The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00344


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Full Text

PAGE 1

MA2 Mark Mayo killed in Norfolk shootingBy MC1 Molly A. BurgessFor Commander, Navy Region Mid AtlanticHundreds of service members, friends and family led into the Naval Station Norfolk auditorium April 7, and whispered calming stories about 24 year-old Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo, as they waited for the memorial service to begin. Mayo, labeled a hero for his actions on March 24 when he was on duty as chief of the guard on Pier 1 of Naval Station Norfolk, put himself between a gunman and USS Mahans (DDG 72) duty petty ocer of the watch, giving his own life to ensure the safety of the Sailors on board the ship. Webster denes a hero as an illustrious warrior, a man admired for his achievements and noble qualities and one who shows great courage. Petty ocer Mayo epitomizes this denition, said NAVSTA Norfolks Commanding Ocer Capt. Robert Clark, during his opening remarks. He made a split-second decision to act and benet more than just himself. is type of courage cannot be taught, it is something that resides deep within and is displayed without conscious thought. It is the decision to render aid when many would watch from the sidelines. As fellow shipmates and guests took turns at the podium, words were spoken to describe Mayos character as they knew him to be. I think we can all say that when we were young, we thought heroes wore a mask, a cape and had super powers. Petty Ocer Mayo wore no mask, yet he had character, said Lt. Errol Johnson, security ocer at NAVSTA Norfolk. He didnt have a cape, yet in the face of danger and adversity, he displayed courage, and with no super powers, also displayed a wealth of self-sacrice. Master-atArms 2nd Class Mark Mayo is a true denition of a real hero. Mayo, born in Washington, D.C., but moved to Hagerstown, Md., when still in grade school, joined the Navy in October 2007, completing a tour at Naval Se curity Forces Bahrain followed by a tour at Naval StaRussians y near USS CookDDG on patrol in Western Black SeaBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceA Russian attack aircraft repeat edly ew near the USS Donald Cook in international waters in the Black Sea on April 12, a Penta gon spokesman said April 14. e USS Cook (DDG 75) was patrolling in the western Black Sea when an unarmed Russian Su-24 Fencer attack aircraft repeatedly ew near the Navy ship, Army Col. Steve Warren told reporters. e aircraft did not respond to multiple queries and warnings from Donald Cook, and the event ended without incident after ap proximately 90 minutes, Warren said. is provocative and un professional Russian action is inconsistent with international pro tocols and previous agreements on the professional interaction between our militaries. Two Russian aircraft were present, but only one took part in the provocative actions, Warren said. e aircraft ew from near sea level to a couple of thousand feet, he added, but never overew the U.S. Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. e Russian plane made a total of 12 passes, he said. e wingman stayed at a considerably higher altitude, Warren said. Ocials later said the aircraft approached within about 1,000 yards of the ship. e USS Cook was never in danger, Warren said. e Donald Cook is more than capable of defending itself against two Su-24s, the colonel said. Warren said he does not think Up Periscope Meeting the famous Page 9 Sex assault Mike Domitrz raises awareness Page 13 Kids Fest MWR hosts its annual celebration Page 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen The Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics were hosted by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay April 10 at Camden County High School. More photos on Page 4.Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Mayo, Page 6 NSB Kings Bay hosts Area competition at Camden County High SchoolBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMarking its 18th anniversary, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Sailors and Marines volunteered their time to help with the Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics April 10, at Camden County High School. is is a very rewarding experience, said Melinda NesSmith-Picard, the Kings Bay community planning liaison. is is the 17th year Ive been out here helping. Its great to see all of these kids and adults with special needs playing and doing their best to excel at their sport. is is a great way to give back to the community and its equally benecial to the kids to interact with the military. Capt. Harvey Guey, NSB Kings Bay Commanding Ocer, opened the ceremony by welcoming both Special Olympians and volunteers, and expressed what a motivation the participants were to all. e spirit of generosity is alive in the hearts of the Special Olympians as well as the Kings Bays service members and volunteers. One Olympian, Mary Chancey wanted to give something in return to her fellow athletes. Mary participates every year during the Special Olympics, said Dr. Millicent Sweeting, a teacher at Camden County Middle School. For her birthday, she unselshly asked for donations for the Special Olympics. She was able to collect a lot of money for this exciting event. Mary said she was happy to collect her birthday money for the Special Olympics because she enjoys participating every year. Each competitor buddied with up to two military volunteers. rough the course of the day, the Olympians competed in the softball and football throw, soccer ball kick and various types of races. I love to see the kids faces running across the line, ET2 Giovanni Toledo said. ey are all excited and happy to accomplish their event, and to have their buddies cheer them on. e Special Olympics mission, aimed at creating a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people, still stands true to this day. roughout Special Olympics history, children and adults with special-needs have been able to compete in Olympicstyle sport competitions, while at the same time learning the importance of teamwork and, most importantly, recognizing the potentials of what they can do. I love to see the kids faces running across the line. ET2 Giovanni Toledo Special Olympics buddy Special Olympians enjoy their day Pentagon ocials testify before Congress April 8By Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceGiven the increasing interconnectedness of global communities, a creative, collaborative approach to the challenges posed by weapons of mass destruction must be the rule, not the exception, senior Pentagon ocials told Congress April 8. Andrew C. Weber, assistant secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical, and biological defense programs, and Rebecca Hersman, deputy assistant secretary of defense for countering weapons of mass destruction, outlined the DODs approach to squelching the constant evolution of weapons materials, tactics, and technologies within adversaries reach at a hearing of the House Armed Services Committees intelligence, emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee. Countering such threats requires exible and agile responses, capable partners, as well as whole-ofdepartment, whole-ofgovernment, and even whole-of-internation al-community solutions, Hersman said. Hersman credited international partners and support from Congress for Syrias dwindling chemical weapons program. e centerpiece of the U.S. contribution, the motor vessel ship Cape Ray, is outtted with DODs recently developed eld deployable hydrolysis systems and manned by the nest experts from our operational and technical communities, she said. Its now ready to neutralize the most dangerous chemicals in the Syrian arsenal in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound fashion. Overall, Hersman said, the Defense Department will look to cooperation as a force multiplier, enabling swift, compreWeber HersmanSuppressing WMD never-ending evolutionNavy photo by MC3 Andrew SchneiderA program sits on a table during a memorial service for Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mark Aaron Mayo at Naval Station Norfolk.Friends remember slain Sailor See WMD, Page 6 See Cook, Page 6

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Question: What should I do if I have a bad reaction to my medication? Answer: Sometimes medications can cause unintended reactions from minor to life-threatening in nature. Minor reactions should be reported to your provider or pharmacist for advice pharmacy phone numbers are usually located on the prescription bottle. For serious or life threatening reactions such as diculty breathing, tightness in your chest, swelling, itching or convulsions call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Q: Why do some medications warn me of sunburn? A: Some medications such as sulfa antibiotics, like septra or bactrim, can cause photosensitivity causing sensitivity to sun rays or likely sunburning. Even short exposure to sun rays or tanning booths can cause skin rash, itching, redness or even severe sunburn. If your prescription label cautions against sun exposure, try avoiding the highest burn index of the day, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be out, wear protective clothing and accessories. In addition, apply sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher), use SPF lip balm and wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. Q: Is it important how I store my medications? A: Each medication has unique storage requirements. Because the eectiveness of your medication may be altered by temperature light or humidity, many medications should be stored in a cool, dry, place away from moisture, heat and sunlight. Always read medication labels for storage recommendations. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist if special storage procedures are needed. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. is column was written by Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West pharmacist. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, send it to jaxpublicaairs@med.navy.mil. From the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Mail RoomNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays Mail Room gets a great deal of mail addressed to individuals living in Unaccompanied Housing with a Building number and room number. Personal mail is not delivered to UH. Department of Defense Postal Manual, OPNAVINST 5218.7B and SUBASEINST 5218.3B states: Personal mail for personnel living on and o base in private quarters where U.S. Postal Service provides service shall be addressed to their home address. Mail for personnel living in UH, where USPS does not provide service should be addressed to their unit address or box number address in order that it may be handled separately from the activities ocial mail. In order to get mail delivered in a timely manner, members should include their command in their address. is helps the Mail Room get the mail to individuals as quickly as possible. If the Mail Room is unable to determine which command the individual is attached, the mail is returned to the sender. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CommissaryApril is the Month of the Military Child, and commissaries are celebrating with giveaways and savings for the entire family. Children in military households face unique challenges because of the demands of military life, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs sales director. So, at the Defense Commissary Agency, we want to acknowledge them and do all we can to provide their families with great values on quality products they can depend on. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries in April to oer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times. For more, go to www.commissaries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_12_14.cfm Little Heros Commissaries are showcasing fruits, veggies for Little Heroes in April. To honor military children, commissaries have fun ways for parents and their little heroes to learn about the nutritious value of fruits and vegetables. During April, the Month of the Military Child, commissary produce departments are inviting installation child development centers to take tours highlighting the health benets of fruits and vegetables. Commissary store managers can also conduct this presentation at the child development center. Our goal in April is that every store will oer a store tour or presentation at the child development center, said Bridget Bennett, DeCAs produce category manager. We may even have local installation dietitians available to enhance the education about the benets of consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. Tour participants may sample some unique fruits and vegetables, and receive new healthful recipes. For more information, go to www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Commissary customers can check their local commissary to nd out more about fresh produce samples, coupons, giveaways and goodie bags for children participating in the fruits and veggies events. Special savings Commissaries.com oers special savings for military patrons, families Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, www.commissaries.com, to nd information about whats on sale at their local commissary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Sav ings link at www.commissaries. com/partners.cfm to nd more coupons, specials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madison and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May. Modelers air show April 19e Kings Bay Radio Controlled Modelers Second Annual Public Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at Oakwell RC Aireld, at the end of Clarks Blu and Oakwell Road. Flight demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for location, pictures and updates. Food and drink available on site.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uniform locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Balfour Beatty event, scholarshipEarth Day is a worldwide celebration in support of environmental protection. Join Balfour Beatty Communities to create ower pots starting at 3:30 p.m., April 22 at the Balfour Beatty Community Center, 16 Wren Court for an Earth Day Craft Event. Bring a 2-liter bottle and a friend. Balfour Beatty is accepting scholarship application from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communities and plan to attend accredited educational/ technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org/scholarships.aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Shrimp Fest parade still open e deadline to enter the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festivals Pirate Parade, has been extended until April 19. Held in Fernandina Beach, the parade begins at 6 p.m. May 1. is years theme is Home of the Shrimpers Celebrating 51 Years of Fun. Parade fees are $25 for non-prots, $30 for civic organizations, $45 for commercial or commercially sponsored entries and $85 for political, candidate or campaign entries. Applications for the Pirate Parade can be found under the Events tab at ShrimpFestival.com. For more information, contact Parade Chair Billie Childers at (904) 548-1163.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335. Now hear this! From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded at www.kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. Additional information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Military Child Month promoted Kings Bay Commissary Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Unaccompanied Housing: no mail Kings Bay Mail Room Ask the Doc By Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin NBHC Key West Know, care for your medications

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Photos by EM1 Mark TreenAbove, Mike Domitrz has Sailors act out roles in a show called Can I Kiss You? April 8 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium, to raise awareness of what can be done about sexual assault. Right, MM1 David Havens enjoys the show. Domitrz entertains while using his life story to touch the heart of the matter. Sailors were impacted and many said they were planning to talk to their wives. I need to go home and tell her Ill be there for her if anything happened, one audience member said. Can I Kiss You? Courtesy photoGateway Inn Appreciation DayThe Navy Lodging Appreciation Day celebration was March 26 as a day of recognition to highlight program and individual accomplishments at the Kings Bay Navy Gateway Inns & Suites. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Officer, Cmdr. Ed Callahan, took a few minutes to express the communitys thanks for the outstanding service all the employees provide. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 RP2 Franklin Dippy helps his buddy light the Special Olympic torch during the opening ceremony at the Camden County High School track. The annual event was April 10. Athletes were greeted by cheers and applause. A Marine hugs his Special Olympic buddy. Special Olympics Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 2014 Sailors and Marines spent the day attending to the needs of the athletes. A Sailor greets her buddy with a hug. The athletes enjoyed the attention. The Special Olympians were the heroes of the day. Sailors and Marines sign up to volunteer. Photos by EM1 Mark Treen

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 5 Kids Fest 2014 NSB Kings Bay MWRsLeft, face painted kids enjoy a ride on the train. Right, MR2 Jonathan Gist and his son Nathan enjoy a slide down one of four inflatables. Below, Makenna gets a pirate tatoo as Brittney, wife of MCSFBns MA2 Tyler Clukey, watches. Left, Black Widow and Captain America made a special appear ance. MA3 Edward Ritchie and MASN Latoshia Mitchell MCSFBn were good sports. A youngster gets the puppy treatment. Lunden Trombley stands by Iron Man. Right, the photo booth was a big hit. Families tried on props and made as many goofy faces as they could. Photos by EM1 Mark Treen Child Abuse Awareness Month. Stormie and Skielor Petenbrink race to pump balloons. Makenna and Brittney Clukey try moustaches.

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. W eekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. hensive action to respond to existing and emerging WMD threats. Similarly on the biological front, advancing technology, unsecured pathogen stores, and weak national controls create dangerous opportunities for hostile state and nonstate actors to acquire, proliferate, or use biological agents with potentially catastrophic consequences, Hersman said. To protect our forces, reduce risks to our citizens, and respond eectively to crises, DOD must build holistic solutions across its bio-prevention and biode fense eorts, she reported. We will continue to pri oritize eorts to secure pathogens worldwide, fos ter a strong bio-security culture, enhance detection and strategic warning, and integrate more eectively with partners. And nuclear threats also remain a prominent concern, Hersman said. Unless arrested and reversed, she told the panel, the nuclear ambitions of countries like North Korea and Iran can imperil the interests of the United States and our allies and partners around the world, creating instability and increasing the likelihood that other nations may seek to become nuclear-armed states. Weber said U.S. investments in countering chemical, biological and nuclear threats have paid dividends in destroying serious chemical weapons materials the Assad regime used to kill civilians in Syria last summer and that posed a looming threat to Israel, Jordan and the region. He noted the recent arrival of U.S. Army civilians to Rota, Spain, where they began their mission to neutralize some of Syrias most dangerous chemicals. DOD scientists and engineers developed these systems aboard the specially tted ship Cape Ray within just six months based on safe, proven chemical weapons destruction technology, Weber said, calling the feat a true testament to what the Department of Defense can contribute to U.S. and international security. eir work, he noted, fol lows the U.S. forces suc cess in assisting the Liby ans in destroying the last of Moammar Gadhas weapons of mass destruction. e success stories of U.S. innovation in developing international partner ships to mitigate the risk of states, terrorist organizations, or rogue individu als accessing and using chemical, biological, and nuclear materials highlight ongoing eorts to coun ter the current and future weapons of mass destruc tion threats, Weber said. Our work ranges from pathogen consolidation and medical biodefense and countermeasure work, biodefense preparedness with the Republic of Korea, to nuclear counterterrorism and threat reduction cooperation with two of our closes allies: the United Kingdom and France, he said. tion Rota, Spain, before checking on board to Naval Station Norfolk in May 2011. Master-at-Arms Virgil Savage, a friend of Mayos, and coworker at NAVSTA Norfolk, remembered Mayo for his outspoken demeanor and courageous posture who he said was always willing to help those in need. Mayo was a little guy but he carried himself with an attitude of a giant. He wouldnt back down from anybody and he wouldnt just let you roll over him for any reason, Savage said. He stood up for people all the time so when I heard that he saved another persons life, it did not surprise me at all. ats something he would do without thinking, and I am proud to say I knew him. During the course of the ceremony, words of scriptures, prayers and kind words to the family were expressed, re minding those in attendance that Mayo and his seless act would not be forgotten. To my shipmate and my friend, MA2 Mayo, rest on my brother, said Department of the Navy Ocer Levon Snyder. We have the watch here on Earth, but one day, we will relieve you from your watch in Heaven. As the ceremony came to a close, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Orlando Morin stood at the podium and began a roll call where Master-at-Arms in attendance stood and replied back Present MA1 as their names were called, signifying that they were ready to stand watch. Call of the roll. MASN Miller. MASN Harrell. MA3 Stewart, Morin called out. As he neared the end of the list, one name did not have a respondent. MA2 Mayo... MA2 Mark Mayo... Mark Aaron Mayo. e call remained unanswered. ank you for providing the United States Navy with a young man of such impeccable character. A man who served his country with honor courage and commitment. Mrs. Blair, Mr. Mayo, your son will forever remain in the hearts and minds of everyone at Naval Station Norfolk, said Clark, comforting the family in attendance. He will be remembered across this great country and throughout the Navy as a hero who made the unquestionable brave decision to protect the lives of others, even at his own peril. Mayo will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Va., later this month.WMDFrom Page 1 MayoFrom Page 1 this is an example of a young pilot joyriding. I would have diculty believing that two Russian pilots, on their own, would chose to take such an action, he said. Weve seen the Russians conduct themselves unprofessionally and in violation of international norms in Ukraine for several months, and these continued acts of provocation and unprofessionalism do nothing to de-escalate the situation in Ukraine, which we called on the Russians to do. e Cook arrived in the Black Sea on April 10. e ship is now making a port call in Constanta, Romania.CookFrom Page 1 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Happy Easter from Rack-N-Roll Lanes. From 1 to 8 p.m. April 20, enjoy bowling with family and friends when all games are 50 and shoe rentals are $2.50 per person. For more information, call R-N-R lanes at (912) 573-9492. Fitness Complex basketball courts e courts will be secured Monday, April 21, for the Save a Life Tour being held inside. e courts will re-open on Tuesday morning regular hours. Call the Fitness Complex for any questions at (912) 573-3990. White Water Adventure Weekend Navy Advencures Unleased Kings Bay is going to National Whitewater Center (www. usnwc.org) in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Friday. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55 (liberty) and optional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www.usnwc.org/memorial-day-trail-races. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Rafting, Mega Jump plus Memorial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All participants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting is April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 4091611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Movie Under the Stars At dusk, approximately 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at the Youth Center Ballelds, MWR will be showing Walking with Dinosaurs (rated PG). Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie outdoors on the giant outdoor theatre. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and user-friendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the lat est information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for chil dren kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student let ter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Periscope file photoRack-N-Roll has special for Easter Just for kids THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 7

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Most of the famous people Ive met are from the world of sports. But theres one who wasnt. Leonard Nimoy. You know him as Mr. Spock, the original one. He was promoting his book I Am Not Spock, in the wake of the Star Trek TV series. Like most actors, he didnt want to be typecast and was looking for new work. Nimoy was a veteran actor who had appeared in 11 forgettable movies and as a guest star on more than 60 TV series before Star Trek. He made a couple more forgettable films and then returned as Spock in Star Trek, the Motion Picture and then did 11 more Star Trekassociated movies and TV series among other things. Nimoy later admitted I Am Not Spock was not a good idea. The lesson here kids, and take it from Mr. Spock, not me, is there are worse things in life than being typecast.Have you ever met somebody whos famous?Dee Lester NSB Public Works Nashville, Tenn. Jim Varney. He told me a funny joke thats not appropriate for the paper. And, Barbara Mandrells sister, Irene. Firefighter/Paramedic Howard Davis Kings Bay F.D. Kingsland Robin Williams on a USO tour and Blake Clark. He plays in all the Adam Sandler movies. Grover Randolph Contractor Jesup, Ga. I met T.I. I met him at a concert during college. MR1 Charles Berry NS Mayport Crestview, Fla. I met Billy Blanks back in 2001 and Lonestar, the country music group. MT1 Levi Hensiek Sub Squadron 20 Mexico, Mo. Payton Manning. He signed my ticket stub at a Jacksonville Jaguar game. It was his last game as an Indianapolis Colt. MA2 Amber Ball Security Force Battalion Rogersville, Tenn. Dolly Parton. I met her at Dollywood. It was awesome. Shes amazing. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceFor the second time since a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, ve years ago, President Barack Obama returned to the Army post April 9 to again pay tribute to soldiers cut down by one of their own, oering condolences to the families of those killed by an Army specialist last week and acknowledging that part of what makes this so painful is that weve been here before. Once more, soldiers who survived foreign war zones were struck down here at home, where they are supposed to be safe, Obama told mourning families and members of the Fort Hood community. is tragedy tears a wound still raw from ve years ago, the president said during a ceremony held at the same location where he eulogized the 13 people killed by Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan in November 2009 in what stands as the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military base in history. It was love for country that inspired these three Americans to put on the uniform and join the greatest army the world has ever known. ey lived those shining values of loyalty, duty, honor that keep us strong and free. Obama recalled how all three of those killed Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Michael Ferguson, Sta Sgt. Carlos Lazaney Rodriguez and Sgt. Timothy Wayne Owens served in Iraq or Afghanistan, and that Ferguson and Owens were cut down while trying to prevent the gunman, Spc. Ivan Lopez, from claiming further victims. As weve heard, when the gunman tried to push his way into that room, Danny held the door shut, saving the lives of others while sacricing his own, White House photo by Pete SouzaPresident Barack Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama, places a coin on each of the three boxes for those who died during a memorial service on Fort Hood, Texas, April 9. Obama eulogizes fallenSee Fallen, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceRussias unlawful actions in Ukraine have dire implications for international and regional security and may lead to a reassessment of force posture in Europe, a Defense Department policy ocial told Congress April 8. Derek Chollet, assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, testied on Russian military developments with Navy Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe, the Joint Stas director of strategic plans and policy, during a House Armed Services Committee hearing. Russias unlawful military intervention against Ukraine challenges our vision of a Europe whole, free and at peace, Chollet said. It changes Europes security landscape, it causes instability on NATOs borders, and it is a challenge to the international order. e United States has pursued three courses of action, Chollet said, since the outset of this crisis. First, demonstrating support to Ukraines transitional government, he said. Second, reassuring allies and deterring Russia from further military threats to Europe, and third, imposing costs on Russia for its illegal actions. e Defense Department, Chollet noted, has an important role in achieving all three objectives. To support Ukraine, he said, the United States has worked with partners such as the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, European Union and the Group of Seven to provide Ukraine with political backing and economic assistance, including a $18 billion package from the International Monetary Fund. For our part, Chollet said, the Department of Defense is working with Ukraine to review, prioritize and grant its defense assistance request for materials and supplies that would serve to support Ukraine without taking actions that would escalate this crisis militarily. e initial round of this process, he said, was completed last week, when 300,000 packaged meals were delivered to support Ukrainian forces in the eld. Chollet said DOD also has maintained seniorlevel defense dialogue with Ukrainian counterparts throughout the crisis. We have led eorts at NATO to oer Ukraine greater access to NATO exercises, invited Ukraine to participate in the development of military capabilities and provided capacity-building programs to the Ukrainian military, he said. e second course of action, Chollet said, is reassuring U.S. allies and deterring Russia from further military action in Europe. Chollet described reassurance measures so far as augmenting NATOs peacetime Baltic air policing mission, deploying air assets and personnel to Poland to supplement the U.S.-Poland aviation detachment, and extending the USS Truxtuns stay in the Black Sea to conduct exercises with Romanian and Bulgarian naval forces. Well also send another ship to the Black Sea within a week, he added. Imposing cost on Russia, Chollet said, is the third course of action. Russias violations of its own agreements and international law require a vigorous, coordinated response, he said. e United States has led the international community in isolating Russia diplomatically. Along with the EU, Canada and Australia, Chollet said, the United States has imposed visa restrictions and comprehensive sanctions on a growing list of Russian ocials. is includes a Russian bank, members of Russian President Vladimir Putins inner circle, as well as Ukrainians who played a role in undermining Ukraines sovereignty and misappropriating Ukrainian assets. As the president has made clear, Chollet said, the sanctions we have imposed to date are not the end of what we can do. DOD has suspended all military-to-military engagements with Russia, he noted, including exercises, bilateral meetings, important visits and planning conferences. Although we have worked hard over two decades to try to build a cooperative, transparent defense relationship with Russia, he said, the violations of international law and the undermining of stability in Europe mean that we cannot proceed with business as usual. Chollet pointed out that NATO and other allies have also suspended military cooperation with Russia while maintaining channels for dialogue that can serve to de-escalate tensions. While we do not seek military confrontation with Russia, he said, its actions in Europe and Eurasia may require the United States to re-examine our force posture in Europe and our requirement for future deployments, exercises and training in the region. Russias actions in Ukraine have dire implications for international and regional security, Chollet said. is has caused a paradigm shift in our relations with Moscow, he added, and this crisis is not one that has been generated by the West or United States. Chollet said he believes Russia has pursued this crisis of choice to further a distorted view of its own interests, which will only lead to its further isolation.Russia in Ukraine presents dire implicationsNavy photo by MC2 William PittmanA Russian honor guard marches in formation during the opening ceremony of the 65th anniversary of the Victory in Europe Day parade in St. Petersburg, Russia. eyre not what they used to beBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceRussias conventional military is a regional power, but has limited capability for global power projection, the Joint Stas director for strategic plans and policy told Congress April 8. Navy Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe discussed the evolution of Russian conventional military power during testimony alongside Derek Chollet, assistant secretary of defense for international security aairs, before the House Armed Services Committee. Today, Russia is a regional power that can proj ect force into nearby states, but it has very limited global power projection capability, Pandolfe said. It has a military of uneven readiness. While some units are well trained, most are less so. Pandolfe said the Russian military suers from corruption, and its logistic capabilities are limited. Aging equipment, infrastructure and demographic and social problems will continue to hamper reform eorts, he added. e U.S. military, in contrast, employs a military of global reach and engagement, Pandolfe said. e readiness of our rotationally deployed forces is high, he said. We are working to address readiness shortfalls at home. And we operate in alliances, the strongest of which is NATO. Composed of 28 nations, Pandolfe said, NATO is the most successful military alliance in history. Should Russia undertake an armed attack against any NATO state, it will nd that our commitment to collective defense is immediate and unwavering, the admiral said. At the height of its military power, Pandolfe said, the Soviet Union was truly a global competitor. With millions of people under arms, a vast number of tanks and planes, a global navy and an extensive intelligence gathering infrastructure, he said, the Soviet military machine posed a very real threat. Following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, Pandolfe said, its arsenal fell into disrepair. Starved of funding and fragmented, Russian military capability decayed throughout the 1990s. From the start of his term in 2000, President [Vladimir] Putin made military modernization a top priority of the Russian government, he said. When Russia invaded Georgia in 2008, a numSee Russians, Page 11DOD photo by MC1 Chad J. McNeeleyA Russian military honor guard stands at attention during a ceremony in St. Petersburg, Russia.

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ber of shortcomings were noted in its military performance Pandolfe said. is led the Russian government to further increase investment in its military services, and since 2008, those eorts have had some success, the admiral told the panel. Russian military forces have been streamlined into smaller, more mobile units, Pandolfe explained. eir overall readiness has improved, and their most elite units are well trained and equiped. ey now employ a more sophisticated approach to joint warfare. Finally, the Russian military adopted doctrinal change placing greater emphasis on speed of movement, the use of special operations forces, and information and cyber warfare, he said. ey instituted snap exercises, the admiral said, with these no-notice drills serving the dual purpose of sharpening military readiness and inducing strategic uncertainty as to whether they would swiftly transition from training to oensive operations. Pandolfe noted Russias military objectives are dicult to predict, but said it is clear that Russia is sustaining a signicant military force on Ukraines border. is is deeply troubling to all states in the region and beyond, he said. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Technical Track plans for transitionsPartnered with the Department of Veterans Affairs staff, the Career Technical Training Track assists service members and spouses in transitioning to civilian life, while navigating through the choices and decisions involved in selecting a technical career. Participants receive assistance in identifying required credentials and investigate training options to pursue those qualifications. The outcome is a customized plan for success to help smooth a service members transition to a technical career. This will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 24 and 25. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. April 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., April 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Family Care Plan training offeredThis class is designed to educate attendees on the need for creating a Family Care Plan, the importance of maintaining it and resources to aid them in its completion. This training will be 1 to 3 p.m., April 22. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. FFSC is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. FFSC hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops RussiansFrom Page 10 From Commander, Submarine Forces Public AffairsCommander, Submarine Forces announced an early end to Ice Camp Nautilus on March 23. e ice camp was a temporary structure built and operated especially for Ice Exercise 2014. Personnel at Ice Camp Nautilus, which is built into the ice oe north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, began a careful breakdown of the camp Sunday. ICEX-2014 began March 17 and was scheduled to continue through March 30. However, large shifts in wind direction created instabilities in the winddriven ice oes of the Arctic Ocean, and these changes in the prevailing winds between March 18th and March 20th led to multiple fractures in the ice near the camp. ese cracks prevented the use of several airelds used for transporting personnel and equipment to the ice camp. e rapidly changing conditions of the ice, along with extremely low temperatures and poor visibility hampered helicopter operations and made sustaining the runway potentially risky. e Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 779) and the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Hampton (SSN 767) will continue to gather data and conduct ice-related exercises until they transit out from under the ice. Submarines have conducted under-ice operations in the Arctic regions in support of inter-eet transit, training, cooperative allied engagements and operations for more than 50 years. USS Nautilus (SSN 571) made the rst submerged transit to the North Pole in 1958. USS Skate (SSN 578) was the rst U.S. submarine to surface through arctic ice at the North Pole in March 1959. Since those events, the U.S. Submarine Force has completed more than 120 Arctic exercises with the last being conducted in 2012. e last ice camp was established in 2011. Since 1987, most of these have been conducted in conjunction with Royal Navy submarines.Navy photo by MC2 Joshua Davies submarine capabilities in an arctic environment. ICEX secures on thin iceNavy photo by MC2 Joshua Davies New Mexico (SSN 779) tie mooring lines after the submarine surfaces through the arctic ice during Ice Exercise 2014. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 11

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From Commander, Task Force 73 Public Affairse U.S. Navy and Vietnam Peoples Navy began the annual Naval Engagement Activity April 7 with a welcoming ceremony for USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50) at the port of Da Nang. During the welcoming ceremony, Vietnamese ocials from the Ministry of Defense, Foreign Relations Department, Naval Zone 3, Military Region 5, Da Nang Defense Command, External Relations Oce and Border Guard welcomed the crews of both ships. 2014 marks the fth consecutive NEA Vietnam and the tenth year that U.S. Navy ships have called upon the port of Da Nang. USS John S. McCain last visited Da Nang in August 2010 as part of the inaugural NEA Vietnam, which coincided with the 15th anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic relations between the United States and Vietnam. Speaking to reporters on the pier, Capt. Paul Schlise, commodore, Destroyer Squadron 7, who is embarked on McCain, emphasized that NEA Vietnam and the many port visits by U.S. Navy ships over the past decade are key examples of growing navy-to-navy cooperation. Each year, NEA Vietnam builds mutual trust and understanding, provides a key venue to address shared maritime security priorities and concerns, and develops our ability to operate with condence in the maritime domain, said Schlise. NEA Vietnam is not a traditional military exercise instead, it focuses on non-combatant professional exchanges in military medicine, search and rescue, diving and salvage and shipboard damage control. It is also an opportunity to develop relationships that will serve both navies for many years to come through ship tours, 7th Fleet band concerts, sporting events and community service projects. Approximately 400 U.S. Navy Sailors and civilian mariners are participating in NEA Vietnam 2014. Participating units include USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) with embarked Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5, sta from Destroyer Squadron 7 and Commander, Task Force 73, and the U.S. 7th Fleet Band, Orient Express.U.S., Vietnam build tiesNavy photo by MC1 Jay C. PughCmdr. Chase Sergeant, left, commanding officer of John S. McCain (DDG 56), gives a shipboard tour to members of the Vietnam Peoples Navy in support of Naval Engagement Activity Vietnam. Navy photo by MC2 Jonathan L. CorreaFormer President Bill Clinton addresses midshipmen, staff and faculty at the Naval Academy during a Forrestal Lecture series in Alumni Hall. Clinton lectures Academy By Naval Academy Public AffairsFormer President William J. Clinton delivered remarks to the Brigade of Midshipmen, sta, faculty and guests at the Naval Academy, April 8, as a part of the 54th Annual Naval Academy Foreign Aairs Conference. Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, immediately endeared himself to the Midshipmen in attendance by granting them all a weekend of overnight liberty at the beginning of his Forrestal lecture. e Forrestal Lecture Series was established at the Naval Academy in 1970 in honor of the late James V. Forrestal, a former Secretary of the Navy who was instrumental in the development of the modern Navy. Clintons remarks were focused on the leadership challenges facing the Navy, Marine Corps and the nation in the age of interdependence on information technology. e theme of NAFAC this year is Human Security in the Information Age. President Clinton talked about the challenges of leadership in the information age and in an interdependent environment. You have to nd a way to build the positives and reduce the negatives of our interdependence, Clinton said. I predict for the next 40 years, the conicts will involve an attempt to dene the terms of our interdependence. Clinton discussed the evolution of world events and how they have played out in the information age, noting that the 2004 Sumatra tsunami was the rst internet disaster, which resulted in millions of dollars in aid being pledged for relief. Further, Clinton noted that the 2010 Haiti earthquake marked a shift in the dynamic of relief donations because people could pledge donations from their smart phones. Clinton warned the audience that the current information environment is also full of potential peril. Political, criminal, and violent threats made possible by the Information Age not only threaten individual security also undermine the ability of states to protect its citizens. is technology empowers the forces of destruction, said Clinton. Clinton ended his lecture in the same way he started, by discussing the importance of leadership during these uncertain times in the information age. Clinton discussed the importance of the leadership legacy left by Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, a former Chief of Naval Operations, to whom Clinton awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. President Clinton eulogized Adm. Zumwalt after his death in 2000, and referred to Zumwalt as the Conscience of the Navy. ere is only one word on his (Zumwalts) gravestone Reformer, said Clinton as he addressed the midshipmen about the topic of reforming leadership. I ask you to remember the theme of reforming. e future of the U.S. rests in no small measure on our ability to reform our most cherished institutions. We can always do better. We can always reform, Clinton said. In closing, Clinton urged the audience to understand and appreciate the similarities between people and leaders in the world, rather than the dierences as we reform leadership and meet the challenges of the information age. If you are trying to think about how the Navy and Marine Corps can be adjusted to meet the demands of the 21st century, it is well to remember that we have to share that future, Clinton said. We have to create a climate of sucient trust and sucient coordination so that we can pay sucient attention to what we have in common. the president said. And its said that Timothy, the counselor, even then gave his life walking toward the gunman trying to calm him down. As this second shooting at Fort Hood has shown, the president said, it will never be possible to eliminate the risk of such incidents. But as a nation, we can do more to help counsel those with mental health issues, to keep rearms out of the hands of those who are having such deep diculties, he added. He pledged that as commander in chief he is determined that we will continue to step up our eorts to reach our troops and veterans who are hurting, to deliver them the care that they need and to make sure we never stigmatize those who have the courage to seek help. While Obama said the exact motive for last weeks shootings is still not known, investigators have said Lopez had argued with members of his unit just prior to opening re and also was being evaluated for mental health issues, although mental illness has not been identied as a factor in the rampage. As he wrapped up his solemn remarks, Obama said the three soldiers were members of a generation that has borne the burden of our security in more than a decade of war, calling them extraordinary citizens in an era when fewer Americans know someone in uniform. Like the 576 Fort Hood soldiers who have given their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan, they were taken from us much too soon, he said. Like the 13 Americans we lost ve years ago, their passing shakes our soul. Yet, he noted, the people aected somehow bear what seems unbearable.FallenFrom Page 9 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Navy photo by MC1 Hannah WilhideSailors and Marines gather on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious Awareness Month. Navy goal: Sailors step up From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navy announced the 2014 Sexual Assault Awareness Month theme of Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault and issued guidance to focus eorts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence in NAVADMIN 066/14 released March 20. e goal of the month is for individual commands to pause and reect on what the Navy has accomplished over the past year with regard to sexual assault prevention and response and to look into the future as to how we can continue to eradicate this crime from our ranks. Commands are empowered to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2014 is a component of our eorts in the 21st Century Sailor Oce to build a resilient Navy community and will use the theme Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault to highlight bystander intervention and accountability, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Oce. Wed like Sailors to take the rst half of the month to reect on the eorts weve put in place this past year and how weve tackled sexual assault. e second half of April will focus on Sailors dedicating themselves to be active bystanders to step up and intervene in potentially destructive situations. In addition to asking Sailors to sit down and talk about sexual assault prevention, commands are encouraged to organize any number of events to highlight the awareness and prevention of sexual assaults. Some of the suggested events include hanging ribbons on trees around base, hosting Meet your SARC and victim advocate events, organizing skits at the local base theater and other such activities to raise awareness during the month of April. In the past few months of traveling to meet the eet, Ive noticed that Sailors themselves are stepping up and taking charge, said Buck. I encourage you to continue to look out for your shipmates and step up to stop sexual assault. Sailors can also nd infor mation, references and re sources at www.sapr.navy. mil to help them determine how they would like their individual command to ob serve this month. e website also includes resources for victims of sexual assault to reach out and get help. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navys Uniform Matters Oce issued new prototype female combination covers for a months-long trial period to approximately 30 D.C. and Annapolis based Sailors, April 8 and 9. e covers were redesigned to more closely resemble the male cover while properly tting womens heads. e covers will be worn by this group of Sailors until the fall, and then the covers will be issued to a larger test group of approximately 100 Sailors. Navy leaders said one of the driving factors for changing female uniforms is to improve uniformity across the force. As you look out across a group of Sailors, you ought to see, not female and male Sailors, but Sailors, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in the December announcement discussing the change. e Sailors participating in the test will wear the covers on a daily basis, enabling them to evaluate t and function. ey will record their own observations and comments provided by observers to be shared at a later date via an online survey and during focus groups at the end of the evaluation period. Observers who see the covers and wish to share comments are invited to e-mail usnpeople@gmail. com. Feedback from both wear tests will be incorporated into the nal design expected in FY15, with eet introduction in FY16.New female covers testedPhoto by MC1 Elliott FabrizioLt. Heidi Boettger and Chief Yeoman Brianne Dentson model a prototype for the female combination cover, redesigned to more closely resemble the male version. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 13

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MA2 Mark Mayo killed in Norfolk shootingBy MC1 Molly A. BurgessFor Commander, Navy Region Mid AtlanticHundreds of service members, friends and family led into the Naval Station Norfolk auditorium April 7, and whispered calming stories about 24 year-old Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo, as they waited for the memorial service to begin. Mayo, labeled a hero for his ac tions on March 24 when he was on duty as chief of the guard on Pier 1 of Naval Station Norfolk, put himself between a gunman and USS Mahans (DDG 72) duty petty ocer of the watch, giving his own life to ensure the safety of the Sailors on board the ship. Webster denes a hero as an illus trious warrior, a man admired for his achievements and noble qualities and one who shows great courage. Petty ocer Mayo epitomizes this denition, said NAVSTA Norfolks Commanding Ocer Capt. Robert Clark, during his opening remarks. He made a split-second decision to act and benet more than just him self. is type of courage cannot be taught, it is something that resides deep within and is displayed with out conscious thought. It is the decision to render aid when many would watch from the sidelines. As fellow shipmates and guests took turns at the podium, words were spoken to describe Mayos character as they knew him to be. I think we can all say that when we were young, we thought heroes wore a mask, a cape and had super powers. Petty Ocer Mayo wore no mask, yet he had character, said Lt. Errol Johnson, security ocer at NAVSTA Norfolk. He didnt have a cape, yet in the face of danger and adversity, he displayed courage, and with no super powers, also displayed a wealth of self-sacrice. Master-atArms 2nd Class Mark Mayo is a true denition of a real hero. Mayo, born in Washington, D.C., but moved to Hagerstown, Md., when still in grade school, joined the Navy in October 2007, completing a tour at Naval Se curity Forces Bahrain followed by a tour at Naval StaRussians y near USS CookDDG on patrol in Western Black SeaBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceA Russian attack aircraft repeat edly ew near the USS Donald Cook in international waters in the Black Sea on April 12, a Penta gon spokesman said April 14. e USS Cook (DDG 75) was patrolling in the western Black Sea when an unarmed Russian Su-24 Fencer attack aircraft repeatedly ew near the Navy ship, Army Col. Steve Warren told reporters. e aircraft did not respond to multiple queries and warnings from Donald Cook, and the event ended without incident after ap proximately 90 minutes, Warren said. is provocative and un professional Russian action is inconsistent with international pro tocols and previous agreements on the professional interaction between our militaries. Two Russian aircraft were present, but only one took part in the provocative actions, Warren said. e aircraft ew from near sea level to a couple of thousand feet, he added, but never over ew the U.S. Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. e Russian plane made a total of 12 passes, he said. e wingman stayed at a consider ably higher altitude, Warren said. Ocials later said the aircraft approached within about 1,000 yards of the ship. e USS Cook was never in danger, Warren said. e Donald Cook is more than capable of defending itself against two Su-24s, the colonel said. Warren said he does not think Up Periscope Meeting the famous Page 9 Sex assault Mike Domitrz raises awareness Page 13 Kids Fest MWR hosts its annual celebration Page 52009 CHINFO Award Winner Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen The Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics were hosted by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay April 10 at Camden County High School. More photos on Page 4.Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Mayo, Page 6 NSB Kings Bay hosts Area competition at Camden County High SchoolBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMarking its 18th anniversary, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Sailors and Marines volunteered their time to help with the Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics April 10, at Camden County High School. is is a very rewarding experience, said Melinda NesSmith-Picard, the Kings Bay community planning liaison. is is the 17th year Ive been out here helping. Its great to see all of these kids and adults with special needs playing and doing their best to excel at their sport. is is a great way to give back to the community and its equally benecial to the kids to interact with the military. Capt. Harvey Guey, NSB Kings Bay Commanding Ocer, opened the cer emony by welcoming both Special Olym pians and volunteers, and expressed what a motivation the participants were to all. e spirit of generosity is alive in the hearts of the Special Olympians as well as the Kings Bays service members and volunteers. One Olympian, Mary Chanc ey wanted to give something in re turn to her fellow athletes. Mary participates every year during the Special Olympics, said Dr. Millicent Sweet ing, a teacher at Camden County Middle School. For her birthday, she unselshly asked for dona tions for the Special Olympics. She was able to collect a lot of money for this excit ing event. Mary said she was happy to collect her birthday money for the Special Olympics because she enjoys participating every year. Each competitor buddied with up to two military volunteers. rough the course of the day, the Olympians competed in the softball and football throw, soccer ball kick and various types of races. I love to see the kids faces running across the line, ET2 Giovanni Toledo said. ey are all excited and hap py to accomplish their event, and to have their buddies cheer them on. e Special Olympics mission, aimed at creating a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people, still stands true to this day. roughout Special Olympics history, children and adults with special-needs have been able to compete in Olympicstyle sport competitions, while at the same time learning the importance of teamwork and, most importantly, recognizing the potentials of what they can do. I love to see the kids faces running across the line. ET2 Giovanni Toledo Special Olympics buddy Special Olympians enjoy their day Pentagon ocials testify before Congress April 8By Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceGiven the increasing interconnected ness of global communities, a creative, collaborative approach to the challenges posed by weapons of mass destruction must be the rule, not the exception, se nior Pentagon ocials told Congress April 8. Andrew C. Weber, assistant secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical, and bio logical defense pro grams, and Rebecca Hersman, deputy as sistant secretary of defense for counter ing weapons of mass destruction, outlined the DODs approach to squelching the constant evolution of weapons materials, tactics, and technologies within adver saries reach at a hearing of the House Armed Services Committees intelligence, emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee. Countering such threats requires ex ible and agile respons es, capable partners, as well as whole-ofdepartment, whole-ofgovernment, and even whole-of-internation al-community solutions, Hersman said. Hersman credited international part ners and support from Congress for Syrias dwindling chemical weapons program. e centerpiece of the U.S. contribu tion, the motor vessel ship Cape Ray, is outtted with DODs recently developed eld deployable hydrolysis systems and manned by the nest experts from our operational and technical communities, she said. Its now ready to neutralize the most dangerous chemicals in the Syrian arsenal in a safe, secure, and environ mentally sound fashion. Overall, Hersman said, the Defense Department will look to cooperation as a force multiplier, enabling swift, compre Weber HersmanSuppressing WMD never-ending evolutionNavy photo by MC3 Andrew SchneiderA program sits on a table during a memorial service for Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Mark Aaron Mayo at Naval Station Norfolk.Friends remember slain Sailor See WMD, Page 6 See Cook, Page 6

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Question: What should I do if I have a bad reaction to my medication? Answer: Sometimes medications can cause unintended reactions from minor to life-threatening in nature. Minor reactions should be reported to your provider or pharmacist for advice pharmacy phone numbers are usually located on the prescription bottle. For serious or life threatening reactions such as diculty breathing, tightness in your chest, swelling, itching or convulsions call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Q: Why do some medications warn me of sunburn? A: Some medications such as sulfa antibiotics, like septra or bactrim, can cause photosensitiv ity causing sensitivity to sun rays or likely sunburning. Even short exposure to sun rays or tanning booths can cause skin rash, itching, redness or even severe sunburn. If your prescription label cautions against sun exposure, try avoiding the highest burn index of the day, usually between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be out, wear protec tive clothing and accessories. In addition, apply sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher), use SPF lip balm and wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. Q: Is it important how I store my medications? A: Each medication has unique storage requirements. Because the eectiveness of your medication may be altered by temperature light or humidity, many medications should be stored in a cool, dry, place away from moisture, heat and sunlight. Always read medication labels for storage recommendations. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist if special storage procedures are needed. Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. is column was written by Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin, Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West pharmacist. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, send it to jaxpublicaairs@med.navy.mil. From the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Mail RoomNaval Submarine Base Kings Bays Mail Room gets a great deal of mail addressed to individuals living in Unaccompanied Housing with a Building number and room number. Personal mail is not delivered to UH. Department of Defense Postal Manual, OPNAVINST 5218.7B and SUBASEINST 5218.3B states: Per sonal mail for personnel living on and o base in private quarters where U.S. Postal Service provides service shall be addressed to their home address. Mail for personnel living in UH, where USPS does not provide service should be addressed to their unit address or box number address in order that it may be handled separately from the ac tivities ocial mail. In order to get mail delivered in a timely manner, members should include their command in their ad dress. is helps the Mail Room get the mail to individuals as quickly as possible. If the Mail Room is unable to de termine which command the in dividual is attached, the mail is returned to the sender. From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CommissaryApril is the Month of the Mili tary Child, and commissaries are celebrating with giveaways and savings for the entire family. Children in military households face unique challenges because of the demands of military life, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs sales director. So, at the Defense Commissary Agency, we want to acknowledge them and do all we can to provide their families with great values on quality products they can depend on. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commis saries in April to oer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have sub stitute events for certain promo tional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times. For more, go to www.commis saries.com/press_room/press_ release/2014/DeCA_12_14.cfm Little Heros Commissaries are showcasing fruits, veggies for Little Heroes in April. To honor military children, commissaries have fun ways for parents and their little heroes to learn about the nutritious value of fruits and vegetables. During April, the Month of the Military Child, commissary produce departments are inviting installation child development centers to take tours highlighting the health benets of fruits and vegetables. Commissary store managers can also conduct this presenta tion at the child development center. Our goal in April is that every store will oer a store tour or presentation at the child development center, said Bridget Ben nett, DeCAs produce category manager. We may even have local installation dietitians avail able to enhance the education about the benets of consuming fresh fruits and vegetables. Tour participants may sample some unique fruits and vegetables, and receive new healthful recipes. For more information, go to www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Commissary customers can check their local commissary to nd out more about fresh pro duce samples, coupons, giveaways and goodie bags for chil dren participating in the fruits and veggies events. Special savings Commissaries.com oers special savings for military patrons, families Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, www.commissaries.com, to nd information about whats on sale at their local commissary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Sav ings link at www.commissaries. com/partners.cfm to nd more coupons, specials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Pedestrian bridges to closeIn the coming days the Seabees on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will begin repairs to pedestrian bridges at Madison and Clay adjacent to branch health clinic, Madi son and Meadowlark adjacent to Meadowlark Enlisted Commissioning Program and on the walkway paralleling Madison between Medical and the water tower. ese bridges will be closed to both pedestrian and bicycle trac until late May. Modelers air show April 19e Kings Bay Radio Controlled Modelers Second Annual Public Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at Oakwell RC Aireld, at the end of Clarks Blu and Oakwell Road. Flight demonstrations be gin at 11 a.m. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for lo cation, pictures and updates. Food and drink available on site.NMCRS Uniform Locker openYouve heard the expression, eres no free lunch. But how about free uniforms? e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has a Uniform Locker that oers a large selection of used uniforms, jackets, hats, shoe and more for active duty men and women at no cost. Visit the uni form locker at the NMCRS oce in Building 1032 at 926 USS James Madison Road. Its open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. e locker also appreciates uniform donations. For more information, call (912) 573-3928.Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil.Balfour Beatty event, scholarshipEarth Day is a worldwide celebration in support of environmental protection. Join Balfour Beatty Communities to create ower pots starting at 3:30 p.m., April 22 at the Balfour Beatty Community Center, 16 Wren Court for an Earth Day Craft Event. Bring a 2-liter bottle and a friend. Balfour Beatty is accepting scholarship ap plication from high school and undergraduate student who live in Balfour Beatty Communi ties and plan to attend accredited educational/ technical institutions in the 2014-15 academic year. To apply, go to www.bbcommunities foundation.org/scholarships.aspx. Applications must be postmarked by May 2.Shrimp Fest parade still open e deadline to enter the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festivals Pirate Parade, has been ex tended until April 19. Held in Fernandina Beach, the parade begins at 6 p.m. May 1. is years theme is Home of the Shrimpers Cel ebrating 51 Years of Fun. Parade fees are $25 for non-prots, $30 for civic organizations, $45 for commercial or commercially sponsored entries and $85 for political, candidate or campaign entries. Applications for the Pirate Parade can be found under the Events tab at ShrimpFestival.com. For more information, contact Parade Chair Billie Childers at (904) 548-1163.Eagles host Child Advocacy DaySt. Marys Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4379 hosts Annual Child Advocacy Day 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 10 behind the St. Marys Police Department, 101 Industrial Drive, St. Marys. e event educates people to agencies and services in the community. Parents have the option to have children ngerprinted and photos taken. Food will be provided. For more information, contact Juan Escudero at (912) 227-1137 or FOE at (912) 882-5335. Now hear this! From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating se niors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded at www.kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. Additional information can be found at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Military Child Month promoted Kings Bay Commissary Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Unaccompanied Housing: no mail Kings Bay Mail Room Ask the Doc By Cmdr. Pamela OLoughlin NBHC Key West Know, care for your medications

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Photos by EM1 Mark TreenAbove, Mike Domitrz has Sailors act out roles in a show called Can I Kiss You? April 8 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium, to raise awareness of what can be done about sexual assault. Right, MM1 David Havens enjoys the show. Domitrz entertains while using his life story to touch the heart of the matter. Sailors were impacted and many said they were planning to talk to their wives. I need to go home and tell her Ill be there for her if anything happened, one audience member said. Can I Kiss You? Courtesy photoGateway Inn Appreciation DayThe Navy Lodging Appreciation Day celebration was March 26 as a day of recognition to highlight program and individual accomplishments at the Kings Bay Navy Gateway Inns & Suites. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Officer, Cmdr. Ed Callahan, took a few minutes to express the communitys thanks for the outstanding service all the employees provide. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 RP2 Franklin Dippy helps his buddy light the Special Olympic torch during the opening ceremony at the Camden County High School track. The annual event was April 10. Athletes were greeted by cheers and applause. A Marine hugs his Special Olympic buddy. Special Olympics Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 2014 Sailors and Marines spent the day attending to the needs of the athletes. A Sailor greets her buddy with a hug. The athletes enjoyed the attention. The Special Olympians were the heroes of the day. Sailors and Marines sign up to volunteer. Photos by EM1 Mark Treen

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 5 Kids Fest 2014 NSB Kings Bay MWRsLeft, face paint ed kids enjoy a ride on the train. Right, MR2 Jonathan Gist and his son Nathan enjoy a slide down one of four inflatables. Below, Makenna gets a pirate tatoo as Brittney, wife of MCSFBns MA2 Tyler Clukey, watches. Left, Black Widow and Captain America made a special appear ance. MA3 Edward Ritchie and MASN Latoshia Mitchell MCSFBn were good sports. A youngster gets the puppy treatment. Lunden Trombley stands by Iron Man. Right, the photo booth was a big hit. Families tried on props and made as many goofy faces as they could. Photos by EM1 Mark Treen Child Abuse Awareness Month. Stormie and Skielor Petenbrink race to pump balloons. Makenna and Brittney Clukey try moustaches.

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. hensive action to respond to existing and emerging WMD threats. Similarly on the bio logical front, advancing technology, unsecured pathogen stores, and weak national controls create dangerous opportunities for hostile state and nonstate actors to acquire, proliferate, or use biologi cal agents with potentially catastrophic consequenc es, Hersman said. To protect our forces, reduce risks to our citizens, and respond eectively to crises, DOD must build holistic solutions across its bio-prevention and biode fense eorts, she reported. We will continue to pri oritize eorts to secure pathogens worldwide, fos ter a strong bio-security culture, enhance detection and strategic warning, and integrate more eectively with partners. And nuclear threats also remain a prominent concern, Hersman said. Unless arrested and re versed, she told the panel, the nuclear ambitions of countries like North Korea and Iran can imperil the interests of the United States and our al lies and partners around the world, creating instability and increasing the likelihood that other nations may seek to become nuclear-armed states. Weber said U.S. in vestments in countering chemical, biological and nuclear threats have paid dividends in destroying serious chemical weapons materials the Assad regime used to kill civilians in Syria last summer and that posed a looming threat to Israel, Jordan and the region. He noted the recent arrival of U.S. Army civilians to Rota, Spain, where they began their mission to neutralize some of Syrias most dan gerous chemicals. DOD scientists and engineers developed these systems aboard the spe cially tted ship Cape Ray within just six months based on safe, proven chemical weapons destruction technology, Weber said, calling the feat a true testament to what the Department of Defense can contribute to U.S. and international security. eir work, he noted, fol lows the U.S. forces suc cess in assisting the Liby ans in destroying the last of Moammar Gadhas weapons of mass destruction. e success stories of U.S. innovation in developing international partner ships to mitigate the risk of states, terrorist organizations, or rogue individu als accessing and using chemical, biological, and nuclear materials highlight ongoing eorts to coun ter the current and future weapons of mass destruc tion threats, Weber said. Our work ranges from pathogen consolidation and medical biodefense and countermeasure work, biodefense pre paredness with the Republic of Korea, to nuclear counterterrorism and threat reduction cooperation with two of our closes allies: the United Kingdom and France, he said. tion Rota, Spain, before checking on board to Naval Station Norfolk in May 2011. Master-at-Arms Virgil Savage, a friend of Mayos, and coworker at NAVSTA Nor folk, remembered Mayo for his outspo ken demeanor and courageous posture who he said was always willing to help those in need. Mayo was a little guy but he carried himself with an attitude of a giant. He wouldnt back down from anybody and he wouldnt just let you roll over him for any reason, Savage said. He stood up for people all the time so when I heard that he saved another persons life, it did not surprise me at all. ats something he would do without thinking, and I am proud to say I knew him. During the course of the ceremony, words of scriptures, prayers and kind words to the family were expressed, re minding those in attendance that Mayo and his seless act would not be forgotten. To my shipmate and my friend, MA2 Mayo, rest on my brother, said Depart ment of the Navy Ocer Levon Snyder. We have the watch here on Earth, but one day, we will relieve you from your watch in Heaven. As the ceremony came to a close, Master-at-Arms 1st Class Orlando Mo rin stood at the podium and began a roll call where Master-at-Arms in attendance stood and replied back Present MA1 as their names were called, signifying that they were ready to stand watch. Call of the roll. MASN Miller. MASN Harrell. MA3 Stewart, Morin called out. As he neared the end of the list, one name did not have a respondent. MA2 Mayo... MA2 Mark Mayo... Mark Aaron Mayo. e call remained unanswered. ank you for providing the United States Navy with a young man of such impeccable character. A man who served his country with honor courage and com mitment. Mrs. Blair, Mr. Mayo, your son will forever remain in the hearts and minds of everyone at Naval Station Nor folk, said Clark, comforting the family in attendance. He will be remembered across this great country and throughout the Navy as a hero who made the unques tionable brave decision to protect the lives of others, even at his own peril. Mayo will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Va., lat er this month.WMDFrom Page 1 MayoFrom Page 1 this is an example of a young pilot joy riding. I would have diculty believing that two Russian pilots, on their own, would chose to take such an action, he said. Weve seen the Russians conduct themselves unprofessionally and in vio lation of international norms in Ukraine for several months, and these continued acts of provocation and unprofessionalism do nothing to de-escalate the situation in Ukraine, which we called on the Russians to do. e Cook arrived in the Black Sea on April 10. e ship is now making a port call in Constanta, Romania.CookFrom Page 1 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Happy Easter from Rack-N-Roll Lanes. From 1 to 8 p.m. April 20, enjoy bowling with family and friends when all games are 50 and shoe rentals are $2.50 per person. For more information, call R-N-R lanes at (912) 573-9492. Fitness Complex basketball courts e courts will be secured Monday, April 21, for the Save a Life Tour being held inside. e courts will re-open on Tuesday morning regular hours. Call the Fitness Complex for any questions at (912) 573-3990. White Water Adventure Weekend Navy Adv encures Unleased Kings Bay is going to National Whitewater Center (www. usnwc.org) in Charlotte, N.C. on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26, departing the BIG EZ at 2 p.m. on that Friday. A non-refundable camping deposit due is by April 25 with balance due by May 16. Your trip, your way. Pick from several cost options plus camping. Cost is camping only $65/$55 (liberty) and optional 2-day Allsport pass add $99 or 1-day Allsport pass add $54 plus optional Memorial Day Trail Run (must pay on-line) at www.usnwc.org/memorial-day-trail-races. Camping, Climb 2 Zip, Biking, Whitewater Rafting, Mega Jump plus Memorial Festival & Trail Run May 25. Includes live music and more. Call NAU for details at (912) 573-8972. Intramural Average Joes Golf League All partic ipants are welcome. Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play beginning April 30. Captains meeting is April 23 at the golf course. Weekly fees for active duty and retirees $10, DoD-civilians $12, which includes cart, 9-holes and weekly prizes. League format is 2-person teams, foursomes, captains choice, ighted. Trophy for overall champion. For details, call (912) 4091611. Intramural 4-vs-4 Flag Football Registration is going on now at the Fitness Complex with play begin ning on May 5. e captains meeting is April 30. Nonrefundable team fees are $100 active duty and $150 nonactive duty. For details, call (912) 409-1611. Movie Under the Stars At dusk, approximately 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 19 at the Youth Center Ball elds, MWR will be showing Walking with Dinosaurs (rated PG). Bring your blankets, chairs and bug spray and grab your neighbors. Enjoy an evening movie out doors on the giant outdoor theatre. Call (912) 573-4564 for more details. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fit ness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all pa trons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new ven ture and is certain that you, the patron, will enjoy the easy accessible and user-friendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend and School Break The movies for April are The Croods Apr. 1, Incredibles April 2, Journey to the Center of the Earth April 3, Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 April 4, Planes April 5 and 6, Epic April 12 and 13 Frozen April 19 and 20 and Journey 2: Mysterious Island April 26 and 27. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more of the lat est information, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp Its at the Youth Center for chil dren kindergarten through age 12. Camp runs May 21 through Aug. 8. Sign-up begins April 14 for SAC, Wounded/Fallen Warriors, Individual Augmentees and single/dual military. Registration for active duty w/ working or student spouse and DoD employees begins April 21, for DoD contractors and all others April 28. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student let ter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/Dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration, and IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack provided. No outside food. Cost based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Liberty call Periscope file photoRack-N-Roll has special for Easter Just for kids THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 7

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Most of the famous people Ive met are from the world of sports. But theres one who wasnt. Leonard Nimoy. You know him as Mr. Spock, the original one. He was promoting his book I Am Not Spock, in the wake of the Star Trek TV series. Like most actors, he didnt want to be typecast and was looking for new work. Nimoy was a veteran actor who had appeared in 11 forgettable movies and as a guest star on more than 60 TV series before Star Trek. He made a couple more forgettable films and then returned as Spock in Star Trek, the Motion Picture and then did 11 more Star Trekassociated movies and TV series among other things. Nimoy later admitted I Am Not Spock was not a good idea. The lesson here kids, and take it from Mr. Spock, not me, is there are worse things in life than being typecast.Have you ever met somebody whos famous?Dee Lester NSB Public Works Nashville, Tenn. Jim Varney. He told me a funny joke thats not appropriate for the paper. And, Barbara Mandrells sister, Irene. Firefighter/Paramedic Howard Davis Kings Bay F.D. Kingsland Robin Williams on a USO tour and Blake Clark. He plays in all the Adam Sandler movies. Grover Randolph Contractor Jesup, Ga. I met T.I. I met him at a concert during college. MR1 Charles Berry NS Mayport Crestview, Fla. I met Billy Blanks back in 2001 and Lonestar, the country music group. MT1 Levi Hensiek Sub Squadron 20 Mexico, Mo. Payton Manning. He signed my ticket stub at a Jacksonville Jaguar game. It was his last game as an Indianapolis Colt. MA2 Amber Ball Security Force Battalion Rogersville, Tenn. Dolly Parton. I met her at Dollywood. It was awe some. Shes amazing. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceFor the second time since a mass shoot ing at Fort Hood, Texas, ve years ago, President Barack Obama returned to the Army post April 9 to again pay tribute to sol diers cut down by one of their own, oering con dolences to the families of those killed by an Army specialist last week and acknowledging that part of what makes this so painful is that weve been here before. Once more, soldiers who survived foreign war zones were struck down here at home, where they are supposed to be safe, Obama told mourning families and members of the Fort Hood community. is tragedy tears a wound still raw from ve years ago, the president said during a ceremony held at the same location where he eulogized the 13 people killed by Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan in November 2009 in what stands as the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military base in history. It was love for country that inspired these three Americans to put on the uniform and join the greatest army the world has ever known. ey lived those shining values of loyalty, duty, honor that keep us strong and free. Obama recalled how all three of those killed Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Michael Ferguson, Sta Sgt. Car los Lazaney Rodriguez and Sgt. Timothy Wayne Owens served in Iraq or Afghanistan, and that Ferguson and Owens were cut down while trying to prevent the gunman, Spc. Ivan Lopez, from claiming further victims. As weve heard, when the gunman tried to push his way into that room, Danny held the door shut, saving the lives of others while sacricing his own, White House photo by Pete SouzaPresident Barack Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama, places a coin on each of the three boxes for those who died during a memorial service on Fort Hood, Texas, April 9. Obama eulogizes fallenSee Fallen, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceRussias unlawful ac tions in Ukraine have dire implications for international and regional security and may lead to a reassessment of force pos ture in Europe, a Defense Department policy ocial told Congress April 8. Derek Chollet, assistant secretary of defense for international security af fairs, testied on Russian military developments with Navy Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe, the Joint Stas director of strategic plans and policy, during a House Armed Services Committee hearing. Russias unlawful military intervention against Ukraine challenges our vision of a Europe whole, free and at peace, Chol let said. It changes Eu ropes security landscape, it causes instability on NATOs borders, and it is a challenge to the interna tional order. e United States has pursued three courses of action, Chollet said, since the outset of this crisis. First, demonstrating support to Ukraines tran sitional government, he said. Second, reassuring allies and deterring Rus sia from further military threats to Europe, and third, imposing costs on Russia for its illegal ac tions. e Defense Depart ment, Chollet noted, has an important role in achieving all three objec tives. To support Ukraine, he said, the United States has worked with partners such as the International Mon etary Fund, the United Nations, European Union and the Group of Seven to provide Ukraine with political backing and economic assistance, including a $18 billion package from the International Monetary Fund. For our part, Chollet said, the Department of Defense is working with Ukraine to review, priori tize and grant its defense assistance request for ma terials and supplies that would serve to support Ukraine without taking ac tions that would escalate this crisis militarily. e initial round of this process, he said, was completed last week, when 300,000 packaged meals were delivered to support Ukrainian forces in the eld. Chollet said DOD also has maintained seniorlevel defense dialogue with Ukrainian counter parts throughout the cri sis. We have led eorts at NATO to oer Ukraine greater access to NATO ex ercises, invited Ukraine to participate in the develop ment of military capabilities and provided capac ity-building programs to the Ukrainian military, he said. e second course of action, Chollet said, is reassuring U.S. allies and deterring Russia from further military action in Europe. Chollet described reassurance measures so far as augmenting NATOs peacetime Baltic air polic ing mission, deploying air assets and personnel to Poland to supplement the U.S.-Poland aviation detachment, and extending the USS Truxtuns stay in the Black Sea to conduct exercises with Romanian and Bulgarian naval forc es. Well also send another ship to the Black Sea with in a week, he added. Imposing cost on Rus sia, Chollet said, is the third course of action. Russias violations of its own agreements and international law require a vigorous, coordinated response, he said. e United States has led the international community in isolating Russia diplo matically. Along with the EU, Canada and Australia, Chollet said, the United States has imposed visa restrictions and comprehensive sanc tions on a growing list of Russian ocials. is includes a Russian bank, members of Rus sian President Vladimir Putins inner circle, as well as Ukrainians who played a role in undermining Ukraines sovereignty and misappropriating Ukrainian assets. As the president has made clear, Chollet said, the sanctions we have imposed to date are not the end of what we can do. DOD has suspended all military-to-military engagements with Russia, he noted, including exer cises, bilateral meetings, important visits and plan ning conferences. Although we have worked hard over two decades to try to build a cooperative, transparent defense relationship with Russia, he said, the violations of international law and the undermining of stability in Europe mean that we cannot proceed with business as usual. Chollet pointed out that NATO and other allies have also suspended military cooperation with Russia while maintaining channels for dialogue that can serve to de-escalate tensions. While we do not seek military confrontation with Russia, he said, its actions in Europe and Eur asia may require the Unit ed States to re-examine our force posture in Eu rope and our requirement for future deployments, exercises and training in the region. Russias actions in Ukraine have dire implica tions for international and regional security, Chollet said. is has caused a paradigm shift in our relations with Moscow, he added, and this crisis is not one that has been generated by the West or United States. Chollet said he believes Russia has pursued this crisis of choice to further a distorted view of its own interests, which will only lead to its further isola tion.Russia in Ukraine presents dire implicationsNavy photo by MC2 William PittmanA Russian honor guard marches in formation during the opening ceremony of the 65th anniversary of the Victory in Europe Day parade in St. Petersburg, Russia. eyre not what they used to beBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceRussias conventional military is a regional power, but has limited capability for global power projection, the Joint Stas director for strategic plans and policy told Congress April 8. Navy Vice Adm. Frank C. Pandolfe discussed the evolution of Russian conventional military power during testimony alongside Derek Chol let, assistant secretary of defense for international security aairs, before the House Armed Services Committee. Today, Russia is a regional power that can proj ect force into nearby states, but it has very limited global power projection capability, Pandolfe said. It has a military of uneven readiness. While some units are well trained, most are less so. Pandolfe said the Russian military suers from corruption, and its logistic capabilities are limited. Aging equipment, infrastructure and demographic and social problems will continue to hamper reform eorts, he added. e U.S. military, in contrast, employs a military of global reach and engagement, Pandolfe said. e readiness of our rotationally deployed forces is high, he said. We are working to ad dress readiness shortfalls at home. And we oper ate in alliances, the strongest of which is NATO. Composed of 28 nations, Pandolfe said, NATO is the most successful military alliance in history. Should Russia undertake an armed attack against any NATO state, it will nd that our com mitment to collective defense is immediate and unwavering, the admiral said. At the height of its military power, Pandolfe said, the Soviet Union was truly a global competi tor. With millions of people under arms, a vast number of tanks and planes, a global navy and an extensive intelligence gathering infrastructure, he said, the Soviet military machine posed a very real threat. Following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, Pandolfe said, its arsenal fell into disrepair. Starved of funding and fragmented, Russian military capability decayed throughout the 1990s. From the start of his term in 2000, President [Vladimir] Putin made military modernization a top priority of the Russian government, he said. When Russia invaded Georgia in 2008, a num See Russians, Page 11DOD photo by MC1 Chad J. McNeeleyA Russian military honor guard stands at attention during a ceremony in St. Petersburg, Russia.

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ber of shortcomings were noted in its military per formance Pandolfe said. is led the Russian government to further increase investment in its military services, and since 2008, those eorts have had some success, the admiral told the panel. Russian military forces have been streamlined into smaller, more mo bile units, Pandolfe ex plained. eir overall readiness has improved, and their most elite units are well trained and equiped. ey now employ a more sophisticated approach to joint warfare. Finally, the Russian military adopted doctrinal change placing great er emphasis on speed of movement, the use of spe cial operations forces, and information and cyber warfare, he said. ey instituted snap ex ercises, the admiral said, with these no-notice drills serving the dual purpose of sharpening military readiness and inducing strategic uncertainty as to whether they would swift ly transition from training to oensive operations. Pandolfe noted Russias military objectives are dicult to predict, but said it is clear that Russia is sustaining a signicant military force on Ukraines border. is is deeply troubling to all states in the region and beyond, he said. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetNew Moms and Dads group meets 10 a.m. to noon every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This is an opportunity for parents of young children to meet and share experiences and for children to make friends in a play-group setting. No pre-registration required.Technical Track plans for transitionsPartnered with the Department of Veterans Affairs staff, the Career Technical Training Track assists service members and spouses in transitioning to civilian life, while navigating through the choices and decisions involved in selecting a technical career. Participants receive assistance in identifying required credentials and investigate training options to pursue those qualifications. The outcome is a customized plan for success to help smooth a service mem bers transition to a technical career. This will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 24 and 25. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 25. For more infor mation or to register, call 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the par enting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. April 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certifi cate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar April 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 30. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal em ployment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., April 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 28. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Family Care Plan training offeredThis class is designed to educate attendees on the need for creating a Family Care Plan, the importance of maintaining it and resources to aid them in its completion. This training will be 1 to 3 p.m., April 22. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a confer ence room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presenta tion in response to a units area of special concerns. FFSC is available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoc trination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty per sonnel. All classes listed are at the Fleet and Family Support Center unless otherwise noted. FFSC hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops RussiansFrom Page 10 From Commander, Submarine Forces Public AffairsCommander, Submarine Forces announced an early end to Ice Camp Nautilus on March 23. e ice camp was a tem porary structure built and operated especially for Ice Exercise 2014. Personnel at Ice Camp Nautilus, which is built into the ice oe north of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, began a careful breakdown of the camp Sunday. ICEX-2014 began March 17 and was scheduled to continue through March 30. However, large shifts in wind direction created instabilities in the winddriven ice oes of the Arctic Ocean, and these changes in the prevail ing winds between March 18th and March 20th led to multiple fractures in the ice near the camp. ese cracks prevented the use of several airelds used for transporting per sonnel and equipment to the ice camp. e rapidly changing conditions of the ice, along with extremely low temperatures and poor visibility hampered helicopter operations and made sustaining the run way potentially risky. e Virginia-class at tack submarine USS New Mexico (SSN 779) and the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Hampton (SSN 767) will continue to gather data and conduct ice-related exercises until they transit out from under the ice. Submarines have conducted under-ice operations in the Arctic regions in support of inter-eet transit, training, cooperative allied engagements and operations for more than 50 years. USS Nautilus (SSN 571) made the rst submerged transit to the North Pole in 1958. USS Skate (SSN 578) was the rst U.S. sub marine to surface through arctic ice at the North Pole in March 1959. Since those events, the U.S. Submarine Force has completed more than 120 Arctic exercises with the last being conducted in 2012. e last ice camp was established in 2011. Since 1987, most of these have been conducted in con junction with Royal Navy submarines.Navy photo by MC2 Joshua Davies submarine capabilities in an arctic environment. ICEX secures on thin iceNavy photo by MC2 Joshua Davies New Mexico (SSN 779) tie mooring lines after the submarine surfaces through the arctic ice during Ice Exercise 2014. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 11

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From Commander, Task Force 73 Public Affairse U.S. Navy and Viet nam Peoples Navy began the annual Naval Engage ment Activity April 7 with a welcoming ceremony for USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USNS Safeguard (T-ARS-50) at the port of Da Nang. During the welcoming ceremony, Vietnamese ocials from the Ministry of Defense, Foreign Relations Department, Naval Zone 3, Military Region 5, Da Nang Defense Command, External Relations Oce and Border Guard welcomed the crews of both ships. 2014 marks the fth consecutive NEA Viet nam and the tenth year that U.S. Navy ships have called upon the port of Da Nang. USS John S. McCain last visited Da Nang in August 2010 as part of the inaugural NEA Vietnam, which coincided with the 15th anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic rela tions between the United States and Vietnam. Speaking to reporters on the pier, Capt. Paul Schlise, commodore, Destroyer Squadron 7, who is embarked on McCain, emphasized that NEA Vietnam and the many port visits by U.S. Navy ships over the past decade are key examples of grow ing navy-to-navy cooperation. Each year, NEA Viet nam builds mutual trust and understanding, provides a key venue to ad dress shared maritime security priorities and concerns, and develops our ability to operate with condence in the maritime domain, said Schlise. NEA Vietnam is not a traditional military exer cise instead, it focuses on non-combatant profes sional exchanges in mili tary medicine, search and rescue, diving and salvage and shipboard damage control. It is also an opportu nity to develop relation ships that will serve both navies for many years to come through ship tours, 7th Fleet band concerts, sporting events and com munity service projects. Approximately 400 U.S. Navy Sailors and civilian mariners are participating in NEA Vietnam 2014. Participating units include USS John S. Mc Cain (DDG 56), USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) with embarked Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit, Explo sive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5, sta from Destroyer Squadron 7 and Commander, Task Force 73, and the U.S. 7th Fleet Band, Orient Express.U.S., Vietnam build tiesNavy photo by MC1 Jay C. PughCmdr. Chase Sergeant, left, commanding officer of John S. McCain (DDG 56), gives a shipboard tour to members of the Vietnam Peoples Navy in support of Naval Engagement Activity Vietnam. Navy photo by MC2 Jonathan L. CorreaFormer President Bill Clinton addresses midshipmen, staff and faculty at the Naval Academy during a Forrestal Lecture series in Alumni Hall. Clinton lectures Academy By Naval Academy Public AffairsFormer President William J. Clinton delivered remarks to the Brigade of Midshipmen, sta, faculty and guests at the Naval Academy, April 8, as a part of the 54th Annual Naval Academy Foreign Aairs Conference. Clinton, the 42nd Presi dent of the United States, immediately endeared himself to the Midshipmen in attendance by granting them all a week end of overnight liberty at the beginning of his For restal lecture. e Forrestal Lecture Series was established at the Naval Academy in 1970 in honor of the late James V. Forrestal, a for mer Secretary of the Navy who was instrumental in the development of the modern Navy. Clintons remarks were focused on the leader ship challenges facing the Navy, Marine Corps and the nation in the age of in terdependence on infor mation technology. e theme of NAFAC this year is Human Security in the Information Age. President Clinton talked about the challenges of leadership in the informa tion age and in an interde pendent environment. You have to nd a way to build the positives and reduce the negatives of our interdependence, Clinton said. I predict for the next 40 years, the con icts will involve an at tempt to dene the terms of our interdependence. Clinton discussed the evolution of world events and how they have played out in the information age, noting that the 2004 Sumatra tsunami was the rst internet disaster, which resulted in millions of dollars in aid being pledged for relief. Further, Clinton noted that the 2010 Haiti earthquake marked a shift in the dynamic of relief donations because people could pledge donations from their smart phones. Clinton warned the au dience that the current information environment is also full of potential peril. Political, criminal, and violent threats made possible by the Informa tion Age not only threaten individual security also undermine the ability of states to protect its citi zens. is technology em powers the forces of destruction, said Clinton. Clinton ended his lec ture in the same way he started, by discussing the importance of leadership during these uncertain times in the information age. Clinton discussed the importance of the leader ship legacy left by Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, a former Chief of Naval Operations, to whom Clinton awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. President Clinton eulogized Adm. Zumwalt after his death in 2000, and referred to Zum walt as the Conscience of the Navy. ere is only one word on his (Zumwalts) gravestone Reformer, said Clinton as he addressed the midshipmen about the topic of reforming leadership. I ask you to remember the theme of reforming. e future of the U.S. rests in no small measure on our ability to reform our most cher ished institutions. We can always do bet ter. We can always reform, Clinton said. In closing, Clinton urged the audience to understand and appreciate the similarities between people and leaders in the world, rather than the dierences as we reform leadership and meet the challenges of the informa tion age. If you are trying to think about how the Navy and Marine Corps can be adjusted to meet the demands of the 21st century, it is well to remember that we have to share that fu ture, Clinton said. We have to create a climate of sucient trust and su cient coordination so that we can pay sucient at tention to what we have in common. the president said. And its said that Timothy, the counselor, even then gave his life walking toward the gunman trying to calm him down. As this second shooting at Fort Hood has shown, the president said, it will never be possible to elimi nate the risk of such inci dents. But as a nation, we can do more to help counsel those with mental health issues, to keep rearms out of the hands of those who are having such deep diculties, he added. He pledged that as com mander in chief he is de termined that we will continue to step up our eorts to reach our troops and veterans who are hurting, to deliver them the care that they need and to make sure we never stigmatize those who have the courage to seek help. While Obama said the exact motive for last weeks shootings is still not known, investigators have said Lopez had ar gued with members of his unit just prior to open ing re and also was be ing evaluated for mental health issues, although mental illness has not been identied as a factor in the rampage. As he wrapped up his solemn remarks, Obama said the three soldiers were members of a gen eration that has borne the burden of our security in more than a decade of war, calling them extraor dinary citizens in an era when fewer Americans know someone in uniform. Like the 576 Fort Hood soldiers who have given their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan, they were taken from us much too soon, he said. Like the 13 Americans we lost ve years ago, their passing shakes our soul. Yet, he noted, the people aect ed somehow bear what seems unbearable.FallenFrom Page 9 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014

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Navy photo by MC1 Hannah WilhideSailors and Marines gather on the flight deck of the multipurpose amphibious Awareness Month. Navy goal: Sailors step up From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navy announced the 2014 Sexual Assault Awareness Month theme of Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault and issued guidance to focus eorts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence in NAVADMIN 066/14 released March 20. e goal of the month is for individual commands to pause and reect on what the Navy has ac complished over the past year with regard to sexual assault prevention and response and to look into the future as to how we can continue to eradicate this crime from our ranks. Commands are empowered to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2014 is a compo nent of our eorts in the 21st Century Sailor Oce to build a resilient Navy community and will use the theme Live Our Val ues: Step Up to Stop Sex ual Assault to highlight bystander intervention and accountability, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Oce. Wed like Sailors to take the rst half of the month to reect on the eorts weve put in place this past year and how weve tackled sexual as sault. e second half of April will focus on Sailors dedicating themselves to be active bystanders to step up and intervene in potentially destructive situations. In addition to asking Sailors to sit down and talk about sexual assault prevention, commands are encouraged to organize any number of events to highlight the awareness and prevention of sexual assaults. Some of the suggested events include hanging ribbons on trees around base, hosting Meet your SARC and victim advocate events, organizing skits at the local base the ater and other such ac tivities to raise awareness during the month of April. In the past few months of traveling to meet the eet, Ive noticed that Sailors themselves are stepping up and taking charge, said Buck. I en courage you to continue to look out for your ship mates and step up to stop sexual assault. Sailors can also nd infor mation, references and re sources at www.sapr.navy. mil to help them determine how they would like their individual command to ob serve this month. e website also in cludes resources for vic tims of sexual assault to reach out and get help. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navys Uniform Matters Oce issued new prototype female combination covers for a months-long trial period to approximately 30 D.C. and Annapolis based Sailors, April 8 and 9. e covers were redesigned to more closely resemble the male cover while properly tting womens heads. e covers will be worn by this group of Sailors until the fall, and then the covers will be issued to a larger test group of approximately 100 Sailors. Navy leaders said one of the driving factors for changing female uniforms is to improve uniformity across the force. As you look out across a group of Sailors, you ought to see, not female and male Sailors, but Sailors, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus in the Decem ber announcement dis cussing the change. e Sailors participat ing in the test will wear the covers on a daily basis, enabling them to evaluate t and function. ey will record their own observations and comments provided by observers to be shared at a later date via an online survey and during focus groups at the end of the evaluation period. Observers who see the covers and wish to share comments are invited to e-mail usnpeople@gmail. com. Feedback from both wear tests will be incorporated into the nal design expected in FY15, with eet introduction in FY16.New female covers testedPhoto by MC1 Elliott FabrizioLt. Heidi Boettger and Chief Yeoman Brianne Dentson model a prototype for the female combination cover, redesigned to more closely resemble the male version. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 17, 2014 13

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