistant manager Jerry Stackhouse help with Team Kings Bay. Myhre is the teams liaison with the zone, providing Duncan with Kings Bays weekly scores. Stackhouse oils the lanes and answers the bowlers questions about how they were prepared. Asked if he gives any coaching tips to the team, Stack house laughed. ey dont need to be coached, he said. eyre all better bowlers than I am. Team Kings Bay competes on Tuesday evenings, like the rest of the zone. All Kings Bay bowlers bowl six games, with four bowlers having their scores counted in region play. ose four earned the right to have their scores counted for the team by having the top four scores among the results of the previous week. ree weeks into the season, after March 25 bowling, Team Kings Bay was leading the Southeast. Its been going well, said ET2 Rob Daugherty, a Team Kings Bay member who works at the Naval Submarine Support Center. Its been a good learning experience for us. And its helped us get ready for the All-Navy tryouts. ere are three or four of us who are going to try out. Its a blessing for MWR to provide this for us. Its all free. Daugherty said he and his teammates have their sights set on winning the zone. Zone winners will be determined by scores over a 10-week season. Daugherty said one key to Team Kings Bays hopes is Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, the USS Florida (SSGN 728) Golds Engineering ocer. He just reported here this year, Daugherty said. Hes got the most experience, and hes helped a lot of us. Platt has been on the All-Navy team the last two years. Last year he was the Navys top bowler and nished third at the all-military tournament hosted by the Marines at Camp Lejeune. Hes a Professional Bowling Association member and on sta with Columbia 300. And, three weeks into the competition, Platt led the Southeast Zone with a 209.44 average. Team Kings Bays MMC Dan Blakeslee was second in the Southeast, with a 204.72 average. ose two are the only Southeast bowlers averaging 200 or over. But two more Kings Bay bowlers, Daugherty and YN2 Erik Day, rank sixth and 10th respectively in the zone, with 188.44 and 184.00 averages. Using the Tour nament Points System for scoring, Kings Bay led the zone by 3435.5 to 2974.5 for NAS Jax. Weve got some good bowlers, Platt said. We denitely can win the (zone). ats the rst step. After the 10-week regular season, there are three weeks of playos to determine a Navy base champion. Five zone winners automatically qualify for the playos. All second-place zone teams will compete in a one-day tournament for three atlarge playo spots. Hodgen said hes happy with how his vision of a Navy-wide base competition has blossomed. Im very excited with it, he said. e response has been fantastic. Im very pleased with the support weve had, and weve had a good response and participation.BowlingFrom Page 1 Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone through 3 of 10 weeks Team Points 1, NSB Kings Bay 3435.5 2, NAS Jax 2974.5 3, NAS Pensacola 2715 4, NS Mayport 2183.5 5, NAS Key West 2071.5 6, NAS Corry 1621.5 7, NS Gitmo 1365 8, JTF Gitmo 1153.5 9, NAS New Orleans 530 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Navy Secretary Ray Mabus shares a laugh over lunch with ET3 Aaron Brown, center, and MM2 Zachary Blakeman. Navy photos by MC1 Rex Nelson SECNAV tours Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay March 21, 2014Rear Adm. Chas Richard speaks with Mabus during a tour of the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Blue) Commanding Officer, Capt. Owen Travis, wel comes Mabus with a hand shake. Mabus signs the guest book and looks through the periscope on the Ohio-class ballistic-mis sile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). Mabus speaks to Sailors and Marines at the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Dunham Barracks at NSB Kings Bay.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 Pre-K Olympics Photos by EM1 Mark TreenVictoria Maldonado races to the finish line during the sitting skate board event. Pre-Ks Jungle Bunch cheer from behind. Robert Kruger races with his filled bucket in this water event. Teacher Jeanne Beverly watches. BUC Steven Maldonado plays the role of anchor during this epic battle of tug of war. Parents love to be involved. MM1 Chris Northern and his wife, Amanda, enjoy a brief hug while watching children run an event in the background. Gabrielle Campbell bounces with a smile while classmates cheer. Isla Forbes and Emberlyn Maddox play the classic game of tug of war. Pre-K Frogs enjoy a moment under the parachute during the Pre-K Olympics March 28 at the Youth Center. Parents and teachers worked together to turn the parachute game into a make shift colorful room. The kids loved running around under it. OS1 Robert Kruger, Maritime Force Protection Unit, helps grills hamburgers during the games to get ready for the kids lunch when the games are done.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resourc es, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 7. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the par enting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. April 7, 14, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must com plete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 14 to 18. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for April 9A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 9. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating mil itary and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive train ing on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a new born baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop for CONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., April 15. For more information, call 573-4513. Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more infor mation or to register, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 5 to 8 p.m., April 17. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., April 17. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interac tive program designed to inform par ticipants on sources of funding for high er education, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 15. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal em ployment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., April 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a confer ence room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presenta tion in response to a units area of special concerns. FFSC is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoc trination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty per sonnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. FFSC hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops one occur. Since the SUBSAFE Programs inception in June 1963, the United States has not lost a SUBSAFE-certified submarine. Our submarines are among the most complicated machines in the world and they operate in an inhospitable environment for extended periods of time, Jabaley said. For this reason, we apply our SUBSAFE principles for the entire life of our submarines, from design, construction, operation, and maintenance throughout their entire service life, to make sure the Sailors who serve aboard them can focus on their job with the complete con dence in the integrity of their ship. Team Submarine conducts annual SUBSAFE training for all military, civilian, and seated contractor per sonnel and hosts a commemoration honoring those lost aboard resher as part of an eort to ensure the work force does not lose sight of the programs critical importance. Ignorance, arrogance, and complacency are our three greatest enemies, said SUBSAFE Program Manager Cmdr. Daniel Ettlich. We use this training to remind our people of reshers loss and to keep the edge we have spent the last half-century honing to ensure we never lose a submarine like that again. is years resher commemoration will take place April 10, the 51st anniversary of its loss, at the Washington Navy Yards Sail Loft lo cated in Building 112 at 1 p.m. Christopher A. Hard, vice chairman for the National Transpor tation Safety Board, will be the guest speaker. prevention tools to incorporate into their current sexual assault prevention and response pro grams. e workshop included two sessions, the rst for command ing ocers, executive ocers, ocers in charge and command master chiefs, on leadership awareness, expectations and resources. e goal of this workshop is to provide leadership with avail able resources and provide as sistance in implementing and executing sexual assault prevention and response policies at ev ery command, said Marie Park er, Fleet Forces SAPR program manager. We plan to build on this workshop based on the feedback received and continue our eorts to promote a cultural change in the area of sexual as sault prevention through educa tion and program implementation. e workshop emphasized SAPR training, but combined Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and suicide prevention, which are many times associated with sexual assault cases. Fleet SAPR Fleet Forces Of cer, Capt. Chuck Marks, said there needs to be a culture change to help prevent these destructive behaviors. Our most valuable resource is our Sailors, they are the most important piece of our combat system, he said. e Sailors are also our most complex tool and they also have the most complex things we need to work on. e command needs to be thinking about that Sailor throughout their career and life, also to include what is going on in their personal life. If their personal readiness is not taken care of, it could to lead to loss of combat readiness. McGrenahans powerful onehour training program is broken up in two parts. e rst part is to hook the audience by opening the program with a 30 minute comedy show. McGrenahan delivered hysterical material from his nu merous television appearances and comedy tours which gains the trust, respect and attention of military and civilians in the audience. e second portion of the pro gram is the Training and Pre vention Message. McGrenahan segues into a se rious and powerful message on his personal and dangerous ex periences with high-risk drink ing and substance-abuse. e result for McGrenahan was poor job performance, career loss, nancial instabil ity, three DUI arrests and a six month jail sentence at 26 years of age. is coupled with his 19 years old brothers alcohol and drug related suicide signaled him to reach out to counselors for help. He is now 21 years drug and alcohol free. Bernies main message is to inspire troops to avoid alcohol and substance abuse to cope with stress and focus on training mission success. It is an honor to come out and give the audience some laughs, but most important to explain about the signs of alco hol destruction that happened in my life, McGrenahan said. I want to help deter anybody who is having thoughts of suicide. e Navy has great command help and a lot of resources to help military members workout and solve their problems. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenFollowing the loss of the USS Thresher (SSN 593) in 1963, the Navy developed and imple mented the SUBSAFE program.SAPRFrom Page 1 SUBSAFEFrom Page 1

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. make split-second deci sions. ese basic inquiries into intuition align with both Navy and Marine Corps leaders plans for the future. e ndings eventually could inuence operations related to cy berspace, unmanned sys tems and other areas em phasized by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, whose Sailing Directions call for provid ing Sailors condence, not only in their equipment, but in their own skills. In addition, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos Planning Guide stresses small unit leadership, cohesion, innovation and education as forming the foundation of the service. Understanding the connection between implicit learning and intuition al lows us to open the doors a new set of training practic es, Squire said. at could provide our warriors a new set of skills to harness when making decisions. ONR provides the science and technology to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 in dustry partners. ONR em ploys approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and con tract personnel.ONRFrom Page 2 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press Servicee Air Force has re lieved nine ocers, allowed a commander to retire and will discipline 91 others as a result of a cheating scandal among intercontinental ballistic missile launch ocers at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James and Lt. Gen. Stephen Wilson, the commander of Air Force Global Strike Command, made the announcements March 27 during a Pentagon news conference. Commanders are also responsible when our peo ple fall short, Wilson said. Air Force Col. Robert Stanley, the commander of the 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom accepted responsibility and submit ted his resignation to Maj. Gen. Jack Weinstein, the commander of 20th Air Force, Wilson said. Weinstein also relieved nine leaders from the group and squadron level, the general said. He re moved Col. Mark Schuler, the 341st Operations Group com mander, for loss of con dence in his leadership ability. He also removed the group deputy commander. e commanders of the 10th, 12th, and 490th mis sile squadrons were also removed, as was the commander of the 341st oper ational support squadron. Weinstein further relieved the directors of operation from the 341st Operation al Support Squadron and the 10th Missile Squadron. Finally, he relieved the 341st Operations Groups standardization and evaluation ocer. None of these people were directly involved in test compromise; howev er, they all failed adequate leadership, supervision and oversight of the crew force, Wilson said. Disciplinary action is also being taken against the ocers who have substan tiated cheating from the investigation, he added. e investigation ultimately implicated 100 ocers who were investi gated as part of the com promise, he said. Of the 100, nine actually were not substantiated and will be returned to duty as soon as practicable, the gen eral said. Details of those actions were released af ter all the members have been served, and theyre being served today. Air Force leaders will determine whether the of cers can return to alert duty after completion of these actions. e ocers who had unsubstantiated allegations will be retrained, recertied and returned to duty, he said. James and Wilson said they will work together to eliminate the systemic problems they found upon investigating the incident. James said she will at tack the unhealthy em phasis on perfection that permeated the base and will reallocate funds to improve the quality of facili ties and quality of life for missileers. In scal year 2014, we have $19 million funded for some of the areas with in the force improvement program, including launch control center refurbish ment and infrastructure repairs, she said. Further more, the 20th Air Force has identied an addition al $3 million for quality-oflife requirements. In its scal year 2015 budget request, the ser vice asked for $455 million to sustain its Minuteman squadrons, ICBM helicopter support and some critical communications areas, James said. Lee Air Force disciplines, relieves ocers involved in cheating THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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This question was suggested by two of my fine read ers, Bill and Nancy Weisensee. By the way, Nancy likes to volunteer in her spare time. Anyway, were here to please, so heres Nancy and Bills question. As for me, I mostly watch sports or read in my spare time. Right now Im watching March Madness and baseball, and Im reading The Betrayal by Lt. Col. William Corson (Ret.) and Not a Good Day to Die: The Untold Story of Operation Anaconda by Sean Naylor.What do you like to do in your spare time?Lance Cpl. Grant Carr Security Force Battalion Chino Hills, Calif. Its not too exciting. I go to the gym or read books. ETC Anthony James Trident Training Facility Norway, S.C. I fish and watch sports. Lt. j.g. Bradley Craig USS Rhode Island Gold Milford, Mich. I just hang out with my wife and kids. Jack Jones Retired Navy Lebanon, Mo. Ive got a boat, so I do some boating. And Ive got six grandkids. Malachy Thedwall Family member Indianapolis I stay home and play with my cars. Theo James Family member Spring Valley, N.Y. I read and coupon and shop. And we spend time with the kids. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTrack and field projectNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays track and football field is getting a new look. The natural turf will be replaced by artificial grass and the track will be resurfaced by Cape Design Engineering Co. At ground breaking for the project were, from left, CDE project manager Mark Lveder, construction manager Ensign Ryan Harbough, Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey Guffey, Morale, Welfare and Recreation Director Robert Spinnewebber and CDE President Lutfi Mized. From Trident Refit Facility Kings Bay Public Affairse Trident Ret Facility on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is seeking applicants for its 2014 Ap prenticeship Program. TRIREFFAC is a tenant command at Kings Bay, and is responsible for pro viding quality maintenance, repair and modernization for sustaining a superior global submarine force. e apprenticeship program is a four-year accredited Department of Labor Program that combines certicate level college courses, along with trade theory classes, and on-the-job work experience at TRIREFFAC. Electricians, pipe tters, machinists, equipment mechanics, welders, sheet metal mechanics and ship wrights are a few examples of the trades that may be available. Apprentices earn a competitive wage and are eligible for benets, which include vacation, medical and retire HillTRF seeking apprenticesSee TRF, Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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ment. About a third of our workforce is currently eligible for retirement, said Capt. Larry Hill, TRIREF FAC Kings Bay Commanding Ocer. So we have a need and an opportunity to recruit and train qualied candidates to become tomorrows highly skilled workforce. To apply for the pro gram, applicants must enroll in and complete the Compass test at Altamaha Technical College. ese tests must be com pleted before applying for the program, and can be taken at any branch of Altamaha Technical College (Camden, Brunswick or Jesup campuses). Interested applicants are urged to register for these tests now as available seats are expected to ll quickly. To register for the tests, applicants should contact Altamaha Technical College, Camden Campus at (912) 510-3361. All academic costs in the apprenticeship program are paid in full by both the HOPE Grant and TRIREFFAC, provided students receive a grade of C or higher at class completion. Eligibility requirements for the pro gram are: All applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applicants must re side in the Georgia coun ties of Camden, Charlton, Wayne, Brantley, Ware, McIntosh, or Glynn, or Nassau County in Florida. Applicants must be able to pass a physical examination prior to em ployment. Applicants must be able to pass a full criminal history background inves tigation. Enroll and complete the Compass test with Altamaha Technical College, Camden, Brunswick or Jesup Campus. Complete all testing prior to submitting a re sume to www.USAJobs.gov e TRIREFFAC Ap prenticeship Program application period begins on April 7 and continues through April 11. No applications for the current selection process will be accepted after April 11. Previous applications will not be considered. Interested applicants should submit their re sume, along with their scores from the Compass test, to the USAJobs web site.TRFFrom Page 9 From Headquarters Marine Corpse Government of Ja pan and the U.S. Marine Corps conducted the Reunion of Honor ceremony to commemorate the Bat tle of Iwo Jima March 19 at Iwo To, formerly known as Iwo Jima. During the 69th commemoration, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos, Japanese and U.S. veterans, distinguished visitors, Marines and Sailors from III Marine Expeditionary Force and leaders from both nations paid respect to those who fought and those who lost their lives during the battle. Every year to commemorate the battle of Iwo Jima, the Iwo Jima Association invites veterans of the battle, along with oth er interested guests, to the battle site on the island. e guests, numbering 500 to 600, y in and out on the same day. ey disembark the air craft, are shuttled to the ceremony site, conduct the ceremony, and have time to reect on their memories on the island. Some guests walk the beaches or climb to Mt. Suribachi where the now famous photo by Joe Rosenthal was taken of the Iwo Jima ag raising. e Marine Corps supports the event with the III Marine Expeditionary ForceBand, ocials and logistics. Japanese veterans of the war also attend the event, along with their guests. e Japanese band and Japanese defense ocials took part in the American ceremony. Veterans from both sides reunite and have a chance to share memories. Every year is special because of the Iwo Veterans that are able to make it to the event, which is something that wont be able to con tinue much longer.Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jose D. LujanoEight U.S. veterans who fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima pose for a photo March 19 during the annual Reunion of Honor ceremony.Iwo Jima vets remember Joe Rosenthal, Associated PressFive Marines and a Navy corpsman raise the flag of the United States, during the Battle of Iwo Jima on Feb. 23, 1945. By Jason BortzNaval Hospital Pensacola Public AffairsI didnt think, I just reacted, said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Zack ery Penner, a corpsman with Naval Hospital Pensacola, when recalling the events of June 22 and 23, 2012, while serving with Bravo Company, 1st Bat talion, 8th Marines in Af ghanistan. For his actions on those two days, Penner was awarded the Silver Star, the third highest military decoration for valor, March 19 at a ceremony at Naval Hospital Pensacola. On June 22, 2012, with approximately 30 days left in country, Penners pla toon encountered Afghan insurgents on the rst day of a seven-day operation, and a Marine was severely wounded on a nearby rooftop. Without hesitation, Penner ran to the Marine while exposing himself to enemy re that was only 50 meters away. With rounds impacting all around him, he treated and evacuated the Marine. ough the Marine did not survive from the wounds he sustained, Penners actions reect ed the relationship and camaraderie shared between Marines and corps men. Marines love their corpsmen, and I love being with Marines, said Penner, who enlisted in the Navy immediately af ter graduating high school in Sacramento, Calif. I wanted to be a corpsman because I wanted to help Marines. Penner got to help a Marine again the very next day. While on a partnered patrol with Afghan sol diers, insurgents attacked his squad with machine guns and precision re weapons. When two members of the patrol sustained in juries, a Marine and an Afghan soldier, Penner ran more than 100 me ters through enemy re to reach the casualties and quickly established a casualty collection point behind a wall. When the squad began receiving enemy re from the rear, Penner shielded the ca sualties from enemy re with his own body until the evacuation aircraft ar rived. Both casualties would ultimately not survive, but Penner again sustained no injuries despite putting himself in harms way. It never crossed my mind that I wouldnt be hurt, Penner said. Its actually hard to remem ber the events of those two days in detail now because I just reacted. After returning from the seven-day operation, Penner immediately contacted his wife. I couldnt tell her what happened because of [op erational security], but I wanted her to know I was okay, said Penner, whose grandfather served in the Navy during World War II. Penner also called the Marines family that he evacuated from the roof top. He was my best friend, and I wanted to talk to them, said Penner before trailing o. e relationship between Marines and their corpsmen was further demonstrated as a large number of Marines at tended the ceremony including Maj. Gen. Ray mond Fox, commanding general, II Marine Expedi tionary Force. e relationship the Marine Corps has had with corpsmen for a long time is what saves a lot of Marines, and [Marines] cherish that relationship incredibly, said Fox. Ev ery one of us should aspire to do what he did when called upon. After returning from Afghanistan, Penner received orders to NHP where he currently works in the Emergency Depart ment. Initially, Penner planned on fullling his current enlistment and then leaving the Navy, but Silver Star for corpsmanNavy photo by Jason BortzHospital Corpsman 3rd Class Zackery Penner, assigned to Naval Hospital Pensacola, is awarded the Silver Star by Major Gen. Raymond Fox, commanding general of II Marine Expeditionary Force. See Corpsman, Page 11 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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Its that time of year to celebrate children. Morale, Welfare and Recreation will be hosting Kidsfest at Under the Pines Park 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 12. Demonstrations by Kings Bay Tae Kwon Do and Crooked River State Park plus face painting, arts and crafts, a photo booth, games, glitter tattoos, a traceless train, music and more. A Fun Zone will be open for a $3 entry of unlimited use with lots of inatables, rock wall and halo jumpers. Food will be available for purchase by Dominos and Chick-l-a. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Pirate Family Adventure Race Have you heard of the Great Race? is is better, me hearties! Register for free at Kids fest at 11 a.m. is is a family scavenger hunt event with challenges e details are secret. Call (912) 573-8972 for a few hints. e only requirement is one electronic device capable of taking snapshots, such as an iPhone, Android, tablets or camera. Happy Easter from Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 1 to 8 p.m. April 20, enjoy bowling with family and friends when all games are 50 and shoe rentals are $2.50 per person. For more information, call R-N-R lanes at (912) 573-9492. White Water Adventure Weekend Navy Adven cures Unleased Kings Bay is going to National Whitewater Center in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Fri day. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55(liberty) and optional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www. usnwc.org/memorial-day-trail-races. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Rafting, Mega Jump plus Me morial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All partic ipants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting is April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 4091611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play begin ning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Movie Under the Stars At dusk, approximately 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at the Youth Center Ball elds, MWR will be showing Walking with Dinosaurs (rated PG). Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie out doors on the giant outdoor theatre. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fit ness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all pa trons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and user-friendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bev erages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Just for kids Periscope file photoMorale, Welfare and Recreations Kidsfest is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12 at Under The Pines Park. MWRs Kidsfest set for April 12 being stateside has given him a new perspective. e stress of working in the emergency room does not compare to the stress of combat, Penner said. Being stationed at a hospital stateside is a lot calmer. Penner is taking college classes and is now planning on continuing his career in the Navy. He is considering the Medical Enlisted Com missioning Program and hopes to eventually receive orders to a naval hospital in California to be closer to his family. When asked about how he felt about receiving the Silver Star, Penner replied, Its humbling. I was in the right place at the wrong time, but any of the Ma rines would have done the same thing.CorpsmanFrom Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceSince the founding of the Marine Corps in 1775, Marines have answered the nations call, faithfully protecting the American people and maintaining a world-class standard of military excellence, the Marine Corps comman dant said March 25. Nothing has changed. We will continue to do the same in the future, Gen. James F. Amos said at a hearing of the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee. e nation is now at a strategic inection point, he said. After 12 years of war, we are drawing down our forces in Afghanistan, re setting our institution and reawakening the soul of our Corps, Amos said. At the same time, scal un certainty threatens the Corps capacity and capabilities and forces it to sac rice long-term health for near-term readiness, the commandant said. Despite these challeng es, Amos said, he remains committed to fueling the most capable and ready Marine Corps that the na tion is willing to pay for. Individual Marines are the Corps greatest asset, he said. Our unique role as Americas signature crisis response force is grounded in the legendary char acter and warghting ethos of our people, the general said. As the Marine Corps resets and prepares for future battles, Amos said, all Marines are rededicating themselves to four timeless attributes: per sistent discipline; faithful obedience to orders and instruc tions; concerned and engaged leader ship 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and strict adherence to established standards. ese characteristics, he said, are what carried Marines across French wheat elds and into German machine guns at Belleau Wood in World War I. And, the commandant continued, in World War II, the same attributes allowed combat-inexperienced young Marines to succeed against a deter mined enemy in the attack on Guadalcanal. And lastly, he said, these enduring strengths of char acter and courage enabled Marines to carry the day in an Iraqi town named Fal lujah, and against a deter mined enemy in the Tali ban strongholds of Marjah and Sangin. ese ironclad impera tives have dened our Corps for 238 years, Amos said. ey will serve us well in the decades to come. While about 30,000 Marines are deployed around the world, promoting peace, protecting the nations interests and secur ing its defense, the com Navy photo by John F. WilliamsCarol Armstrong, ships sponsor for the Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research research vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27), breaks a bottle across bow during a christening ceremony at Dakota Creek Industries, Inc., shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. Neil Armstrong christened By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval Research Public AffairsChief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder joined family members of the late Neil Armstrong March 29 to christen the Navys newest research ship, named for the legendary astronaut and rst man to walk on the moon. e lead Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) ship in its class, the research vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) began construction in 2012 and will be delivered to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in January 2015 to continue studies in the Atlantic, western Pacic and Indian ocean regions. I cant think of a better name to go on the side of a ship designed for explora tion and discovery, Klunder said. R/V Neil Armstrong will play a pivotal role in teaching the Navy about the ocean so we can more eectively plan our operations around the world. e Navy, through the Oce of Naval Research, has been a leader in building and providing large ships for the nations academic research eet since World War II. e newest addition to the eet, R/V Neil Armstrong will replace R/V Knorr (AGOR 15), which will be retired at the end of the year after nearly half a century of service. R/V Knorr was launched during the same decade as President Kennedys vow to put a man on the moon and the famed Apollo 11 mission that fullled that vi sion. It is best known for carrying researchers on the 1985 expedition that resulted in discov ery of the Titanic. In all, R/V Knorr has traveled more than a million miles-about the same distance as two trips to the moon and back. Now the R/V Neil Armstrong will provide a continuum of exploration for the next 50 years, said Carol Armstrong, the astronauts widow and sponsor of the ship. e new ship is 238 feet long and equipped with the latest technologies, including a high-eciency diesel engine, emission control for stack gasses, infor mation technology tools for monitoring shipboard systems and communicating with the world, and hull coatings that should result in fewer maintenance is sues. It will operate with a crew of 20 with accommodations for 24 scientists who will use the ship and its assets to collect samples and data from both coastal and deep ocean areas. In addition to ocials from ONR, the christening at the Dakota Creek Indus tries, Inc. shipyard in Anacortes, Wash., was attended by the oceanographer of the Navy and representatives from the secretary of the Navys oce. Kali Armstrong, the late astronauts granddaughter, was maid of honor. Armstrong By Joseph BattistaNaval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Ship System Engineering Station Public AffairsEngineers from the Naval Surface Warfare Cen ter Carderock Division Ship System Engineer ing Station completed the rst submarine communications cable test at the newly constructed Tow Cable Test Site, Naval Sea Systems Command announced March 27. e new facility provides the Navy the capa bility to test and evaluate prototype synthetic and steel electrical, optical, and mechanical cables used in submarine com munications systems. e site can also be used to test other systems like towed arrays, mast anten na cables and remote op erated vehicle cables. is test site will allow us to learn more about the tow cable in order to develop better designs for our submarine force, said Jason Delisser, electrical engineer with Antenna Engineering and Sail Sys tems Branch, who over saw the construction of the test site. e ultimate goal is to signicantly improve system reliability and the test site will allow us to understand how and why the cable fails during operation so that we can design out the most com mon failure modes. e TCTS was funded by the Navys Program Executive Oce for Com mand, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence as part of a Lean Six Sigma ini tiative to increase system reliability. Similar testing was previously conducted by private industry and this capability will reduce costs, test and other lead times, as well as reduce dependence on outside contracting. e TCTS incorporates two separate test xtures. e rst xture is a ten sion test xture capable of simulating loads up to 25,000 pounds. is test xture is primarily used to assess the tensile proper ties of the cable, including breaking strength, cable strain and torque balance. e second xture is a Bend Over Sheave fatigue test xture. is xture uses a beltdriven actuator to drive a tow cable around a set of two xed sheaves while under tension in order to assess the bending fatigue life of a cable. e bend ing fatigue life can often be the most important determinant for the expected lifecycle of a cable design. During all mechanical testing the cable core is connected electrically to a dielectric analyzer, and optically to a ber spec trometer and light source. e dielectric analyzer measures the insulation resistance and continuity of the electrical lines, and the ber spectrometer measures the continuity of up to two ber optic lines. Understanding the relationship between the structural component of the cable and the cable core is critical in tow cable design. One of the most impor tant design aspects for this site was the requirement for safe operation. Del isser recognized this early on. We realized that apply ing high tensions at a fast rate could create poten tially dangerous situations for the test operators if all safety measures werent incorporated in our design. e test site is cong ured with multiple levels of safety including struc tural guards against cable whipping, multiple emer gency stops and a control system that prohibits op eration of any mechanical equipment if the test area is not secured. e test site also uti lizes solenoid locks on the gates to further prevent access to the test area dur ing testing or if power is unexpectedly lost. In addition, eight cam eras are stationed within the test area in order to al low test operators to safely set-up and perform test ing without entering the test area. e Ship Systems Engineering Station, Philadelphia is a major com ponent of Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. It is the Navys principal test and evalu ation station and in-ser vice engineering agent for all hull, mechanical and electrical ship systems and equipment and has the capability to test and engineer the full range of shipboard systems and equipment from full-scale propulsion systems to digital controls and electric power systems.New site tests sub cables Navy photo by PAO Joseph Battista The Tow Cable Test Site incorporates two separate test fixtures. Foreground, the tension test fixture capable of exciting loads up to 25,000 pounds and the Bend Over Sheave fatigue test fixture, which utilizes a belt driven actuator to drive a tow cable around a set of two fixed sheaves. AmosMarines Amos: Well do same with lessSee Marines, Page 13

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13 By Adriana SalasArmy News ServiceWhite Sands Missile Range hosted about 6,200 participants during this years 25th annual Bataan Memorial Death March on March 23. e march honors the American and Filipino Soldiers who were surren dered to Japanese Forces during World War II. As prisoners of war, the Soldiers had to endure a death march the length of almost three marathons and a ride on a hell ship with little to no room to breathe. Participants have on option of taking on the entire 26.2 mile of mountain ter rain, or the honorary 14.2 mile course, or if youre 96-year-old Bataan POW Col. Ben Skardon, an honorary eight and a half mile march. Tyranny and oppres sion do not have a place in the modern world. rough your actions we make sure that our na tion never forgets, said Maj. Gen. Gwen Bing ham, White Sands Missile Range commander, prior to starting her honorary march. e march begins with the participants shaking the hands of the survivors who attend the event. is year, 13 survivors attended. Skardon participated in his seventh per sonal honorary march. He started to march when he rst attended the event at 90-years-old and has since created a large following who aec tionately call themselves Bens Brigade. is is a once in a life time experience that Ill carry with me for the rest of my life, said Cadet Pvt. Aaron Stoddard, who was asked to watch over Skardon throughout the events. e events, created to honor the lives of the pris oners of war, began on Sat urday, where participants heard rst-hand accounts from each of the survivors. is year, a dinner was held to honor the survi vors the Friday before the march. Survivors were also intermittently present dur ing registration to sign memorabilia from the march. Aside from honoring the prisoners of war, family members who lost a Soldier during the encamp ment also nd it a good way to pay tribute. One of those is 71-yearold Joe Brown, who never met his father, Warrant Ocer Charles D. Brown, who died on a hell ship. Since he found the march that pays tribute to his fathers life he has par ticipated in the full marathon for 10 years straight. Brown brought along his son for his journey. My dad made his whole marathon as long as Im able I gure I could go 26 miles, which is only a portion of what he did, Brown said. Some who have no relation to Bataan, attend the event because of what it signies to them. Michael Smith, a Viet nam veteran, his son Joshua, also a veteran, and Joshuas 10-year-old son, Caleb, are all participating in the full marathon. is is Michaels eighth time and Joshuas sixth, this will be Calebs rst. Prior to arriving to White Sands Missile Range, Ca leb did research on what happened at Bataan and why the event was held. He did several written re ports for school and de cided to create a fundrais er to honor the Wounded Warriors. Caleb raised $1,000 in donations. It uplifts my spirits, Josh said. Its important for our kids to get to see the men who made and are currently making these sacrices for us. Others wanted to cel ebrate a personal ac complishment, like retired White Sands Missile Range employee and re tired Soldier Marva Little who was unable to nish the honorary march on her rst attempt two years back due to a concurrent battle with breast cancer. Little returned this year, cancer free, to take on the 14.2 trek and vows to re turn for the full marathon. I am hard charging and I can do it, Little said. Anyone who knows my character has always used the term strength to describe me. Cadets from the local New Mexico State Uni versity, or NMSU, who are usually in charge of a Sat urday historical seminar and a water point along the route, also took on the role of acting as aids for the Bataan survivors who attended the event. e cadets are with the survivors from the time they arrive until the survivors depart. If school time interferes, the non-commissioned ocer in charge, Sgt. James Walker takes over in order to allow for the Ca dets to focus on school. e overall sponsor ship the NMSU ROTC has in the entire event is an awesome thing to me, Walker said. e events ended with a tribute to the survivors and an award ceremony for the march leaders within each division.DoD Photo by Marvin LynchardVietnam War veterans and Medal of Honor recipients, from left, Spc4 Santiago Erevia, Staff Sgt. Melvin Morris and Sfc Jose Rodela get acknowledged from the audience during Valor 24 Hall of Heroes induction ceremony. Soldiers receive medals By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceTwenty-four U.S. Army veterans from three wars World War II, Korea and Vietnam received upgrades to the highest military decoration for uncommon bravery and gallantry at a White House ceremony March 18. President Barack Obama presented posthumous Medals of Honor to family members and rep resentatives of 21 of those Soldiers, and draped the sky-blue ribbon and vepointed star-bearing medals around the necks of the three living veterans from the Vietnam War. Each of the 24 had re ceived a Distinguished Service Cross for the same fearless actions for which they were now receiving long overdue upgrades to the Medal of Honor. is ceremony is 70 years in the making and today, we have the chance to set the record straight, he said, noting that more than a decade ago Con gress mandated a review to ensure heroism of vet erans wasnt overlooked due to prejudice or dis crimination. During that review, the 24 Soldiers Hispanic, Jewish and African Ameri can were identied as deserving of the Medal of Honor. is is the length to which America will go to make sure everyone who serves under our proud ag receives the thanks that they deserve, he said. So with each generation, we keep on striving to live up to our ideals of free dom and equality, and to recognize the dignity and patriotism of every per son, no matter who they are, what they look like, or how they pray. Obama invited each liv ing Soldier to the stage, one at a time, dressed in uniforms they could have worn in their 20s, but they now were lling out in their 70s with a full complement of ribbons and badges that testied to their skills as young Sol diers. eir citations were read, their Medals of Honor were draped and hand shakes exchanged. ese are extraordinary Americans. ey are exemplary Soldiers, the president said. Following the presentation to the three Vietnam veterans, Obama called them all to the stage. Santiago Erevia, Melvin Morris, Jose Rodela in the thick of the ght, all those years ago, for your comrades and your country, you refused to yield, he said. On behalf of a grate ful nation, we all want to thank you for inspiring us, then and now, with your strength, your will and your heroic hearts. Sons, daughters, nephews, brothers, wives, friends and representatives of the 21 Soldiers who werent present to receive the long overdue recognition each were called to the stage to hear their Sol diers citation read aloud for a nal time. While some fought tears, others smiled, faint ly remembering. en each was present ed with a framed citation and Medal of Honor which their Soldiers so deserved. ere was little doubt their Soldiers would never be forgotten again. Ladies and gentlemen, it is very rare where we have the opportunity to reect on the extraordinary courage and patriotism of such a remarkable collec tion of men, Obama concluded. We are so grateful to them, we are so grateful to their families, it makes us proud and it makes us inspired.Photo by Adriana SalasA Soldier thanks Bataan prisoner of war Ewin Johnson for his service before the start of the march.Death March remembered mandant said, they arent working alone. e Ma rine Corps partnership with the Navy provides the United States with an unmatched naval expeditionary capability, he said. Our relationship with the Navy is a symbiotic one, Amos said. at close relationship is at the heart of the com mandants concern over the eects of cuts to the eet and to shipbuilding funds, he said. Americas engagement throughout the future security environment of the next two decades will be naval in character make no mistake, the general said. To be forward-engaged and to be present when it matters most, we need capital ships and those ships need to be loaded with United States Marines. By maintaining a for ward presence, the Navy and Marine Corps team can respond immediately when success is mea sured in hours, not in days, Amos said. e general pledged that even in the scal cli mate in which it must ac complish its mission going forward, the Marine Corps will step up to the task. We will not do less with less, Amos said. We will do the same with less. MarinesFrom Page 12

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NSB has SAPR trainingMarch 26 two-session workshop covered drugs, alcohol tooBy MC1 Michael WissNavy Public Affairs Support Element East, Detachment SoutheastLive Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault was the message during a Fleet Forces Command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response workshop at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 26. e SAPR workshop was a precursor to the beginning of the annual Sexual Assault Awareness Month which began April 1. e afternoon session was an all hands Happy Hour comedy performance presented by professional comedian Bernie McGrenahan. NSB Kings Bay Executive Ofcer, Cmdr. Edward Callahan, said performance was entertaining and a powerful message to get help for any problems you have. McGrenahan uses comedy to get the attention of the audience, he said. rough his personal experiences, there are resources to help prevent this from happening to you. If you feel you are being overwhelmed, there is a lifeline out there, many people and resources that care about your well-being. Fleet Forces Commander, Adm. Bill Gortney, said he believes if action is not taken to prevent sexual assault, it can destroy our professional values and compromise eet readiness. My steadfast commitment is that I will not accept sexual assault or related behaviors within the U.S. Fleet Forces Command, Gortney said. Strong leadership is required to ensure that aggressive and sustained measures are taken to prevent sexual assault and to provide prompt, adequate care for the victims. e workshop provided command leaders, SAPR representatives and advocates with training, education and Started in 1963, SUBSAFE Program has compiled an excellent recordFrom Team Submarine Public Affairse Naval Sea Systems Commands Submarine Safety Program was awarded the 2013 Secretary of the Navy Safety Award in the Emerging Center of Excellence category, March 20. e Safety Excellence Awards were established in 2002 and is the Department of the Navys premier tribute to commands and programs that promote the safety of Sailors, Marines and civilians, and protect aircraft, ships and facilities from mishap. e winner of the Emerging Center of Excellence category is determined by an organization exhibiting promising innovative programs, positive trends and obstacles overcome. e SUBSAFE program has had a tremendous impact over the past 50 years on the safety of the U.S. Naval Submarine Force, said Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley, deputy commander for Undersea Warfare. SUBSAFE codies submarine design and safety requirements and processes, while providing a framework for certifying critical systems for unrestricted submerged operations. From 1915 to early 1963, the Navy lost 16 submarines due to noncombat related incidents, an average of one submarine every three years. All told, these accidents took the lives of 454 submariners. On April 10, 1963, the attack submarine USS resher (SSN 593) suered uncontrolled ooding during a postshipyard availability and was lost along with 129 submariners and civilians, marking the single largest noncombat related loss-of-life incident in the Submarine Forces history. After reshers sinking, the Navy created the SUBSAFE program, with the goal of providing maximum reasonable assurance of hull integrity to preclude ooding and of the operability and integrity of critical systems and components to control and recover from a ooding casualty should Up Periscope Your spare time ... what do you like to do? Page 9 Look back Secretary Mabus tour at NSB Kings Bay Page 4 Olympics Youtb Center Pre-K students get active Page 52009 CHINFO Award Winner SUBSAFE earns SECNAV Safety Award Our submarines are among the most complicated machines in the world ... Rear Adm. Michael Jabaley Undersea WarfareClockwise from bottom left, Team Kings Bay bowlers MCC Alvin Rodriguez, MTC Keith Williams, FTC Dave Mesmer, YN2 Eric Day, MMC Dan Blakeslee, Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt and ET2 Rob Daugherty. Not pictured, ET2 Austin Boone.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenKings Bay bowlers primed for successCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See SAPR, Page 6 O to a hot start, team sets goal of winning Southeast in Navy-wide competitionBy Bill WesselhoffThe Periscope editorMorale, Welfare and Recreations Intramural Sports program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay provides plenty of competition for commands here. eres softball, ag football, soccer and basketball among others. But Kings Bay has one team doesnt compete within the connes of the base. Its Team Kings Bay, the base bowling team that competes in the rst-year Navy Bowling Base Team Championships. e Navy-wide league was the idea of Washington-based Commander Navy Installation Commands Bowling Program Manager Ron Hodgen. e teams compete at their home bowling centers, but the scores are matched up with other teams in their bowling zone. We started on this two years ago. is is the rst such league in the world, Hodgen said. e Navy has 60 bowling centers around the world, in dierent states and countries. Com petition though is limited by distances between bases. I visualized all of the bowling program as one giant center. Instead of 60 centers, we have Weve got some good bowlers. We definitely can win the (zone). Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt USS Florida (SSGN 728) Gold Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenCary Grinold, Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays sexual assault forensic examination provider, reviews SAFE room checklist and training procedures with sexual assault prevention and response team members HM2 Andrea Saenz, left, and HM1 Calvanna Major. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay recognizes April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month themed Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault by encouraging awareness and prevention through education and outreach. We all play a role in the ght against sexual assaultwith the commitment to eliminate it from our ranks, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles commanding ofcer. We must rst foster a professional command climate that encourages sexual assault victims to report these crimes, and hold perpetrators accountable. If we work together, we can create a culture that does not tolerate sexual assault. Sexual assault is dened as any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent. According to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, an average of 237,868 sexual assaults occur each year about one every two minutes. About 60 percent go unreported. e Department of Defense See SUBSAFE, Page 6 See Bowling, Page 3Awareness of sexual assault in spotlight Callahan See Aware, Page 2

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Safe Helpline provides many steps to reduce the risk. Common sense, situational awareness and trusting ones instincts are key. Other tips include consume alcohol only in moderation; communicate limits and expectations clearly with others; inform close friends when going on a date with a new person; walk only in lighted areas if its dark; and have a plan for someone to call for help. One of the most eective methods of preventing sexual assault is active bystander intervention. e three components to active bystander intervention are recognizing when to intervene, considering whether the situation needs attention and deciding if there is a responsibility to act. e active bystander approach encourages people to identify situations that might lead to a sexual assault and then safely intervene to prevent an assault from occurring. Remember, everyone has the right to say no, even if they rst say yes. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911. To report a sexual assault, call the DoD Safe Helpline at (877) 995-5247, NSB Kings Bay duty SAPR Victim Advocate at (912) 674-6827, NSB Kings Bay SARC at (912) 467-1979 or Naval Air Station Jacksonville duty SAPR Victim Advocate at (904) 910-9075. NBHC Kings Bay is one of NH Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired Sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 63,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval ResearchHunches are 50-50 propositions, but Navy researchers want to know if those facing the unexpected in the heat of battle can be trained to guess right more often than not, according to a new research eort announced March 27. In February, the Oce of Naval Research hosted leading experts in neural, cognitive and behavioral science to synchronize their studies of intuition and translate their ndings into applications for military personnel and rst responders. ough the research invites comparisons to a sixth sense or Spiderman, what researchers hope to learn has nothing to do with the supernatural or superheroes. Ultimately, this is about Sailors and Marines being able to harness their gut instincts in situations where they need to act quickly, said Dr. Peter Squire, program ocer for human performance, training and education in ONRs Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combatting Terrorism Department. But rst, we have to understand what gives rise to this so-called sixth sense. Can we model it? Is there a way to improve it through training? Sailors and Marines dont always have the luxury to take a lot of time to gure out their next move. ey must rely on intuition and a rapid, unconscious interpretation of their surroundings. In addition to the recent meeting that brought together representatives from other military services, industry and university laboratories, ONR has embarked on a four-year basic research program to enhance intuitive decision making through implicit learning. A team of scientists will study factors such as memory and perception to better understand how decisions are made and whether there are ways to improve premonition through training. Detecting roadside bombs while in a moving vehicle; sensing impending danger based on something unusual at local cafe; deciding whether that object just launched o the coast is a missile or airliner these are just a few of many scenarios where there isnt a lot of time to make a decision. A seasoned Warghter develops a gut instinct through experience, said Lt. Cmdr. Brent Olde, ONR Warfighter Performance Departments division deputy for human and bio-engineered systems. If we can characterize this intuitive decisionmaking process and model it, then the hope is to accelerate the acquisition of these skills through simulation and scenarios; thus, providing our Sailors and Marines with years of experience in a matter of days and greatly improving their ability to By Lt. Chao PanNavy Judge Advocate Generals Corpse rift Savings Plan is a dened-contribution plan available to civilian and military employees of the United States government, akin to the 401(k) plans found in the private sector. TSP recently rolled out a new Roth option for civilian and military members. is article will explain the dierences between the Roth TSP and traditional TSP options, and how the TSP interacts with other retirement plans, such as individual retirement arrangements. e fundamental dierence between the Roth TSP and the traditional TSP is that contributions to a Roth TSP are taxed as income in the tax year in which the contributions were earned and are generally not taxed upon withdrawal at retirement, while contributions to a traditional TSP are not taxed in the tax year in which the contributions were earned (they are deductible), but are taxed upon withdrawal at retirement. Traditional TSP Lets say Petty Ocer Second Class Jones has no dependents and has a taxable of income of $25,000 per year. If he contributes $6,000 to a traditional TSP, hell only be taxed on $19,000 of income that year minus any other deductions and exemptions hes eligible for. When he withdraws the funds in retirement after age 59, however, the withdrawals will be considered ordinary income and a tax bill will become due. He may start making withdrawals before age 59, but it may be subject to penalties. Roth TSP If PO2 Jones decided to make a Roth TSP contribution, however, hed make contributions on an aftertax basis. e $6,000 he originally set aside for his contribution would be reduced to $5,100 (the tax man takes out 15 percent since hes in the 15 percent marginal income tax bracket), but when he begins withdrawing at age 59, he wont get another tax bill. Which one is right for me? Ultimately, the main reason to prefer one account over another is an investors marginal tax rate at the time of contribution and at the time of withdrawal (retirement). If an investor is in a high tax bracket today, he may want to reduce his taxable income through contributions to his traditional TSP. is is especially true if he expects to be in a lower tax bracket in retirement. Remember, the higher a taxpayers income, the higher the marginal tax bracket hell generally nd himself in. If an investor is young and just starting out his career, however, a Roth TSP may be more tempting. All else being equal, SN Jones is probably paying less in taxes than PO2 Jones or CPO Jones, so SN Jones probably wouldnt get as much benet from a lower taxable income today. e Roth TSP is also a good option if an investor believes that tax rates will rise in the future. Likewise, its a bad option if an investor believes that tax rates will generally fall in the future. Based on the above, it is likely that while one option may be better for SN Jones, another may make more sense for Capt. Jones. Mixing it up If an investor does not know which way tax rates will go, what his tax rate will be in retirement, or anything else about the future, he can invest in both the traditional TSP and the Roth TSP. For instance, he can invest money in his traditional TSP one year and the next year switch his contributions over to his Roth TSP. Contribution limits For the TSP, contributions can usually only be made as a deduction from current pay. In total, an individual can only contribute $17,500 per year into a TSP account for tax year 2013 ($23,000 if the individual is at least age 50). is limit generally applies across TSP, 401(k) and 403(b) accounts. For example, an individual under 50 can contribute $10,000 towards his Roth TSP and $7,500 towards his 401(k) in the same tax year assuming he has a second job that allows it, but cannot contribute $17,500 towards his Roth TSP and $17,500 towards his 401(k). is limit does not include any employer match. A small note about IRAS With all this talk of TSP, it is important to note that there is a dierence between the TSP and IRAs. While both come in traditional and Roth avors, it is important to keep in mind that these are separate accounts. e annual contribution limit for an IRAs is currently $5,500 or $6,500 if the investor is age 50 or older. is limit is in addition to the limits above for TSP/401(k)/403(b). is means that an individual under age 50 can contribute both $17,500 to his traditional TSP account and an additional $5,500 to his Roth IRA in the same tax year. For more information, go to your local legal assistance oce or visit www.tsp.gov/planparticipation/ eligibility/traditionalRothContribu tions.shtml. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928. Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com.Sub Vet chapter selling cookbook Silent Service Food to Dive For is a cookbook published by the United States Submarine Veterans Inc. Farragut Base. Proceeds from this fund-raiser help support a variety of community, military and veterans activities. e cost is $25, which includes postage. For more information or to order, contact Judy at (208) 7625055 or at judymwol@yahoo.com. Now hear this! From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded at www.kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. Additional information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.ONR researches your sixth sense Oce of Naval Research Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League How to keep more of your money Navy JAG AwareFrom Page 1 See ONR, Page 7

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Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTeam Kings Bay bowler MMC Alvin Rodriguez of NSSC takes his turn at Rack-N-Roll lanes.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenYN2 Eric Day lines up his ball on his approach. one ... with 480 lanes. Its the only sports program where there is no travel, but everybody gets to compete. Hodgen said to have a true competition, all the lanes need to be in the same condition with the same applied oil and pattern. Modern technology has created machinery that can do just that. We have lane machines that can verify the same bowling conditions at each site, he said. Hodgen set up ve bowling zones, based on Navy Regions. Right now there are 48 teams in those regions, stretching across the United States to Diego Garcia, Japan, Europe, Guam, Hawaii and Guantanamo Bay. Along with Team Kings Bay, Southeast Zone mens teams competing are Naval Air Station Key West, NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, NAS Pensacola, NAS Corry, also in Pensacola, NS Guantanamo Bay, Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay and NAS New Orleans. In addition, there are womens teams competing at NAS Jax, Mayport, NS Pensacola and Gitmo. John Duncan, food and beverage manager at NAS Jax, is the secretary for the zone. Its pretty neat, Duncan said. Im having fun seeing all the scores and coaching the team here. Its been a real blast so far. Ann Myhre, Kings Bays Rack-N-Roll Lanes manager, and assistant manager Jerry Stackhouse help with Team Kings Bay. Myhre is the teams liaison with the zone, providing Duncan with Kings Bays weekly scores. Stackhouse oils the lanes and answers the bowlers questions about how they were prepared. Asked if he gives any coaching tips to the team, Stackhouse laughed. ey dont need to be coached, he said. eyre all better bowlers than I am. Team Kings Bay competes on Tuesday evenings, like the rest of the zone. All Kings Bay bowlers bowl six games, with four bowlers having their scores counted in region play. ose four earned the right to have their scores counted for the team by having the top four scores among the results of the previous week. ree weeks into the season, after March 25 bowling, Team Kings Bay was leading the Southeast. Its been going well, said ET2 Rob Daugherty, a Team Kings Bay member who works at the Naval Submarine Support Center. Its been a good learning experience for us. And its helped us get ready for the All-Navy tryouts. ere are three or four of us who are going to try out. Its a blessing for MWR to provide this for us. Its all free. Daugherty said he and his teammates have their sights set on winning the zone. Zone winners will be determined by scores over a 10-week season. Daugherty said one key to Team Kings Bays hopes is Lt. Cmdr. Leon Platt, the USS Florida (SSGN 728) Golds Engineering ocer. He just reported here this year, Daugherty said. Hes got the most experience, and hes helped a lot of us. Platt has been on the All-Navy team the last two years. Last year he was the Navys top bowler and nished third at the all-military tournament hosted by the Marines at Camp Lejeune. Hes a Professional Bowling Association member and on sta with Columbia 300. And, three weeks into the competition, Platt led the Southeast Zone with a 209.44 average. Team Kings Bays MMC Dan Blakeslee was second in the Southeast, with a 204.72 average. ose two are the only Southeast bowlers averaging 200 or over. But two more Kings Bay bowlers, Daugherty and YN2 Erik Day, rank sixth and 10th respectively in the zone, with 188.44 and 184.00 averages. Using the Tournament Points System for scoring, Kings Bay led the zone by 3435.5 to 2974.5 for NAS Jax. Weve got some good bowlers, Platt said. We denitely can win the (zone). ats the rst step. After the 10-week regular season, there are three weeks of playos to determine a Navy base champion. Five zone winners automatically qualify for the playos. All second-place zone teams will compete in a one-day tournament for three atlarge playo spots. Hodgen said hes happy with how his vision of a Navy-wide base competition has blossomed. Im very excited with it, he said. e response has been fantastic. Im very pleased with the support weve had, and weve had a good response and participation.BowlingFrom Page 1 Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone through 3 of 10 weeks Team Points 1, NSB Kings Bay 3435.5 2, NAS Jax 2974.5 3, NAS Pensacola 2715 4, NS Mayport 2183.5 5, NAS Key West 2071.5 6, NAS Corry 1621.5 7, NS Gitmo 1365 8, JTF Gitmo 1153.5 9, NAS New Orleans 530 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Navy Secretary Ray Mabus shares a laugh over lunch with ET3 Aaron Brown, center, and MM2 Zachary Blakeman. Navy photos by MC1 Rex Nelson SECNAV tours Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay March 21, 2014Rear Adm. Chas Richard speaks with Mabus during a tour of the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Blue) Commanding Officer, Capt. Owen Travis, wel comes Mabus with a hand shake. Mabus signs the guest book and looks through the periscope on the Ohio-class ballistic-mis sile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736). Mabus speaks to Sailors and Marines at the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Dunham Barracks at NSB Kings Bay.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 Pre-K Olympics Photos by EM1 Mark TreenVictoria Maldonado races to the finish line during the sitting skate board event. Pre-Ks Jungle Bunch cheer from behind. Robert Kruger races with his filled bucket in this water event. Teacher Jeanne Beverly watches. BUC Steven Maldonado plays the role of anchor during this epic battle of tug of war. Parents love to be involved. MM1 Chris Northern and his wife, Amanda, enjoy a brief hug while watching children run an event in the background. Gabrielle Campbell bounces with a smile while classmates cheer. Isla Forbes and Emberlyn Maddox play the classic game of tug of war. Pre-K Frogs enjoy a moment under the parachute during the Pre-K Olympics March 28 at the Youth Center. Parents and teachers worked together to turn the parachute game into a make shift colorful room. The kids loved running around under it. OS1 Robert Kruger, Maritime Force Protection Unit, helps grills hamburgers during the games to get ready for the kids lunch when the games are done.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 7. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. April 7, 14, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 14 to 18. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for April 9A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 9. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop for CONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., April 15. For more information, call 573-4513. Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 5 to 8 p.m., April 17. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Sponsorship training for command repsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., April 17. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform par ticipants on sources of funding for higher education, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 15. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., April 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. FFSC is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. FFSC hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops one occur. Since the SUBSAFE Programs inception in June 1963, the United States has not lost a SUBSAFE-certified submarine. Our submarines are among the most complicated machines in the world and they operate in an inhospitable environment for extended periods of time, Jabaley said. For this reason, we apply our SUBSAFE principles for the entire life of our submarines, from design, construction, operation, and maintenance throughout their entire service life, to make sure the Sailors who serve aboard them can focus on their job with the complete condence in the integrity of their ship. Team Submarine conducts annual SUBSAFE training for all military, civilian, and seated contractor per sonnel and hosts a commemoration honoring those lost aboard resher as part of an eort to ensure the work force does not lose sight of the programs critical importance. Ignorance, arrogance, and complacency are our three greatest enemies, said SUBSAFE Program Manager Cmdr. Daniel Ettlich. We use this training to remind our people of reshers loss and to keep the edge we have spent the last half-century honing to ensure we never lose a submarine like that again. is years resher commemoration will take place April 10, the 51st anniversary of its loss, at the Washington Navy Yards Sail Loft located in Building 112 at 1 p.m. Christopher A. Hard, vice chairman for the National Transportation Safety Board, will be the guest speaker. prevention tools to incorporate into their current sexual assault prevention and response programs. e workshop included two sessions, the rst for commanding ocers, executive ocers, ocers in charge and command master chiefs, on leadership awareness, expectations and resources. e goal of this workshop is to provide leadership with available resources and provide assistance in implementing and executing sexual assault prevention and response policies at every command, said Marie Parker, Fleet Forces SAPR program manager. We plan to build on this workshop based on the feedback received and continue our eorts to promote a cultural change in the area of sexual assault prevention through education and program implementation. e workshop emphasized SAPR training, but combined Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and suicide prevention, which are many times associated with sexual assault cases. Fleet SAPR Fleet Forces Ofcer, Capt. Chuck Marks, said there needs to be a culture change to help prevent these destructive behaviors. Our most valuable resource is our Sailors, they are the most important piece of our combat system, he said. e Sailors are also our most complex tool and they also have the most complex things we need to work on. e command needs to be thinking about that Sailor throughout their career and life, also to include what is going on in their personal life. If their personal readiness is not taken care of, it could to lead to loss of combat readiness. McGrenahans powerful onehour training program is broken up in two parts. e rst part is to hook the audience by opening the program with a 30 minute comedy show. McGrenahan delivered hysterical material from his numerous television appearances and comedy tours which gains the trust, respect and attention of military and civilians in the audience. e second portion of the program is the Training and Prevention Message. McGrenahan segues into a serious and powerful message on his personal and dangerous experiences with high-risk drinking and substance-abuse. e result for McGrenahan was poor job performance, career loss, nancial instability, three DUI arrests and a six month jail sentence at 26 years of age. is coupled with his 19 years old brothers alcohol and drug related suicide signaled him to reach out to counselors for help. He is now 21 years drug and alcohol free. Bernies main message is to inspire troops to avoid alcohol and substance abuse to cope with stress and focus on training mission success. It is an honor to come out and give the audience some laughs, but most important to explain about the signs of alcohol destruction that happened in my life, McGrenahan said. I want to help deter anybody who is having thoughts of suicide. e Navy has great command help and a lot of resources to help military members workout and solve their problems. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenFollowing the loss of the USS Thresher (SSN 593) in 1963, the Navy developed and implemented the SUBSAFE program.SAPRFrom Page 1 SUBSAFEFrom Page 1

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. make split-second decisions. ese basic inquiries into intuition align with both Navy and Marine Corps leaders plans for the future. e ndings eventually could inuence operations related to cyberspace, unmanned sys tems and other areas em phasized by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, whose Sailing Directions call for provid ing Sailors condence, not only in their equipment, but in their own skills. In addition, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos Planning Guide stresses small unit leadership, cohesion, innovation and education as forming the foundation of the service. Understanding the connection between implicit learning and intuition al lows us to open the doors a new set of training practic es, Squire said. at could provide our warriors a new set of skills to harness when making decisions. ONR provides the science and technology to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 in dustry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and con tract personnel.ONRFrom Page 2 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press Servicee Air Force has relieved nine ocers, allowed a commander to retire and will discipline 91 others as a result of a cheating scandal among intercontinental ballistic missile launch ocers at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James and Lt. Gen. Stephen Wilson, the commander of Air Force Global Strike Command, made the announcements March 27 during a Pentagon news conference. Commanders are also responsible when our peo ple fall short, Wilson said. Air Force Col. Robert Stanley, the commander of the 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom accepted responsibility and submitted his resignation to Maj. Gen. Jack Weinstein, the commander of 20th Air Force, Wilson said. Weinstein also relieved nine leaders from the group and squadron level, the general said. He re moved Col. Mark Schuler, the 341st Operations Group commander, for loss of con dence in his leadership ability. He also removed the group deputy commander. e commanders of the 10th, 12th, and 490th missile squadrons were also removed, as was the commander of the 341st operational support squadron. Weinstein further relieved the directors of operation from the 341st Operational Support Squadron and the 10th Missile Squadron. Finally, he relieved the 341st Operations Groups standardization and evaluation ocer. None of these people were directly involved in test compromise; however, they all failed adequate leadership, supervision and oversight of the crew force, Wilson said. Disciplinary action is also being taken against the ocers who have substan tiated cheating from the investigation, he added. e investigation ultimately implicated 100 ocers who were investigated as part of the compromise, he said. Of the 100, nine actually were not substantiated and will be returned to duty as soon as practicable, the general said. Details of those actions were released after all the members have been served, and theyre being served today. Air Force leaders will determine whether the ofcers can return to alert duty after completion of these actions. e ocers who had unsubstantiated allegations will be retrained, recertied and returned to duty, he said. James and Wilson said they will work together to eliminate the systemic problems they found upon investigating the incident. James said she will attack the unhealthy emphasis on perfection that permeated the base and will reallocate funds to improve the quality of facilities and quality of life for missileers. In scal year 2014, we have $19 million funded for some of the areas with in the force improvement program, including launch control center refurbish ment and infrastructure repairs, she said. Further more, the 20th Air Force has identied an addition al $3 million for quality-oflife requirements. In its scal year 2015 budget request, the service asked for $455 million to sustain its Minuteman squadrons, ICBM helicopter support and some critical communications areas, James said. Lee Air Force disciplines, relieves ocers involved in cheating THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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This question was suggested by two of my fine readers, Bill and Nancy Weisensee. By the way, Nancy likes to volunteer in her spare time. Anyway, were here to please, so heres Nancy and Bills question. As for me, I mostly watch sports or read in my spare time. Right now Im watching March Madness and baseball, and Im reading The Betrayal by Lt. Col. William Corson (Ret.) and Not a Good Day to Die: The Untold Story of Operation Anaconda by Sean Naylor.What do you like to do in your spare time?Lance Cpl. Grant Carr Security Force Battalion Chino Hills, Calif. Its not too exciting. I go to the gym or read books. ETC Anthony James Trident Training Facility Norway, S.C. I fish and watch sports. Lt. j.g. Bradley Craig USS Rhode Island Gold Milford, Mich. I just hang out with my wife and kids. Jack Jones Retired Navy Lebanon, Mo. Ive got a boat, so I do some boating. And Ive got six grandkids. Malachy Thedwall Family member Indianapolis I stay home and play with my cars. Theo James Family member Spring Valley, N.Y. I read and coupon and shop. And we spend time with the kids. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTrack and field projectNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays track and football field is getting a new look. The natural turf will be replaced by artificial grass and the track will be resurfaced by Cape Design Engineering Co. At ground breaking for the project were, from left, CDE project manager Mark Lveder, construction manager Ensign Ryan Harbough, Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey Guffey, Morale, Welfare and Recreation Director Robert Spinnewebber and CDE President Lutfi Mized. From Trident Refit Facility Kings Bay Public Affairse Trident Ret Facility on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is seeking applicants for its 2014 Apprenticeship Program. TRIREFFAC is a tenant command at Kings Bay, and is responsible for providing quality maintenance, repair and modernization for sustaining a superior global submarine force. e apprenticeship program is a four-year accredited Department of Labor Program that combines certicate level college courses, along with trade theory classes, and on-the-job work experience at TRIREFFAC. Electricians, pipe tters, machinists, equipment mechanics, welders, sheet metal mechanics and shipwrights are a few examples of the trades that may be available. Apprentices earn a competitive wage and are eligible for benets, which include vacation, medical and retireHillTRF seeking apprenticesSee TRF, Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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ment. About a third of our workforce is currently eligible for retirement, said Capt. Larry Hill, TRIREFFAC Kings Bay Commanding Ocer. So we have a need and an opportunity to recruit and train qualied candidates to become tomorrows highly skilled workforce. To apply for the program, applicants must enroll in and complete the Compass test at Altamaha Technical College. ese tests must be completed before applying for the program, and can be taken at any branch of Altamaha Technical College (Camden, Brunswick or Jesup campuses). Interested applicants are urged to register for these tests now as available seats are expected to ll quickly. To register for the tests, applicants should contact Altamaha Technical College, Camden Campus at (912) 510-3361. All academic costs in the apprenticeship program are paid in full by both the HOPE Grant and TRIREFFAC, provided students receive a grade of C or higher at class completion. Eligibility requirements for the program are: All applicants must be U.S. citizens. Applicants must reside in the Georgia counties of Camden, Charlton, Wayne, Brantley, Ware, McIntosh, or Glynn, or Nassau County in Florida. Applicants must be able to pass a physical examination prior to employment. Applicants must be able to pass a full criminal history background investigation. Enroll and complete the Compass test with Altamaha Technical College, Camden, Brunswick or Jesup Campus. Complete all testing prior to submitting a re sume to www.USAJobs.gov e TRIREFFAC Apprenticeship Program application period begins on April 7 and continues through April 11. No applications for the current selection process will be accepted after April 11. Previous applications will not be considered. Interested applicants should submit their resume, along with their scores from the Compass test, to the USAJobs website.TRFFrom Page 9 From Headquarters Marine Corpse Government of Japan and the U.S. Marine Corps conducted the Reunion of Honor ceremony to commemorate the Battle of Iwo Jima March 19 at Iwo To, formerly known as Iwo Jima. During the 69th commemoration, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos, Japanese and U.S. veterans, distinguished visitors, Marines and Sailors from III Marine Expeditionary Force and leaders from both nations paid respect to those who fought and those who lost their lives during the battle. Every year to commemorate the battle of Iwo Jima, the Iwo Jima Association invites veterans of the battle, along with other interested guests, to the battle site on the island. e guests, numbering 500 to 600, y in and out on the same day. ey disembark the aircraft, are shuttled to the ceremony site, conduct the ceremony, and have time to reect on their memories on the island. Some guests walk the beaches or climb to Mt. Suribachi where the now famous photo by Joe Rosenthal was taken of the Iwo Jima ag raising. e Marine Corps supports the event with the III Marine Expeditionary ForceBand, ocials and logistics. Japanese veterans of the war also attend the event, along with their guests. e Japanese band and Japanese defense ocials took part in the American ceremony. Veterans from both sides reunite and have a chance to share memories. Every year is special because of the Iwo Veterans that are able to make it to the event, which is something that wont be able to continue much longer.Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jose D. LujanoEight U.S. veterans who fought in the Battle of Iwo Jima pose for a photo March 19 during the annual Reunion of Honor ceremony.Iwo Jima vets remember Joe Rosenthal, Associated PressFive Marines and a Navy corpsman raise the flag of the United States, during the Battle of Iwo Jima on Feb. 23, 1945. By Jason BortzNaval Hospital Pensacola Public AffairsI didnt think, I just reacted, said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Zackery Penner, a corpsman with Naval Hospital Pensacola, when recalling the events of June 22 and 23, 2012, while serving with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Marines in Afghanistan. For his actions on those two days, Penner was awarded the Silver Star, the third highest military decoration for valor, March 19 at a ceremony at Naval Hospital Pensacola. On June 22, 2012, with approximately 30 days left in country, Penners platoon encountered Afghan insurgents on the rst day of a seven-day operation, and a Marine was severely wounded on a nearby rooftop. Without hesitation, Penner ran to the Marine while exposing himself to enemy re that was only 50 meters away. With rounds impacting all around him, he treated and evacuated the Marine. ough the Marine did not survive from the wounds he sustained, Penners actions reected the relationship and camaraderie shared between Marines and corpsmen. Marines love their corpsmen, and I love being with Marines, said Penner, who enlisted in the Navy immediately after graduating high school in Sacramento, Calif. I wanted to be a corpsman because I wanted to help Marines. Penner got to help a Marine again the very next day. While on a partnered patrol with Afghan soldiers, insurgents attacked his squad with machineguns and precision re weapons. When two members of the patrol sustained injuries, a Marine and an Afghan soldier, Penner ran more than 100 meters through enemy re to reach the casualties and quickly established a casualty collection point behind a wall. When the squad began receiving enemy re from the rear, Penner shielded the casualties from enemy re with his own body until the evacuation aircraft arrived. Both casualties would ultimately not survive, but Penner again sustained no injuries despite putting himself in harms way. It never crossed my mind that I wouldnt be hurt, Penner said. Its actually hard to remember the events of those two days in detail now because I just reacted. After returning from the seven-day operation, Penner immediately contacted his wife. I couldnt tell her what happened because of [operational security], but I wanted her to know I was okay, said Penner, whose grandfather served in the Navy during World War II. Penner also called the Marines family that he evacuated from the rooftop. He was my best friend, and I wanted to talk to them, said Penner before trailing o. e relationship between Marines and their corpsmen was further demonstrated as a large number of Marines attended the ceremony including Maj. Gen. Raymond Fox, commanding general, II Marine Expeditionary Force. e relationship the Marine Corps has had with corpsmen for a long time is what saves a lot of Marines, and [Marines] cherish that relationship incredibly, said Fox. Every one of us should aspire to do what he did when called upon. After returning from Afghanistan, Penner received orders to NHP where he currently works in the Emergency Department. Initially, Penner planned on fullling his current enlistment and then leaving the Navy, but Silver Star for corpsmanNavy photo by Jason BortzHospital Corpsman 3rd Class Zackery Penner, assigned to Naval Hospital Pensacola, is awarded the Silver Star by Major Gen. Raymond Fox, commanding general of II Marine Expeditionary Force. See Corpsman, Page 11 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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Its that time of year to celebrate children. Morale, Welfare and Recreation will be hosting Kidsfest at Under the Pines Park 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 12. Demonstrations by Kings Bay Tae Kwon Do and Crooked River State Park plus face painting, arts and crafts, a photo booth, games, glitter tattoos, a traceless train, music and more. A Fun Zone will be open for a $3 entry of unlimited use with lots of inatables, rock wall and halo jumpers. Food will be available for purchase by Dominos and Chick-l-a. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Pirate Family Adventure Race Have you heard of the Great Race? is is better, me hearties! Register for free at Kidsfest at 11 a.m. is is a family scavenger hunt event with challenges e details are secret. Call (912) 573-8972 for a few hints. e only requirement is one electronic device capable of taking snapshots, such as an iPhone, Android, tablets or camera. Happy Easter from Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 1 to 8 p.m. April 20, enjoy bowling with family and friends when all games are 50 and shoe rentals are $2.50 per person. For more information, call R-N-R lanes at (912) 573-9492. White Water Adventure Weekend Navy Advencures Unleased Kings Bay is going to National Whitewater Center in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Friday. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55(liberty) and optional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www. usnwc.org/memorial-day-trail-races. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Rafting, Mega Jump plus Memorial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All participants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting is April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 4091611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Movie Under the Stars At dusk, approximately 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing Walking with Dinosaurs (rated PG). Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor theatre. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and user-friendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and bev erages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Just for kids Periscope file photoMorale, Welfare and Recreations Kidsfest is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12 at Under The Pines Park. MWRs Kidsfest set for April 12 being stateside has given him a new perspective. e stress of working in the emergency room does not compare to the stress of combat, Penner said. Being stationed at a hospital stateside is a lot calmer. Penner is taking college classes and is now planning on continuing his career in the Navy. He is considering the Medical Enlisted Com missioning Program and hopes to eventually receive orders to a naval hospital in California to be closer to his family. When asked about how he felt about receiving the Silver Star, Penner replied, Its humbling. I was in the right place at the wrong time, but any of the Marines would have done the same thing.CorpsmanFrom Page 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press ServiceSince the founding of the Marine Corps in 1775, Marines have answered the nations call, faithfully protecting the American people and maintaining a world-class standard of military excellence, the Marine Corps commandant said March 25. Nothing has changed. We will continue to do the same in the future, Gen. James F. Amos said at a hearing of the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee. e nation is now at a strategic inection point, he said. After 12 years of war, we are drawing down our forces in Afghanistan, resetting our institution and reawakening the soul of our Corps, Amos said. At the same time, scal uncertainty threatens the Corps capacity and capabilities and forces it to sacrice long-term health for near-term readiness, the commandant said. Despite these challenges, Amos said, he remains committed to fueling the most capable and ready Marine Corps that the nation is willing to pay for. Individual Marines are the Corps greatest asset, he said. Our unique role as Americas signature crisis response force is grounded in the legendary character and warghting ethos of our people, the general said. As the Marine Corps resets and prepares for future battles, Amos said, all Marines are rededicating themselves to four timeless attributes: persistent discipline; faithful obedience to orders and instruc tions; concerned and engaged leader ship 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and strict adherence to established standards. ese characteristics, he said, are what carried Marines across French wheat elds and into German machine guns at Belleau Wood in World War I. And, the commandant continued, in World War II, the same attributes allowed combat-inexperienced young Marines to succeed against a determined enemy in the attack on Guadalcanal. And lastly, he said, these enduring strengths of char acter and courage enabled Marines to carry the day in an Iraqi town named Fal lujah, and against a deter mined enemy in the Taliban strongholds of Marjah and Sangin. ese ironclad imperatives have dened our Corps for 238 years, Amos said. ey will serve us well in the decades to come. While about 30,000 Marines are deployed around the world, promoting peace, protecting the nations interests and secur ing its defense, the com Navy photo by John F. WilliamsCarol Armstrong, ships sponsor for the Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research research vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27), breaks a bottle across bow during a christening ceremony at Dakota Creek Industries, Inc., shipyard in Anacortes, Wash. Neil Armstrong christened By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval Research Public AffairsChief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder joined family members of the late Neil Armstrong March 29 to christen the Navys newest research ship, named for the legendary astronaut and rst man to walk on the moon. e lead Auxiliary General Oceanographic Research (AGOR) ship in its class, the research vessel Neil Armstrong (AGOR 27) began construction in 2012 and will be delivered to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in January 2015 to continue studies in the Atlantic, western Pacic and Indian ocean regions. I cant think of a better name to go on the side of a ship designed for exploration and discovery, Klunder said. R/V Neil Armstrong will play a pivotal role in teaching the Navy about the ocean so we can more eectively plan our operations around the world. e Navy, through the Oce of Naval Research, has been a leader in building and providing large ships for the nations academic research eet since World War II. e newest addition to the eet, R/V Neil Armstrong will replace R/V Knorr (AGOR 15), which will be retired at the end of the year after nearly half a century of service. R/V Knorr was launched during the same decade as President Kennedys vow to put a man on the moon and the famed Apollo 11 mission that fullled that vision. It is best known for carrying researchers on the 1985 expedition that resulted in discovery of the Titanic. In all, R/V Knorr has traveled more than a million miles-about the same distance as two trips to the moon and back. Now the R/V Neil Armstrong will provide a continuum of exploration for the next 50 years, said Carol Armstrong, the astronauts widow and sponsor of the ship. e new ship is 238 feet long and equipped with the latest technologies, including a high-eciency diesel engine, emission control for stack gasses, information technology tools for monitoring shipboard systems and communicating with the world, and hull coatings that should result in fewer maintenance issues. It will operate with a crew of 20 with accommodations for 24 scientists who will use the ship and its assets to collect samples and data from both coastal and deep ocean areas. In addition to ocials from ONR, the christening at the Dakota Creek Industries, Inc. shipyard in Anacortes, Wash., was attended by the oceanographer of the Navy and representatives from the secretary of the Navys oce. Kali Armstrong, the late astronauts granddaughter, was maid of honor. Armstrong By Joseph BattistaNaval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Ship System Engineering Station Public AffairsEngineers from the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Ship System Engineering Station completed the rst submarine communications cable test at the newly constructed Tow Cable Test Site, Naval Sea Systems Command announced March 27. e new facility provides the Navy the capability to test and evaluate prototype synthetic and steel electrical, optical, and mechanical cables used in submarine communications systems. e site can also be used to test other systems like towed arrays, mast antenna cables and remote operated vehicle cables. is test site will allow us to learn more about the tow cable in order to develop better designs for our submarine force, said Jason Delisser, electrical engineer with Antenna Engineering and Sail Systems Branch, who oversaw the construction of the test site. e ultimate goal is to signicantly improve system reliability and the test site will allow us to understand how and why the cable fails during operation so that we can design out the most common failure modes. e TCTS was funded by the Navys Program Executive Oce for Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence as part of a Lean Six Sigma initiative to increase system reliability. Similar testing was previously conducted by private industry and this capability will reduce costs, test and other lead times, as well as reduce dependence on outside contracting. e TCTS incorporates two separate test xtures. e rst xture is a tension test xture capable of simulating loads up to 25,000 pounds. is test xture is primarily used to assess the tensile properties of the cable, including breaking strength, cable strain and torque balance. e second xture is a Bend Over Sheave fatigue test xture. is xture uses a beltdriven actuator to drive a tow cable around a set of two xed sheaves while under tension in order to assess the bending fatigue life of a cable. e bending fatigue life can often be the most important determinant for the expected lifecycle of a cable design. During all mechanical testing the cable core is connected electrically to a dielectric analyzer, and optically to a ber spectrometer and light source. e dielectric analyzer measures the insulation resistance and continuity of the electrical lines, and the ber spectrometer measures the continuity of up to two ber optic lines. Understanding the relationship between the structural component of the cable and the cable core is critical in tow cable design. One of the most important design aspects for this site was the requirement for safe operation. Delisser recognized this early on. We realized that applying high tensions at a fast rate could create potentially dangerous situations for the test operators if all safety measures werent incorporated in our design. e test site is congured with multiple levels of safety including structural guards against cable whipping, multiple emergency stops and a control system that prohibits operation of any mechanical equipment if the test area is not secured. e test site also utilizes solenoid locks on the gates to further prevent access to the test area during testing or if power is unexpectedly lost. In addition, eight cameras are stationed within the test area in order to allow test operators to safely set-up and perform testing without entering the test area. e Ship Systems Engineering Station, Philadelphia is a major component of Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. It is the Navys principal test and evaluation station and in-service engineering agent for all hull, mechanical and electrical ship systems and equipment and has the capability to test and engineer the full range of shipboard systems and equipment from full-scale propulsion systems to digital controls and electric power systems.New site tests sub cables Navy photo by PAO Joseph Battista The Tow Cable Test Site incorporates two separate test fixtures. Foreground, the tension test fixture capable of exciting loads up to 25,000 pounds and the Bend Over Sheave fatigue test fixture, which utilizes a belt driven actuator to drive a tow cable around a set of two fixed sheaves. AmosMarines Amos: Well do same with lessSee Marines, Page 13

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13 By Adriana SalasArmy News ServiceWhite Sands Missile Range hosted about 6,200 participants during this years 25th annual Bataan Memorial Death March on March 23. e march honors the American and Filipino Soldiers who were surrendered to Japanese Forces during World War II. As prisoners of war, the Soldiers had to endure a death march the length of almost three marathons and a ride on a hell ship with little to no room to breathe. Participants have on option of taking on the entire 26.2 mile of mountain terrain, or the honorary 14.2 mile course, or if youre 96-year-old Bataan POW Col. Ben Skardon, an honorary eight and a half mile march. Tyranny and oppression do not have a place in the modern world. rough your actions we make sure that our nation never forgets, said Maj. Gen. Gwen Bingham, White Sands Missile Range commander, prior to starting her honorary march. e march begins with the participants shaking the hands of the survivors who attend the event. is year, 13 survivors attended. Skardon participated in his seventh personal honorary march. He started to march when he rst attended the event at 90-years-old and has since created a large following who aectionately call themselves Bens Brigade. is is a once in a lifetime experience that Ill carry with me for the rest of my life, said Cadet Pvt. Aaron Stoddard, who was asked to watch over Skardon throughout the events. e events, created to honor the lives of the prisoners of war, began on Saturday, where participants heard rst-hand accounts from each of the survivors. is year, a dinner was held to honor the survivors the Friday before the march. Survivors were also intermittently present during registration to sign memorabilia from the march. Aside from honoring the prisoners of war, family members who lost a Soldier during the encampment also nd it a good way to pay tribute. One of those is 71-yearold Joe Brown, who never met his father, Warrant Ocer Charles D. Brown, who died on a hell ship. Since he found the march that pays tribute to his fathers life he has participated in the full marathon for 10 years straight. Brown brought along his son for his journey. My dad made his whole marathon as long as Im able I gure I could go 26 miles, which is only a portion of what he did, Brown said. Some who have no relation to Bataan, attend the event because of what it signies to them. Michael Smith, a Vietnam veteran, his son Joshua, also a veteran, and Joshuas 10-year-old son, Caleb, are all participating in the full marathon. is is Michaels eighth time and Joshuas sixth, this will be Calebs rst. Prior to arriving to White Sands Missile Range, Caleb did research on what happened at Bataan and why the event was held. He did several written reports for school and decided to create a fundraiser to honor the Wounded Warriors. Caleb raised $1,000 in donations. It uplifts my spirits, Josh said. Its important for our kids to get to see the men who made and are currently making these sacrices for us. Others wanted to celebrate a personal accomplishment, like retired White Sands Missile Range employee and retired Soldier Marva Little who was unable to nish the honorary march on her rst attempt two years back due to a concurrent battle with breast cancer. Little returned this year, cancer free, to take on the 14.2 trek and vows to return for the full marathon. I am hard charging and I can do it, Little said. Anyone who knows my character has always used the term strength to describe me. Cadets from the local New Mexico State University, or NMSU, who are usually in charge of a Saturday historical seminar and a water point along the route, also took on the role of acting as aids for the Bataan survivors who attended the event. e cadets are with the survivors from the time they arrive until the survivors depart. If school time interferes, the non-commissioned ocer in charge, Sgt. James Walker takes over in order to allow for the Cadets to focus on school. e overall sponsorship the NMSU ROTC has in the entire event is an awesome thing to me, Walker said. e events ended with a tribute to the survivors and an award ceremony for the march leaders within each division.DoD Photo by Marvin LynchardVietnam War veterans and Medal of Honor recipients, from left, Spc4 Santiago Erevia, Staff Sgt. Melvin Morris and Sfc Jose Rodela get acknowledged from the audience during Valor 24 Hall of Heroes induction ceremony. Soldiers receive medals By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceTwenty-four U.S. Army veterans from three wars World War II, Korea and Vietnam received upgrades to the highest military decoration for uncommon bravery and gallantry at a White House ceremony March 18. President Barack Obama presented posthumous Medals of Honor to family members and representatives of 21 of those Soldiers, and draped the sky-blue ribbon and vepointed star-bearing medals around the necks of the three living veterans from the Vietnam War. Each of the 24 had received a Distinguished Service Cross for the same fearless actions for which they were now receiving long overdue upgrades to the Medal of Honor. is ceremony is 70 years in the making and today, we have the chance to set the record straight, he said, noting that more than a decade ago Congress mandated a review to ensure heroism of veterans wasnt overlooked due to prejudice or discrimination. During that review, the 24 Soldiers Hispanic, Jewish and African American were identied as deserving of the Medal of Honor. is is the length to which America will go to make sure everyone who serves under our proud ag receives the thanks that they deserve, he said. So with each generation, we keep on striving to live up to our ideals of freedom and equality, and to recognize the dignity and patriotism of every person, no matter who they are, what they look like, or how they pray. Obama invited each living Soldier to the stage, one at a time, dressed in uniforms they could have worn in their 20s, but they now were lling out in their 70s with a full complement of ribbons and badges that testied to their skills as young Soldiers. eir citations were read, their Medals of Honor were draped and handshakes exchanged. ese are extraordinary Americans. ey are exemplary Soldiers, the president said. Following the presentation to the three Vietnam veterans, Obama called them all to the stage. Santiago Erevia, Melvin Morris, Jose Rodela in the thick of the ght, all those years ago, for your comrades and your country, you refused to yield, he said. On behalf of a grateful nation, we all want to thank you for inspiring us, then and now, with your strength, your will and your heroic hearts. Sons, daughters, nephews, brothers, wives, friends and representatives of the 21 Soldiers who werent present to receive the long overdue recognition each were called to the stage to hear their Soldiers citation read aloud for a nal time. While some fought tears, others smiled, faintly remembering. en each was presented with a framed citation and Medal of Honor which their Soldiers so deserved. ere was little doubt their Soldiers would never be forgotten again. Ladies and gentlemen, it is very rare where we have the opportunity to reect on the extraordinary courage and patriotism of such a remarkable collection of men, Obama concluded. We are so grateful to them, we are so grateful to their families, it makes us proud and it makes us inspired.Photo by Adriana SalasA Soldier thanks Bataan prisoner of war Ewin Johnson for his service before the start of the march.Death March remembered mandant said, they arent working alone. e Ma rine Corps partnership with the Navy provides the United States with an unmatched naval expeditionary capability, he said. Our relationship with the Navy is a symbiotic one, Amos said. at close relationship is at the heart of the commandants concern over the eects of cuts to the eet and to shipbuilding funds, he said. Americas engagement throughout the future security environment of the next two decades will be naval in character make no mistake, the general said. To be forward-engaged and to be present when it matters most, we need capital ships and those ships need to be loaded with United States Marines. By maintaining a forward presence, the Navy and Marine Corps team can respond immediately when success is measured in hours, not in days, Amos said. e general pledged that even in the scal climate in which it must accomplish its mission going forward, the Marine Corps will step up to the task. We will not do less with less, Amos said. We will do the same with less. MarinesFrom Page 12

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