The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00345


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Full Text

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Birdies for the Brave outreach helps fund homefront groupsBy Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceKnown for its plush landscape and daunting 17th-hole island green, the Professional Golfers Association Tour headquarters here also boasts a ourishing military outreach program for total force military members and their families, the senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said April 15. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia visited Tournament Players Club Sawgrass to meet ocials from Birdies for the Brave, which oers complimentary admission, lessons and more for active duty, Guard and Reserve and retired service members and their families at select PGA Tour, Champions Tour, and Web.com Tour events. John Flaschner, public relations and community outreach director for e PGA Tour and the Tournament Players Club network, said Birdies for the Brave fundraising eorts have benetted nine military homefront groups supported by PGA Tour players. Our entire mission is just to say thank you to military men, women and their families, Flaschner said, adding that in 2012, as part of the Joining Forces initiative, the White House named Birdies for the Brave among the top 20 military-friendly charities in the United States. Pro golfer Phil Mickelson and his wife, Amy, originally created Birdies for the Brave to support troops who suered combat injuries, Flaschner said, noting that Mickelson pledged to the Homes For Our Troops and Special Operations Warrior foundations $100 for each birdie and $500 for each eagle he makes. e PGA Tour has more than 100 tournaments on all three of its tours, including the Web. com Tour for up-and-coming players and the Champions Tour for players over age 50. And Birdies for the Brave is at 32 tournaments out of 45 on the PGA Tour, with a presence of six each on the Web.com and the Champions tours, Flaschner noted. Our goal by 2018 is to have a presence at all of these tournaments, he added. Birdies for the Brave has partnered with organizations such as Operation Shower, a charitable program out of St. Louis that coordinates with base ombudsmen and local stores to set up surprise baby showers for expectant mothers whose spouses are underway or deployed. Donations include cribs, dressers and other necessary baby supplies. Battaglia commended Birdies for the Braves connection of role-model athletes to military veterans and their families. Flaschner said his main motivation is to give back to service members who have committed their lives to freedom and bravery. Whether its mortgage-free home donations to wounded service members and their families or the donation Kings Bays Submarine Ball set for April 26 at Hyatt Regency in JacksonvilleBy MCC John OsborneFor Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Public AffairsMore than 1,000 Sailors, spouses and their guests gathered to celebrate the 114th birthday of the submarine force at e Founders Inn in Virginia Beach, Va., April 12. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will have its ball from 5 p.m. until midnight this Saturday at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Jacksonville. ETC Mitch Steinhauer said tickets are available through Friday. As of Monday nearly 800 personnel have committed to attend, including members of the United States Submarine Veterans and USS Halibuts Veterans Association, Steinhauer said. We are expecting this years Submarine Birthday Ball to be as rich in tradition as any previous years. is year we will be honoring the 50th anniversary of the USS Halibuts nal Regulus Missile Patrol. For tickets to the ball in Jacksonville, contact Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil. e Norfolk celebration paid tribute to the men and women serving the submarine force, their families and all of those who came before them to take on the arduous task of undersea warfare that began when John Holland sold the submersible that would be commissioned USS Holland (SS-1) to the U.S. Navy, April 11, 1900. Vice Adm. Mike Connor, commander, Submarine Force, hosted the event for the Hampton Roads submarine community and introduced the nights keynote speaker, Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Gortney thanked all in attendance for their great service and paid homage to the accomplishments of the submarine force through the years. E-cigs banned indoorsAll tobacco products limited to designated outdoor smoking areasBy Lorri NewmanNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety ManagerWe all are very aware of the hazards of smoking and the health eects to others who breathe in second-hand smoke. Most personnel working or living on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay also aware are that smoking is prohibited indoors and only authorized in designated smoking areas. However, did you know this policy includes the use of any tobacco product; smokeless tobacco and all electronic nicotine delivery systems, for example e-cigarettes, e-pipes, and e-cigars? e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center state in their Frequent Questions about Electronic Cigarettes the following: e current SECNAVINST 5100.13E Tobacco Policy states that all tobacco use is prohibited inside Department of the Navy facilities. All types of tobacco product use (smoking and smokeless) may only be used in the designated tobacco use area. e bottom line is no e-cigarette use inside any building. e Food and Drug Administration and the federal courts have deemed e-cigarettes and other electronic nicotine delivery devices as a tobacco product. Our local instruction, SUBASEINST 5100.2F, Chapter 30, supplemental page for section 3003, states: a. Smoking on board SUBASE Kings Bay is only authorized in designated outdoor smoking areas. b. is instruction refers to all forms of tobacco and its use. is includes regular smoking methods, smokeless tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems. e use of any form of electronic nicotine delivery system (e.g., e-cigarette, e-pipe, and e-Cigar) is governed by this policy as these are considered tobacco products. Be mindful of this policy and only use tobacco products in the designated smoking areas. Up Periscope Whats the saddest song youve heard? Page 9 Lensman MC1 Rex Nelson brings camera to Group 10 Pages 4, 5 Our past History & Heritage Command grows Page 132009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Birdies, Page 7 Birdies for the Brave The nine military homefront groups and their supporting Tour players are: Homes for Our Troops and Special Operations Warrior Foundation: Phil Mickelson Operation Homefront: Corey Pavin Navy SEAL Foundation: Jerry Kelly, Vijay Singh and Frank Lickliter II United Through Reading: Rory Sabbatini Military Warriors Support Foundation: Ted Purdy and David Toms Green Beret Foundation: Bubba Watson K9s for Warriors: David Duval and Bob Duval Norfolk has Sub BallBirdies for the Brave photoBubba Watson shows support for Birdies for the Brave at The Travelers PGA tournament.PGA players chip in for military causesSee Sub Ball, Page 7 EM3 Brandon Perkins and MM2 Robert Raeemacher, the newest submarine-qualified Sailors, joined Adm. Bill Gortney, Vice Adm. Mike Connor and Ek Kracker, the lone WWII submarine veteran in attendance, in cutting the ceremonial Submarine Birthday Ball cake at a celebration honoring 114 years of the submarine force.Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. Barnwell Newman USS Georgia in Diego GarciaThe Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729) is pierside during a crew exchange at Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia. Navy photo MCSN Hank Gettys

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentHeres a reminder from the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department: Move right for sirens and lights. When the Fire Department is called to an emergency it is important that we respond quickly and safely. If you are driving down the road and see the lights and sirens of an emergency vehicle in your rearview mirror, move to the right and stop to allow emergency vehicles to move easily down the road. Once the emergency vehicles have passed merge back into trac when it is safe to begin driving. Every time re engines or aid cars are called to an emergency, re ghters are giving their all to help others. Do your part as a driver to help re ghters do their job as quickly and safely as possible.Gateway Inn traininge Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Manager Training Workshop ReadySet-Grow was April 1 through April 4 at the MWR Magnolia Conference Center, Kings Bay. CNIC, Southeast Region leadership and sta along with NGIS Managers from across the country and overseas locations such as Greece, Japan, and Guam were in attendance. Bruce Grenier, CNIC eet readiness director and Tamara Davis, CNIC Navy Lodging programs director were guest speakers. e workshop covered nancial management, accreditation standards, sales and marketing, leadership and human resources. It culminated in an open forum discussion and case study presentation on April 4. From the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Mail RoomNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays Mail Room gets a great deal of mail addressed to individuals living in Unaccompanied Housing with a Building number and room number. Personal mail is not delivered to UH. Department of Defense Postal Manual, OPNAVINST 5218.7B and SUBASEINST 5218.3B states: Personal mail for personnel living on and o base in private quarters where U.S. Postal Service provides service shall be addressed to their home address. Mail for personnel living in UH, where USPS does not provide service should be addressed to their unit address or box number address in order that it may be handled separately from the activities ocial mail. In order to get mail delivered in a timely manner, members should include their command in their address. is helps the Mail Room get the mail to individuals as quickly as possible. If the Mail Room is unable to determine which command the individual is attached, the mail is returned to the sender. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CommissaryApril is the Month of the Military Child, and commissaries are celebrating with giveaways and savings for the entire family. Children in military households face unique challenges because of the demands of military life, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs sales director. So, at the Defense Commissary Agency, we want to acknowledge them and do all we can to provide their families with great values on quality products they can depend on. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries in April to oer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times. For more, go to www.commissaries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_12_14.cfm Little Heros Commissaries are showcasing fruits, veggies for Little Heroes in April. To honor military children, commissaries have fun ways for parents and their little heroes to learn about the nutritious value of fruits and vegetables. During April, the Month of the Military Child, commissary produce departments are inviting installation child development centers to take tours highlighting the health benets of fruits and vegetables. Commissary store managers can also conduct this presentation at the child development center. Our goal in April is that every store will oer a store tour or presentation at the child development center, said Bridget Bennett, DeCAs produce category manager. We may even have local installation dietitians available to enhance the education about the benets of consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. Tour participants may sample some unique fruits and vegetables, and receive new healthful recipes. For more information, go to www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Commissary customers can check their local commissary to nd out more about fresh produce samples, coupons, giveaways and goodie bags for children participating in the fruits and veggies events. Special savings Commissaries.com oers special savings for military patrons, families Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, www.commissaries.com, to nd information about whats on sale at their local commissary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Sav ings link at www.commissaries. com/partners.cfm to nd more coupons, specials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May. NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Mitch Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipBalfour Beatty Communities is accepting scholarship application from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communities and plan to attend accredited educational/technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www. bbcommunitiesfoundation.org/scholarships. aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Crawfish Fest Friday, Saturdaye Woodbine Crawsh Festival is 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 25 and 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Saturday, April 26 in downtown Woodbine. eres a parade, food, crafts, live entertainment and more. For more information, visit www.woodbinecrawsh.com.Shrimp Festival next weekend e 51st Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival runs ursday, May 1 through Sunday, May 4, in downtown Fernandina Beach, Fla. For more information, visit www.shrimpfestival.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base. Now hear this! Military Child Month promoted Kings Bay Commissary Fire Department issues reminder Potpourri Unaccompanied Housing: no mail Kings Bay Mail Room From Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support CenterKings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center is oering a new and improved educational experience on parenting. is six-session class is facilitated by two licensed clinical social workers, Sallie Galyean, the child counselor and Mary Jenssen, a clinical counselor and FAP case manager. Both of these facilitators have experience working with military families and the common struggles parents encounter. e rotating class schedule allows participants to join at any time, choose a particular class topic to attend, make up a class or take a refresher class throughout the next session cycle. e interactive sessions promote an informal and stimulating educational experience. e following is information regarding each of the class topics: 1, Ages & Stages involves ages and stages of physical and sexual development from birth to age 18. 2, Parenting Styles & Co-parenting discusses parenting styles and coparenting, as well as struggles with divorce, blended and extended families. 3, Child Abuse & Domestic Violence teaches parents about the effects of domestic violence and child abuse on children as well as how to cope and resources to assist families. 4, Dealing with Misbehavior explores the misbehavior of children, why they do what they do and how parents can appropriately respond to negative behavior. 5, Communication: It Goes Both Ways helps parents learn to communicate with their children, spouse and family in a positive way. 6, Structure & Safety covers the benets of routines, ways to help families bond, as well as helpful information to safeguard your family and maintain a healthy home environment. Classes are held at FFSC 9 to 11:30 a.m., Mondays. Each participant will receive a certicate of completion for each session attended. When all six parenting sessions have been attended, the participant receives a certicate for completion for the course. ere is so much valuable information in this class, but you wont know until you sign up. Call FFSC at 573-4512 and ask to sign up for the next Parenting Class, or ask to speak with one of the facilitators who can provide you with more details. FFSC oers new Parenting Class Kings Bay FFSC

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By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White will receive the Medal of Honor during a May 13 ceremony at the White House, President Obama announced, April 15. e 27-year-old Seattle native will become the seventh living recipient of the nations highest military decoration for conspicuous gallantry and valor during actions in Iraq or Afghanistan. White will receive the Medal of Honor for his disregard of his own life while trying to save the lives of a Marine and two fellow Soldiers after his team of 14 U.S. Soldiers and squad of Afghan National Army soldiers were set up and ambushed by a much larger and more heavily armed Taliban force, who engaged in a three-prong attack from elevated ground. On Nov. 8, 2007, Soldiers of 1st Platoon, Chosen Com pany, 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry Regi ment, 173 Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) Sky Soldiers, left Combat Outpost Bella by foot to visit the large village of Aranas, Afghanistan, for a Shura meeting with village elders. e American Soldiers werent thrilled about the mission because the villagers had been suspected of collusion in a major attack months earlier on Combat Outpost Ranch House, which resulted in 11 wounded and the closure of the outpost. At daybreak, Nov. 9, the group pre pared for the late morning meeting at the mosque, but villagers delayed the get-together, say ing the elders were praying for several hours. e meeting was put o. e lone Marine and embedded training team member Sgt. Phillip A. Bocks then advised platoon leader 1st Lt. Matthew C. Ferrara, it was best to leave the area. ere was one shot, you know, down into the valley, and then it was two shots, and then it was full-automatic re and RPGs (rocket-propelled grenades) ... it was coming from multiple directions, White remembered. Carrying a fully-automatic M4A1, White emptied his 30-round magazine, then loaded another, but he didnt get a chance to re. An RPG hit right behind my head and knocked me unconscious ... it was just lights out ... when I woke up, I was face-down on a rock, he said, recalling that as he was awakening, an enemy round fragmented near his head sending a shower of broken rock chips and debris into the side of his face. More shots, more booms, more chaos ... then White realized 10 of the 14-man American element and the ANA soldiers were gone. With no cover, the remainder of the patrol had been forced to slide more than 150 feet down the side of a rocky cli. e only ones remaining up top were Spc. Kain Schilling, Ferrara, Bocks, the interpreter and White. White looked around and saw Schilling had been shot in the and was dodging and weaving and running toward the cover of shrubs and the umbrella canopy of a single prickly tree. White made for the tree, which provided just enough shade to make the two nearly invisible. White pulled out a tourniquet and asked Schilling, who was grimacing with pain, if he could apply it. White could see where the bullet entered and the blood was owing from, so he slipped the tourniquet on and instead of cranking down too hard, White said he tightened it just enough to stop the bleeding. As I was working on him, I had the radio on, then I Army paratrooper earns top medal White See White, Page 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Shayne Campbell gives a thumbs up signal ing safe to launch an F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Knighthawks of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Six (VFA-136) aboard Washington. Airman George Henry cleans the window covering the Pilot Landing Air Television camera aboard Washington. The best of Submarine Group Tens MC1 Rex NelsonThe Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 7 following routine operations. New to Kings Bay, here are some photos MC1 Rex Nelson took at his previous commands. Airman Jennifer Varney and Airman Patrick Tabor conduct routine maintenance on one of four arresting wire systems on the flight deck aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73).Storekeeper 3rd Class Larry Jones holds his baby for the first time after returning to Norfolk aboard Washington. An F/A-18E Superhornet prepares to make a landing on Washington.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5 Nelson watches an F-14B Tomcat assigned to Carrier Air Wing Seven launch off the flight deck aboard Washington.Navy photo by PHAN Joan KretschmerCrewmembers assigned to Washington visit the guided mis sile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) to fire an M-60 rifle from the bridge during a training exercise. Crewmembers assigned to the Deck Department lower a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat during a man overboard drill aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf. Above, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Benjamin Adams signals to flight deck personnel onboard Washington. Right, crew members from USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) operate a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) to pick up Sailors and mail for transport from Washington. USS George Washington (CVN 73) Sailors enjoy snorkeling off the coast of St. Maarten, one of the many tours offered by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, during Washingtons port visit.

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Im honored to be here celebrating your history and your future, Gortney said. Its good to see all the men and women here tonight that make the submarine force potent. I am in awe of your community. It took the boldness of a submariner to lead us to victory in the Pacic and bold commanding ocers to bravely take on our adversaries in that challenging time. You were the rst to bring the Navy into the nuclear age, silently doing your duty while impacting diplomacy during the Cold War. You tracked Soviet Fleets and deterred them from attacking our great nation. e Navy could not accomplish our mission without the presence you provide. You are a key piece of our weapon system. You are everywhere, always working behind the scenes and below the surface. We have the most formidable undersea warfare system in the world. e theme of this years Submarine Birthday Ball in Virginia Beach was Celebrating 114 Years of Partnerships for Undersea Dominance. Gortney addressed the importance of that theme to the continued success of the Navy and the nation, and then reminded everyone in uniform that their families personify that theme every day with their support and devotion. When we deploy, we do so in concert, ghting together. We can take the best of our respective communities and link them to accomplish our mission as the United States Navy. When our nation calls us to action, our interoperability will be our saving grace. It is our force multiplier. As I look out at this room, I see a legacy of excellence and a future full of potential and accomplishment. No matter what rank you hold, youre making a dierence and keeping our nation safe. I know that when you are called upon not one of you will miss a beat in defeating our adversaries. We are the greatest ghting force in the history of civilization and that ghting force has a not-so-secret weapon and that is our families. I want to thank those of you who enable our service. We know our families are the very stitches that hold the cloth of our nation together. It is because of you that we are able to follow our passion. For what you do today and will do in the future, I thank you. Over the years, a total of 63 U.S. submarines have been lost in war and peace, and some 4,000 young men have lost their lives serving on those submarines. e traditional tolling of the boats honoring all fallen submarines and their crews was captured in an awe-inspiring video. Force Master Chief Wes Koshoer, master of ceremonies and force master chief, Commander, Submarine Forces, then had the honor of announcing the traditional cake cutting. It is a tradition at each submarine birthday ball that the senior and junior qualied submariners in attendance conduct the cake cutting, Koshoer said. Submariners are extremely proud of the high level of knowledge, skill and reliability required for submarine qualication. ose of us who have earned dolphins, gold and silver, look back with pride on the occasion which signied that we had acquired the required skills and joined the submarine brotherhood. EM3 Brandon Perkins of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) and MM2 Robert Raeemacher from the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Albany (SSN 753), were announced as the newest submarine qualied Sailors. ey joined Gortney, Connor and Ed Kracker, the lone WWII submarine veteran in attendance who qualied on the Balaoclass submarine USS Bang (SS 385) in 1944, in cutting the ceremonial submarine ball cake. A fun few hours of dancing and celebration that transcended rank and rating closed out the evening and left with it the indelible mark of the submarine force that has been on scene and unseen for 114 years. Sailors march on the 18th fairway during Military Appreciation Day at the 2009 The Players Championship golf tournament at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. This years tournament is scheduled for May 6 to 11.Navy photo Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. BarnwellSailors and their spouses took to the dance floor at Submarine Force Atlantics 114th Submarine Birthday Ball at The Founders Inn in Virginia Beach, Va., April 12. Sub BallFrom Page 1Its not just the Earth getting hot by more of the suns rays. Its not just the flowers blooming Its getting outdoors more, and playing with the kids. Youth sports starting. T-Ball and Soccer is in full swing. Get the bikes and balls out of the garage. Get the swimming pool toys ready. Take a moment and enjoy the changes on base. What is spring like on base? Photo and copy by EM1 Mark Treen of service dogs to veterans suering from post-traumat ic stress disorder, our fund-raising events have raised more than $13 million for military homefront charities that directly benet military members and their fami lies, Flaschner said. And to see their gratitude for us when theyve given so much is just overwhelming.BirdiesFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7

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Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Anna AlbrechtVolunteers from the North County Chief Petty Officer Association stand on the deck of the USS Iowa in Los Angeles, March 15. The volunteers spent the morning restoring the ships interior. Sailors restore USS Iowa By Lance Cpl. Caitlin BevelI Marine Expeditionary ForceMembers of the North County Petty Ocer Association volunteered for preservation work aboard the USS Iowa in Long Beach, Calif., March 15. e USS Iowa, built in 1940, was commissioned to active service for 50 years. It represented the United States in World War II, the Korean conict and other combat situations until its decommissioning in 1990. e ship also hosted more U.S. presidents than any other battleship. Master Chief Petty Ofcer Michael Smith and other members of the North County Petty Ocer Association worked to restore one of this historic warships sleeping areas to prepare for a program that will allow groups from within the community to spend the night aboard ship. What were doing here today is were preparing this berthing space for occupancy for the overnight program, said Senior Chief Petty Ocer Dave Bennett, president of the North County Chief Petty Ocer Association. We saw this as an opportunity for us to come up here and give back. e Iowa is a national treasure. e crews of many historic battleships included both Sailors and Marines. e USS Iowa and other ships of its class have a single turret of ve-inch guns traditionally manned by Marines in combat. Bennett said he is looking forward to the opportunity to use this ship to teach service members about the history and traditions of their branches. is opens up opportunities for us in the future, for the Navy and the Marine Corps, because we can also come up here and do heritage training, Bennett said. As chief petty ocers, thats one of our charges is to be stewards of that naval history and heritage. e USS Iowas operations director, Dan Pawloski, witnessed rst hand how much the volunteer work means to people who visit the ship. Veteran and former USS Iowa crewmember, Brian Moss, helped bring the ship to Long Beach. Mosss reaction when he boarded the ship after it was relocated made a lasting impression on Pawloski. He personally came up, shed a tear, said Dan, thank you for being a part of bringing the ship down here. You and the whole team and gave a hug and then a salute. It was great to feel that and thats why we do it, said Pawloski. e USS Iowa is open to the public for tours including scavenger hunts for children, information on the weapons and armor used on the ship, and insight into what life aboard the ship was like for enlisted and ocers. After 30 years working in commercial construction, Pawloski started out as a volunteer aboard the USS Iowa. Now, groups like the North County Petty Ocer Association help him to keep this piece of history alive. rolled over and sat next to Schilling just to take my pack o, thats when I got that metallic taste, then that burning in my lungs, White said, adding that he and Kain covered their mouths with their shirts to lter whatever it was. Initially, I thought we were the rst unlucky bastards to have chemical weapons on us ... thats what we thought initially, but then I saw a stream of smoke over my shoulder and I realized my pack was smoldering it was the battery from my radio burning up, he said. White checked his radio, but it was out of the ght. en White saw Bocks, who was badly wounded, lying out in the open, about 30 feet from the shade of the tree. He began encouraging the Marine to use all the strength he could, but Bocks couldnt make any progress. I knew he needed help and there was a lot of re coming in, but it really didnt matter at that point, but by then I already had known, well, were not gonna make it through this one; its just a matter of time before Im dead, White said. I gured, if thats going to happen, I might as well help someone while I can. White sprinted the 30 feet to Bocks as rounds skipped around his feet and snapped past his head, but he made it to Bocks un scathed, but remembered thinking, his wounds were severe. He looked over at Schilling and yelled at the interpreter to attend to the Soldier, but the interpreter was pinned down and couldnt move. At that time, I can re member thinking he wasnt going to make it, but I knew I wasnt going to stop trying, White said. No matter what the out come, Im going to do what I can with what I have. White grabbed the buddy carry handle on the back of Bocks vest and began pulling the 200-pound plus Marine under cover. White saw that Bocks leg was bleeding badly, so he grabbed another tourniquet out of his pack, slipped it around Bocks leg and tightened down until the bleeding stopped. Next he tore Bocks shirt open, saw another wound, but it wasnt until he rolled him over that he saw the large exit wound. Stop the bleeding is all he thought as he stued bandages, clothing, whatever he could to stop the bleeding. No matter what White did, the bleeding wasnt stopping and the Marine succumbed to his wounds. No sooner had White realized Bocks had passed away than he looked over to see Schilling get hit again by small-arms re, this time in the left leg. White scrambled to Schilling. Out of tourniquets, White pulled his belt from his uniform and looped it around Schillings leg. Hey man, this is going to hurt, White said to Schilling, who replied, Just do it! So, I put my foot on his leg and pulled the belt as hard as I could until the bleeding stopped, White recalled. White next looked around for the lieutenant and noticed his platoon leader, Ferrara, was lying still, face-down on the trail. Again, White exposed himself to re, this time crawling to Ferraras position. e lieutenant was dead, so White moved back to Schilling where he began to use Schillings radio until an enemy round zipped right through the hand-mic blowing it out of his hand. Now two radios had been destroyed. e paratrooper moved to Bocks and found that his radio was still operational, so he established communication with friendly elements and rendered a situation report. He understood the situation well enough that he was able to bring in mortars, artillery, air strikes and helicopter gun runs to keep the enemy from massing on friendly positions. I heard a hiss, just a second of a hiss and then a big, big explosion and that one brought me to my knees, he said. It scrambled my brains a little bit. at was concussion No. 2 for the day, caused by a friendly 120-mm mortar round that fell a little short of its target. After nightfall, White began giving the interpreter commands to relay to the Afghan National Army soldiers to establish themselves as a security perimeter. MedEvac was still a few hours away. While trying to keep Schilling from falling asleep, White battled his own multiple concussions. He knew if he passed out, the helicopters wouldnt be able to nd them or the two wounded Afghan National Army soldiers who White had also treated. Eventually, White marked the landing zone and assisted the ight medic in hoisting the wounded into the helicopter. Only after all wounded were o the trail did White allow himself to be evacuated. White separated from the Army on July 8, 2011, and used his G.I. Bill to attend the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, from which he received a bachelors degree. Today, he works as an investment analyst at e Royal Bank of Canada in Charlotte. Schilling who was shot twice, credits White with saving his life. He said before White patched him up with two tourniquets, he didnt think he had a chance of getting out of the ambush. Today, hes well and serves as a security ocer in Palo, Iowa.WhiteFrom Page 3 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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The first sad song I remember hearing was Bobby Goldboros Honey, some 45 years ago. It was sad then, but today I laugh at it because its so con trived. He just tries too hard. But there is one song that makes me weep in my beer instantly. Its All My Rowdy Friends Have Settled Down by Hank Williams Jr. I guess I empathize with Bocephus because that really happened to me, too. I need to hook up with that cat so we can get over it. Unless, of course, hes settled down now too.Whats the saddest song youve ever heard?Mallorie Hilley Family member Orange Park, Fla. Im Already There by Lonestar. Its about a hus band whos gone and his wife misses him, but hes there in spirit. Lance Cpl. Gary Shoemaker Security Force Battalion Belleville, Ill. He Stopped Loving Her Today by George Jones. Even though theyre sepa rated, he had so much love for her that it brought them both to death. LSSA Randy Harris USS Florida Blue Albany, Ga. One of my sad songs is Smokey Robinsons Really Gonna Miss You. He sang it at the funeral of one of the Temptations. Lt. j.g. Michael Adcock USS Rhode Island Gold Maumelle, Ark. I cant even talk about it because its too sad. MA3 Ben Huber Security Force Battalion Murfreesboro, Tenn. Its called Miles Away by Memphis May Fire. Its about a man having to pack up all his things and leave his wife. Lance Cpl. Cody Henry Security Force Battalion Houston Id probably have to say Remember Everything by Five Finger Death Punch. Its about a man who basically is apologizing to everyone in his life for things hes done. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Marine Corps photoSelf-healing paint could halt rust on military vehicles.New paint may stop rust By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval ResearchA new additive could help military vehicles, including the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, heal like human skin and avoid costly maintenance as a result of corrosion. Developed by e Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in partnership with the Oce of Naval Research, polybroblast allows scratches forming in vehicle paint to scar and heal before the eects of corrosion ever reach the metal beneath. Corrosion costs the Department of the Navy billions of dollars each year, said Marine Capt. Frank Furman, who manages logistics research programs for ONRs Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department. is technology could cut maintenance costs, and, more importantly, it could increase the time vehicles are out in the eld with our Marines. Polybroblast is a powder that can be added to commercial-off-the-shelf paint primers. It is made up of microscopic polymer spheres lled with an oily liquid. When scratched, resin from the broken capsules forms a waxy, water-repellant coating across the exposed steel that protects against corrosion. While many self-healing See Paint, Page 15 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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By Sgt. Maj. Justin LeHewMarine Corps Base Quantico Last year, on March 23, I had the incredible honor of being one of only a handful of active duty Marines to participate in the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Death March held at White Sands Missile Range near Alamorgordo, N.M. e 26.2-mile event is conducted annually in honor of the individu als who survived, and those who gave their lives during the barbaric death march at the hands of the Japanese on the Bataan Peninsula in 1942. Of the 6,200 participants who began the march at 7 a.m. on a cold and extremely windy desert morning, fewer than 20 were uniformed active duty or reserve Marines. Most were aliated with the Army or Air Force with a spattering of Navy and Coast Guard personnel as well. ere were foreign militaries represented. ROTC units from around the nation were present. A lot of the participants were civilians. ere was a strong civilian Marine showing at the event and I could always count on a shout of Oohrah! or Semper Fi! somewhere along the entire route to raise the spirits. e best way to explain the march would be to imagine the Marine Corps, Boston, New York City or Los Angeles marathons, all the same distance at 26.2 miles, but put it in the middle of the desert and tie the theme of it to a historically signicant event in our nations past. Next, add in blazing sun, tall mountains and shifting sand along with vast stretches of open scrub brush trails which transform back into burning sections of pavement for miles at a time all along the course. One section of the course stretches uphill for 10 straight miles and another, even more imposing section is a 3-mile long, 6-inch deep sand pit that is all uphill as well. en, after you take all of that in, nally, military category participants run the course wearing a full military combat uniform, boots, pack along with battle gear and you have the Bataan Memorial Death March. is is denitely not an event that for the weak of heart, spirit, mind or body. I embarked on the journey to run this course years ago, but as with everything in life, competing interests and more notably, military commitments and deployments always seemed to deter my attempts. Believe me, as a 44-year-old sergeant major running it, at roughly the 12-mile mark, I most certainly wished I attempted this earlier in my career. As the Training and Education Command Sergeant Major for the Marine Corps, I made it my mission to take on this challenge to highlight this event for the rest of the Marine Corps who, for the most part, does not know it even exists. I am most certain that, if more Marines knew about this and understood the historical signicance of this event in the annals of our own history, it would attract more than 20 Marines to represent our Corps. is is an event that was made for Marines and gets to the root of our very ethos and core of who we are as Marines. A notable fact that is largely lost to history is that, of all of the individuals who endured Bataan in 1942, not a single Marine was lost or succumbed to death during the entire forced march into captivity. History records this as testament to the basic training and discipline the Marine Corps instilled in its personnel during this period, the same testament that holds true in creating todays Marines. Our tradition of never leaving a fallen comrade behind can be attributed, in no short part, to the Marines who endured this hellish march more than 72 years ago, carrying their starved and wounded brothers in their arms all along the way, allowing none to fall by the wayside to be executed by the Japanese. at is the major drawing force to participate in this event is to honor that legacy. at, above all else, is the major dierence in all other marathon events of this distance. To know you are marching to honor and ensure that the sacrices of so many who came before you are not forgotten. From the moment the cannons re to announce that the march has begun, to the hundreds of people encircling the nish line 26.2 miles later who cheer on the participants as they complete the march, every aspect of this race exudes a brother and sisterhood like no other event on this scale. Hundreds of support personnel and volunteers stretch along the entire course, ensuring everything is conducted safely. Unlike the original death march, there are plenty of water stations, sports drinks and fresh fruit along the route. e group however, that is the true rock stars of the event are the Bataan Survivors and veterans who are interspersed throughout the course, providing that boost of motivation needed to go the next mile. Imagining the horrors these men endured at the hands of their Japanese captors during the march and their subsequent time in captivity during the remainder of the war was all the motivation needed to know that, no matter how you physically or mentally felt throughout this day, it paled in comparison to what these men endured. e Greatest Generation, indeed. As Marines, we can never forget the sacrices of those who have gone before and built the legacy that we proudly carry on today. A scant 26.2 miles and several hours later it was all over. e sense of pride and honor in accomplishment I felt as I crossed the nish line was only bested by the sound of someone yelling Sgt. Maj. LeHew! Its me, Doc! National ArchivesThis picture, captured from the Japanese, shows American prisoners using improvised litters to carry those of their comrades who, from the lack of food or water on the march from Bataan, fell along the road. By Cpl. Samuel EllisMarine Corps Base Quanticoe Chosin Reservoir didnt stop him from nishing a 15-year Marine Corps career, and the fact that he is 82-years-old is not holding him back from participating in two Marine Corps Marathon events this year. Richard Ferry, a mustang veteran and one of the few and proud to survive the 1950s frozen battleeld of Koreas Chosin Reservoir, ran the rst of his two 82-year-old in run Marine Corps photoMarines on march from Frozen Chosen.Corps Sgt. Major takes part in Death March Run LeHew See Ferry, Page 13 See LeHew, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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Navy Adventures Unleased Kings Bay is having a White Water Adventure Weekend at National Whitewater Center (www.usnwc.org) in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Friday. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55 (liberty) and optional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www.usnwc.org/memorial-day-trailraces. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Rafting, Mega Jump plus Memorial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All participants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting was April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-NRoll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meat balls 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Sat urday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a par ent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 5734548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack pro vided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call NAU plans adventure Just for kids MWR Intramural Sports photoThe USS Florida soccer team which finished second in the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Intramural Sports Spring 7v7 league. From left, front, are team mem bers STS3 Carver Wiggins, ET3 Chase Newell, Lt. j.g. Ryan Veatch, TM2 Justin Nicholson, Lt. j.g. Erin Barfield, MM2 Tim McColly; back, Lt. Leon Platt, Lt. j.g. Jeff Weatherspoon, Lt. j.g. James Kusel, STS2 Mark Nicholson, STS3 Cuauhtemoc Navavaldez, MT2 Derek Cunningham, ETC Brian Moore, MM3 Jon Barras and STS2 Adam Coleman. Not pictured were MT1 Samuel Lovelace and TMC Jeremy Appleby. MWR Intramural Sports photoThe Marine Corps Security Force Battalion soccer team Danger Zone finished first in the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Intramural Sports Spring 7v7 league. Pictured are team members, front, from left, MASN Eric Grand, MA3 Jonathan Gonzales, Luis Vallejo and MA2 Oral Plummer. Back, from left, Kevin Head, MA3 Michael LeFloch, MA3 Daniel Anderson, MA2 Jeremy Whittaker, HM3 Gary Brown and Kirk Murray. Coed 12-inch Softball1, Angry Birds 2, Shop 38 3, Smoking Bases 4, SoftballBusters 5, WildcatsMens 12-inch Softball1, JCs Crew 2, West Virginia 3, TTF 4, Shop 38 5, CraigslistAverage Joes BowlingTeam Pins 1, Ray & Ryan 3,640 2, Balls of Steel 3,391 3, B&J Express 3,383 4, Two Cliffs 2,948 5, Spare Us 2,823Upcoming Average Joes Golf signups are still be conducted. Captains meeting was April 23 and play will begin April 30. 4v4 flag football signups are going on. The captains meeting is set for April 30 and play will begin May 5. Intramural Sports Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 5 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 3,640 2, NAS Jax 3,391 3, NASP 3,383 4, Mayport 2,948 5, Key West 2,823 6, NASP Corry 3,640 7, NAVSTA Gitmo 3,391 8, JTF Gitmo 3,383 9, New Orleans 2,948 Individuals Average 1, Dan Blakeslee KB 205.64 2, Leon Platt KB 204.03 3, Kyler Ascue KW 197.04 4, C. Washington NAS J 193.50 5, Rob Daugherty KB 192.94 6, T. Lowrance NAS J 191.90 7, Chris Oglsby NO 191.42 8, Shaun Spitler NAS J 191.33 9, C. Kiwatowsski NASP 186.67 10, Roger Byrd Mayport 185.67 Navy Team Bowling As I turned around I saw a young Navy corpsman running toward me and with a hand clasp, followed by a big hug he said excitedly I knew it was you! For that brief moment, all the pain I was feeling went away and was immediately replaced with the feeling of brotherhood that I mentioned earlier. Im sorry I had to pass you right at the nish line, he said with a smile on his face, but I couldnt let an old guy like you beat me! Yes, Devil Doc, I suppose you did cross the nish line just ahead of me, I said, wearing half the amount of gear and at half my age ... We had a good laugh, wished each other the best and parted ways with smiles on our faces. As I limped away, my body once again feeling every mile of the march, I took solace in the fact that even in age alone, I could be in a position that day to inspire a young man to give a little bit more than he thought he had at the end, just like the survivors of Bataan had done to inspire me. I could barely move in the days following the event. e bottoms of my feet were on re, as were my muscles. My toenails were black and blue, and some had already begun to fall o. Yet, even through all this, the sense of pride in accomplishment in completion of this event was euphoric. More importantly however, was the feeling of pride I had in representing our present day Corps of Marines who by all accounts are just as great as the generations of Marines who have come before. e 26th Annual Bataan Memorial Death March, was March 22. Tragically, however, the survivors of this storied event in history will not. Last year, just four veterans of the march attended. e event was preceded that morning by a nal roll call of men who have given their last full measure over the past year. I was honored to shake the hands of these veterans and watch their eyes light up when they saw a man standing in front of them wearing the full battle uniform of a Marine. ey were honored and remembered. It is in their honor we continue to show the world the indomitable spirit of the Corps. at unbreakable bond we have with all those from our past who have taken up arms to defend this great nation, coupled with the unwavering commitment of present day Marines to continue to do honor by our solemn pledge to Corps and Country. is is the benchmark for all that is still right and good about our nation today and will continue to be the driving force behind our nations success in the future.Photo courtesy of Bataanmarch.comThe Bataan Memorial Death March is run at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. LeHewFrom Page 11 Photo by Adriana SalasA Soldier thanks Bataan prisoner of war Ewin Johnson for his service before the start of the Bataan Death March Run. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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From Naval History and Heritage Commandey are part detective, part researcher, technology-savvy defenders with a smidgen of enforcer. ey are the curators of the collections management division at the Naval History and Heritage Command. e Navy is big on tradition, and with that tradition, comes a collection of items that range from a $4.4 million sterling silver trophy to a simple anksgiving menu from a destroyer during World War II. Some are hand-chosen from decommissioned ships by the curators themselves. Others are donated by those who served the Navy, plucked from a moment in time to inspire people decades later. And some are items found while literally cleaning out the attic. e curators of this collection often joke the last time theyve been caught up with their extensive inventory was after the rst item was donated to the Navy, said head curator Karen France. Concern about the loss of precious items in storage has created an urgency that has been directed by Capt. Henry Hendrix, commander of the Naval History and Heritage Command. NHHC is the keeper of 10,864 reels of microlm and 5.67 terabytes of electronic data, along with 200 million pages documenting history. While the Naval History and Heritage Command has undergone a number of name changes over the years, its mission has not: acquisition, custody, distribution and exhibition of items of historical or patriotic value to the Navy; provide guidance on the preservation and storage of historical material; make those items available to the public and provide maintenance when necessary. e entire collections division is undergoing an artifact baseline reset, which means the sta is going through the collection, item-by-item, to make sure it is correctly cataloged, photographed, inventoried and if necessary, rehoused under the proper conditions, which includes a constant temperature and humidity. It also allows the division to evaluate the collection to determine the condition of the items and whether they should be retained or donated to another organization. With almost no sta for many years, it was all the collections division could do to keep up with items on loan to a variety of museums and organizations in every state in the union, while at the same time storing and cataloging boxes and boxes of items donated from families of former Sailors. Its up to a relatively small sta to keep track of the 595,000 artifacts, of which more than 30,000 are on loan throughout the world. e underwater archeology department alone catalogs more than 17,000 sunken military ships and aircraft around the world. From 2003 to 2009, Frank ompson, collection management division deputy director, and France were the only two collection managers, responsible for a collection of more than 150,000 items. Progress has been made in updating the inventory. Now that they have sta, they have been able to go through more boxes to see what treasures might be mixed in with the plaques and other private donations. People would call us about things in their attic and if we wanted only one item, we would end up taking it all, France laughed. While that certainly contributed to the backlog of items to be cataloged, part of the job is also culling out what doesnt belong, items in poor condition and redundant to the collection. An inspector general report in 2011 determined some artifacts were at risk, items sensitive to temperature and humidity, such as textiles and art, microlm and photographs. e report also suggested the department consolidate where they could, cull the collection and inventory it to get it to the right size, France said. As they catalogue items, many are photographed and displayed on NHHCs Flickr site, since most of the artifacts are not stored at the Washington Navy Yard. Case in point: the sterling silver Spokane Naval Trophy given each year to the Pacic-based ship with the best record in battle eciency. Its currently on display in San Diego. When the trophy was crafted in 1908, it was valued at $10,000. When appraised 100 years later, the value had skyrocketed to $4.4 million. Some of the artifacts come from companies not typically associated with the Navy. One of the items taken o a decommissioned submarine was a 1960 Steinway upright piano. Steinway & Sons contacted the command and offered to restore it if they could display it for a while. e restored piano is now in the submarine mess deck display at the Cold War Museum at the Washington Navy Yard. Other businesses with items in the Navy collection that might surprise a few, France said, include the jewelry companies of Tiany and Bailey, Banks & Biddle. e Chelsea Clock Company of Massachusetts has also had a long history with the Navy, having supplied thousands of clocks for Navy ships over the years, ompson said. When a donated Chelsea clock turned out to be one of the rarer ones due to a low production rate, the company asked if they could restore the clock and then display it to show the companys long and storied history with the Navy. France and ompson both pointed out, in every case, the companies contacted them oering to restore the pieces made by their companies. Its this loaning and borrowing aspect of the job that can often be the most challenging. We have more than 15,000 objects in the loan program, and theres something in every state, ompson said. Complicating the task is the fact that in the past, loans were sometimes not as controlled as they are today. Additionally, agreements sometimes included language that unintentionally complicated matters, mistakenly using the word gift instead of loan, for example. en, when the agreement was revisited years later, its dicult to determine ownership of the artifact. ats when curators turn into sleuths. We are upgrading those records to properly reect a gift from a loan so people who work here after us dont have to deal with this, ompson said. Weve also tightened up the policies so there are no more open-ended loans. If the custodians show they have been good stewards of the artifact, they can continue to hold on to it. MCM races April 12, as he participated in their rst event of the year, the Marine Corps 17.75K. Ferry not only tackled the 11.03 miles of Prince William County, but he ran it while carrying a Chosin Few banner. e [nishing] time doesnt make a dierence, but I want to nish and to cross with that banner ying, Ferry said before the race. I want people to know we [those who served during the Korean conict] are still relevant. We still did something. Ferry started his career with the Marine Corps in August of 1954 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, in Platoon 67. From there, his career took o. Ferry was a sta sergeant, which he earned in only ve years, when his career changed gears. I was an acting rst sergeant when my commission came through in 1954, Ferry said. I then served at Parris Island; [Naval Base Coronado, in] San Diego, for combat cargo school; Quantico, where I taught at e Basic School, and Headquarters Marine Corps, which at that time was located in the Navy Annex. Ferry continued to reminisce about his military experiences as he told of his time in Korea. I was deployed to Inchon and Seoul with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, he said. [While serving in the Chosin Reservoir] I was evacuated on Dec. 5, 1950, to a hospital in Japan. Ferry was awarded two purple hearts re lated to his time in Korea, and he resigned his commission in 1964, as a captain. He is those things that are Marinebased: loyal, detailed and very organized, said David Ferch, Valjean operations manager. Ferrys determination and success didnt end when he hung up his uniform though. e law-school graduate went on to raise six children with his wife of 54 years and now has 16 grandchildren and 4 great-grand children. Currently a resident of Vero Beach, Fla., Ferry also holds a 20-year position as the chief executive ocer of the Valjean Corp. which manufactures topical drugs, perfumes and suncare products. Mr. Ferry devoted his life to his country, was wounded and came back to have a very successful career, said Keron Deaton, Ferrys assistant. He always thinks about his employees and is very compassionate, caring, thoughtful, persistent, generous and cute, she added with a grin in her voice. He is always saying, but Im cute, Deaton said. Its kind of a joke here. Although the cute, workaholic spends as much time as needed in the oce. In his spare time, he likes to run. He has only been running consistently for two years, the white-legged, chatterbox is excited about Saturdays race. Im dedicating this race to Harold Roland, Ferry said. He was very close friend. We were in training together and in port together. F erry, the oldest runner of the 17.75 will be also coming back to the area to run the Historic Half, 13.1-mile race, on May 18.FerryFrom Page 11History and Heritage Command always growing Navy photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordKate Morrand, archeological conservator at the Naval History and Heritage Command, Underwater Archeology Branch, points out the embossing of a twomast ship on a leather wallet to German Embassy Naval Attach Capt. Karl Setzer and his aide, Cmdr. Tobias Vob. The wallet was found by a diver near the wreck of WWII a German U-boat.Navy photo Karen France, Curator with the Naval Historical Center (NHC), examines the World War II battle flag of the destroyer USS Zellars (DD 777) after its recent conservation. The flag, damaged during a 1945 kamikaze attack, was preserved through the efforts of the NHC, USS Zellars Association, and the Stillwater Textile Conservation Studio. Navy photo by MC2 Gina K. MorrissetteMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael D. Stevens visits the Naval History and Heritage Command at the Washington Navy Yard for a guided tour with Capt. Henry J. Hendrix, director of NHHC. Photo courtesy of Mrs. Richard FerryRichard Ferry receives a second purple heart for wounds received in Korea. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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From Defense Media ActivityWith the eet having wrapped up its annual E-5 periodic evaluations and the chief petty ocer selection board eligible list now released, the sta at All Hands Magazine thought now would be a good time to address some common myths about enlisted evaluations. All Hands recently interviewed Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, the eet master chief for manpower, personnel, training and education, to get her thoughts on six evaluation myths. Myth 1: Because this is a Sailors rst evaluation at a new command, he or she should expect to get a P promotion recommendation when ranked against his or her peers. Answer: I would not say that it is a given that any Sailors rst evaluation at a command is automatically going to be a P. I have seen where that is not true. I have seen some rst evaluations be MPs. What I would share though is we have to be practical about it. For instance, you have an RDC coming from Recruit Training Command. eyve been there for three years and theyre a hot runner EP. en they check in to VFA-136 as an AT1, lets say, and theyve only been there for four months. Should that Sailor have the expectation that they get an EP? I dont think they should. I got it that you were an EP at RTC, but youve been here for four months. ere are other Sailors that have been at that command for maybe a year or two and theyre also front runners. So, we have to take that into consideration. e automatic myth is just not true. Are there some commands that use that as a going in for recommendations to the ranking board? Sure. Remember, these are the rst evals these guys are going to get at this command. eyre going to be here for three or four years, and if theyre on a ship, some of the sea intensive ratings are going to be there for ve years. Are we setting that Sailor up? Is he or she going to be able to sustain that hot running [performance] for ve years? We have to take all that into consideration. So, I dont think that its automatic. I think there is a lot of leadership thought that goes into how we rank our Sailors, and I have to trust that the command master chiefs and commanding ocers out there are doing due diligence and really using integrity when they sit down and evaluate their personnel. I believe a board member is going to look at Block 14 and Block 15 and it will tell them right there how long that evaluation period is for. Myth 2: Block 40, the individual trait average, is not as important as the promotion recommendation for a Sailor. Performance trait averages uctuate based on where Sailors are ranked in a summary group, and are not a true reection of a Sailors individual performance. A: Some Sailors may have come to that conclusion because when we take advancement exams, for example, we are not looking at Block 40 for the individual trait average. We are calculating their PMA based on whether they were an EP, MP or P. So, that might be where that myth comes from. But lets talk about [Sailors] taking the E-7 exam and they get to the [CPO] selection board. And Ill tell you what, as a board member Block 40 meant a lot to me. Because I would compare Block 40 to the reporting seniors summary group average, and whether that Sailor was a P, MP or an EP, if they were well above that reporting seniors average I took that into account. at meant a lot to me. So, I think maybe there are two stories there: for calculating your exam score, thats why we use the promotion recommendation. But, now that youre taking that chiefs exam and youre making the board, Im denitely looking at Block 40 to see what your individual trait average is. As we all know, we do make some very junior chief petty ocers seven or eight years. at board member will go back at least ve years. I might see a second class eval. Is Block 40 then going to come into account for me? Absolutely, and Im denitely going to be reading it. Block 40 might not matter today, but is it going to matter in your future? So, lets not discount how important it is to work hard for every single trait. Myth 3: Block 41, assignment recommendations, are essentially meaningless and not taken into account by detailers or selection boards. A: If I have a Sailor that the chain of command does not feel that that individual does not perform at a rate where they would recommend them for a more responsible billet out in the eet, I would be concerned. If the recommendation said None and None, I would be concerned. So, it does matter, and I do think that board members do look at that. at [block] also tells me, if I was a supervisor or LPO, what I am going to challenge that Sailor with for their next job. I know theyre going to want to take on greater responsibility, what am I going to recommend them for; LPO at sea, RDC, instructor duty? But if I see None and None then Im going to be concerned. As petty ocers, when we prepare our brag sheets for our leadership we should be telling them what were interested in also. Let us know what your desires are. However, if I have a Sailor that struggles with physical tness, Im probably not going to recommend them for recruit division commander. We need to make sure that our Sailors are qualied for what were recommending them for. Because were sending them mixed messages when we say theyre recommended for RDC or ag writer and they have some challenges. We need to be brutally honest with our Sailors so that they can aspire to get better. If I tell you that youre a .0 all the time, youre not going to do anything to get better. Myth 4: In order for PO1s to be selected by the CPO selection board, they must have the title LPO listed in Block 29, primary duties, from a deployable command, i.e. ship, squadron, NECC billet, etc. Also, LPOs who change positions from one evaluation cycle to the next, and no longer have the LPO title on their evaluation, should view this change as a detractor. A: In Block 29, each [rating] community has specic expectations of milestones they want their Sailors to reach. If I see an eval from a large command, like an aircraft carrier I know in air department there are dozens of rst class petty ocers. eyre probably not all going to get to be LPOs. e board members understand that. So, Im not going to have LPO in Block 29, but in Block 43 thats where I really get to share information about what that Sailor is really doing. If there are still some leadership roles the Sailor holds that arent LPO, that information should be captured in Block 43. For example, I see that an ABH1 has been aboard USS Carl Vinson for three years and hasnt been an LPO. OK, so Im a little concerned, but when I turn the eval over and read Block 43, that command has done an outstanding job of describing what that Sailor did. Now if Im on a destroyer and I know theres only one PS1 working in admin. If theyre not the LPO Im concerned. Leadership has a responsibility of setting Sailors up for success. e way I do that is by sharing information with them and giving them opportunities. Now, once Ive given someone an opportunity, its their responsibility to capitalize on that opportunity. So, if youre a rst class petty ocer and Im trying to set you up for success and giving you an opportunity, and youre not rising to the challenge, I think I need to be brutally honest with you on that eval. Maybe you just dont have what it takes to be an LPO, and maybe that command is sending the selection board a message. I dont think that just because youre not an LPO youre not going to make chief. ats what Block 43 is for, and thats why commands expand on what that Sailor is doing in whatever billet is listed in Block 29. Myth 5: Having a comment such as Performing as an EP Sailor in Block 43 is just as strong as getting an EP promotion recommendation in Block 45. A: I think this is very important. Sometimes you have a rst class mess thats hitting on all cyl inder s. Someones going to get a promotable and theyre really an EP. ats when I see that statement and it sends a message to the board to say Dont even look at that P promotion recommendation. Let me talk about this EP Sailor, and he performs at a much higher level than I can give him credit for. When a commanding ocer, department head or department LCPO is using a line like that, they mean what theyre saying and sending a strong message to the board. Myth 6: Sailors do not get promoted with P promotion recommendations, especially if the evaluations are below a reporting seniors summary group average. A: I dont think thats a myth. at type of eval is also sending the board a message. Youre not only saying that this Sailor is a P, but also that they are below the reporting seniors summary group average. So, lets say that the summary group average is 4.00. And this Sailor is coming in at 3.17. eres a big dierence between a 3.17 and a 3.86. e 3.86 is very close to the reporting seniors average, so that Sailor I would give him the benet of the doubt. But if that commanding ocer is giving me a 3.17, hes probably telling me something, and that Sailor is probably not ready right now to be promoted. If the myth is Sailors dont get promoted with P promotion recommendations, then that is a myth. Because Ive seen some Ps that were above or at the reporting seniors average get selected. But if youre below the reporting seniors average, then youre probably not doing everything that you need to be doing. My nal thought on this topic is that we should all be familiar with the evaluation instruction, BUPERS Instruction 1610.10C. It is our responsibility to understand what the instruction says, and then guide our evaluation processes accordingly.Six myths about enlisted evaluations debunkedNavy photo by MC3 Jules StobaughFleet Master Chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education April Beldo answers questions from Sailors during a world-wide all-hands call at Defense Media Activity at Fort George G. Meade, Md.Navy photoThen Master Chief April Beldo, then-Command Master Chief of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), compliments Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joel Carlson on his haircut in this 2010 photo. Beldo 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service mem bers wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family SC workshops paints are designed solely for cosmetic purposes, polybroblast is being engineered specically for tactical vehicles used in a variety of extremely harsh environments. We dont care if its pretty, said Dr. Jason Benkoski, senior scientist at the university lab and lead researcher on the project. We only care about preventing corrosion. From rainstorms to sunlight, tactical vehicles face constant corrosion threats from the elements. Corrosion costs the Department of the Navy about $7 billion each year. About $500 million of that is the result of corrosion to Marine Corps ground vehicles, according to the most recent Department of Defense reports. Vehicles transported and stored on ships also are subject to salt spray from the ocean, a leading cause of problems for military hardware. In one laboratory experiment, polybroblast showed it could prevent rusting for six weeks inside a chamber lled with salt fog. We are still looking into how to make this additive even more eective, but initial results like that are encouraging, said Scott Rideout, deputy program manager, Light Tactical Vehicles, Program Executive Ocer Land Systems, which is overseeing continued development on polybroblast for potential use on the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. Carry that out of the lab and into the inventory, and that translates to improved readiness and big savings. e research and development of polybroblast underscores the Marine Corps commitment to be modernized with equipment and logistics that expand expeditionary capability and preserve our ability to operate from the sea as stated in the Marine Corps Vision and Strategy 2025. Development of polybroblast began in 2008 and continued through the succession of three ONR program managers, eventually culminating in promising eld and lab tests and a transition to PEO Land Systems. To go from nothing to deployment in ve years would be quite extraordinary, Benkoski said. is progress has a lot to do with ONRs close relationship with PEO Land Systems and both organizations willingness to let me carry out the research in accordance with our shared vision.PaintFrom Page 9 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Marine statue awaits repairsBy Cpl. Samuel EllisMarine Corps Base Quantico | April 09, 2014A copy of probably one of the most iconic Marine Corps symbols, the monument of the Iwo Jima agraising, sits, as if a guard, at the main gate aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico. When Marines of the Ceremonial Platoon went to change the monuments ag on March 30, 2014, they found cracks in the structure. I would attribute this damage to normal weathering, said John Callaway, Quantico Public Works operations ocer, engineering technician. e cracks are not large, but they need repair so water damage doesnt get in the limestone. Callaway explained that water in the cracks could become ice, which would further damage the structure. Although damaged property typically isnt a positive thing, Elton Rupe, facilities operations specialist, base facilities division, explained that while examining the damage, the inspectors also found other maintenance issues that needed to be addressed. [e statue] shows sign of cracking where some repairs were made several year ago after it was vandalized [in December, 2012], said Rupe. ere are additional cracks including original ones, and a crack in the reattached nger. Looking back on the timeline from the date of discovery to the corrective actions that are being made, Rupe noted the level of professionalism and timeliness displayed in the handling of the case. It went through the proper channels, said Callaway. e damage was found, reported and acted on in a matter of days, said Rupe. Its been discovered and acted on quickly, and we are hoping to have the repairs done as soon as possible. Although a contract package to repair the monument is being developed, there is no set date or cost for completion at this time. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Josue SantoyoCracks line a hand of the Iwo Jima monument aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico. Coast Guard photo by PO1 Bill ColcloughCoast Guard Station New Orleans member Seaman Lyndsey Singer pilots the 45-foot Response Boat Medium on Lake Pontchartrain during a checkBy PO1 Bill ColcloughFrom Coast Guard CompassFor Coast Guardsmen engaged in an active search for people in distress, who may be on the verge of panic, fright or worse, they have to be cool and calm, regardless of the state of seas, the boat or their own mind. Response crews must be ready and capable to take the helm of a Coast Guard boat and pilot it home, even the newest members. In a word, they must be qualied, or as members say, quald, before they are full-edged crewmembers. Known as the check ride, part exam and practical exercise crucible, each crewmember undergoes a series of drills simulating casualties and incidents that can and do occur in the maritime environment. At Coast Guard Station New Orleans, Seaman Lyndsey Singer completed a check ride aboard the stations new 45-foot Response Boat Medium, which features joystick controls on the armrests instead of a traditional steering wheel. Just step into the 45-footers pilothouse and you step into the future. With water jet propulsion, shock-mitigating seats and live-feed monitors of the engine space, you get the feeling you need ight school. is boat almost has joysticks for joysticks. A combination of joystick and tillers control thrust vectoring for maneuvering. I was very nervous. Im still nervous, always nervous to drive the boat, but its a part of the job. e size and the way it handles and getting used to everything, especially when you get aboard, its so overwhelming, said Singer. I am more at ease now driving the boat after the check ride. In addition to driving the boat along a charted course, Singer tracked the location of Oscar, a red inatable device simulating a person in the water fallen overboard, while maintaining clear communication with the crew, including the demonstration of steering the boat inside the aft steering space. In a span of just under two hours or the time it takes to watch a movie, Singer passed the board; a technical error while tending line during a tow evolution and minor diculty heaving line to another boatcrew did not prevent earning the 45-footer qualication. e most nerve-wracking part is the apprehension, anxiety going into it knowing you are going to have a board, , Singer said. Not because I have done it a million times, but, anything can go wrong. Upon entrance into the communications center on the second oor at Station New Orleans, the motto Facta Non Verba, which is Latin for Actions speak louder than words, is painted at the top of the wall as a reminder to all who enter. It is not enough to say you can drive the boat. No matter what happens, you have to be ready to drive, lead and care for your crew and survivors. With as strong a determination and a light touch as the aluminum in the deep-V hull of the 45, Singer forged nerves of keel.Check ride oers training

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 17 From Coast Guard CompassCoast Guard crews had an important medical transport from Kauai to Oahu, Hawaii, and back again. e mission required many agencies working together to ensure the precious cargo was safe. eir cargo? R1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal. Hawaiian monk seals like R1KU are one of the rarest marine mammals in the world with an estimated population of 1,200. Part of the true seal family, they are one of only two remaining monk seal species. is particular transport, with the support of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, required two independent missions. e rst involved a Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point C-130 airplane transporting the ill animal from Kauai to Oahu for medical care. ere, R1KU underwent surgery to remove a life-threatening infection in her eye. Not long after surgery, the Hawaiian monk seal was medically cleared for release and an H-65 helicopter supported the second ight to transport the animal from Oahu back to Kauai. It was a rst for the air station, as the facility had just opened a new landing area. We were able to land within yards of the rehab center eliminating the onehour land transport from the facility to our air station and the additional stress placed on the animal, said Eric Roberts, marine mammal response coordinator for the 14th Coast Guard District. Now back in Kauai, the seal will be reintroduced into the ocean after a full recovery from the surgery and eye infection. Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guards living marine resources mission, one of the services 11 statutory missions. e nations waterways and their ecosystems are vital to the countrys economy and health. is includes ensuring the countrys marine protected species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels. Coast Guard units in Hawaii partner with NOAA often on living marine resources missions. In fact, the 14th Coast Guard District is home to four marine national monuments and two national marine sanctuaries, more than any other region in the United States.Navy photo by John F. WilliamsRear Adm. Matthew Klunder, chief of naval research, talks with a visitor at the joint Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory and Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory exhibit during the Navy Leagues Sea-Air-Space Exposition. Forward presence stressed By MC3 Jules StobaughDefense Media ActivityLeading ocials from the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard spoke about operating forward and being partners with global presence at the 2014 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Md., April 7. e Sea-Air-Space Expo is an annual event that brings together key military decision makers, the U.S. defense industrial base and private-sector U.S. companies for an innovative and educational maritime based event. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, deputy chief of naval operations for Operations, Plans, and Strategy, delivered opening remarks. Its my pleasure to sit with such a group of, not just distinguished panelists, but in many cases good friends, said Howard. e Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard are partners that share a responsibility to safeguard the nation, sustain global engagement, project U.S. inuence, and deter future conict. Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet, spoke about surface ships and the importance of operating forward. Surface ships, which Im the surface boss, were about 73 percent of the commissioned ships in the Navy, said Copeman. We make up the vast majority of the forward presence that we talk about and I think were key in developing partnerships. If youre not out and about, if youre not deployed, you cant be where it matters, when it matters, said Copeman. e 2014 Sea-Air-Space features more than 175 industry exhibits, opportunities to learn about and test advanced military equipment, professional development sessions, and daily exhibit hall oor speaker sessions. e Sea-Air-Space Expo is free and open to active duty, Reserve and retired military, federal and state government employees, members of Congress and their sta, and Navy League members.Coast Guard photoR1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal was transported for treatment. Coast Guard aids rescue By Cpl. Joshua YoungMarine Expeditionary Brigade AfghanistanSoldiers with 4th Tolay, 6th Kandak, 4th Brigade, Afghan National Army, conducted a nal training exercise for a security training program with Regional Corps Battle School aboard Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, April 1. e two-week training program teaches the soldiers medical treatment, communication, patrolling techniques, forward operating base security and how to conduct vehicle checkpoints and operate as a quick reaction force. Afghan instructors run the entire exercise, with coalition forces in the background who provide feedback to the instructors. When you go into the battleeld, these kind of things will happen, said Sgt. Patson Zazai, a soldier with the ANA and a participant in the course, speaking about the applicability of rehearsing the set-up of forward operating base security. We are getting experience from here and we need to continue our training. Doing this kind of practice will help us provide security for our people and we can save our country. When the soldiers arrived at the simulated forward operating base, they received instruction from their commanders and took to providing immediate security. Once security was established the platoon was broken o into smaller groups designated as communication, FOB security and a quick reaction force, the remainder establishing a team dedicated to patrolling. is is way ahead of what we thought it would be, said Sta Sgt. Damian Rodriguez, security forces chief, Regional Corps Battle School. is is night and day compared to where it was two weeks ago at the beginning of the training. e patrols initial mission was to search the surrounding villages for potential threats and to get a better idea of what to expect. e Afghan villagers were role-played by coalition personnel and interpreters. Following the patrol, the next training task was to reach out to local village elders to nd out if there are any Taliban role-players in the area. ere were some bar riers to overcome, but theyre trying to get it worked out right now, said Rodriguez, 33, from San Fernando, Calif., referenc ing the language and cul tural barriers the Afghans have with each other as a result of being from various regions of Afghanistan. ings are going very well. With the right amount of training, they should be able to get it. ere is a proverb in the military that if you waste much in sweat, it will prevent you from wasting blood in the battleeld, said 1st Sgt. Abdulla, the company commander for 4th Tolay. ats why Im very sure this kind of exercise and training is best for our soldiers.Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Joshua YoungA soldier with 4th Tolay, 6th Kandak, 4th Brigade, Afghan National Army, provides security during a final training exercise for the security training program.Marine Corps wraps up Afghan Army training

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20 THE PERISCOPE NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014



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Birdies for the Brave outreach helps fund homefront groupsBy Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceKnown for its plush landscape and daunting 17th-hole island green, the Professional Golfers Association Tour head quarters here also boasts a ourishing military outreach program for total force military members and their families, the senior enlisted advisor to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said April 15. Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan B. Battaglia visited Tournament Players Club Sawgrass to meet ocials from Birdies for the Brave, which oers com plimentary admission, lessons and more for active duty, Guard and Reserve and retired service members and their families at select PGA Tour, Champions Tour, and Web.com Tour events. John Flaschner, public rela tions and community outreach director for e PGA Tour and the Tournament Players Club network, said Birdies for the Brave fundraising eorts have benetted nine military home front groups supported by PGA Tour players. Our entire mission is just to say thank you to military men, women and their families, Flas chner said, adding that in 2012, as part of the Joining Forces ini tiative, the White House named Birdies for the Brave among the top 20 military-friendly charities in the United States. Pro golfer Phil Mickelson and his wife, Amy, originally created Birdies for the Brave to support troops who suered combat injuries, Flaschner said, noting that Mickelson pledged to the Homes For Our Troops and Special Operations War rior foundations $100 for each birdie and $500 for each eagle he makes. e PGA Tour has more than 100 tournaments on all three of its tours, including the Web. com Tour for up-and-coming players and the Champions Tour for players over age 50. And Birdies for the Brave is at 32 tournaments out of 45 on the PGA Tour, with a presence of six each on the Web.com and the Champions tours, Flaschner noted. Our goal by 2018 is to have a presence at all of these tournaments, he added. Birdies for the Brave has part nered with organizations such as Operation Shower, a charita ble program out of St. Louis that coordinates with base ombuds men and local stores to set up surprise baby showers for ex pectant mothers whose spouses are underway or deployed. Do nations include cribs, dressers and other necessary baby sup plies. Battaglia commended Birdies for the Braves connection of role-model athletes to mili tary veterans and their families. Flaschner said his main motivation is to give back to service members who have committed their lives to freedom and brav ery. Whether its mortgage-free home donations to wounded service members and their families or the donation Kings Bays Submarine Ball set for April 26 at Hyatt Regency in JacksonvilleBy MCC John OsborneFor Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Public AffairsMore than 1,000 Sailors, spouses and their guests gathered to celebrate the 114th birthday of the submarine force at e Founders Inn in Virginia Beach, Va., April 12. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will have its ball from 5 p.m. until midnight this Saturday at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Jacksonville. ETC Mitch Steinhauer said tickets are available through Friday. As of Monday nearly 800 personnel have committed to attend, including members of the United States Submarine Veterans and USS Halibuts Veterans As sociation, Steinhauer said. We are ex pecting this years Submarine Birthday Ball to be as rich in tradition as any previ ous years. is year we will be honoring the 50th anniversary of the USS Halibuts nal Regulus Missile Patrol. For tickets to the ball in Jacksonville, contact Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil. e Norfolk celebration paid tribute to the men and women serving the subma rine force, their families and all of those who came before them to take on the arduous task of undersea warfare that began when John Holland sold the sub mersible that would be commissioned USS Holland (SS-1) to the U.S. Navy, April 11, 1900. Vice Adm. Mike Connor, commander, Submarine Force, hosted the event for the Hampton Roads submarine community and introduced the nights keynote speaker, Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Gortney thanked all in attendance for their great service and paid homage to the accomplishments of the submarine force through the years. E-cigs banned indoorsAll tobacco products limited to designated outdoor smoking areasBy Lorri NewmanNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety ManagerWe all are very aware of the hazards of smoking and the health eects to others who breathe in second-hand smoke. Most personnel working or living on board Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay also aware are that smoking is prohibited indoors and only authorized in designated smoking areas. However, did you know this policy includes the use of any tobacco product; smokeless tobacco and all electronic nicotine deliv ery systems, for example e-ciga rettes, e-pipes, and e-cigars? e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center state in their Frequent Questions about Electronic Cigarettes the following: e current SECNAVINST 5100.13E Tobacco Policy states that all tobacco use is prohib ited inside Department of the Navy facilities. All types of to bacco product use (smoking and smokeless) may only be used in the designated tobacco use area. e bottom line is no e-cigarette use inside any building. e Food and Drug Admin istration and the federal courts have deemed e-cigarettes and other electronic nicotine deliv ery devices as a tobacco prod uct. Our local instruction, SUB ASEINST 5100.2F, Chapter 30, supplemental page for section 3003, states: a. Smoking on board SUBASE Kings Bay is only authorized in designated outdoor smoking ar eas. b. is instruction refers to all forms of tobacco and its use. is includes regular smoking methods, smokeless tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems. e use of any form of electronic nicotine delivery system (e.g., e-cigarette, e-pipe, and e-Cigar) is governed by this policy as these are considered tobacco products. Be mindful of this policy and only use tobacco products in the designated smoking areas. Up Periscope Whats the saddest song youve heard? Page 9 Lensman MC1 Rex Nelson brings camera to Group 10 Pages 4, 5 Our past History & Heritage Command grows Page 132009 CHINFO Award Winner Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Birdies, Page 7 Birdies for the Brave The nine military homefront groups and their supporting Tour players are: Homes for Our Troops and Special Operations Warrior Foundation: Phil Mickelson Operation Homefront: Corey Pavin Navy SEAL Foundation: Jerry Kelly, Vijay Singh and Frank Lickliter II United Through Reading: Rory Sabbatini Military Warriors Support Foundation: Ted Purdy and David Toms Green Beret Foundation: Bubba Watson K9s for Warriors: David Duval and Bob Duval Norfolk has Sub BallBirdies for the Brave photoBubba Watson shows support for Birdies for the Brave at The Travelers PGA tournament.PGA players chip in for military causesSee Sub Ball, Page 7 EM3 Brandon Perkins and MM2 Robert Raeemacher, the newest submarine-qualified Sailors, joined Adm. Bill Gortney, Vice Adm. Mike Connor and Ek Kracker, the lone WWII submarine veteran in atten dance, in cutting the ceremonial Submarine Birthday Ball cake at a celebration honoring 114 years of the submarine force.Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. Barnwell Newman USS Georgia in Diego GarciaThe Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Georgia (SSGN 729) is pierside during a crew exchange at Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia. Navy photo MCSN Hank Gettys

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire DepartmentHeres a reminder from the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department: Move right for sirens and lights. When the Fire Department is called to an emergency it is important that we respond quickly and safely. If you are driving down the road and see the lights and sirens of an emergency vehicle in your rear view mirror, move to the right and stop to allow emergency vehicles to move easily down the road. Once the emergency vehicles have passed merge back into trac when it is safe to begin driving. Every time re engines or aid cars are called to an emergency, re ghters are giving their all to help others. Do your part as a driver to help re ghters do their job as quickly and safely as possible.Gateway Inn traininge Navy Gateway Inns & Suites Manager Training Workshop ReadySet-Grow was April 1 through April 4 at the MWR Magnolia Conference Center, Kings Bay. CNIC, Southeast Region leadership and sta along with NGIS Managers from across the country and overseas locations such as Greece, Japan, and Guam were in attendance. Bruce Grenier, CNIC eet readiness director and Tamara Davis, CNIC Navy Lodging programs di rector were guest speakers. e workshop covered nancial man agement, accreditation standards, sales and marketing, leadership and human resources. It culminated in an open forum discussion and case study presentation on April 4. From the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Mail RoomNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays Mail Room gets a great deal of mail addressed to individuals living in Unaccompanied Housing with a Building number and room number. Personal mail is not delivered to UH. Department of Defense Postal Manual, OPNAVINST 5218.7B and SUBASEINST 5218.3B states: Per sonal mail for personnel living on and o base in private quarters where U.S. Postal Service provides service shall be addressed to their home address. Mail for personnel living in UH, where USPS does not provide service should be addressed to their unit address or box number address in order that it may be handled separately from the ac tivities ocial mail. In order to get mail delivered in a timely manner, members should include their command in their ad dress. is helps the Mail Room get the mail to individuals as quickly as possible. If the Mail Room is unable to de termine which command the in dividual is attached, the mail is returned to the sender. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CommissaryApril is the Month of the Mili tary Child, and commissaries are celebrating with giveaways and savings for the entire family. Children in military households face unique challenges because of the demands of military life, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs sales director. So, at the Defense Commissary Agency, we want to acknowledge them and do all we can to provide their families with great values on quality products they can depend on. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commis saries in April to oer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have sub stitute events for certain promo tional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times. For more, go to www.commis saries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_12_14.cfm Little Heros Commissaries are showcasing fruits, veggies for Little Heroes in April. To honor military children, commissaries have fun ways for parents and their little heroes to learn about the nutritious value of fruits and vegetables. During April, the Month of the Military Child, commissary produce departments are inviting installation child development centers to take tours highlighting the health benets of fruits and vegetables. Commissary store managers can also conduct this presenta tion at the child development center. Our goal in April is that every store will oer a store tour or presentation at the child development center, said Bridget Ben nett, DeCAs produce category manager. We may even have local installation dietitians avail able to enhance the education about the benets of consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. Tour participants may sample some unique fruits and vegetables, and receive new healthful recipes. For more information, go to www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Commissary customers can check their local commissary to nd out more about fresh pro duce samples, coupons, giveaways and goodie bags for chil dren participating in the fruits and veggies events. Special savings Commissaries.com oers special savings for military patrons, families Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, www.commissaries.com, to nd information about whats on sale at their local commissary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Sav ings link at www.commissaries. com/partners.cfm to nd more coupons, specials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett Erika Figueroa, EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May. NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Mitch Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipBalfour Beatty Communities is accepting scholarship application from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communities and plan to attend accred ited educational/technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www. bbcommunitiesfoundation.org/scholarships. aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Crawfish Fest Friday, Saturdaye Woodbine Crawsh Festival is 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 25 and 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Saturday, April 26 in downtown Woodbine. eres a parade, food, crafts, live entertain ment and more. For more information, visit www.woodbinecrawsh.com.Shrimp Festival next weekend e 51st Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival runs ursday, May 1 through Sunday, May 4, in downtown Fernandina Beach, Fla. For more information, visit www.shrimpfestival.com.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base. Now hear this! Military Child Month promoted Kings Bay Commissary Fire Department issues reminder Potpourri Unaccompanied Housing: no mail Kings Bay Mail Room From Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support CenterKings Bay Fleet and Family Sup port Center is oering a new and improved educational experience on parenting. is six-session class is facilitated by two licensed clinical social work ers, Sallie Galyean, the child coun selor and Mary Jenssen, a clinical counselor and FAP case manager. Both of these facilitators have experience working with military families and the common struggles parents encounter. e rotating class schedule al lows participants to join at any time, choose a particular class topic to attend, make up a class or take a refresher class throughout the next session cycle. e interactive ses sions promote an informal and stimulating educational experience. e following is information re garding each of the class topics: 1, Ages & Stages involves ages and stages of physical and sexual devel opment from birth to age 18. 2, Parenting Styles & Co-parenting discusses parenting styles and coparenting, as well as struggles with divorce, blended and extended fam ilies. 3, Child Abuse & Domestic Violence teaches parents about the ef fects of domestic violence and child abuse on children as well as how to cope and resources to assist fami lies. 4, Dealing with Misbehavior ex plores the misbehavior of children, why they do what they do and how parents can appropriately respond to negative behavior. 5, Communication: It Goes Both Ways helps parents learn to commu nicate with their children, spouse and family in a positive way. 6, Structure & Safety covers the benets of routines, ways to help families bond, as well as helpful in formation to safeguard your family and maintain a healthy home environment. Classes are held at FFSC 9 to 11:30 a.m., Mondays. Each participant will receive a certicate of completion for each session attended. When all six par enting sessions have been attended, the participant receives a certicate for completion for the course. ere is so much valuable infor mation in this class, but you wont know until you sign up. Call FFSC at 573-4512 and ask to sign up for the next Parenting Class, or ask to speak with one of the fa cilitators who can provide you with more details. FFSC oers new Parenting Class Kings Bay FFSC

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By J.D. LeipoldArmy News ServiceFormer Army Sgt. Kyle Jerome White will receive the Medal of Honor during a May 13 ceremony at the White House, President Obama announced, April 15. e 27-year-old Seattle native will become the seventh living recipient of the nations highest military decoration for conspicuous gallantry and valor during actions in Iraq or Afghanistan. White will receive the Medal of Honor for his disre gard of his own life while trying to save the lives of a Ma rine and two fellow Soldiers after his team of 14 U.S. Sol diers and squad of Afghan National Army soldiers were set up and ambushed by a much larger and more heav ily armed Taliban force, who engaged in a three-prong attack from elevated ground. On Nov. 8, 2007, Soldiers of 1st Platoon, Chosen Com pany, 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry Regi ment, 173 Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) Sky Soldiers, left Combat Outpost Bella by foot to visit the large village of Aranas, Afghanistan, for a Shura meeting with village elders. e American Soldiers werent thrilled about the mission because the villagers had been suspected of collusion in a major attack months earlier on Combat Outpost Ranch House, which resulted in 11 wounded and the closure of the outpost. At daybreak, Nov. 9, the group pre pared for the late morning meeting at the mosque, but villagers delayed the get-together, say ing the elders were praying for several hours. e meeting was put o. e lone Marine and embedded training team member Sgt. Phillip A. Bocks then advised platoon leader 1st Lt. Matthew C. Ferrara, it was best to leave the area. ere was one shot, you know, down into the valley, and then it was two shots, and then it was full-automat ic re and RPGs (rocket-propelled grenades) ... it was coming from multiple directions, White remembered. Carrying a fully-automatic M4A1, White emptied his 30-round magazine, then loaded another, but he didnt get a chance to re. An RPG hit right behind my head and knocked me unconscious ... it was just lights out ... when I woke up, I was face-down on a rock, he said, recalling that as he was awakening, an enemy round fragmented near his head sending a shower of broken rock chips and debris into the side of his face. More shots, more booms, more chaos ... then White realized 10 of the 14-man American element and the ANA soldiers were gone. With no cover, the remainder of the patrol had been forced to slide more than 150 feet down the side of a rocky cli. e only ones remaining up top were Spc. Kain Schil ling, Ferrara, Bocks, the interpreter and White. White looked around and saw Schilling had been shot in the and was dodging and weaving and running toward the cover of shrubs and the umbrella canopy of a single prickly tree. White made for the tree, which provided just enough shade to make the two nearly invisible. White pulled out a tourniquet and asked Schilling, who was grimacing with pain, if he could apply it. White could see where the bullet entered and the blood was owing from, so he slipped the tourniquet on and in stead of cranking down too hard, White said he tight ened it just enough to stop the bleeding. As I was working on him, I had the radio on, then I Army paratrooper earns top medal White See White, Page 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Shayne Campbell gives a thumbs up signal ing safe to launch an F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Knighthawks of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Six (VFA-136) aboard Washington. Airman George Henry cleans the window covering the Pilot Landing Air Television camera aboard Washington. The best of Submarine Group Tens MC1 Rex NelsonThe Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) returns to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Feb. 7 following routine operations. New to Kings Bay, here are some photos MC1 Rex Nelson took at his previous commands. Airman Jennifer Varney and Airman Patrick Tabor conduct routine maintenance on one of four arresting wire systems on the flight deck aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73).Storekeeper 3rd Class Larry Jones holds his baby for the first time after returning to Norfolk aboard Washington. An F/A-18E Superhornet prepares to make a landing on Washington.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 5 Nelson watches an F-14B Tomcat assigned to Carrier Air Wing Seven launch off the flight deck aboard Washington.Navy photo by PHAN Joan KretschmerCrewmembers assigned to Washington visit the guided mis sile cruiser USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) to fire an M-60 rifle from the bridge during a training exercise. Crewmembers assigned to the Deck Department lower a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat during a man overboard drill aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf. Above, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class Benjamin Adams signals to flight deck personnel onboard Washington. Right, crew members from USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) operate a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) to pick up Sailors and mail for transport from Washington. USS George Washington (CVN 73) Sailors enjoy snorkeling off the coast of St. Maarten, one of the many tours offered by the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, during Washingtons port visit.

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Im honored to be here celebrating your history and your future, Gortney said. Its good to see all the men and women here tonight that make the submarine force potent. I am in awe of your community. It took the boldness of a submariner to lead us to victory in the Pacic and bold commanding ocers to bravely take on our adversaries in that challeng ing time. You were the rst to bring the Navy into the nuclear age, silently doing your duty while impacting diplomacy during the Cold War. You tracked Soviet Fleets and deterred them from attacking our great nation. e Navy could not accomplish our mission without the pres ence you provide. You are a key piece of our weapon system. You are every where, always working be hind the scenes and below the surface. We have the most formidable under sea warfare system in the world. e theme of this years Submarine Birthday Ball in Virginia Beach was Celebrating 114 Years of Partnerships for Undersea Dominance. Gortney addressed the importance of that theme to the continued success of the Navy and the nation, and then reminded everyone in uniform that their families personify that theme every day with their support and devo tion. When we deploy, we do so in concert, ght ing together. We can take the best of our respec tive communities and link them to accomplish our mission as the United States Navy. When our na tion calls us to action, our interoperability will be our saving grace. It is our force multiplier. As I look out at this room, I see a legacy of excellence and a future full of potential and ac complishment. No matter what rank you hold, youre making a dierence and keeping our nation safe. I know that when you are called upon not one of you will miss a beat in defeat ing our adversaries. We are the greatest ghting force in the his tory of civilization and that ghting force has a not-so-secret weapon and that is our families. I want to thank those of you who enable our service. We know our families are the very stitches that hold the cloth of our nation together. It is because of you that we are able to follow our passion. For what you do today and will do in the future, I thank you. Over the years, a to tal of 63 U.S. submarines have been lost in war and peace, and some 4,000 young men have lost their lives serving on those sub marines. e traditional tolling of the boats honoring all fall en submarines and their crews was captured in an awe-inspiring video. Force Master Chief Wes Koshoer, master of cer emonies and force master chief, Commander, Submarine Forces, then had the honor of announcing the traditional cake cut ting. It is a tradition at each submarine birthday ball that the senior and junior qualied submariners in attendance conduct the cake cutting, Koshoer said. Submariners are ex tremely proud of the high level of knowledge, skill and reliability required for submarine qualication. ose of us who have earned dolphins, gold and silver, look back with pride on the occasion which signied that we had ac quired the required skills and joined the submarine brotherhood. EM3 Brandon Perkins of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764) and MM2 Robert Raeemacher from the Los Angeles-class at tack submarine USS Albany (SSN 753), were announced as the newest submarine qualied Sailors. ey joined Gortney, Connor and Ed Kracker, the lone WWII submarine veteran in attendance who qualied on the Balaoclass submarine USS Bang (SS 385) in 1944, in cutting the ceremonial submarine ball cake. A fun few hours of danc ing and celebration that transcended rank and rat ing closed out the evening and left with it the indel ible mark of the subma rine force that has been on scene and unseen for 114 years. Sailors march on the 18th fairway during Military Appreciation Day at the 2009 The Players Championship golf tournament at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. This years tournament is scheduled for May 6 to 11.Navy photo Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. BarnwellSailors and their spouses took to the dance floor at Submarine Force Atlantics 114th Submarine Birthday Ball at The Founders Inn in Virginia Beach, Va., April 12. Sub BallFrom Page 1Its not just the Earth getting hot by more of the suns rays. Its not just the flowers blooming Its getting outdoors more, and playing with the kids. Youth sports starting. T-Ball and Soccer is in full swing. Get the bikes and balls out of the garage. Get the swim ming pool toys ready. Take a moment and enjoy the changes on base. What is spring like on base? Photo and copy by EM1 Mark Treen of service dogs to veterans suering from post-traumat ic stress disorder, our fund-raising events have raised more than $13 million for military homefront charities that directly benet military members and their fami lies, Flaschner said. And to see their gratitude for us when theyve given so much is just overwhelming.BirdiesFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 7

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Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Anna AlbrechtVolunteers from the North County Chief Petty Officer Association stand on the deck of the USS Iowa in Los Angeles, March 15. The volunteers spent the morning restoring the ships interior. Sailors restore USS Iowa By Lance Cpl. Caitlin BevelI Marine Expeditionary ForceMembers of the North County Petty Ocer As sociation volunteered for preservation work aboard the USS Iowa in Long Beach, Calif., March 15. e USS Iowa, built in 1940, was commissioned to active service for 50 years. It represented the United States in World War II, the Korean conict and other combat situations until its decommis sioning in 1990. e ship also hosted more U.S. presidents than any other battleship. Master Chief Petty Of cer Michael Smith and other members of the North County Petty O cer Association worked to restore one of this historic warships sleeping areas to prepare for a program that will allow groups from within the community to spend the night aboard ship. What were doing here today is were preparing this berthing space for oc cupancy for the overnight program, said Senior Chief Petty Ocer Dave Bennett, president of the North County Chief Petty Ocer Association. We saw this as an opportunity for us to come up here and give back. e Iowa is a national treasure. e crews of many his toric battleships included both Sailors and Marines. e USS Iowa and other ships of its class have a single turret of ve-inch guns traditionally manned by Marines in combat. Bennett said he is look ing forward to the oppor tunity to use this ship to teach service members about the history and tra ditions of their branches. is opens up oppor tunities for us in the future, for the Navy and the Marine Corps, because we can also come up here and do heritage training, Bennett said. As chief petty ocers, thats one of our charges is to be stewards of that naval history and heritage. e USS Iowas opera tions director, Dan Paw loski, witnessed rst hand how much the volunteer work means to people who visit the ship. Veteran and former USS Iowa crewmember, Brian Moss, helped bring the ship to Long Beach. Mosss reaction when he boarded the ship after it was relo cated made a lasting impression on Pawloski. He personally came up, shed a tear, said Dan, thank you for being a part of bringing the ship down here. You and the whole team and gave a hug and then a salute. It was great to feel that and thats why we do it, said Pawloski. e USS Iowa is open to the public for tours in cluding scavenger hunts for children, information on the weapons and armor used on the ship, and insight into what life aboard the ship was like for enlisted and ocers. After 30 years working in commercial construc tion, Pawloski started out as a volunteer aboard the USS Iowa. Now, groups like the North County Petty O cer Association help him to keep this piece of his tory alive. rolled over and sat next to Schilling just to take my pack o, thats when I got that metallic taste, then that burning in my lungs, White said, adding that he and Kain covered their mouths with their shirts to lter whatever it was. Initially, I thought we were the rst unlucky bastards to have chemi cal weapons on us ... thats what we thought initially, but then I saw a stream of smoke over my shoulder and I realized my pack was smoldering it was the battery from my radio burning up, he said. White checked his ra dio, but it was out of the ght. en White saw Bocks, who was badly wounded, lying out in the open, about 30 feet from the shade of the tree. He began encourag ing the Marine to use all the strength he could, but Bocks couldnt make any progress. I knew he needed help and there was a lot of re coming in, but it really didnt matter at that point, but by then I already had known, well, were not gonna make it through this one; its just a matter of time before Im dead, White said. I gured, if thats going to happen, I might as well help someone while I can. White sprinted the 30 feet to Bocks as rounds skipped around his feet and snapped past his head, but he made it to Bocks un scathed, but remembered thinking, his wounds were severe. He looked over at Schilling and yelled at the interpreter to attend to the Soldier, but the interpreter was pinned down and couldnt move. At that time, I can re member thinking he wasnt going to make it, but I knew I wasnt going to stop trying, White said. No matter what the out come, Im going to do what I can with what I have. White grabbed the buddy carry handle on the back of Bocks vest and be gan pulling the 200-pound plus Marine under cover. White saw that Bocks leg was bleeding badly, so he grabbed another tourniquet out of his pack, slipped it around Bocks leg and tightened down until the bleeding stopped. Next he tore Bocks shirt open, saw an other wound, but it wasnt until he rolled him over that he saw the large exit wound. Stop the bleed ing is all he thought as he stued bandages, clothing, whatever he could to stop the bleeding. No matter what White did, the bleeding wasnt stop ping and the Marine suc cumbed to his wounds. No sooner had White realized Bocks had passed away than he looked over to see Schilling get hit again by small-arms re, this time in the left leg. White scrambled to Schilling. Out of tourniquets, White pulled his belt from his uniform and looped it around Schillings leg. Hey man, this is go ing to hurt, White said to Schilling, who replied, Just do it! So, I put my foot on his leg and pulled the belt as hard as I could until the bleeding stopped, White recalled. White next looked around for the lieuten ant and noticed his pla toon leader, Ferrara, was lying still, face-down on the trail. Again, White ex posed himself to re, this time crawling to Ferraras position. e lieutenant was dead, so White moved back to Schilling where he began to use Schillings ra dio until an enemy round zipped right through the hand-mic blowing it out of his hand. Now two radios had been destroyed. e paratrooper moved to Bocks and found that his radio was still opera tional, so he established communication with friendly elements and rendered a situation report. He understood the situation well enough that he was able to bring in mor tars, artillery, air strikes and helicopter gun runs to keep the enemy from massing on friendly positions. I heard a hiss, just a second of a hiss and then a big, big explosion and that one brought me to my knees, he said. It scram bled my brains a little bit. at was concussion No. 2 for the day, caused by a friendly 120-mm mortar round that fell a little short of its target. After nightfall, White began giving the inter preter commands to relay to the Afghan National Army soldiers to establish themselves as a security perimeter. MedEvac was still a few hours away. While trying to keep Schilling from falling asleep, White battled his own multiple concussions. He knew if he passed out, the helicopters wouldnt be able to nd them or the two wounded Afghan Na tional Army soldiers who White had also treated. Eventually, White marked the landing zone and assisted the ight medic in hoisting the wounded into the helicopter. Only after all wounded were o the trail did White allow himself to be evacuated. White separated from the Army on July 8, 2011, and used his G.I. Bill to attend the University of North Carolina at Char lotte, from which he received a bachelors de gree. Today, he works as an investment analyst at e Royal Bank of Canada in Charlotte. Schilling who was shot twice, credits White with saving his life. He said before White patched him up with two tourniquets, he didnt think he had a chance of getting out of the ambush. Today, hes well and serves as a secu rity ocer in Palo, Iowa.WhiteFrom Page 3 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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The first sad song I remember hearing was Bobby Goldboros Honey, some 45 years ago. It was sad then, but today I laugh at it because its so con trived. He just tries too hard. But there is one song that makes me weep in my beer instantly. Its All My Rowdy Friends Have Settled Down by Hank Williams Jr. I guess I empathize with Bocephus because that really happened to me, too. I need to hook up with that cat so we can get over it. Unless, of course, hes settled down now too.Whats the saddest song youve ever heard?Mallorie Hilley Family member Orange Park, Fla. Im Already There by Lonestar. Its about a hus band whos gone and his wife misses him, but hes there in spirit. Lance Cpl. Gary Shoemaker Security Force Battalion Belleville, Ill. He Stopped Loving Her Today by George Jones. Even though theyre sepa rated, he had so much love for her that it brought them both to death. LSSA Randy Harris USS Florida Blue Albany, Ga. One of my sad songs is Smokey Robinsons Really Gonna Miss You. He sang it at the funeral of one of the Temptations. Lt. j.g. Michael Adcock USS Rhode Island Gold Maumelle, Ark. I cant even talk about it because its too sad. MA3 Ben Huber Security Force Battalion Murfreesboro, Tenn. Its called Miles Away by Memphis May Fire. Its about a man having to pack up all his things and leave his wife. Lance Cpl. Cody Henry Security Force Battalion Houston Id probably have to say Remember Everything by Five Finger Death Punch. Its about a man who basically is apologizing to everyone in his life for things hes done. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Marine Corps photoSelf-healing paint could halt rust on military vehicles.New paint may stop rust By Eric BeidelOffice of Naval ResearchA new additive could help military vehicles, in cluding the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, heal like human skin and avoid costly maintenance as a result of corrosion. Developed by e Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in partnership with the Oce of Naval Research, polybroblast allows scratches forming in vehicle paint to scar and heal before the eects of corrosion ever reach the metal beneath. Corrosion costs the De partment of the Navy billions of dollars each year, said Marine Capt. Frank Furman, who manages logistics research programs for ONRs Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare and Combating Terrorism Department. is technology could cut maintenance costs, and, more impor tantly, it could increase the time vehicles are out in the eld with our Ma rines. Polybroblast is a pow der that can be added to commercial-off-the-shelf paint primers. It is made up of microscopic polymer spheres lled with an oily liquid. When scratched, resin from the broken capsules forms a waxy, water-repellant coating across the exposed steel that protects against corrosion. While many self-healing See Paint, Page 15 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 9

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By Sgt. Maj. Justin LeHewMarine Corps Base Quantico Last year, on March 23, I had the incredible honor of being one of only a handful of active duty Marines to participate in the 25th Annual Bataan Memorial Death March held at White Sands Missile Range near Alamorgordo, N.M. e 26.2-mile event is conducted annually in honor of the in dividu als who survived, and those who gave their lives during the barbaric death march at the hands of the Japanese on the Bataan Peninsula in 1942. Of the 6,200 participants who began the march at 7 a.m. on a cold and extremely windy desert morning, fewer than 20 were uniformed active duty or reserve Marines. Most were aliated with the Army or Air Force with a spattering of Navy and Coast Guard person nel as well. ere were foreign militaries represented. ROTC units from around the nation were present. A lot of the participants were civilians. ere was a strong civilian Marine showing at the event and I could always count on a shout of Oohrah! or Semper Fi! somewhere along the entire route to raise the spirits. e best way to explain the march would be to imagine the Marine Corps, Boston, New York City or Los Angeles marathons, all the same distance at 26.2 miles, but put it in the middle of the desert and tie the theme of it to a his torically signicant event in our nations past. Next, add in blazing sun, tall mountains and shifting sand along with vast stretches of open scrub brush trails which transform back into burn ing sections of pavement for miles at a time all along the course. One section of the course stretches uphill for 10 straight miles and another, even more im posing section is a 3-mile long, 6-inch deep sand pit that is all uphill as well. en, after you take all of that in, nally, military category participants run the course wearing a full military combat uni form, boots, pack along with battle gear and you have the Bataan Memorial Death March. is is denitely not an event that for the weak of heart, spirit, mind or body. I embarked on the jour ney to run this course years ago, but as with ev erything in life, compet ing interests and more notably, military commit ments and deployments always seemed to de ter my attempts. Believe me, as a 44-year-old ser geant major running it, at roughly the 12-mile mark, I most certainly wished I attempted this earlier in my career. As the Training and Education Command Ser geant Major for the Ma rine Corps, I made it my mission to take on this challenge to highlight this event for the rest of the Marine Corps who, for the most part, does not know it even exists. I am most certain that, if more Marines knew about this and understood the historical signicance of this event in the annals of our own history, it would attract more than 20 Ma rines to represent our Corps. is is an event that was made for Marines and gets to the root of our very ethos and core of who we are as Marines. A notable fact that is largely lost to history is that, of all of the individuals who endured Bataan in 1942, not a single Marine was lost or succumbed to death during the entire forced march into captiv ity. History records this as testament to the basic training and discipline the Marine Corps instilled in its personnel during this period, the same testa ment that holds true in creating todays Marines. Our tradition of never leaving a fallen comrade behind can be attributed, in no short part, to the Marines who endured this hellish march more than 72 years ago, carrying their starved and wounded brothers in their arms all along the way, allowing none to fall by the wayside to be executed by the Japanese. at is the major drawing force to participate in this event is to honor that legacy. at, above all else, is the major dierence in all other marathon events of this distance. To know you are marching to honor and ensure that the sacrices of so many who came before you are not forgot ten. From the moment the cannons re to announce that the march has begun, to the hundreds of people encircling the nish line 26.2 miles later who cheer on the participants as they complete the march, every aspect of this race exudes a brother and sisterhood like no other event on this scale. Hundreds of support personnel and volunteers stretch along the entire course, ensuring every thing is conducted safely. Unlike the original death march, there are plenty of water stations, sports drinks and fresh fruit along the route. e group however, that is the true rock stars of the event are the Bataan Sur vivors and veterans who are interspersed through out the course, providing that boost of motivation needed to go the next mile. Imagining the horrors these men endured at the hands of their Japanese captors during the march and their subsequent time in captivity during the re mainder of the war was all the motivation needed to know that, no matter how you physically or mentally felt throughout this day, it paled in comparison to what these men endured. e Greatest Genera tion, indeed. As Marines, we can nev er forget the sacrices of those who have gone before and built the legacy that we proudly carry on today. A scant 26.2 miles and several hours later it was all over. e sense of pride and honor in accomplish ment I felt as I crossed the nish line was only bested by the sound of someone yelling Sgt. Maj. LeHew! Its me, Doc! National ArchivesThis picture, captured from the Japanese, shows American prisoners using impro vised litters to carry those of their comrades who, from the lack of food or water on the march from Bataan, fell along the road. By Cpl. Samuel EllisMarine Corps Base Quanticoe Chosin Reservoir didnt stop him from nish ing a 15-year Marine Corps career, and the fact that he is 82-years-old is not holding him back from par ticipating in two Marine Corps Marathon events this year. Richard Ferry, a mustang veteran and one of the few and proud to survive the 1950s frozen battleeld of Koreas Chosin Reservoir, ran the rst of his two 82-year-old in run Marine Corps photoMarines on march from Frozen Chosen.Corps Sgt. Major takes part in Death March Run LeHew See Ferry, Page 13 See LeHew, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 11

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Navy Adventures Unleased Kings Bay is having a White Water Adventure Weekend at National Whitewater Center (www.usnwc.org) in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Friday. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55 (liberty) and op tional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www.usnwc.org/memorial-day-trailraces. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Raft ing, Mega Jump plus Memorial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All participants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting was April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play begin ning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fit ness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-NRoll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meat balls 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Sat urday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a par ent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the latest information, call (912) 5734548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for children kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack pro vided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call NAU plans adventure Just for kids MWR Intramural Sports photoThe USS Florida soccer team which finished second in the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Intramural Sports Spring 7v7 league. From left, front, are team mem bers STS3 Carver Wiggins, ET3 Chase Newell, Lt. j.g. Ryan Veatch, TM2 Justin Nicholson, Lt. j.g. Erin Barfield, MM2 Tim McColly; back, Lt. Leon Platt, Lt. j.g. Jeff Weatherspoon, Lt. j.g. James Kusel, STS2 Mark Nicholson, STS3 Cuauhtemoc Navavaldez, MT2 Derek Cunningham, ETC Brian Moore, MM3 Jon Barras and STS2 Adam Coleman. Not pictured were MT1 Samuel Lovelace and TMC Jeremy Appleby. MWR Intramural Sports photoThe Marine Corps Security Force Battalion soccer team Danger Zone finished first in the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Intramural Sports Spring 7v7 league. Pictured are team members, front, from left, MASN Eric Grand, MA3 Jonathan Gonzales, Luis Vallejo and MA2 Oral Plummer. Back, from left, Kevin Head, MA3 Michael LeFloch, MA3 Daniel Anderson, MA2 Jeremy Whittaker, HM3 Gary Brown and Kirk Murray. Coed 12-inch Softball1, Angry Birds 2, Shop 38 3, Smoking Bases 4, SoftballBusters 5, WildcatsMens 12-inch Softball1, JCs Crew 2, West Virginia 3, TTF 4, Shop 38 5, CraigslistAverage Joes BowlingTeam Pins 1, Ray & Ryan 3,640 2, Balls of Steel 3,391 3, B&J Express 3,383 4, Two Cliffs 2,948 5, Spare Us 2,823Upcoming Average Joes Golf signups are still be conducted. Captains meeting was April 23 and play will begin April 30. 4v4 flag football signups are going on. The captains meeting is set for April 30 and play will begin May 5. Intramural Sports Navy Team Bowling ChampionshipsSoutheast Zone Through 5 of 10 weeksTeam Pins 1, Kings Bay 3,640 2, NAS Jax 3,391 3, NASP 3,383 4, Mayport 2,948 5, Key West 2,823 6, NASP Corry 3,640 7, NAVSTA Gitmo 3,391 8, JTF Gitmo 3,383 9, New Orleans 2,948 Individuals Average 1, Dan Blakeslee KB 205.64 2, Leon Platt KB 204.03 3, Kyler Ascue KW 197.04 4, C. Washington NAS J 193.50 5, Rob Daugherty KB 192.94 6, T. Lowrance NAS J 191.90 7, Chris Oglsby NO 191.42 8, Shaun Spitler NAS J 191.33 9, C. Kiwatowsski NASP 186.67 10, Roger Byrd Mayport 185.67 Navy Team Bowling As I turned around I saw a young Navy corps man running toward me and with a hand clasp, fol lowed by a big hug he said excitedly I knew it was you! For that brief moment, all the pain I was feeling went away and was immediately replaced with the feeling of brotherhood that I mentioned earlier. Im sorry I had to pass you right at the nish line, he said with a smile on his face, but I couldnt let an old guy like you beat me! Yes, Devil Doc, I suppose you did cross the nish line just ahead of me, I said, wearing half the amount of gear and at half my age ... We had a good laugh, wished each other the best and parted ways with smiles on our faces. As I limped away, my body once again feeling every mile of the march, I took solace in the fact that even in age alone, I could be in a position that day to inspire a young man to give a little bit more than he thought he had at the end, just like the survivors of Bataan had done to in spire me. I could barely move in the days following the event. e bottoms of my feet were on re, as were my muscles. My toenails were black and blue, and some had already begun to fall o. Yet, even through all this, the sense of pride in accomplishment in com pletion of this event was euphoric. More importantly however, was the feeling of pride I had in represent ing our present day Corps of Marines who by all ac counts are just as great as the generations of Marines who have come before. e 26th Annual Bataan Memorial Death March, was March 22. Tragically, however, the survivors of this storied event in his tory will not. Last year, just four veter ans of the march attended. e event was preceded that morning by a nal roll call of men who have giv en their last full measure over the past year. I was honored to shake the hands of these veter ans and watch their eyes light up when they saw a man standing in front of them wearing the full bat tle uniform of a Marine. ey were honored and remembered. It is in their honor we continue to show the world the indomitable spirit of the Corps. at unbreakable bond we have with all those from our past who have taken up arms to defend this great nation, coupled with the unwavering com mitment of present day Marines to continue to do honor by our solemn pledge to Corps and Coun try. is is the benchmark for all that is still right and good about our nation today and will continue to be the driving force behind our nations success in the future.Photo courtesy of Bataanmarch.comThe Bataan Memorial Death March is run at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. LeHewFrom Page 11 Photo by Adriana SalasA Soldier thanks Bataan prisoner of war Ewin Johnson for his service before the start of the Bataan Death March Run. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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From Naval History and Heritage Commandey are part detective, part researcher, technology-savvy defenders with a smidgen of enforcer. ey are the curators of the collections management division at the Naval History and Heritage Command. e Navy is big on tradi tion, and with that tradition, comes a collection of items that range from a $4.4 million sterling silver trophy to a simple anksgiving menu from a destroyer during World War II. Some are hand-chosen from decommissioned ships by the curators themselves. Others are donated by those who served the Navy, plucked from a mo ment in time to inspire people decades later. And some are items found while literally cleaning out the attic. e curators of this collection often joke the last time theyve been caught up with their extensive inventory was after the rst item was donated to the Navy, said head cura tor Karen France. Concern about the loss of precious items in stor age has created an urgency that has been directed by Capt. Henry Hendrix, commander of the Na val History and Heritage Command. NHHC is the keeper of 10,864 reels of microlm and 5.67 tera bytes of electronic data, along with 200 million pages documenting his tory. While the Naval History and Heritage Command has undergone a number of name changes over the years, its mission has not: acquisition, custody, dis tribution and exhibition of items of historical or pa triotic value to the Navy; provide guidance on the preservation and stor age of historical material; make those items avail able to the public and pro vide maintenance when necessary. e entire collections division is undergoing an artifact baseline reset, which means the sta is going through the col lection, item-by-item, to make sure it is correctly cataloged, photographed, inventoried and if neces sary, rehoused under the proper conditions, which includes a constant temperature and humidity. It also allows the divi sion to evaluate the collection to determine the condition of the items and whether they should be retained or donated to an other organization. With almost no sta for many years, it was all the collections division could do to keep up with items on loan to a variety of mu seums and organizations in every state in the union, while at the same time storing and cataloging boxes and boxes of items donated from families of former Sailors. Its up to a relatively small sta to keep track of the 595,000 artifacts, of which more than 30,000 are on loan throughout the world. e underwater arche ology department alone catalogs more than 17,000 sunken military ships and aircraft around the world. From 2003 to 2009, Frank ompson, collec tion management division deputy director, and France were the only two collection managers, responsible for a collec tion of more than 150,000 items. Progress has been made in updating the inventory. Now that they have sta, they have been able to go through more boxes to see what treasures might be mixed in with the plaques and other private donations. People would call us about things in their at tic and if we wanted only one item, we would end up taking it all, France laughed. While that certainly contributed to the backlog of items to be cataloged, part of the job is also cull ing out what doesnt be long, items in poor condi tion and redundant to the collection. An inspector general report in 2011 determined some artifacts were at risk, items sensitive to temper ature and humidity, such as textiles and art, micro lm and photographs. e report also suggested the department consolidate where they could, cull the collection and inventory it to get it to the right size, France said. As they catalogue items, many are photographed and displayed on NHHCs Flickr site, since most of the artifacts are not stored at the Washington Navy Yard. Case in point: the sterling silver Spokane Naval Trophy given each year to the Pacic-based ship with the best record in battle eciency. Its currently on display in San Diego. When the trophy was crafted in 1908, it was valued at $10,000. When appraised 100 years later, the value had skyrocketed to $4.4 mil lion. Some of the artifacts come from companies not typically associated with the Navy. One of the items taken o a decommissioned submarine was a 1960 Steinway upright piano. Steinway & Sons contact ed the command and of fered to restore it if they could display it for a while. e restored piano is now in the submarine mess deck display at the Cold War Museum at the Washington Navy Yard. Other businesses with items in the Navy collec tion that might surprise a few, France said, include the jewelry companies of Tiany and Bailey, Banks & Biddle. e Chelsea Clock Company of Massachusetts has also had a long history with the Navy, hav ing supplied thousands of clocks for Navy ships over the years, ompson said. When a donated Chel sea clock turned out to be one of the rarer ones due to a low production rate, the company asked if they could restore the clock and then display it to show the companys long and storied history with the Navy. France and ompson both pointed out, in ev ery case, the companies contacted them oering to restore the pieces made by their companies. Its this loaning and borrowing aspect of the job that can often be the most challenging. We have more than 15,000 objects in the loan program, and theres something in every state, ompson said. Complicating the task is the fact that in the past, loans were sometimes not as controlled as they are today. Additionally, agreements sometimes includ ed language that unin tentionally complicated matters, mistakenly using the word gift instead of loan, for example. en, when the agree ment was revisited years later, its dicult to de termine ownership of the artifact. ats when curators turn into sleuths. We are upgrading those records to properly reect a gift from a loan so people who work here after us dont have to deal with this, ompson said. Weve also tightened up the policies so there are no more open-ended loans. If the custodians show they have been good stewards of the artifact, they can continue to hold on to it. MCM races April 12, as he participated in their rst event of the year, the Marine Corps 17.75K. Ferry not only tackled the 11.03 miles of Prince William County, but he ran it while carrying a Chosin Few banner. e [nishing] time doesnt make a dierence, but I want to nish and to cross with that banner ying, Ferry said before the race. I want people to know we [those who served during the Korean conict] are still relevant. We still did something. Ferry started his career with the Marine Corps in August of 1954 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, in Platoon 67. From there, his career took o. Ferry was a sta sergeant, which he earned in only ve years, when his career changed gears. I was an acting rst sergeant when my commission came through in 1954, Ferry said. I then served at Parris Island; [Naval Base Coronado, in] San Diego, for combat cargo school; Quantico, where I taught at e Basic School, and Head quarters Marine Corps, which at that time was located in the Navy Annex. Ferry continued to reminisce about his military experiences as he told of his time in Korea. I was deployed to Inchon and Seoul with the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, he said. [While serving in the Chosin Res ervoir] I was evacuated on Dec. 5, 1950, to a hospital in Japan. Ferry was awarded two purple hearts re lated to his time in Korea, and he resigned his commission in 1964, as a captain. He is those things that are Marinebased: loyal, detailed and very orga nized, said David Ferch, Valjean opera tions manager. Ferrys determination and success didnt end when he hung up his uniform though. e law-school graduate went on to raise six children with his wife of 54 years and now has 16 grandchildren and 4 great-grand children. Currently a resident of Vero Beach, Fla., Ferry also holds a 20-year position as the chief executive ocer of the Valjean Corp. which manufactures topical drugs, perfumes and suncare products. Mr. Ferry devoted his life to his country, was wounded and came back to have a very successful career, said Keron Deaton, Ferrys assistant. He always thinks about his employees and is very compas sionate, caring, thoughtful, persistent, generous and cute, she added with a grin in her voice. He is always saying, but Im cute, Deaton said. Its kind of a joke here. Although the cute, workaholic spends as much time as needed in the oce. In his spare time, he likes to run. He has only been running consistently for two years, the white-legged, chatterbox is excited about Saturdays race. Im dedicating this race to Harold Roland, Ferry said. He was very close friend. We were in training together and in port together. Ferry, the oldest runner of the 17.75 will be also coming back to the area to run the Historic Half, 13.1-mile race, on May 18.FerryFrom Page 11History and Heritage Command always growing Navy photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordKate Morrand, archeological conservator at the Naval History and Heritage Command, Underwater Archeology Branch, points out the embossing of a twomast ship on a leather wallet to German Embassy Naval Attach Capt. Karl Setzer and his aide, Cmdr. Tobias Vob. The wallet was found by a diver near the wreck of WWII a German U-boat.Navy photo Karen France, Curator with the Naval Historical Center (NHC), examines the World War II battle flag of the destroyer USS Zellars (DD 777) after its recent conservation. The flag, damaged during a 1945 kamikaze attack, was preserved through the efforts of the NHC, USS Zellars Association, and the Stillwater Textile Conservation Studio. Navy photo by MC2 Gina K. MorrissetteMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael D. Stevens visits the Naval History and Heritage Command at the Washington Navy Yard for a guided tour with Capt. Henry J. Hendrix, director of NHHC. Photo courtesy of Mrs. Richard FerryRichard Ferry receives a second purple heart for wounds received in Korea. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 13

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From Defense Media ActivityWith the eet having wrapped up its annual E-5 periodic evaluations and the chief petty ocer selection board eligible list now released, the sta at All Hands Magazine thought now would be a good time to address some common myths about enlisted evaluations. All Hands recently in terviewed Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, the eet master chief for manpower, personnel, training and education, to get her thoughts on six evaluation myths. Myth 1: Because this is a Sailors rst evaluation at a new command, he or she should expect to get a P promotion recommendation when ranked against his or her peers. Answer: I would not say that it is a given that any Sailors rst evaluation at a command is automatically going to be a P. I have seen where that is not true. I have seen some rst evaluations be MPs. What I would share though is we have to be practical about it. For instance, you have an RDC coming from Recruit Training Command. eyve been there for three years and theyre a hot runner EP. en they check in to VFA-136 as an AT1, lets say, and theyve only been there for four months. Should that Sailor have the expectation that they get an EP? I dont think they should. I got it that you were an EP at RTC, but youve been here for four months. ere are other Sailors that have been at that command for maybe a year or two and theyre also front runners. So, we have to take that into consideration. e automatic myth is just not true. Are there some com mands that use that as a going in for recommen dations to the ranking board? Sure. Remember, these are the rst evals these guys are going to get at this command. eyre going to be here for three or four years, and if theyre on a ship, some of the sea intensive ratings are going to be there for ve years. Are we setting that Sailor up? Is he or she going to be able to sustain that hot running [performance] for ve years? We have to take all that into consideration. So, I dont think that its automatic. I think there is a lot of leadership thought that goes into how we rank our Sailors, and I have to trust that the command master chiefs and com manding ocers out there are doing due diligence and really using integrity when they sit down and evaluate their personnel. I believe a board member is going to look at Block 14 and Block 15 and it will tell them right there how long that evaluation period is for. Myth 2: Block 40, the individual trait average, is not as important as the promotion recommendation for a Sailor. Per formance trait averages uctuate based on where Sailors are ranked in a summary group, and are not a true reection of a Sailors individual perfor mance. A: Some Sailors may have come to that con clusion because when we take advancement exams, for example, we are not looking at Block 40 for the individual trait average. We are calculating their PMA based on whether they were an EP, MP or P. So, that might be where that myth comes from. But lets talk about [Sailors] taking the E-7 exam and they get to the [CPO] selection board. And Ill tell you what, as a board member Block 40 meant a lot to me. Because I would compare Block 40 to the reporting seniors summary group average, and whether that Sailor was a P, MP or an EP, if they were well above that reporting seniors av erage I took that into ac count. at meant a lot to me. So, I think maybe there are two stories there: for calculating your exam score, thats why we use the promotion recommendation. But, now that youre taking that chiefs exam and youre making the board, Im denitely looking at Block 40 to see what your individual trait average is. As we all know, we do make some very ju nior chief petty ocers seven or eight years. at board member will go back at least ve years. I might see a second class eval. Is Block 40 then going to come into account for me? Absolutely, and Im denitely going to be reading it. Block 40 might not mat ter today, but is it going to matter in your future? So, lets not discount how im portant it is to work hard for every single trait. Myth 3: Block 41, as signment recommendations, are essentially meaningless and not tak en into account by detailers or selection boards. A: If I have a Sailor that the chain of command does not feel that that in dividual does not perform at a rate where they would recommend them for a more responsible billet out in the eet, I would be concerned. If the recommendation said None and None, I would be concerned. So, it does matter, and I do think that board members do look at that. at [block] also tells me, if I was a supervisor or LPO, what I am going to challenge that Sailor with for their next job. I know theyre going to want to take on greater re sponsibility, what am I go ing to recommend them for; LPO at sea, RDC, instructor duty? But if I see None and None then Im going to be concerned. As petty ocers, when we prepare our brag sheets for our leadership we should be telling them what were interested in also. Let us know what your desires are. However, if I have a Sailor that struggles with physical tness, Im prob ably not going to recom mend them for recruit division commander. We need to make sure that our Sailors are qualied for what were recommending them for. Be cause were sending them mixed messages when we say theyre recommended for RDC or ag writer and they have some challenges. We need to be brutally honest with our Sailors so that they can aspire to get better. If I tell you that youre a .0 all the time, youre not going to do any thing to get better. Myth 4: In order for PO1s to be selected by the CPO selection board, they must have the title LPO listed in Block 29, primary duties, from a deployable command, i.e. ship, squadron, NECC billet, etc. Also, LPOs who change positions from one evaluation cycle to the next, and no longer have the LPO title on their evaluation, should view this change as a detractor. A: In Block 29, each [rating] community has specic expectations of milestones they want their Sailors to reach. If I see an eval from a large command, like an aircraft carrier I know in air de partment there are dozens of rst class petty ocers. eyre probably not all going to get to be LPOs. e board members un derstand that. So, Im not going to have LPO in Block 29, but in Block 43 thats where I really get to share information about what that Sailor is really do ing. If there are still some leadership roles the Sailor holds that arent LPO, that information should be captured in Block 43. For example, I see that an ABH1 has been aboard USS Carl Vinson for three years and hasnt been an LPO. OK, so Im a little concerned, but when I turn the eval over and read Block 43, that command has done an outstanding job of describing what that Sailor did. Now if Im on a de stroyer and I know theres only one PS1 working in admin. If theyre not the LPO Im concerned. Leadership has a responsibil ity of setting Sailors up for success. e way I do that is by sharing informa tion with them and giving them opportunities. Now, once Ive given someone an opportunity, its their responsibility to capitalize on that opportunity. So, if youre a rst class petty ocer and Im trying to set you up for success and giving you an opportu nity, and youre not rising to the challenge, I think I need to be brutally honest with you on that eval. Maybe you just dont have what it takes to be an LPO, and maybe that command is sending the selection board a message. I dont think that just because youre not an LPO youre not going to make chief. ats what Block 43 is for, and thats why commands expand on what that Sailor is do ing in whatever billet is listed in Block 29. Myth 5: Having a comment such as Performing as an EP Sailor in Block 43 is just as strong as get ting an EP promotion rec ommendation in Block 45. A: I think this is very important. Sometimes you have a rst class mess thats hitting on all cyl inders. Someones going to get a promotable and theyre really an EP. ats when I see that statement and it sends a message to the board to say Dont even look at that P promotion recommendation. Let me talk about this EP Sailor, and he performs at a much higher level than I can give him credit for. When a commanding ocer, de partment head or depart ment LCPO is using a line like that, they mean what theyre saying and send ing a strong message to the board. Myth 6: Sailors do not get promoted with P promotion recommendations, especially if the evaluations are below a reporting seniors sum mary group average. A: I dont think thats a myth. at type of eval is also sending the board a message. Youre not only saying that this Sailor is a P, but also that they are below the reporting seniors summary group av erage. So, lets say that the summary group average is 4.00. And this Sailor is coming in at 3.17. eres a big dierence between a 3.17 and a 3.86. e 3.86 is very close to the reporting seniors aver age, so that Sailor I would give him the benet of the doubt. But if that commanding ocer is giving me a 3.17, hes probably telling me something, and that Sailor is probably not ready right now to be pro moted. If the myth is Sailors dont get promoted with P promotion recommendations, then that is a myth. Because Ive seen some Ps that were above or at the reporting seniors av erage get selected. But if youre below the report ing seniors average, then youre probably not doing everything that you need to be doing. My nal thought on this topic is that we should all be familiar with the evaluation instruction, BUPERS Instruction 1610.10C. It is our responsibility to understand what the instruc tion says, and then guide our evaluation processes accordingly.Six myths about enlisted evaluations debunkedNavy photo by MC3 Jules StobaughFleet Master Chief of Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education April Beldo answers questions from Sailors during a world-wide all-hands call at Defense Media Activity at Fort George G. Meade, Md.Navy photoThen Master Chief April Beldo, then-Command Master Chief of the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), compliments Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joel Carlson on his haircut in this 2010 photo. Beldo 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014

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New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more infor mation or to register, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service mem bers wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit or command can fur nish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five par ticipants. Personnel will tailor presenta tions to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet and Family is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. Fleet and Family hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family SC workshops paints are designed solely for cosmetic purposes, polybroblast is being engineered specically for tactical vehicles used in a variety of extremely harsh en vironments. We dont care if its pretty, said Dr. Jason Benkoski, senior scientist at the university lab and lead researcher on the project. We only care about pre venting corrosion. From rainstorms to sunlight, tactical vehicles face constant corrosion threats from the elements. Corrosion costs the Department of the Navy about $7 billion each year. About $500 million of that is the result of corrosion to Marine Corps ground vehicles, according to the most recent De partment of Defense reports. Vehicles transported and stored on ships also are subject to salt spray from the ocean, a leading cause of problems for military hardware. In one laboratory experiment, poly broblast showed it could prevent rust ing for six weeks inside a chamber lled with salt fog. We are still looking into how to make this additive even more eective, but initial results like that are encouraging, said Scott Rideout, deputy program manager, Light Tactical Vehicles, Pro gram Executive Ocer Land Systems, which is overseeing continued development on polybroblast for potential use on the Marine Corps variant of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. Carry that out of the lab and into the inventory, and that translates to improved readiness and big savings. e research and development of polybroblast underscores the Marine Corps commitment to be modernized with equipment and logistics that ex pand expeditionary capability and pre serve our ability to operate from the sea as stated in the Marine Corps Vision and Strategy 2025. Development of polybroblast began in 2008 and continued through the suc cession of three ONR program manag ers, eventually culminating in promis ing eld and lab tests and a transition to PEO Land Systems. To go from nothing to deployment in ve years would be quite extraordinary, Benkoski said. is progress has a lot to do with ONRs close relationship with PEO Land Systems and both organiza tions willingness to let me carry out the research in accordance with our shared vision.PaintFrom Page 9 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Marine statue awaits repairsBy Cpl. Samuel EllisMarine Corps Base Quantico | April 09, 2014A copy of probably one of the most iconic Marine Corps symbols, the monu ment of the Iwo Jima agraising, sits, as if a guard, at the main gate aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico. When Marines of the Ceremonial Platoon went to change the monu ments ag on March 30, 2014, they found cracks in the structure. I would attribute this damage to normal weath ering, said John Callaway, Quantico Public Works operations ocer, engineering technician. e cracks are not large, but they need repair so water damage doesnt get in the limestone. Callaway explained that water in the cracks could become ice, which would further damage the struc ture. Although damaged property typically isnt a positive thing, Elton Rupe, facilities operations spe cialist, base facilities division, explained that while examining the damage, the inspectors also found other maintenance issues that needed to be ad dressed. [e statue] shows sign of cracking where some repairs were made sev eral year ago after it was vandalized [in December, 2012], said Rupe. ere are additional cracks including original ones, and a crack in the reattached nger. Looking back on the timeline from the date of discovery to the correc tive actions that are be ing made, Rupe noted the level of professionalism and timeliness displayed in the handling of the case. It went through the proper channels, said Callaway. e damage was found, reported and acted on in a matter of days, said Rupe. Its been discovered and acted on quickly, and we are hoping to have the repairs done as soon as pos sible. Although a contract package to repair the monument is being developed, there is no set date or cost for completion at this time. Marine Corps photo by Master Sgt. Josue SantoyoCracks line a hand of the Iwo Jima monument aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico. Coast Guard photo by PO1 Bill ColcloughCoast Guard Station New Orleans member Seaman Lyndsey Singer pilots the 45-foot Response Boat Medium on Lake Pontchartrain during a checkBy PO1 Bill ColcloughFrom Coast Guard CompassFor Coast Guards men engaged in an active search for people in dis tress, who may be on the verge of panic, fright or worse, they have to be cool and calm, regardless of the state of seas, the boat or their own mind. Response crews must be ready and capable to take the helm of a Coast Guard boat and pilot it home, even the newest members. In a word, they must be qualied, or as members say, quald, before they are full-edged crew members. Known as the check ride, part exam and practi cal exercise crucible, each crewmember undergoes a series of drills simulating casualties and incidents that can and do occur in the maritime environment. At Coast Guard Station New Orleans, Seaman Lyndsey Singer completed a check ride aboard the stations new 45-foot Re sponse Boat Medium, which features joystick controls on the armrests instead of a traditional steering wheel. Just step into the 45-footers pilothouse and you step into the future. With water jet propulsion, shock-mitigating seats and live-feed monitors of the engine space, you get the feeling you need ight school. is boat almost has joysticks for joysticks. A combination of joystick and tillers control thrust vectoring for maneuver ing. I was very nervous. Im still nervous, always ner vous to drive the boat, but its a part of the job. e size and the way it handles and getting used to every thing, especially when you get aboard, its so over whelming, said Singer. I am more at ease now driving the boat after the check ride. In addition to driving the boat along a charted course, Singer tracked the location of Oscar, a red inatable device simulat ing a person in the water fallen overboard, while maintaining clear com munication with the crew, including the demonstra tion of steering the boat inside the aft steering space. In a span of just under two hours or the time it takes to watch a movie, Singer passed the board; a technical error while tending line during a tow evo lution and minor diculty heaving line to another boatcrew did not prevent earning the 45-footer qualication. e most nerve-wrack ing part is the apprehen sion, anxiety going into it knowing you are going to have a board, , Singer said. Not because I have done it a million times, but, anything can go wrong. Upon entrance into the communications center on the second oor at Station New Orleans, the motto Facta Non Verba, which is Latin for Actions speak louder than words, is painted at the top of the wall as a reminder to all who enter. It is not enough to say you can drive the boat. No matter what happens, you have to be ready to drive, lead and care for your crew and survivors. With as strong a de termination and a light touch as the aluminum in the deep-V hull of the 45, Singer forged nerves of keel.Check ride oers training

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014 17 From Coast Guard CompassCoast Guard crews had an important medical transport from Kauai to Oahu, Hawaii, and back again. e mission required many agencies working together to ensure the precious cargo was safe. eir cargo? R1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal. Hawaiian monk seals like R1KU are one of the rarest marine mammals in the world with an estimated population of 1,200. Part of the true seal family, they are one of only two remaining monk seal species. is particular transport, with the sup port of the National Oceanic and Atmo spheric Administration, required two independent missions. e rst involved a Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point C-130 airplane transporting the ill animal from Kauai to Oahu for medical care. ere, R1KU underwent surgery to remove a life-threat ening infection in her eye. Not long after surgery, the Hawaiian monk seal was medically cleared for re lease and an H-65 helicopter supported the second ight to transport the animal from Oahu back to Kauai. It was a rst for the air station, as the facility had just opened a new landing area. We were able to land within yards of the rehab center eliminating the onehour land transport from the facility to our air station and the additional stress placed on the animal, said Eric Roberts, marine mammal response coordinator for the 14th Coast Guard District. Now back in Kauai, the seal will be reintroduced into the ocean after a full recovery from the surgery and eye infec tion. Safeguarding marine mammals falls under the Coast Guards living marine resources mission, one of the services 11 statutory missions. e nations waterways and their eco systems are vital to the countrys econ omy and health. is includes ensuring the countrys marine protected species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels. Coast Guard units in Hawaii partner with NOAA often on living marine re sources missions. In fact, the 14th Coast Guard District is home to four marine national monuments and two national marine sanctu aries, more than any other region in the United States.Navy photo by John F. WilliamsRear Adm. Matthew Klunder, chief of naval research, talks with a visitor at the joint Office of Naval Research, Naval Research Laboratory and Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory exhibit during the Navy Leagues Sea-Air-Space Exposition. Forward presence stressed By MC3 Jules StobaughDefense Media ActivityLeading ocials from the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard spoke about op erating forward and being partners with global presence at the 2014 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Md., April 7. e Sea-Air-Space Expo is an annual event that brings together key military decision makers, the U.S. defense indus trial base and private-sector U.S. compa nies for an innovative and educational maritime based event. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, deputy chief of naval operations for Operations, Plans, and Strategy, delivered opening remarks. Its my pleasure to sit with such a group of, not just distinguished panel ists, but in many cases good friends, said Howard. e Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard are partners that share a responsibility to safeguard the nation, sustain global engagement, project U.S. inuence, and deter future conict. Vice Adm. Tom Copeman, commander, Naval Surface Forces Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet, spoke about sur face ships and the importance of operat ing forward. Surface ships, which Im the surface boss, were about 73 percent of the com missioned ships in the Navy, said Cope man. We make up the vast majority of the forward presence that we talk about and I think were key in developing part nerships. If youre not out and about, if youre not deployed, you cant be where it mat ters, when it matters, said Copeman. e 2014 Sea-Air-Space features more than 175 industry exhibits, opportunities to learn about and test advanced military equipment, professional develop ment sessions, and daily exhibit hall oor speaker sessions. e Sea-Air-Space Expo is free and open to active duty, Reserve and retired military, federal and state government employees, members of Congress and their sta, and Navy League members.Coast Guard photoR1KU, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal was transported for treatment. Coast Guard aids rescue By Cpl. Joshua YoungMarine Expeditionary Brigade AfghanistanSoldiers with 4th Tolay, 6th Kandak, 4th Brigade, Afghan National Army, conducted a nal train ing exercise for a security training program with Regional Corps Battle School aboard Camp Bastion, Af ghanistan, April 1. e two-week training program teaches the sol diers medical treatment, communication, patrolling techniques, forward operating base security and how to conduct vehicle checkpoints and op erate as a quick reaction force. Afghan instructors run the entire exercise, with coalition forces in the background who provide feedback to the instruc tors. When you go into the battleeld, these kind of things will happen, said Sgt. Patson Zazai, a soldier with the ANA and a participant in the course, speaking about the appli cability of rehearsing the set-up of forward operat ing base security. We are getting experience from here and we need to con tinue our training. Doing this kind of practice will help us provide security for our people and we can save our country. When the soldiers ar rived at the simulated for ward operating base, they received instruction from their commanders and took to providing immedi ate security. Once security was es tablished the platoon was broken o into smaller groups designated as communication, FOB security and a quick reac tion force, the remainder establishing a team dedi cated to patrolling. is is way ahead of what we thought it would be, said Sta Sgt. Damian Rodriguez, security forc es chief, Regional Corps Battle School. is is night and day compared to where it was two weeks ago at the beginning of the training. e patrols initial mis sion was to search the surrounding villages for potential threats and to get a better idea of what to expect. e Afghan villagers were role-played by coalition personnel and inter preters. Following the patrol, the next training task was to reach out to local village elders to nd out if there are any Taliban role-play ers in the area. ere were some bar riers to overcome, but theyre trying to get it worked out right now, said Rodriguez, 33, from San Fernando, Calif., referenc ing the language and cul tural barriers the Afghans have with each other as a result of being from various regions of Afghanistan. ings are going very well. With the right amount of training, they should be able to get it. ere is a proverb in the military that if you waste much in sweat, it will pre vent you from wasting blood in the battleeld, said 1st Sgt. Abdulla, the company commander for 4th Tolay. ats why Im very sure this kind of exer cise and training is best for our soldiers.Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Joshua YoungA soldier with 4th Tolay, 6th Kandak, 4th Brigade, Afghan National Army, provides security during a final training exercise for the security training program.Marine Corps wraps up Afghan Army training

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20 THE PERISCOPE NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 24, 2014