The Kings Bay periscope

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00341


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PostAfghan optionsFull withdrawl or less eyed by end of year; election in spotlightBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press Servicee commander of the NATOled International Security As sistance Force in Afghanistan explained in detail March 14 his condence in the ability to preserve multiple options for a post2014 presence in Afghanistan. During a media roundtable at the Pentagon, Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. discussed a potential timeline for preserv ing decision space while wait ing for a signed bilateral security agreement with the Afghan gov ernment for a post-2014 pres ence. President Barack Obama has directed the military to plan for a full withdrawal from Afghani stan by the end of the year in the absence of a signed agreement. A national council of Afghan elders and community leaders endorsed the agreement, but Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign it. However, all primary candidates for next months presiden tial election in Afghanistan have said they will sign it if elected. When you start to get to July, I feel we can still manage provid ing decision space for both options, Dunford said. In other words, if were going to with draw, if were going to have the NATO regional approach weve talked about a few times, or if were going to have anything in between. In July and August, the general said, he can set up for success no matter what decision is made. So were preserving [that] decision space until September, he added. e general described a 102-day timeUp Periscope Heres our picks for NCAA hoops Page 9 Shamrock Marines don Kelly green for run Page 4 Centennial Anniversary nearing for World War I Page 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Afghan, Page 32009 CHINFO Award Winner Defense secretary, Joint Chiefs chair testify before HouseBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceIf sequestration begins again in scal year 2016, the U.S. mili tary will not be able to carry out defense strategy, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee March 13. A return to sequester would put at risk Americas traditional role as a guarantor of global se curity, and ultimately our own security, Hagel said. Events in Europe over the past few weeks underscore the need for American involvement, Hagel said. President Barack Obamas scal 2015 defense budget request reects that re ality, he added, and sustains U.S. commitments and leader ship at a very dening time. I believe this budget has to be far more than a set of num bers or just a list of decisions, the secretary said. It is a state ment of values. Its a statement of priorities. Its a statement of our needs. Its a statement of our responsibilities. e budget request is realis tic, Hagel said, and prepares the military to defend the nation at a time of increasing uncertainty throughout the world. From the troop side, Hagel discussed compensation reform. e department is committed to providing service members fair compensation, he emphasized, as well as the training and the tools and the edge they will always need to succeed in battle and return home safely. To meet those obligations under constrained budgets, we need some modest adjust ments to the growth in pay and benets, the secretary said. All these savings will be reinvested in training and equipping our troops. And there are no proposals to change retirement in this budget. e Defense Department will continue to recommend pay increases, Hagel said, but they will not be as substantial as in past years. e department will continue subsidizing o-base housing costs, he added, but not at 100 percent, as it is today. DOD will pay about 95 percent, he said, and it will be phased in over the next several years. e budget request includes a provision to reduce subsidies for military commissaries. We are not shutting down commissaries, Hagel ex plained. We recommend gradually phasing out some subsidies, but only for domestic commissaries that are not in re mote areas. Finally, the secretary said, the Defense Department recommends simplifying and mod ernizing the three TRICARE military health plan systems by merging them into one.DoD Photo by Erin A. Kirk-CuomoSecretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, and Department of Defense Comptroller Robert Hale testify before the House Appropriations Committee for Defense March 13. Dunford Capt. Christopher Harkins relieved by Capt. William HoustonBy MC1 Rex NelsonSubmarine Group 10 Public AffairsSubmarine Squadron 20 held a change-of-command cer emony at the chapel on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 14. Capt. William J. Houston relieved Capt. Christopher L. Harkins as the Submarine Squadron 20 commodore. Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10, was the guest speaker for the ceremony. He commended Har kins for his excellent leadership. Chris, your performance in direct support of our strategic deterrence mission as Commodore of Squadron 20 has just been superior, Richard said. Harkins, a native of Pitts burgh, praised the personnel at Kings Bay and ac credited his suc cessful tour to their perform-ance. ese past two years at SubChange of Command for Sub Squadron 20Navy photo by MC1 Rex NelsonCapt. Christopher Harkins looks on as Capt. William J. Houston salutes Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10. Harkins was relieved by Houston as Commander, Submarine Squadron 20 during a change of command ceremony March 14. ... Ive had the pleasure of working with some of the highest caliber people in our submarine force. Capt. Christopher Harkins Outgoing Squadron 20 commodoreSee 20, Page 5Hagel: Sequestration would cripple Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenChief of Naval Operations visits NSB Kings BayAdm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations, and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Tuesday, March 18. Greenert held an All Hands Call discussing the Navys budget priorities and how that impacts the quality of service in the Navy. They also filmed another episode of conversations with a shipmate where they discussed submarine programs and efforts to maintain Undersea Dominance.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From Navy Personel Command Public AffairsAn increase in enlisted critical at-sea billets has Navy community managers reminding Sailors of the various incentive programs avail able to them. e Navy has several incentive programs that the enlisted community managers and detailers use to ll vacancies at sea, said Ron Dodge, deputy director of enlist ed distribution at Navy Personnel Command. We want to give Sailors good reasons to choose sea duty be cause that is where we need them. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced in March an upcoming increase in Career Sea Pay and Ca reer Sea Pay Premium incentives for eligible Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mis sion is conducted at sea. is increase, the rst since 2001, is intended to compensate Sailors for extended deployments, and is expected to take place early this summer. Additionally, Sailors may qualify for Sea Duty Incentive Pay if they serve in specic ratings, pay grades and/or NECs and agree to remain on sea duty past their Prescribed Sea Tour, volunteer for a back-toback sea tour, or curtail their current shore duty and return early to sea duty. Sailors who wish to extend at sea or return to sea duty early may be entitled to receive an incentive pay along with a choice of duty station via the Voluntary Sea Duty Program. Updated instructions outlining the VSDP guidelines are forthcoming, but Sailors can continue to refer to NAVADMINs 043/12 and 205/12 un til the updates are released. e Chief Petty Ocer Early Return to Sea, announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, authorized detailers to ll opening high priority E7-E9 sea duty billets using their authorized transfer window in conjunction with the candidates current length of time on shore, recent advancement, eet experience, and Navy Enlisted Classications. When the CPO Early Return to Sea initiative was implemented, we were focused very hard on improv ing the Supervisor (E7 to E9) man ning at sea. However, we know that journeymen requirements are also important, particularly within the technical (NEC) skills. With this initiative we are trying to create a more holistic improvement in sea duty manning by expanding this initia tive to E4-E9 Sailors, Dodge said. Navy detailers now will have in creased exibility in lling anticipat ed eet vacancies on time with a fully trained and qualied relief, accord ing to NAVADMIN 058/14. is is one more tool to ensure proper manning of the eet for all Sailors. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Navy-Marine Relief Golf March 28e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society will have a 4-man Scramble Golf Tournament be ginning with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m., Fri day, March 28 at Trident Lake Golf Club. Entry fee is $40 per person, $160 per team, which includes cart, green fees, lunch. Prizes for lon gest drive on No. 17 and more. To sign up, on tact Kevin at 753-8475/8476 or kevin.doetch@ navy.mil. e tournament is hosted by the NSB Kings Bay Chief Petty Ocers Association.Youth Job Fair set for March 26e Georgia Department of Labor and sev eral other local organizations will participate in the 19th annual Youth Job Fair and Career Expo, 4 to 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 26, in the cafeteria at Camden County High School, 6300 Laurel Island Parkway. e job fair is de signed to help youth 15 to 22 years old nd jobs and career opportunities. Parents are invited to to participate. Expo participants include Camden County Chamber of Com merce, Camden Community Alliance and Re source Center, Camden County High Schools Youth Apprenticeship Program, Harveys Supermarket, Kings Bays Naval Sub Bases Fleet and Family Support Center and Morale, Wel fare and Recreation Center, Lowes, OMNI Amelia Island, and the Salvation Army. For more information, contact the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center at (912) 673-6942, or e-mail Kings_Bay_CC@gdol.ga.gov Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil. Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a fes tival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military heli copter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical perfor mances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniver sary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Op erations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@com cast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association is accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by member ship-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dis persed to local nonprot organiza tions through the KBSOSA Commu nity Grants program. e community grants are avail able by application to local nonprot organizations needing as sistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organiza tion dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to rais ing funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportu nities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of Ameri can Sea Power and obtain a recom mendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Ocers spouses oer civic grants Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Incentives available for sea duty Personnel Command By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith warmer weather comes peak moving season, so when orders are in hand, people should plan ahead to ensure the most hassle-free relo cation, a senior ocial who over sees personal property moves for military families said in a recent in terview. Navy Capt. Aaron Stanley, person al property program director for U.S. Transportation Commands Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, told the Pentagon Channel that peak moving season is a moving industry phenomenon in which government and privatesector moves compete for the same resources during busy summer months, typically between the Me morial Day and Independence Day holidays. Whether moving this summer or any time, do your homework, be exible and know what your rights are, Stanley said. e main moving issue is volume, with most families opting to relocate after their children are out of school for the year, he said. Stanley said the Defense Depart ment conducted 520,000 moves last year, with about about 40 percent occurring from May 15 to Aug. 15, with similar numbers projected this year. Stanley encouraged those with a permanent-change-of-station move on the horizon to propose multiple windows or dates for moving con sideration. By having multiple dates in mind, we have the best chance of getting you the dates youre after, Stanley said. And because of the busy summer season, the better you under stand what the movers are supposed to do on your behalf, the better [pre pared you will be] to hold them ac countable to do exactly that. By using the online Defense Per sonal Property System at http:// www.move.mil, Defense Depart ment personnel and their families can self-counsel and submit their applications online, track their ship ments, le a claim, and settle direct ly with the moving company to get full replacement value of lost and damaged goods, as opposed to de preciated value oered in the past, Stanley explained. ere are some changes being made to the claims module that should make it more user-friendly, he added. Ocials have been responsive to customer feedback, Stanley said, and he noted that a higher customer Plan carefully for all PCS moves Transportation See PCS, Page 3

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back and we did the math, he said, and we said, All right, how [much] equip ment do we have? How many airplanes can you land every day? How many planes do you need to lift this equipment out? How many people do we have? And so on and so forth. e result was a 102-day timeline that includes tak ing home all equipment, transporting troops, elimi nating hazardous materials and unexploded ord nance, and making sure bases are properly trans ferred to the Afghans. So when I talk about high risk in September, I kind of take the physics part of the equation, he said. I say thats probably 102 days. Dunford said executing such a withdrawal plan would entail what he de scribed as friction bad weather or aircraft maintenance or enemy issues, for example. So what Id want to have is some kind of buf fer, he added. What Ive said to the leadership is, Look, Im pretty comfort able that up until September, I can manage multiple options. e general emphasized this doesnt mean multiple options cant be man aged after September. What it means is that my risk of conducting an orderly withdrawal starts to go up, he said. at doesnt mean any of those things cant be reversed, and frankly, if a decision is made later than the rst of Septem ber, well clearly adjust. But well have done some things that will either have to be reversed, or well work much harder and probably less [eciently] in terms of disposition of equipment and those kinds of things. Dunford restated that there isnt a specic day when he could say, If you dont have a decision by this day, we cant accom plish the mission. eres a period of risk that starts in Septem ber that is benchmarked against, again, how many days you actually need to close the theater down, he said. If you dont have a de cision, but you know you have to empty the theater if youre directed, the closer you get December, the more you have to do things that would allow you to meet that 31 December deadline, he added. survey response rate currently at about 35 to 45 percent would improve their ability to see that the best moving companies get the most business in moving military families. at customer satisfac tion survey is the underly ing foundation for the program, and its best-value approach accounts for 75 percent of the formulae to allocate shipments for [transportation service providers], he said. More feedback means a better program and good shipments to the right companies.PCSFrom Page 3Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Mark BellA 2nd Cavalry Regiment soldier stands watch over-looking the valley south of Forward Operating Base Masum Ghar, in the Panjwayi District of Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. AfghanFrom Page 1 American Forces Press ServiceAmerican forces boarded and took control of a commercial tanker ship that was seized earlier this month by three armed Libyans, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said in a Defense Department news release issued March 17. No one was hurt tonight when U.S. forces, at the request of both the Libyan and Cypriot gov ernments, boarded and took control of the commercial tanker Morning Glory, a stateless vessel seized earlier this month by three armed Libyans, Kirby said in the release. e boarding operation, approved by President Barack Obama and con ducted just after 10 p.m. EDT on March 16 in inter national waters southeast of Cyprus, was executed by a team of Navy SEALs attached to Special Opera tions Command Europe, Kirby added. e SEAL team em barked and operated from the guided missile destroyer USS Roosevelt, Kirby said in the release. e USS Roosevelt provided helicopter support and served as a command and control and support platform for the other members of the force assigned to conduct the mission, he said. e Morning Glory is carrying a cargo of oil owned by the Libyan government National Oil Company, Kirby said in the release. e ship and its cargo were illicitly ob tained from the Libyan port of As-Sidra. e USS Roosevelt is homeported in Mayport, Fla.SEAL team takes tanker back from armed Libyans THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Capt. Andrew Wright pushes Huckleberry and Locklyn, while wife, Katie, keeps up the pace. SA Zachary Snyder sets his pace. No telling if hes way ahead or somewhere in the middle. Families also were welcome for the 8 a.m. starting time. Sporting a bowler for the March 11 run. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Shamrock Run Photos by India WinslowSgt. Chadwick McCrary with wife, Morgan, and Aidan (inset). Luke arrived two days later. From left, SA Ebony Braun, SR Marcus Carrizales, SA Daniel Solorio, MASA Rioval Rodriguez, SR Garrett Alexander and SA Zachary Snyder. Lance Cpl. Victor Martinez added a tie and moustache.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 5 Overlooked in America, Great Wars impact still felt worldwide today By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceIt was called e Great War even as it was going on. It engulfed the world, and the world is still feeling its eects. is year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and U.S. ocials are gearing up to mark the centen nial. In his day job, Robert J. Dalessandro is the director of the U.S. Army Center of Military History at Fort Lesley J. McNair here. He also is the acting chairman of the World War I Centennial Commission. e Great War began in July 1914 with the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. is triggered an inter connecting network of alliances to spark mobilization, bringing in the empires of Europe. England, France and Russia lined up against Germany, the AustroHungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. A generation of men died in battle on the elds of France. e Somme, Verdun, Ypres and Meuse-Argonne became killing grounds. On the Eastern Front, millions of Ger mans, Austrians and Russians battled. Overall, about 16.5 million people were killed in the war. At rst, the United States stayed out of it. In fact, when President Woodrow Wilson ran for re-election in 1916, his cam paign slogan was He kept us out of war. But on April 7, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and the other Central Powers and raised a military force of more than 4 million men. e United States lost 116,516 service mem bers in World War I. Another 205,690 were wounded. While the United States didnt enter the war until 1917, the U.S. commemora tion commission is beginning its mission of education now to provide Americans some context for the epochal war. You cant just drop into World War I in April of without understanding the road to war, Dalessandro said in an interview. It was complex politically and internationally, and Americans to day need to know what Americans then thought about the war. is summer begins the centennial, Dalessandro said, calling the archdukes assassination the Fort Sumter of World War I, refer ring to the site of the U.S. Civil Wars rst engage ment. Congress char tered the commission to encourage private organizations and state and local governments to organize activities commemorating the centennial. e panel will coordinate activities throughout the United States tied to the centennial and will serve as a clearinghouse for the dis semination of plans and events, he said. While its charter covers the United States, the commission also is looking at inter national events, and will mark those appropriately, he added. We want to lead eorts that raise awareness, that encourage a spectrum of organizations to plan programs and develop an education program targeting Americas youth, Dalessandro said. e education aspect may be the com missions most important challenge, he added. We need to wake up the interest of a new generation of Americans on the eects of World War I, he said. Americans today need to know that World War I changed every thing for America, Dales sandro said. In the short term, he ex plained, the experience of the slaughter of the Western Front turned America away from entangling alliances in Europe. But the lesson for leaders, he added, was 180 degrees from that. ey learned we have to be engaged in Europe and involved in business, he said. While the Civil War saw a draft, Da lessandro said, World War I saw the rst universal draft. e rst question is if you have a universal draft for men, what do you do with African-American men? he said. From Marine Corps History DivisionDuring World War I, the Marine Corps distinguished itself on the battlefields of France as the 4th Marine Brigade earned the title of Devil Dogs for heroic action during 1918 at Belleau Wood.World War I centennial planning begins There isnt a person in the United Kingdom who doesnt know these guys are not coming back. Robert J. Dalessandro Army Center of Military History Courtesy photoCFC CelebrationThe 2013 Combined Federal Campaign Celebration was at the the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Officers Club March 6. Representing Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were, from left, Trident Refit Facility Chief David Wood, Public Works Fred Naylor and Community Plannings Melinda NesSmith-Picard. Naylor was Kings Bays CFC coordinator, while Wood and NesSmith-Picard were loaned executives. NesSmith-Picard received a CFC Star Award for Dedication for the 2013 CFC Region. The CFC of Northeast Florida-Southeast Georgia encompasses a 48-county region with more than 44,000 federal employees and military members. Air Force photoWorld War I was the first war in which air planes were used extensively. Pictured is a U.S. Nieuport model at an Air Force re-enactment fly-in. See WW I, Page 6 marine Squadron 20, Ive had the pleasure of working with some of the highest caliber people in our sub marine force, Harkins said. Harkins went on to ac knowledge Team Kings Bay, including all major commands at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Each of the organiza tions directly contribute to the nations strategic deterrence mission readiness, and without them, none of our submarines in Kings Bay would be able to do their jobs, he said. Richard awarded Har kins with the Legion of Merit for his service as commodore. Houston took command of Submarine Squadron 20 which is responsible for the maintenance and operations of ve Ohioclass ballistic missile sub marines USS Alaska (SSBN 732), USS Tennes see (SSBN 734), USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). [Ohio-class] submarines have two crews because you have to be that good, Houston said. It takes a team; team Kings Bay. I am honored and humbled to take com mand of Squadron 20. Harkins will report to Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic for his new assignment.20From Page 1Navy photos by MC1 Rex NelsonCapt. Christopher Harkins addresses guests and staff during a change of command ceremony for Submarine Squadron 20 March 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Chapel. Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10, presents Capt. Christopher Harkins with a Legion of Merit award. Capt. William J. Houston, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, salutes as he is piped through sideboys following the change of command ceremony.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Marine Corps Historical Division photoAfter 16 days on the line during the Battle of Belleau Wood, 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines march to a rest area.Navy History and Heritage CommandLt. Frank L. Muller, left, and Lt. j.g. Junius H. Fulcher were taken prisoner by the crew of the U-152 after it sank the USS Ticonderoga in 1918. Much of the Navys World War I efforts were combating U-boats. African-American leaders were determined that black men ght as combat soldiers and ght in integrated units. ey also pushed for black ocers, Dalessandro said. Part of that happened, he added. For many AfricanAmericans, he noted, the experience in France was their rst taste of an en vironment without Jim Crow laws. ere, they are looked on as equals and that is a revelatory ex perience, he said. World War I was the rst time masses of American women entered the work force, Dalessandro said. ere were nurses, yeom anettes, telephone operators, Red Cross workers, Doughnut Dollies and women working in facto ries. And at the end of the war, women had the vote. In the Civil War, you have Irish and German im migrants in great numbers in the Army, Dalessandro said. But in World War I, you have Italian-Americans, Eastern Europeans, Jews, large numbers of Russians, Poles, Czechs, Slovaks soldiers from ethnic groups that have emigrated, and its a quick road to citizenship. e question was whether these men would ght together whether they would consider themselves Americans, he added. And the answer was yes, he said. Some historians call e Great War just Act 1 of a greater war that includes World War II and the Cold War. Fascism grew out of the experiences in the war. Revolution took hold in Russia, and the Soviet Union was born. e Versailles Peace Treaty set the stage for Act 2 in 1939. e Battle of MeuseArgonne was the largest American battle up to that point. More than 500,000 doughboys and Marines fought, and many died, on the elds and forests of France. ey faced not only bullets and artillery, but also poison gas, tanks and planes. And yet, the American impression of the war is Snoopy vs. the Red Baron or movies such as All Quiet on the Western Front, Paths of Glory or Wings Dalessandro said. is is our biggest chal lenge, he added, noting that a scene at the end of a recent British movie shows two soldiers going over the top in the Somme in 1916. ere isnt a person in the United Kingdom who doesnt know these guys are not coming back, he said. We [in America] dont have a national con sciousness like that. World War I set the stage for the rest of the 20th cen tury. It destroyed four empires: the German Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire and the Ottoman Em pire. It also set the stage for current conditions in the Middle East by the Balfour Declaration, which called for a Jewish homeland in the region and by the vic tors drawing the borders of new countries. One hundred years on, World War I continues to cast a shadow, Dalessan dro said. e nation needs to learn from it, he added, and the commemoration is a place to start. WW IFrom Page 5New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 25. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be reg istered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal em ployment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 24 and 31. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sand wiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. By Joseph F. GradisherOffice of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance, Public AffairsChief of Naval Opera tions Admiral Jonathan Greenert has directed Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command to es tablish an Information Dominance Type Command. In his March 4, 2014 memorandum to CUS FFC, Greenert wrote, I approve the establishment of Navy Information Dominance Forces as an echelon III command un der your administrative control. As the immedi ate superior in command, oversee the commands implementation...with an initial operating capability of 1 October 2014. e TYCOM will report directly to CUSFFC and have supporting relationships with the rest of the Navy, focusing primar ily on the Navys infor mation environ ment. Commander, Navy Cyber Forces, Rear Adm. Diane Webber will have her command re-designated as Commander, Navy In formation Dominance Forces and will provide the initial infrastructure, resources and assets for the TYCOM. Webber noted that the new TYCOMs mission will be to support Combatant Commanders and Navy Commanders ashore and aoat by providing forward deployable, sustainable, combat-ready Information Dominance forces. Full operational capability for NAVIDFOR is expected by the end of the calendar year. A Navy Type Command or TYCOM, coordinates the Man, Train and Equip functions for specic com munities within the Navy. For example, Commander, Naval Air Forces exercises administrative control over aviation forc es and Commander, Navy Surface Forces does the same for the surface war fare community. NAVIDFOR will serve in that capacity for the Infor mation Dominance Corps. e IDC was formed in 2009 and built on the deep expertise and strengths of the ocers/enlisted, ac tive/reserve, and civilian workforce from the ocean ography/meteorology, information professional, information warfare, naval intelligence and space cadre. e IDC is an inter-disciplinary corps that possess es a deep understanding of potential adversaries and the battlespace, is able to accurately identify targets and brings an array of non-kinetic, oensive and defensive capabilities to the ght in the Informa tion Age. Vice Adm. Ted N. Twig Branch, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance and the lead for the Navys IDC, said, e continuing evolution of Information Dominance as a Navy warghting dis cipline demands a single, integrated TYCOM to pro vide relevant and eective capabilities, including a highly trained and moti vated workforce. Im con dent the new NAVIDFOR will provide the Fleet and the entire Navy the ID ca pabilities needed to deter, ght and win within this information domain. GreenertCNO establishes Information Dominance Type Command THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By Gunnery Sgt. Scott DunnHeadquarters Marine Corpse Marine Corps plans to stand up an experimen tal task force comprised of both men and women volunteers in primar ily ground-combat-arms specialties for about a year so analysts can assess their performance, the general ocer overseeing the Marine Corps forceintegration planning eort said March 10. Brig. Gen. George W. Smith Jr. said one of the Corps four eorts in a deliberate, measured and responsible approach to integrating women into combat units and occupa tional specialties by Jan. 1, 2016 the Defense Departments deadline for full integration across the services will be borne by the Ground Combat Element Experimental Task Force. Pending nal approval of human-research requirements, the approximately 460-Marine task force is slated to activate this summer at Camp Lejeune, N.C., allowing informed, female Marines the opportunity to volun teer as test subjects in oc cupational specialties that have been heretofore held only by men. Guidance for command ers and instructions for vol unteers will be published in a Marine administrative message at a later date. e task force will be comprised of about 25 percent women and will help the Corps assess the outcome of physical demands Marines must meet in the execution of individual and collective tasks, Smith said. is pilot eort will simulate the functions of an expeditionary units ground-combat element, Smith said. It will look somewhat like a small version of a battalion landing team in that its got an infantry nucleus, and then it will have those attachments tanks, artillery, (tracked amphibious landing vehicles) and the like, with a headquarters element, Smith said. Planners also intend to send the task force to the Corps premier combat training center in Twenty nine Palms, Calif., and to mountain-warfare training in Bridgeport, Calif. We expect them to deploy for training into those two locations, in ad dition to what theyll do at Camp Lejeune, Smith said. ey may be based at Camp Lejeune, but our units deploy to train in those very, very dierent environments with unique demands associated with those environments. e task forces head quarters element slated to have a male command er and a female senior-enlisted advisor is expect ed to stand up sometime this summer, with volun teers arriving in the fall. Female volunteers ac cepted for the task forces combat-arms cohort must rst report to military occupational specialty schools to learn the entry-level tasks for respec tive ground-combat-arms jobs. Since October 2013, 40 female Marine volunteers have completed infantry rieman training at the School of Infantry in Camp Lejeune; however, the Corps needs to con tinue measuring female performance beyond entry-level tasks, Smith said. He said all Marines must have the physical capacity to meet the de mands of those occupational specialties in the operating forces, which in some cases is signicantly dierent and greater than what we nd in our entrylevel training pipeline. Smith gave hiking as an example and mentioned the 20-kilometer hike required to complete entrylevel infantry training. He said although it is something to certainly be proud of, it is a onetime event that must be sustained in the operating forces. He went on to describe the standard, progressive hike program a Marine must undergo at an infan try battalion conceding it was an extreme example: You do a hike program over the course of many months. Youre hiking, week in and week out, ex tended distances well in excess of 20 kilometers. Responsible research, he said, must account for the physiological dier ences between men and women when studying the sustained wear and tear on the body, and the physical endurance associated with increasingly more demanding individual and collective tasks. e only way to truly understand the potential challenges for our female Marines out in the operat ing forces is to develop this purpose-built experimental task force and put that task force through a training syllabus, Smith said, adding that such training requires a building-block approach that progresses into increasingly more demanding individual tasks. We need to do that by simulating an operational environment. By late summer 2015, researchers from within the Marine Corps and external agencies are ex pected to present their data to the commandant of the Marine Corps to inform his best military judgment as to how he wants to proceed in mak ing recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of Defense, Smith said. Its important for ev erybody to understand that (full integration) is actual law, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos said during an interview with Marin esTV Feb. 29. And theres no force on the face of the earth that obeys laws more than the United States Ma rines do. We not only obey them, we enforce them. Data collected from the task force will support other eorts the Corps is conducting, which ocials announced March 12: Since 2012, female of cers and sta noncommissioned ocers have had the opportunity to serve in more than 20 ground-combat-arms bat talions that were previously closed to women. Sergeants and corporals will now have the same opportunity, and females will now be assigned at the company and battery levels. Female Marine re cruits will have the opportunity to volunteer for more ground-combatarms schools following their graduation from boot camp, much like the Corps has been doing with its infantry rieman training since September 2013. e additional schools include more infantry training such as machine gunner, mortarman, as saultman and anti-tank missleman courses, as well as artillery cannon eer, tank crewman and assault amphibian vehicle crewman courses. Pending completion of Congressional notication, the Marine Corps will open 11 occupational specialties in three previously closed elds: artillery, ground ordnance maintenance and low-altitude air defense. Following the opening of these military occupational specialties, the Corps will have 20 of its 335 primary MOSs closed. e eorts are unprec edented; however, Smith pointed to the Corps decades of incremental integration: Ill use the aviation-combat element as an example: Weve had fully integrated combat squadrons for 20 years. We just had our rst female squadron commander a couple years ago. eyve performed tremendously in Iraq and Afghanistan pilots, aircrew, maintainers; you name it fully integrated, fully cohesive, high-morale squadrons. e recent research ef forts are near-term but Smith said they are meant to shape the Marine Corps for decades to come: As we do this, the commandant has been absolutely clear that we are going to maintain the highest lev els of combat readiness the combat readiness that America demands of her Marines. Smith said female Marines have time and again expressed to the comman dant that all they want is the opportunity to com pete on an equitable play ing eld, and given the mandates of the Secretary of Defense, the Marine Corps must gather all it can in the next 18 months to ensure that when we open an MOS, that our female Marines are going to be successful in that MOS. And success, Smith said, must be measured beyond entering into that occupational specialty and get ting to that unit: It is be ing successful over a truly viable career path, over the course of 20 or even 30 years. e Corps may request an exception to the Department of Defense poli cy if opening certain units or occupational specialties by deadline does not meet specic guidelines. at includes ensuring mission readiness as well as viable career paths. We are not going to lower the standards, and I want all Marines every where to understand that, Amos said. We are Ameri cas premier ghting force. When the Klaxon sounds, and they say, Send in the Marines, we are going to be ready, and we better be ready because the rst time we fail, then America quite honestly doesnt need a Marine Corps any more.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Kristin E. MorenoEducators view a portion of the Crucible, a 54-con tinuous-hour test of physical and mental challenges, during an Educators Workshop aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Marine Corps women train for combat rolesMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Justin A. Rodriguez Pfc. Cristina Fuentes Montenegro and Pfc. Julia Carroll, right, two of the first three female Marine graduates from the School of Infantry-Easts Infantry Training Battalion course visit with Shirley M. John, center, from the North Carolina Tarheel Chapter of the Women Marines Association.

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By Ensign Alexander WashofskyUSS Mahan Public Affairse crew of the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) wrapped up a ve-day port vis it March 10 to New Orleans, the rst ship in ve years to make a visit there during Mardi Gras. While in port, the crew participated in a number of events, including marching in both the Bacchus and Rex parades. Fire Controlman 1st Class Joshua Briles chose to have his re-enlistment ceremo ny on the USS Constitution oat during the Bacchus Parade. It was a unique experience that Ill never forget, said Briles. e ships distinguished visitors included Rear Adm. Brian Brown, commander, Na val Meteorology and Oceanography Com mand; Erin Kern, director, Shore Readiness and Logistics; and actor Hugh Laurie, fa mous for his lead role as Dr. Gregory House in the television show House On March 2, Mahans Crew hosted a group of local Navy Junior Reserve Of cer Training Corps (NJROTC) Sea Ca dets. e Sea Cadets were given a tour of the destroyer and were able to get some hands-on training on damage control equipment and line handling at various stations around the ship. It was great being able to give them some real eet experience, said Yeoman 2nd Class Jason Taylor. Wrapping up their stay, a group of 20 Mahan Sailors visited the New Orleans Childrens Hospital March 10, to deliver gifts and spend time with the kids. For crewmembers like Senior Chief Logis tics Specialist LaClondria Caddell, the childrens hospital visit was just another example of how the port call was about more than Mardi Gras. Anywhere we go, we always reach out and help the local community however we can, said Caddell. is was my favorite part of our port visit. Cmdr. Zoah Scheneman, Mahan com manding ocer, said the visit was great. We were happy to visit a city so rich with history and tradition, especially during the Mardi Gras, Scheneman said. It was an experience for our Sailors to participate in the celebration.I did these interviews one week ago, prior to Sundays seedings and brackets, while conference tourna ment play was ongoing. At that time, Las Vegas had Kentucky at 40/1, Duke at 10/1, Arizona at 15/2, Wichita State at 8/1 and Louisville18/1. Vegas bookmakers had the Florida Gators (11/2) as the team to beat, followed by Kansas (6/2) and Arizona. Thats just Vegas. Actually a lot of people are picking Kentucky to win it. Me? Im like the bookies. I like the Gators.Who will win NCAA mens hoops tourney?MM2 Brice Wilson USS Georgia Blue Wichita, Kan. Wichita State. Im from Wichita. Theyre playing angry. ETC Kevin Grant Trident Training Facility Baltimore Ive got to go with the home team, the Maryland Terrapins. But my second pick is Louisville to repeat. MT2 Dean Moore USS West Virginia Gold Montrose, Pa. Duke, because of Jabari Parker. CSSN Antwan Brown USS Florida Gold Savannah Kentucky. Theyve got a solid defense. The offense is doing pretty well. Theyve got a lot of young guys. Theyll take it. Lance Cpl. Kylere Paulsen Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Cedar Rapids, Iowa Arizona. Theyre playing pretty well. STS1 Harris Behrman Trident Training Facility East Windsor, N.J. I dont think Wichita State. Arizonas not a bad pick. Theyve got a wellrounded team. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Louisiana Office of Tourism photoUSS Mahan (DDG 72) Sailors marched in two Mardi Gras parades.Sailors go to Mardi Gras THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By MC2 Tiarra FulghamNavy Public Affairs Support Element West Detachment HawaiiAshes of Pearl Harbor survivor, Machinists Mate 1st Class William Henderson, were scattered into the calm waters at the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam during a ceremony March 10. Henderson was born Nov. 12, 1922 and joined the U.S. Navy the day after his 18th birthday Nov. 13, 1940. Fol lowing graduation from Recruit Training Command, he received orders to the Brooklyn-class cruiser USS Hel ena (CL 50) in Pearl Harbor. On the morning of the 1941 Japanese attacks, Hender son was asleep in his rack and awakened by a general alarm calling for all crew to report to their battle stations. While getting dressed, the ship was hit by a Japanese torpedo, knocking out the power throughout the ship and ooding the engine and boiler rooms. Henderson managed to make it to his battle station shortly after a brief state of unconsciousness. Capt. Larry Scruggs, deputy commander of Pearl Har bor Naval Shipyard, spoke at the ceremony about Hendersons dedication and bravery he put forth that day. I am sure he felt that this was his last day as he ran to perform his duties as trained, Scruggs said. He would witness his world forever changed that day, and yet, he would go on to serve his country honorably, with pas sion and courage, and a deep commitment to his ship mates. Despite extensive damage, the ship was repaired and returned to full active status, deploying to sea as a part of the task force to intercept the Japanese eet in Oct. 1942. Henderson continued to serve in the Navy and on the Helena during the Battles of Esperance, Guadalcanal and Kula Gulf, in which the ship was hit by three torpe does, breaking it into three parts and ultimately sinking. In an excerpt from his book Escape from the Sea he re called the night he survived the Japanese attacks on the Helena in the Kula Gulf in great detail: For us the battle was over but we had lost eight of cers, 186 enlisted men and four Marines. Most of them died while manning their battle stations during the ght. Some severely wounded men managed to abandon ship but later died in the water or aboard the rescue ships. ey were all shipmates who made the supreme sacrice. Some were friends, men with whom I had been on liberty. ey will be sorely missed until we are all called to meet the Supreme Commander. After the sinking of Helena, he was later reassigned to the attack transport USS President Polk (AP 103) and served until the end of the war and later discharged in 1947: I feel very fortunate to have survived the war without a scratch or wound. To this day I have a poignant feeling for the Helena, but have no desire to repeat the harrow ing experience of action in the South Pacic. I left the Navy after serving a six year hitch and worked thirty six years for the Pacic Telephone Company in California, retiring in 1984. Francis and I have three ne daughters, three great son-in-laws and six wonderful grandchil dren. How sweet it is. To show his feelings and love for the Helena, he named all three of his daughters after the ship. ey all have the same initials C-L-H after the cruiser light Helena. Hendersons son-in-law, Mike Danaher, talked about many of the things Henderson did to continue to honor his shipmates even after he retired. He raised money and ran a sculpture competition to build a World War II memorial in our hometown and now thats the focus for the 4th of July activities, said Danaher. His family mentioned that Henderson began to col lect stories from surviving shipmates and put them into his book. He did a lot to honor his shipmates and he would really appreciate this, said Danaher. Im thankful for all the ne men and women who contributed to the ceremony, said Fran Henderson, his wife of more than 63 years. I feel appreciation for the many years I had with my husband and his contribution to the war. He was a hero to his family, the Navy, and the United States, said Jim Taylor, Pearl Harbor Survivors Liaison who spoke at the ceremony. His desire was to make a nal voyage to Pearl Harbor and have his remains re turned to honor his fellow friends and shipmates lost during the attacks. anks to the eorts of his family, his wish has came true. Henderson passed away in Aug. 2013. His ashes were returned to the site of the attacks to join his shipmates and received full military honors including a ag presentation, playing of Taps, and a threevolley rie salute from members of the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Honors and Ceremonies and a member of the Pacic Fleet Band.Navy photo by MC2 Tiarra FulghamFamily members scatter the ashes of a retired Chief Petty Officer over the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island following a farewell ceremony. Pearl Harbor, Helena survivor laid to nal rest Naval History and Heritage CommandUSS Helena (CL 50), center, firing during the Battle of Kula Gulf, just before it was torpedoed and sunk. William Henderson served on USS Helena.Naval History and Heritage Command photoSurvivors of USS Helena after their rescue from the waters of the Central Solomons, July 6, 1943. Helena had been sunk by Japanese torpedos on the previous night. By Colie Young, Frank Jordan and Tami BegasseNavy News ServiceFor the 5,800 veterans and 1,500 ac tive duty military living in the Albany, Ga. area, accessibility to health care services has been expanded and enhanced thanks to an agreement between Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the Department of Vet erans Aairs. e agreement relocates VA health care providers and services to NH Jackson villes Branch Health Clinic Albany onboard the Marine Corps Logistics Base. Combining Navy Medicine and VA resources will bring the best in patient care for our active duty and veterans in Alba ny, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, NH Jackson villes commanding ocer. Our collaboration not only expands and enhances care, but we are able to deliver that care in a cost-eective way as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. e VA relocation to BHC Albanys 22,179 square-foot building provides vet erans a state-of-the-art facility and access to new ancillary services such as phar macy, laboratory and radiology. ey will also have expanded access to services from primary care to mental health. For existing BHC Albany service mem bers, new services will include podiatry and optometry and increased stang of existing services. e jointly staed clinic will provide high quality, ecient and convenient care to patients in the region. e joint clinic will complement an ex isting agreement the VA has with MCLB Albany, entered into May 16, 2013, that provides a separate building near BHC Albany. Carl Vinson VA Medical Center director John S. Goldman was enthusias tic about the move. In addition to oering primary care, we will expand services for veterans and active duty military to include optometry, audiology, mental health, podiatry, and physical rehabilitation, Goldman said. NH Jacksonville has another joint eort with the VA at its BHC in Key West, Fla. for mental health and physical therapy care. is latest partnership with the Na val Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., and the Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dub lin, Ga., combines resources to open a VA community-based outpatient clinic aboard the base. is oers the promise of greater access for veterans and activeduty military, while maximizing existing resources and oering potential expan sion of medical services in a joint eort, said Marine Col. Don Davis, MCLB Alba nys commanding ocer. Navy, Marines, VA work in harmony at BHC Albany

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Registration open for Lifeguard Training, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to prepay and regis ter. Cost is $175 and class is re stricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Fes tival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun, including orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex, cost is $15 for each team of two, which includes t-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together. All bike types are welcome. e event is limited to 15 teams per wave. After, join in the fun at Lake D with the festival in full swing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with lots of fun things to do, including a zipline, halo jumper, rock wall, obstacle inatable, kids shing, geocaching and more. Food will be available for purchase. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been ap proved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new venture and is cer tain that you, the patron, will en joy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowl ing you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free kids movies shown Liberty call Lifeguard class nearingFree Movies for the Kids Weekend movies for March are Percy Jackson: Sea of Mon sters March 22 and 23, Escape from Planet Earth March 29 and 30 and The Smurfs 2 Mon day, March 31. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sun day and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes af ter the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Intramural Sports MWR Intramural Sports photoAs the 7-vs-7 Spring Soccer season nears its end, registration is open for Average Joes Bowling. The captains meeting is March 25 in the Fitness Center classroom. Play begins April 4.7x7 Soccer LeagueTeam W L T1, MFPUGC 5 0 0 2t, Turf Toe 3 1 1 2t, Danger Zone 3 1 0 4, Kings Bay United 3 2 0 5t, USS Florida Gold 2 2 1 5t, Slow Attack 1 1 1 7, Ballbusters 2 3 0 8, Black Sails 2 4 0 9t, Trident Training 1 3 1 9t, The Agency 1 3 0 11, TRF FC 1 4 0 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Used and non-authentic counterfeit electronic components are widespread throughout the defense supply chain. Over the past two years alone, more than one million suspect parts have been associated with known supply chain compromis es. e problem is perva sive, with both expensive and inexpensive electronic parts being targeted. Counterfeit, or other wise suspect electronic components, present a critical risk for the Depart ment of Defense, where a malfunction of a single part could lead to system failures that can put warf ighter lives and missions at risk. A new DARPA program seeks to develop a tool to verify, without disrupting or harming the system, the trustworthiness of a protected electronic component. e DARPA Supply Chain Hardware Integrity for Electronics Defense program seeks proposals to develop a small (100 micron x 100 micron) component, or dielet, that authenticates the provenance of electronics com ponents. Proposed dielets should contain a full encryption engine, sensors to detect tampering and would readily ax to todays electronic components such as microchips. Successful development of SHIELD technology would provide 100 percent assurance against common threat modes: Recycled components that are sold as new Unlicensed overproduction of authorized components Test rejects and substandard components sold as high-quality Parts marked with falsely elevated reliability or newer date of manufac ture Clones and copies, which may be of low qual ity, or may include hidden functionality Components that are covertly repackaged for unauthorized applications SHIELD demands a tool that costs less than a penny per unit, yet makes counterfeiting too expensive and technically di cult to do, said Kerry Ber nstein, DARPA program manager. e dielet will be designed to be robust in operation, yet fragile in the face of tampering. What SHIELD is seeking is a very advanced piece of hardware that will oer an on-demand authentication method never before available to the supply chain. e dielet will be in serted into the electronic components package at the manufacturing site or axed to existing trusted components, without any alteration of the host com ponents design or reliability. ere is no electrical connection between the dielet and the host component. Authenticity testing could be done anywhere with a handheld probe or with an automated one for larger volumes. Probes need to be close to the di elet for scanning. After a scan, an inex pensive appliance per haps a smartphone uploads a serial number to a central, industry-owned server. e server sends an unencrypted challenge to the dielet, which sends back an encrypted answer and data from passive sensors like light exposure that could indicate tampering. e Department of Defense puts severe de mands on electronics, which is why a trusted supply chain is so important Bernstein said. SHIELD is a technology demonstration leveraging the asym metry of scaling for secu rity. While the program is being funded by DARPA, industry will adapt future implementations to make the technology scalable to the industry and the De fense supply chain. SHIELD is seeking pro posals that revolutionize electronic authentication with potential scalability and advanced technology not available today. DARPA imageAn artists concept of Supply Chain Hardware Integrity for Electronics Defense tech.DARPA hunts fake tech NASA photoOne of the booster rockets that will power NASAs Orion spacecraft.Booster rockets make trip From the National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationTwo of the boosters that will help send NASAs Orion spacecraft into space for the rst time have made their way to Florida. Orion will launch on top of a Delta IV rocket this fall, and two of the rockets three boosters were rolled out of the United Launch Alliance facility in Deca tur, Ala., and loaded onto a Mariner cargo barge Feb 21. ULA is constructing the Delta IV for the ight test of Orion, called Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. From ULA, the boosters arrived at Cape Canaveral, Fla., in early March for nal processing prior to the launch. A third booster is still in fabrication at the Decatur facility. is is a very exciting time for NASA, said Bill Hill, NASA assistant deputy as sociate administrator for exploration systems. EFT-1 is a big milestone for us, and is the start of venturing further into space than we ever have before. Seeing these rocket boosters roll out headed for the Cape is a testament of the hard work taking place to help further NASAs space exploration goals. During the ight test, Orion will travel 3,600 miles into space farther than a spacecraft built for humans has been in more than 40 years and orbit the Earth twice. e capsule will re-enter Earths at mosphere at speeds approaching 20,000 mph, generating temperatures as high as 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, before splash ing down in the Pacic Ocean. e uncrewed ight will provide engineers with important data about Orions heat shield and other elements, including the spacecraft adapters performance. e spacecraft adapter will connect Orion to the Delta IV and also will con nect Orion to NASAs new rocket, the Space Launch System, on its rst mission in 2017. e adapter was completed earlier this month at NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center and will be delivered to ULA in mid-March. SLS, NASAs new rocket, will be capable of taking humans to deep space missions, including Mars. NASA and our partners have worked very hard to get Orion ready for EFT-1, said Paul Marshall, NASAs Orion assistant program manager. It truly is a team eort, and that has been showcased here today. We really cant wait to see Orion y this fall on the Delta IV, and use that data to get us ready for the rst SLS ight in 2017.

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Coast Guard photo by PO2 Patrick KelleyCoast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp provides testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security March 12. Papp talks budget request By Cmdr. Rick WesterFrom Coast Guard CompassCoast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp testied March 12 before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Home land Security on the Coast Guards Fiscal Year 2015 budget request. e Commandant led his opening statement by thanking both the Subcommittee and Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson for their continued support of Coast Guardsmen. I will be eternally indebted to all of you for your hard work behind the scenes to make sure our people are taken care of, said the Commandant. e Commandant also thanked the subcommittee for their support of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 which helped to relieve the erosive eects of sequestration on the Coast Guard, re storing front line operations and badly needed training hours. In his testimony, the Commandant focused on the need for cutter recapitalization eorts to allow the Coast Guard to better serve our maritime nation. We rely on the safe, secure and free ow of goods across the seas and into our ports and waterways, said the Comman dant. Every day the Coast Guard acts to both prevent and respond to an array of threats that, if left unchecked, would impede trade, weaken our economy and create instability. During scal year 2013 the Coast Guard saved 3,200 lives, seized 88 metric tons of cocaine and 37 metric tons of marijuana, responded to 11,146 reports of pollution, interdicted more than 2,000 undocumented migrants and detained 190 sus pected smugglers. As the nations maritime governance force, the Coast Guard aims to interdict threats as far from U.S. shores as possible per DHS layered security strategy, and a capable oshore eet of cutters is critical. However, the average Reliance Class Me dium Endurance Cutter is 46 years old, and the oldest turns 50 this year. I sailed aboard one of these cutters, the Valiant, as a cadet at the Coast Guard Academy, said Adm. Papp, who gradu ated from the Coast Guard Academy in 1975. Due solely to the determination of our cuttermen, naval engineers and our modernized mission support system, Val iant will still be sailing when I retire this May. Recently the Coast Guard awarded the preliminary and contract design contracts for the Oshore Patrol Cutter eet which will replace the aging Medium En durance Cutters. In his recent State of the Coast Guard Address, the Commandant called this the most important shipbuilding initiative in the services 223-year history. We now sit at a critical point in time where the vital necessity to recapitalize our aging oshore eet connects with the expertise and strong competition to Old salts mentor SailorsBy MC3 Karl AndersonUSS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Public AffairsSailors aboard the air craft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) are helping one another us ing a mentorship program that pairs veteran Sailors with less experienced Sailors to help foster career development and profes sional growth. Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Randy Caras is a mentorship program coordinator. He said it is important to nd the right mentor to guide you per sonally and professionally. Its always good to have someone else provide insight from their experienc es, he said. Regardless of where you are in your ca reer, you can always ben et from a mentor. Caras said mentoring is part of Harry S. Trumans command culture and is an integral aspect of naval leadership. Senior Sailors have a responsibility to pass down their experience, wisdom and expertise to junior Sailors, he said. When Hospitalman Herbert Navarro report ed to Harry S. Truman, he knew exactly what he wanted in a mentor. I looked for someone to inspire me to push harder and try to do better in all aspects of my life and career, he said. Some one with experience more than anything else. He found such a mentor in Chief Mass Communi cation Specialist Harold Nance. Chief Nance is like a big brother mixed with a career counselor, Navarro said. He doesnt let me slide and he doesnt shoot from the hip. If he doesnt have the facts hell nd them. Navarro said he and Nance help each other ac complish their goals. Chief Nance makes sure Im on track to ac complish my goals, but this is not a one-sided re lationship, said Navarro. I help him accomplish his goals as well. Even though hes had a success ful career, he still has his own goals and ambitions. I admire that. It keeps me motivated. Navarro said everyone can benet from a mentor, regardless of rank or age. Its always nice to know that you have at least one person in your corner, said Navarro. If for no other reason, at least you know youre not by your self. Nance said mentorship is not only about profes sional guidance, but help ing Sailors in all aspects of their life. When a Sailor is dealing with problems at home, you oer a dier ent perspective to make the situation better, said Nance. Not necessarily how they can x the prob lem, but you give them the tools to make it better. He said a mentor is pertinent to success-they are the glue that binds everything together. e whole goal of the mentor ship program is to set the precedent that you are not alone. Nobody can live and operate in the world alone, said Nance. No matter how successful you are, nobody knows ev erything. Even as a chief petty ocer, I can learn something from the ju nior Sailors. You have to be open for the opportu nity to learn. at is what is rewarding. e return is much more than the give. Navy photo by MC3 Taylor M. DiMartinoSailors onboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) have a mentoring program that fosters career development and professional growth. See Papp, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press Servicee Defense Departments chief infor mation ocer unveiled the Pentagons strategy for addressing the ever-increas ing demand for wireless spectrum to achieve national security goals Feb. 20. All of our joint functions, our ability to ght, our movement and maneuver, res, command and control, intelligence, protection and sustainment are accom plished with systems that depend on spectrum, Teri Takai said. e strategy announcement puts DOD on the path to developing a comprehen sive implementation plan that will ad dress spectrum shortages, she said. e safety and security of U.S. citi zens, the eectiveness of our U.S. combat forces, and the lives of our U.S. military members, our allies, and noncombatants depend on spectrum access more than ever, Takai said. Wireless technologies can be found in practically every piece of electronics cur rently available. Televisions, refrigerators and even cars are communicating via Wi-Fi, and DOD is seeing the same ex ponential growth of wireless usage in its equipment. I used to say that everythings con nected to the network except for if you carry around a weapon, and I was very quickly corrected that no, in fact, most of our weaponry is facilitated by position navigation and timing or what youd call GPS, Takai said in an interview with American Forces Press Service. All of that is dependent upon the networks, which are when we use wireless, de pendent upon spectrum. Spectrum is a nite resource, she said. Every new device places an additional demand on the network. While wireless devices are governed by a standard that directs what frequencies they can use, each additional device takes up a certain amount of space on its assigned set of fre quencies. Most of the time, theres enough room in the device standard for many connections, but as the number of wireless devices increases, so does the potential for conict, she said. is can lead to slow or inaccessible networks, and it can become a public safety risk or a threat to national security. For example, numerous problems were reported with cellphone networks over whelmed by a surge in trac following the bombings at the Boston Marathon last year. So, in 2010, President Barack Obama signed an executive order directing federal agencies to make 500 MHz of federal and nonfederal spectrum available over the next 10 years, suitable for both mobile and xed wireless broadband use. e spectrum strategy outlines the departments objectives for achieving the presidents vision, Takai said. e DOD is examining a number of op tions for freeing up bandwidth continuous sets of frequencies on the wire less spectrum. Among the challenges facing DOD is the fact that parts of the wireless spec trum are unsuitable for national security purposes, she said. To overcome this challenge, Takai said, the rst goal of the strategy is to improve the technology in DODs spectrum-dependent systems. Technologies currently in development could manage network demands by allowing for dynamic shar ing of frequencies, more eciently com pressing data or by using time-based fre quency sharing. e second objective is to improve the exibility of DODs spectrum operations, she said. Simply put, DOD spectrum-based op erations must be able to move with and adjust to the spectrum environment as it changes, Takai said, noting that this process begins with acquisitions. ird, she said, is increasing the par ticipation of the DOD in spectrum regulatory policy discussions. Eective engagement in the develop ment of policies helps us to better inu ence new regulatory developments in a way that enhances sharing opportunities and increases the agility of our spectrum use, Takai said. e release of the spectrum strategy is just the rst step, she said. Over the next six months, the department will develop an implementation plan that will take into account the strategys goals as well as the practical issues inherent in real locating space on the electromagnetic spectrum. Ideally, Takai said, the coming changes to spectrum allocation will be invisible to the warghter. e whole idea behind the spectrum strategy is to try to get ahead of this in creasing demand so that they dont have to operate with radios that are either more dicult to use or that have to be recalibrated. Instead, the next generation of de vices that operate on the wireless spec trum would contain technology exible enough to adjust to the frequency requirements of the operational environ ment, Takai said. e department is partnering with the private sector to develop new technolo gies that will provide warghters with the exibility they need to operate in the next battlespace. If we can work together on commer cial technologies and innovative tech nologies, those technologies are going to be applicable to us just as they are applicable to industry, Takai said. e eort to nd better ways to use the wireless spectrum isnt just about freeing up bandwidth. Its really about enabling one of our key industries. Special Ops eye threatsBy Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceWhile the scale of the homeland security threat has diminished, overseas threats to U.S. interests con tinue to grow, the militarys top special operations leaders said on Capitol Hill March 12. Michael D. Lumpkin, as sistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conict, and Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, told the Sen ate Armed Services Com mittees emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee that al-Qaida still retains sanctuaries in remote areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, with burgeoning sects in Syria, North Africa and the Sahel. e threat continues to evolve, Lumpkin said. We must maintain pres sure on terrorist organiza tions. Despite austere scal conditions, Lumpkin said, the Defense Department has provided counterinsurgency training and hu manitarian assistance in Colombia, not only bring ing security and prosper ity to the region, but also helping it emerge as an expert in regional security. Similar opportunities exist in Africa and the Middle East, Lumpkin re ported. Our support to the French in [Africas Sahel region] has been critical in stemming the tide of extremism in Mali, he noted. Modest support to [the African Union Mis sion in Somalia troops in] the Horn of Africa have helped to reverse the tra jectory of [terrorist group] al-Shabab. In Yemen, we have had successes, but require a more robust and sustained eort to turn the tide of [al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsulas] ex pansion. McRaven said special operations will continue to meet priority demands globally, to prepare for current and future con icts, and to take of its people, despite scal tur bulence. Globally, we are devel oping plans to better serve the geographic combatant commanders who, owing to the past 12 years of engagement in Iraq and Afghanistan, have gone under-resourced with [special operations] forc es, the admiral said. McRaven stressed the importance of maintaining readiness as the Unit ed States and its partners continue to sustain forces around the world, with people in 84 countries and 7,000 people deployed globally. e future of special op erations will be in helping to build partner capacity with willing nations who share U.S. interests, McRa ven said. No nation alone can stem the rise of extremism, he added. By Lt. j.g. Jeff BrauserUSS Russell Public Affairse ocers and crew of the guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) remembered the life of Dr. Barry Friedman, a World War II veteran, au thor and special friend of the crew during a special memorial service held on board the ship, March 9. Receiving a commission in the Navy Reserve in June 1941, Friedman was called to active duty as the medical ocer aboard USS Russell (DD 414) in the Pacic eater dur ing World War II and kept close ties with the Navy until his passing. During his service on board DD 414 during World War II, Friedman saw action during cam paigns in the Aleutian Islands, the Gilbert and Marshall Island invasions, New Guinea, and Leyte and Lingayen Gulf actions in the Philippines and Okinawa. After leaving the Navy, Friedman practiced med icine as an orthopedic surgeon for more than 40 years and authored 12 books. His most recently published book Survivor chronicles his ex periences as the medical ocer on board DD 414 during World War II. During the eulogy, Friedmans children expressed what they described as their fathers proudest moments while serving aboard DD 414. Coming to the aid of Sailors in need after the sinking of USS Lexington (CV 2) and USS Yorktown, as well as many other ships, the crew of DD 414 would save the lives of more than 1,200 Sailors during the war. Friedmans ties to the crew of the current USS Russell began when the ship arrived in San Diego Jan. 9, 2013 after having been previously homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Hawaii. Its a privilege to be able to honor a man as special as Dr. Friedman, said Cmdr. James Harney, Russells commanding of cer. When we learned of his passing, we started working immediately to put together a memorial to honor such a great man, who gave so much to the world, and who chose to spend his later years be coming part of our family. e Russells crew, knew Friedman well and he had last joined the crew as the guest of honor during the ships change of command ceremony Jan. 24. He was an incredible man, part of the Greatest Generation, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class Joseph Cook. is day, while somber, reminds you why we do this, to be part of something bigger than yourself that will span generations. Following the memorial serve there was a small re ception in the wardroom where guests shared sto ries of Friedman. Russell is currently un dergoing a 12-month, $70 million Extended Dry Dock Selective Restric tive Availability at the BAE Shipyard in San Diego. Russell is assigned as part of Destroyer Squadron 1.Naval History and Heritage CommandDr. Barry Friedman served on board this USS Russell (DD 414) during World War II.Navy photo by MC2 Robert StirrupThe guided-missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Russell mourns shipmateNavy photo by Mc2 Martin CareyNavy SEALs climb a caving ladder during training on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. McRavenNavy photo by MC2 Kiona MillerNaval District Washington officials present their smart grid pilot to John Conger, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment, during a presentation at the Washington Navy Yard. The team displayed energy conservation technology, such as the Energy Guard, a wireless sensor interface device for digital control systems and the Virtual Fence, a wireless video sensor for critical infrastructure protection. Takai New strategy evolvesdo so aordably, the Commandant said. To lose this opportunity would aect the very shape of our service and impact our ability to conduct our missions for the next 40 years. As important as the Oshore Patrol Cutter recapitalization project is, Adm. Papp noted that his top priority over the past two years has been eliminating sex ual harassment from the service. We started a military campaign of ce to oversee the implementation of our Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Strategic Plan and I have personally talked to about 35,000 Coast Guardsmen over the last 18 months during all hands meetings, the Commandant said. Even though the number of reports are going up, I feel that is a sign that victims are now trusting the system, and allowing us to vigorously hold the perpetrators ac countable.PappFrom Page 13

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PostAfghan optionsFull withdrawl or less eyed by end of year; election in spotlightBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.American Forces Press Servicee commander of the NATOled International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan explained in detail March 14 his condence in the ability to preserve multiple options for a post2014 presence in Afghanistan. During a media roundtable at the Pentagon, Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. discussed a potential timeline for preserving decision space while waiting for a signed bilateral security agreement with the Afghan government for a post-2014 presence. President Barack Obama has directed the military to plan for a full withdrawal from Afghanistan by the end of the year in the absence of a signed agreement. A national council of Afghan elders and community leaders endorsed the agreement, but Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign it. However, all primary candidates for next months presidential election in Afghanistan have said they will sign it if elected. When you start to get to July, I feel we can still manage providing decision space for both options, Dunford said. In other words, if were going to withdraw, if were going to have the NATO regional approach weve talked about a few times, or if were going to have anything in between. In July and August, the general said, he can set up for success no matter what decision is made. So were preserving [that] decision space until September, he added. e general described a 102-day timeUp Periscope Heres our picks for NCAA hoops Page 9 Shamrock Marines don Kelly green for run Page 4 Centennial Anniversary nearing for World War I Page 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Afghan, Page 32009 CHINFO Award Winner Defense secretary, Joint Chiefs chair testify before HouseBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceIf sequestration begins again in scal year 2016, the U.S. military will not be able to carry out defense strategy, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee March 13. A return to sequester would put at risk Americas traditional role as a guarantor of global security, and ultimately our own security, Hagel said. Events in Europe over the past few weeks underscore the need for American involvement, Hagel said. President Barack Obamas scal 2015 defense budget request reects that reality, he added, and sustains U.S. commitments and leadership at a very dening time. I believe this budget has to be far more than a set of numbers or just a list of decisions, the secretary said. It is a statement of values. Its a statement of priorities. Its a statement of our needs. Its a statement of our responsibilities. e budget request is realistic, Hagel said, and prepares the military to defend the nation at a time of increasing uncertainty throughout the world. From the troop side, Hagel discussed compensation reform. e department is committed to providing service members fair compensation, he emphasized, as well as the training and the tools and the edge they will always need to succeed in battle and return home safely. To meet those obligations under constrained budgets, we need some modest adjustments to the growth in pay and benets, the secretary said. All these savings will be reinvested in training and equipping our troops. And there are no proposals to change retirement in this budget. e Defense Department will continue to recommend pay increases, Hagel said, but they will not be as substantial as in past years. e department will continue subsidizing o-base housing costs, he added, but not at 100 percent, as it is today. DOD will pay about 95 percent, he said, and it will be phased in over the next several years. e budget request includes a provision to reduce subsidies for military commissaries. We are not shutting down commissaries, Hagel explained. We recommend gradually phasing out some subsidies, but only for domestic commissaries that are not in remote areas. Finally, the secretary said, the Defense Department recommends simplifying and modernizing the three TRICARE military health plan systems by merging them into one.DoD Photo by Erin A. Kirk-CuomoSecretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, and Department of Defense Comptroller Robert Hale testify before the House Appropriations Committee for Defense March 13. Dunford Capt. Christopher Harkins relieved by Capt. William HoustonBy MC1 Rex NelsonSubmarine Group 10 Public AffairsSubmarine Squadron 20 held a change-of-command ceremony at the chapel on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 14. Capt. William J. Houston relieved Capt. Christopher L. Harkins as the Submarine Squadron 20 commodore. Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10, was the guest speaker for the ceremony. He commended Har kins for his excellent leadership. Chris, your performance in direct support of our strategic deterrence mission as Commodore of Squadron 20 has just been superior, Richard said. Harkins, a native of Pitts burgh, praised the personnel at Kings Bay and ac credited his suc cessful tour to their perform-ance. ese past two years at SubChange of Command for Sub Squadron 20Navy photo by MC1 Rex NelsonCapt. Christopher Harkins looks on as Capt. William J. Houston salutes Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10. Harkins was relieved by Houston as Commander, Submarine Squadron 20 during a change of command ceremony March 14. ... Ive had the pleasure of working with some of the highest caliber people in our submarine force. Capt. Christopher Harkins Outgoing Squadron 20 commodoreSee 20, Page 5Hagel: Sequestration would cripple Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenChief of Naval Operations visits NSB Kings BayAdm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations, and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens, visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Tuesday, March 18. Greenert held an All Hands Call discussing the Navys budget priorities and how that impacts the quality of service in the Navy. They also filmed another episode of conversations with a shipmate where they discussed submarine programs and efforts to maintain Undersea Dominance.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From Navy Personel Command Public AffairsAn increase in enlisted critical at-sea billets has Navy community managers reminding Sailors of the various incentive programs available to them. e Navy has several incentive programs that the enlisted community managers and detailers use to ll vacancies at sea, said Ron Dodge, deputy director of enlisted distribution at Navy Personnel Command. We want to give Sailors good reasons to choose sea duty because that is where we need them. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced in March an upcoming increase in Career Sea Pay and Career Sea Pay Premium incentives for eligible Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. is increase, the rst since 2001, is intended to compensate Sailors for extended deployments, and is expected to take place early this summer. Additionally, Sailors may qualify for Sea Duty Incentive Pay if they serve in specic ratings, pay grades and/or NECs and agree to remain on sea duty past their Prescribed Sea Tour, volunteer for a back-toback sea tour, or curtail their current shore duty and return early to sea duty. Sailors who wish to extend at sea or return to sea duty early may be entitled to receive an incentive pay along with a choice of duty station via the Voluntary Sea Duty Program. Updated instructions outlining the VSDP guidelines are forthcoming, but Sailors can continue to refer to NAVADMINs 043/12 and 205/12 until the updates are released. e Chief Petty Ocer Early Return to Sea, announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, authorized detailers to ll opening high priority E7-E9 sea duty billets using their authorized transfer window in conjunction with the candidates current length of time on shore, recent advancement, eet experience, and Navy Enlisted Classications. When the CPO Early Return to Sea initiative was implemented, we were focused very hard on improving the Supervisor (E7 to E9) manning at sea. However, we know that journeymen requirements are also important, particularly within the technical (NEC) skills. With this initiative we are trying to create a more holistic improvement in sea duty manning by expanding this initiative to E4-E9 Sailors, Dodge said. Navy detailers now will have increased exibility in lling anticipat ed eet vacancies on time with a fully trained and qualied relief, accord ing to NAVADMIN 058/14. is is one more tool to ensure proper manning of the eet for all Sailors. tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Marine Corps League drive one Kings Bay Detachment No. 1229 of the Marine Corps League is looking for mem bers. Meetings are the second Tuesday of each month. e league volunteers aid and assis tance to Marine and Navy Corpsman widows and orphans and observes historical Marine anniversaries. For more information, e-mail MarineCorpsLeagueKingsBay@gmail.com.Navy-Marine Relief Golf March 28e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society will have a 4-man Scramble Golf Tournament beginning with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m., Friday, March 28 at Trident Lake Golf Club. Entry fee is $40 per person, $160 per team, which includes cart, green fees, lunch. Prizes for longest drive on No. 17 and more. To sign up, ontact Kevin at 753-8475/8476 or kevin.doetch@ navy.mil. e tournament is hosted by the NSB Kings Bay Chief Petty Ocers Association.Youth Job Fair set for March 26e Georgia Department of Labor and several other local organizations will participate in the 19th annual Youth Job Fair and Career Expo, 4 to 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 26, in the cafeteria at Camden County High School, 6300 Laurel Island Parkway. e job fair is designed to help youth 15 to 22 years old nd jobs and career opportunities. Parents are invited to to participate. Expo participants include Camden County Chamber of Commerce, Camden Community Alliance and Resource Center, Camden County High Schools Youth Apprenticeship Program, Harveys Supermarket, Kings Bays Naval Sub Bases Fleet and Family Support Center and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Center, Lowes, OMNI Amelia Island, and the Salvation Army. For more information, contact the GDOLs Kings Bay Career Center at (912) 673-6942, or e-mail Kings_Bay_CC@gdol.ga.gov Kings Bay Sub Ball April 26The 114th Submarine Birthday Ball for Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitch ell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin. rivera@navy.mil. Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a festival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military helicopter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical performances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association is accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Ocers spouses oer civic grants Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Incentives available for sea duty Personnel Command By Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceWith warmer weather comes peak moving season, so when orders are in hand, people should plan ahead to ensure the most hassle-free relocation, a senior ocial who oversees personal property moves for military families said in a recent interview. Navy Capt. Aaron Stanley, personal property program director for U.S. Transportation Commands Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command, told the Pentagon Channel that peak moving season is a moving industry phenomenon in which government and privatesector moves compete for the same resources during busy summer months, typically between the Memorial Day and Independence Day holidays. Whether moving this summer or any time, do your homework, be exible and know what your rights are, Stanley said. e main moving issue is volume, with most families opting to relocate after their children are out of school for the year, he said. Stanley said the Defense Department conducted 520,000 moves last year, with about about 40 percent occurring from May 15 to Aug. 15, with similar numbers projected this year. Stanley encouraged those with a permanent-change-of-station move on the horizon to propose multiple windows or dates for moving consideration. By having multiple dates in mind, we have the best chance of getting you the dates youre after, Stanley said. And because of the busy summer season, the better you understand what the movers are supposed to do on your behalf, the better [prepared you will be] to hold them accountable to do exactly that. By using the online Defense Personal Property System at http:// www.move.mil, Defense Department personnel and their families can self-counsel and submit their applications online, track their shipments, le a claim, and settle directly with the moving company to get full replacement value of lost and damaged goods, as opposed to depreciated value oered in the past, Stanley explained. ere are some changes being made to the claims module that should make it more user-friendly, he added. Ocials have been responsive to customer feedback, Stanley said, and he noted that a higher customer Plan carefully for all PCS moves Transportation See PCS, Page 3

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back and we did the math, he said, and we said, All right, how [much] equip ment do we have? How many airplanes can you land every day? How many planes do you need to lift this equipment out? How many people do we have? And so on and so forth. e result was a 102-day timeline that includes taking home all equipment, transporting troops, eliminating hazardous materials and unexploded ordnance, and making sure bases are properly transferred to the Afghans. So when I talk about high risk in September, I kind of take the physics part of the equation, he said. I say thats probably 102 days. Dunford said executing such a withdrawal plan would entail what he de scribed as friction bad weather or aircraft maintenance or enemy issues, for example. So what Id want to have is some kind of buf fer, he added. What Ive said to the leadership is, Look, Im pretty comfort able that up until September, I can manage multiple options. e general emphasized this doesnt mean multiple options cant be managed after September. What it means is that my risk of conducting an orderly withdrawal starts to go up, he said. at doesnt mean any of those things cant be reversed, and frankly, if a decision is made later than the rst of September, well clearly adjust. But well have done some things that will either have to be reversed, or well work much harder and probably less [eciently] in terms of disposition of equipment and those kinds of things. Dunford restated that there isnt a specic day when he could say, If you dont have a decision by this day, we cant accomplish the mission. eres a period of risk that starts in September that is benchmarked against, again, how many days you actually need to close the theater down, he said. If you dont have a decision, but you know you have to empty the theater if youre directed, the closer you get December, the more you have to do things that would allow you to meet that 31 December deadline, he added. survey response rate currently at about 35 to 45 percent would improve their ability to see that the best moving companies get the most business in moving military families. at customer satisfaction survey is the underlying foundation for the program, and its best-value approach accounts for 75 percent of the formulae to allocate shipments for [transportation service providers], he said. More feedback means a better program and good shipments to the right companies.PCSFrom Page 3Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Mark BellA 2nd Cavalry Regiment soldier stands watch over-looking the valley south of Forward Operating Base Masum Ghar, in the Panjwayi District of Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. AfghanFrom Page 1 American Forces Press ServiceAmerican forces boarded and took control of a commercial tanker ship that was seized earlier this month by three armed Libyans, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said in a Defense Department news release issued March 17. No one was hurt tonight when U.S. forces, at the request of both the Libyan and Cypriot governments, boarded and took control of the commercial tanker Morning Glory, a stateless vessel seized earlier this month by three armed Libyans, Kirby said in the release. e boarding operation, approved by President Barack Obama and conducted just after 10 p.m. EDT on March 16 in international waters southeast of Cyprus, was executed by a team of Navy SEALs attached to Special Operations Command Europe, Kirby added. e SEAL team em barked and operated from the guided missile destroyer USS Roosevelt, Kirby said in the release. e USS Roosevelt provided helicopter support and served as a command and control and support platform for the other members of the force assigned to conduct the mission, he said. e Morning Glory is carrying a cargo of oil owned by the Libyan government National Oil Company, Kirby said in the release. e ship and its cargo were illicitly obtained from the Libyan port of As-Sidra. e USS Roosevelt is homeported in Mayport, Fla.SEAL team takes tanker back from armed Libyans THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Capt. Andrew Wright pushes Huckleberry and Locklyn, while wife, Katie, keeps up the pace. SA Zachary Snyder sets his pace. No telling if hes way ahead or somewhere in the middle. Families also were welcome for the 8 a.m. starting time. Sporting a bowler for the March 11 run. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Shamrock Run Photos by India WinslowSgt. Chadwick McCrary with wife, Morgan, and Aidan (inset). Luke arrived two days later. From left, SA Ebony Braun, SR Marcus Carrizales, SA Daniel Solorio, MASA Rioval Rodriguez, SR Garrett Alexander and SA Zachary Snyder. Lance Cpl. Victor Martinez added a tie and moustache.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 5 Overlooked in America, Great Wars impact still felt worldwide today By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceIt was called e Great War even as it was going on. It engulfed the world, and the world is still feeling its eects. is year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, and U.S. ocials are gearing up to mark the centennial. In his day job, Robert J. Dalessandro is the director of the U.S. Army Center of Military History at Fort Lesley J. McNair here. He also is the acting chairman of the World War I Centennial Commission. e Great War began in July 1914 with the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. is triggered an interconnecting network of alliances to spark mobilization, bringing in the empires of Europe. England, France and Russia lined up against Germany, the AustroHungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. A generation of men died in battle on the elds of France. e Somme, Verdun, Ypres and Meuse-Argonne became killing grounds. On the Eastern Front, millions of Germans, Austrians and Russians battled. Overall, about 16.5 million people were killed in the war. At rst, the United States stayed out of it. In fact, when President Woodrow Wilson ran for re-election in 1916, his campaign slogan was He kept us out of war. But on April 7, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and the other Central Powers and raised a military force of more than 4 million men. e United States lost 116,516 service members in World War I. Another 205,690 were wounded. While the United States didnt enter the war until 1917, the U.S. commemoration commission is beginning its mission of education now to provide Americans some context for the epochal war. You cant just drop into World War I in April of without understanding the road to war, Dalessandro said in an interview. It was complex politically and internationally, and Americans today need to know what Americans then thought about the war. is summer begins the centennial, Dalessandro said, calling the archdukes assassination the Fort Sumter of World War I, refer ring to the site of the U.S. Civil Wars rst engage ment. Congress char tered the commission to encourage private organizations and state and local governments to organize activities commemorating the centennial. e panel will coordinate activities throughout the United States tied to the centennial and will serve as a clearinghouse for the dissemination of plans and events, he said. While its charter covers the United States, the commission also is looking at international events, and will mark those appropriately, he added. We want to lead eorts that raise awareness, that encourage a spectrum of organizations to plan programs and develop an education program targeting Americas youth, Dalessandro said. e education aspect may be the commissions most important challenge, he added. We need to wake up the interest of a new generation of Americans on the eects of World War I, he said. Americans today need to know that World War I changed every thing for America, Dales sandro said. In the short term, he explained, the experience of the slaughter of the Western Front turned America away from entangling alliances in Europe. But the lesson for leaders, he added, was 180 degrees from that. ey learned we have to be engaged in Europe and involved in business, he said. While the Civil War saw a draft, Dalessandro said, World War I saw the rst universal draft. e rst question is if you have a universal draft for men, what do you do with African-American men? he said. From Marine Corps History DivisionDuring World War I, the Marine Corps distinguished itself on the battlefields of France as the 4th Marine Brigade earned the title of Devil Dogs for heroic action during 1918 at Belleau Wood.World War I centennial planning begins There isnt a person in the United Kingdom who doesnt know these guys are not coming back. Robert J. Dalessandro Army Center of Military History Courtesy photoCFC CelebrationThe 2013 Combined Federal Campaign Celebration was at the the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Officers Club March 6. Representing Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were, from left, Trident Refit Facility Chief David Wood, Public Works Fred Naylor and Community Plannings Melinda NesSmith-Picard. Naylor was Kings Bays CFC coordinator, while Wood and NesSmith-Picard were loaned executives. NesSmith-Picard received a CFC Star Award for Dedication for the 2013 CFC Region. The CFC of Northeast Florida-Southeast Georgia encompasses a 48-county region with more than 44,000 federal employees and military members. Air Force photoWorld War I was the first war in which air planes were used extensively. Pictured is a U.S. Nieuport model at an Air Force re-enactment fly-in. See WW I, Page 6 marine Squadron 20, Ive had the pleasure of working with some of the highest caliber people in our sub marine force, Harkins said. Harkins went on to acknowledge Team Kings Bay, including all major commands at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Each of the organizations directly contribute to the nations strategic deterrence mission readiness, and without them, none of our submarines in Kings Bay would be able to do their jobs, he said. Richard awarded Harkins with the Legion of Merit for his service as commodore. Houston took command of Submarine Squadron 20 which is responsible for the maintenance and operations of ve Ohioclass ballistic missile submarines USS Alaska (SSBN 732), USS Tennessee (SSBN 734), USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742). [Ohio-class] submarines have two crews because you have to be that good, Houston said. It takes a team; team Kings Bay. I am honored and humbled to take command of Squadron 20. Harkins will report to Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic for his new assignment.20From Page 1Navy photos by MC1 Rex NelsonCapt. Christopher Harkins addresses guests and staff during a change of command ceremony for Submarine Squadron 20 March 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Chapel. Rear Adm. Chas Richard, Commander, Submarine Group 10, presents Capt. Christopher Harkins with a Legion of Merit award. Capt. William J. Houston, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, salutes as he is piped through sideboys following the change of command ceremony.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Marine Corps Historical Division photoAfter 16 days on the line during the Battle of Belleau Wood, 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines march to a rest area.Navy History and Heritage CommandLt. Frank L. Muller, left, and Lt. j.g. Junius H. Fulcher were taken prisoner by the crew of the U-152 after it sank the USS Ticonderoga in 1918. Much of the Navys World War I efforts were combating U-boats. African-American leaders were determined that black men ght as combat soldiers and ght in integrated units. ey also pushed for black ocers, Dalessandro said. Part of that happened, he added. For many AfricanAmericans, he noted, the experience in France was their rst taste of an environment without Jim Crow laws. ere, they are looked on as equals and that is a revelatory experience, he said. World War I was the rst time masses of American women entered the workforce, Dalessandro said. ere were nurses, yeomanettes, telephone operators, Red Cross workers, Doughnut Dollies and women working in factories. And at the end of the war, women had the vote. In the Civil War, you have Irish and German immigrants in great numbers in the Army, Dalessandro said. But in World War I, you have Italian-Americans, Eastern Europeans, Jews, large numbers of Russians, Poles, Czechs, Slovaks soldiers from ethnic groups that have emigrated, and its a quick road to citizenship. e question was whether these men would ght together whether they would consider themselves Americans, he added. And the answer was yes, he said. Some historians call e Great War just Act 1 of a greater war that includes World War II and the Cold War. Fascism grew out of the experiences in the war. Revolution took hold in Russia, and the Soviet Union was born. e Versailles Peace Treaty set the stage for Act 2 in 1939. e Battle of MeuseArgonne was the largest American battle up to that point. More than 500,000 doughboys and Marines fought, and many died, on the elds and forests of France. ey faced not only bullets and artillery, but also poison gas, tanks and planes. And yet, the American impression of the war is Snoopy vs. the Red Baron or movies such as All Quiet on the Western Front, Paths of Glory or Wings Dalessandro said. is is our biggest challenge, he added, noting that a scene at the end of a recent British movie shows two soldiers going over the top in the Somme in 1916. ere isnt a person in the United Kingdom who doesnt know these guys are not coming back, he said. We [in America] dont have a national consciousness like that. World War I set the stage for the rest of the 20th century. It destroyed four empires: the German Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Russian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. It also set the stage for current conditions in the Middle East by the Balfour Declaration, which called for a Jewish homeland in the region and by the victors drawing the borders of new countries. One hundred years on, World War I continues to cast a shadow, Dalessandro said. e nation needs to learn from it, he added, and the commemoration is a place to start. WW IFrom Page 5New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benets. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. is class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 24 and 31. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFleet and Family will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. By Joseph F. GradisherOffice of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance, Public AffairsChief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert has directed Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command to establish an Information Dominance Type Command. In his March 4, 2014 memorandum to CUSFFC, Greenert wrote, I approve the establishment of Navy Information Dominance Forces as an echelon III command under your administrative control. As the immediate superior in command, oversee the commands implementation...with an initial operating capability of 1 October 2014. e TYCOM will report directly to CUSFFC and have supporting relationships with the rest of the Navy, focusing primar ily on the Navys infor mation environ ment. Commander, Navy Cyber Forces, Rear Adm. Diane Webber will have her command re-designated as Commander, Navy Information Dominance Forces and will provide the initial infrastructure, resources and assets for the TYCOM. Webber noted that the new TYCOMs mission will be to support Combatant Commanders and Navy Commanders ashore and aoat by providing forward deployable, sustainable, combat-ready Information Dominance forces. Full operational capability for NAVIDFOR is expected by the end of the calendar year. A Navy Type Command or TYCOM, coordinates the Man, Train and Equip functions for specic communities within the Navy. For example, Commander, Naval Air Forces exercises administrative control over aviation forces and Commander, Navy Surface Forces does the same for the surface warfare community. NAVIDFOR will serve in that capacity for the Information Dominance Corps. e IDC was formed in 2009 and built on the deep expertise and strengths of the ocers/enlisted, active/reserve, and civilian workforce from the oceanography/meteorology, information professional, information warfare, naval intelligence and space cadre. e IDC is an inter-disciplinary corps that possesses a deep understanding of potential adversaries and the battlespace, is able to accurately identify targets and brings an array of non-kinetic, oensive and defensive capabilities to the ght in the Information Age. Vice Adm. Ted N. Twig Branch, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance and the lead for the Navys IDC, said, e continuing evolution of Information Dominance as a Navy warghting discipline demands a single, integrated TYCOM to provide relevant and eective capabilities, including a highly trained and motivated workforce. Im condent the new NAVIDFOR will provide the Fleet and the entire Navy the ID capabilities needed to deter, ght and win within this information domain. GreenertCNO establishes Information Dominance Type Command THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By Gunnery Sgt. Scott DunnHeadquarters Marine Corpse Marine Corps plans to stand up an experimental task force comprised of both men and women volunteers in primarily ground-combat-arms specialties for about a year so analysts can assess their performance, the general ocer overseeing the Marine Corps forceintegration planning eort said March 10. Brig. Gen. George W. Smith Jr. said one of the Corps four eorts in a deliberate, measured and responsible approach to integrating women into combat units and occupational specialties by Jan. 1, 2016 the Defense Departments deadline for full integration across the services will be borne by the Ground Combat Element Experimental Task Force. Pending nal approval of human-research requirements, the approximately 460-Marine task force is slated to activate this summer at Camp Lejeune, N.C., allowing informed, female Marines the opportunity to volunteer as test subjects in occupational specialties that have been heretofore held only by men. Guidance for command ers and instructions for vol unteers will be published in a Marine administrative message at a later date. e task force will be comprised of about 25 percent women and will help the Corps assess the outcome of physical demands Marines must meet in the execution of individual and collective tasks, Smith said. is pilot eort will simulate the functions of an expeditionary units ground-combat element, Smith said. It will look somewhat like a small version of a battalion landing team in that its got an infantry nucleus, and then it will have those attachments tanks, artillery, (tracked amphibious landing vehicles) and the like, with a headquarters element, Smith said. Planners also intend to send the task force to the Corps premier combat training center in Twentynine Palms, Calif., and to mountain-warfare training in Bridgeport, Calif. We expect them to deploy for training into those two locations, in addition to what theyll do at Camp Lejeune, Smith said. ey may be based at Camp Lejeune, but our units deploy to train in those very, very dierent environments with unique demands associated with those environments. e task forces headquarters element slated to have a male commander and a female senior-enlisted advisor is expected to stand up sometime this summer, with volunteers arriving in the fall. Female volunteers accepted for the task forces combat-arms cohort must rst report to military occupational specialty schools to learn the entry-level tasks for respective ground-combat-arms jobs. Since October 2013, 40 female Marine volunteers have completed infantry rieman training at the School of Infantry in Camp Lejeune; however, the Corps needs to continue measuring female performance beyond entry-level tasks, Smith said. He said all Marines must have the physical capacity to meet the demands of those occupational specialties in the operating forces, which in some cases is signicantly dierent and greater than what we nd in our entrylevel training pipeline. Smith gave hiking as an example and mentioned the 20-kilometer hike required to complete entrylevel infantry training. He said although it is something to certainly be proud of, it is a onetime event that must be sustained in the operating forces. He went on to describe the standard, progressive hike program a Marine must undergo at an infantry battalion conceding it was an extreme example: You do a hike program over the course of many months. Youre hiking, week in and week out, extended distances well in excess of 20 kilometers. Responsible research, he said, must account for the physiological dierences between men and women when studying the sustained wear and tear on the body, and the physical endurance associated with increasingly more demanding individual and collective tasks. e only way to truly understand the potential challenges for our female Marines out in the operating forces is to develop this purpose-built experimental task force and put that task force through a training syllabus, Smith said, adding that such training requires a building-block approach that progresses into increasingly more demanding individual tasks. We need to do that by simulating an operational environment. By late summer 2015, researchers from within the Marine Corps and external agencies are expected to present their data to the commandant of the Marine Corps to inform his best military judgment as to how he wants to proceed in making recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of Defense, Smith said. Its important for everybody to understand that (full integration) is actual law, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos said during an interview with MarinesTV Feb. 29. And theres no force on the face of the earth that obeys laws more than the United States Marines do. We not only obey them, we enforce them. Data collected from the task force will support other eorts the Corps is conducting, which ocials announced March 12: Since 2012, female ofcers and sta noncommissioned ocers have had the opportunity to serve in more than 20 ground-combat-arms battalions that were previously closed to women. Sergeants and corporals will now have the same opportunity, and females will now be assigned at the company and battery levels. Female Marine recruits will have the opportunity to volunteer for more ground-combatarms schools following their graduation from boot camp, much like the Corps has been doing with its infantry rieman training since September 2013. e additional schools include more infantry training such as machine gunner, mortarman, assaultman and anti-tank missleman courses, as well as artillery cannoneer, tank crewman and assault amphibian vehicle crewman courses. Pending completion of Congressional notication, the Marine Corps will open 11 occupational specialties in three previously closed elds: artillery, ground ordnance maintenance and low-altitude air defense. Following the opening of these military occupational specialties, the Corps will have 20 of its 335 primary MOSs closed. e eorts are unprecedented; however, Smith pointed to the Corps decades of incremental integration: Ill use the aviation-combat element as an example: Weve had fully integrated combat squadrons for 20 years. We just had our rst female squadron commander a couple years ago. eyve performed tremendously in Iraq and Afghanistan pilots, aircrew, maintainers; you name it fully integrated, fully cohesive, high-morale squadrons. e recent research efforts are near-term but Smith said they are meant to shape the Marine Corps for decades to come: As we do this, the commandant has been absolutely clear that we are going to maintain the highest levels of combat readiness the combat readiness that America demands of her Marines. Smith said female Marines have time and again expressed to the comman dant that all they want is the opportunity to com pete on an equitable play ing eld, and given the mandates of the Secretary of Defense, the Marine Corps must gather all it can in the next 18 months to ensure that when we open an MOS, that our female Marines are going to be successful in that MOS. And success, Smith said, must be measured beyond entering into that occupational specialty and getting to that unit: It is being successful over a truly viable career path, over the course of 20 or even 30 years. e Corps may request an exception to the Department of Defense policy if opening certain units or occupational specialties by deadline does not meet specic guidelines. at includes ensuring mission readiness as well as viable career paths. W e are not going to lower the standards, and I want all Marines everywhere to understand that, Amos said. We are Americas premier ghting force. When the Klaxon sounds, and they say, Send in the Marines, we are going to be ready, and we better be ready because the rst time we fail, then America quite honestly doesnt need a Marine Corps anymore.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Kristin E. MorenoEducators view a portion of the Crucible, a 54-continuous-hour test of physical and mental challenges, during an Educators Workshop aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Marine Corps women train for combat rolesMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Justin A. Rodriguez Pfc. Cristina Fuentes Montenegro and Pfc. Julia Carroll, right, two of the first three female Marine graduates from the School of Infantry-Easts Infantry Training Battalion course visit with Shirley M. John, center, from the North Carolina Tarheel Chapter of the Women Marines Association.

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By Ensign Alexander WashofskyUSS Mahan Public Affairse crew of the Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Mahan (DDG 72) wrapped up a ve-day port visit March 10 to New Orleans, the rst ship in ve years to make a visit there during Mardi Gras. While in port, the crew participated in a number of events, including marching in both the Bacchus and Rex parades. Fire Controlman 1st Class Joshua Briles chose to have his re-enlistment ceremony on the USS Constitution oat during the Bacchus Parade. It was a unique experience that Ill never forget, said Briles. e ships distinguished visitors included Rear Adm. Brian Brown, commander, Na val Meteorology and Oceanography Com mand; Erin Kern, director, Shore Readiness and Logistics; and actor Hugh Laurie, fa mous for his lead role as Dr. Gregory House in the television show House On March 2, Mahans Crew hosted a group of local Navy Junior Reserve Ofcer Training Corps (NJROTC) Sea Cadets. e Sea Cadets were given a tour of the destroyer and were able to get some hands-on training on damage control equipment and line handling at various stations around the ship. It was great being able to give them some real eet experience, said Yeoman 2nd Class Jason Taylor. Wrapping up their stay, a group of 20 Mahan Sailors visited the New Orleans Childrens Hospital March 10, to deliver gifts and spend time with the kids. For crewmembers like Senior Chief Logistics Specialist LaClondria Caddell, the childrens hospital visit was just another example of how the port call was about more than Mardi Gras. Anywhere we go, we always reach out and help the local community however we can, said Caddell. is was my favorite part of our port visit. Cmdr. Zoah Scheneman, Mahan commanding ocer, said the visit was great. We were happy to visit a city so rich with history and tradition, especially during the Mardi Gras, Scheneman said. It was an experience for our Sailors to participate in the celebration.I did these interviews one week ago, prior to Sundays seedings and brackets, while conference tourna ment play was ongoing. At that time, Las Vegas had Kentucky at 40/1, Duke at 10/1, Arizona at 15/2, Wichita State at 8/1 and Louisville18/1. Vegas bookmakers had the Florida Gators (11/2) as the team to beat, followed by Kansas (6/2) and Arizona. Thats just Vegas. Actually a lot of people are picking Kentucky to win it. Me? Im like the bookies. I like the Gators.Who will win NCAA mens hoops tourney?MM2 Brice Wilson USS Georgia Blue Wichita, Kan. Wichita State. Im from Wichita. Theyre playing angry. ETC Kevin Grant Trident Training Facility Baltimore Ive got to go with the home team, the Maryland Terrapins. But my second pick is Louisville to repeat. MT2 Dean Moore USS West Virginia Gold Montrose, Pa. Duke, because of Jabari Parker. CSSN Antwan Brown USS Florida Gold Savannah Kentucky. Theyve got a solid defense. The offense is doing pretty well. Theyve got a lot of young guys. Theyll take it. Lance Cpl. Kylere Paulsen Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Cedar Rapids, Iowa Arizona. Theyre playing pretty well. STS1 Harris Behrman Trident Training Facility East Windsor, N.J. I dont think Wichita State. Arizonas not a bad pick. Theyve got a wellrounded team. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Louisiana Office of Tourism photoUSS Mahan (DDG 72) Sailors marched in two Mardi Gras parades.Sailors go to Mardi Gras THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By MC2 Tiarra FulghamNavy Public Affairs Support Element West Detachment HawaiiAshes of Pearl Harbor survivor, Machinists Mate 1st Class William Henderson, were scattered into the calm waters at the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam during a ceremony March 10. Henderson was born Nov. 12, 1922 and joined the U.S. Navy the day after his 18th birthday Nov. 13, 1940. Following graduation from Recruit Training Command, he received orders to the Brooklyn-class cruiser USS Helena (CL 50) in Pearl Harbor. On the morning of the 1941 Japanese attacks, Henderson was asleep in his rack and awakened by a general alarm calling for all crew to report to their battle stations. While getting dressed, the ship was hit by a Japanese torpedo, knocking out the power throughout the ship and ooding the engine and boiler rooms. Henderson managed to make it to his battle station shortly after a brief state of unconsciousness. Capt. Larry Scruggs, deputy commander of Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, spoke at the ceremony about Hendersons dedication and bravery he put forth that day. I am sure he felt that this was his last day as he ran to perform his duties as trained, Scruggs said. He would witness his world forever changed that day, and yet, he would go on to serve his country honorably, with passion and courage, and a deep commitment to his shipmates. Despite extensive damage, the ship was repaired and returned to full active status, deploying to sea as a part of the task force to intercept the Japanese eet in Oct. 1942. Henderson continued to serve in the Navy and on the Helena during the Battles of Esperance, Guadalcanal and Kula Gulf, in which the ship was hit by three torpedoes, breaking it into three parts and ultimately sinking. In an excerpt from his book Escape from the Sea he recalled the night he survived the Japanese attacks on the Helena in the Kula Gulf in great detail: For us the battle was over but we had lost eight ofcers, 186 enlisted men and four Marines. Most of them died while manning their battle stations during the ght. Some severely wounded men managed to abandon ship but later died in the water or aboard the rescue ships. ey were all shipmates who made the supreme sacrice. Some were friends, men with whom I had been on liberty. ey will be sorely missed until we are all called to meet the Supreme Commander. After the sinking of Helena, he was later reassigned to the attack transport USS President Polk (AP 103) and served until the end of the war and later discharged in 1947: I feel very fortunate to have survived the war without a scratch or wound. To this day I have a poignant feeling for the Helena, but have no desire to repeat the harrowing experience of action in the South Pacic. I left the Navy after serving a six year hitch and worked thirty six years for the Pacic Telephone Company in California, retiring in 1984. Francis and I have three ne daughters, three great son-in-laws and six wonderful grandchildren. How sweet it is. To show his feelings and love for the Helena, he named all three of his daughters after the ship. ey all have the same initials C-L-H after the cruiser light Helena. Hendersons son-in-law, Mike Danaher, talked about many of the things Henderson did to continue to honor his shipmates even after he retired. He raised money and ran a sculpture competition to build a World War II memorial in our hometown and now thats the focus for the 4th of July activities, said Danaher. His family mentioned that Henderson began to collect stories from surviving shipmates and put them into his book. He did a lot to honor his shipmates and he would really appreciate this, said Danaher. Im thankful for all the ne men and women who contributed to the ceremony, said Fran Henderson, his wife of more than 63 years. I feel appreciation for the many years I had with my husband and his contribution to the war. He was a hero to his family, the Navy, and the United States, said Jim Taylor, Pearl Harbor Survivors Liaison who spoke at the ceremony. His desire was to make a nal voyage to Pearl Harbor and have his remains returned to honor his fellow friends and shipmates lost during the attacks. anks to the eorts of his family, his wish has came true. Henderson passed away in Aug. 2013. His ashes were returned to the site of the attacks to join his shipmates and received full military honors including a ag presentation, playing of Taps, and a threevolley rie salute from members of the Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Honors and Ceremonies and a member of the Pacic Fleet Band.Navy photo by MC2 Tiarra FulghamFamily members scatter the ashes of a retired Chief Petty Officer over the USS Utah Memorial on Ford Island following a farewell ceremony. Pearl Harbor, Helena survivor laid to nal rest Naval History and Heritage CommandUSS Helena (CL 50), center, firing during the Battle of Kula Gulf, just before it was torpedoed and sunk. William Henderson served on USS Helena.Naval History and Heritage Command photoSurvivors of USS Helena after their rescue from the waters of the Central Solomons, July 6, 1943. Helena had been sunk by Japanese torpedos on the previous night. By Colie Young, Frank Jordan and Tami BegasseNavy News ServiceFor the 5,800 veterans and 1,500 active duty military living in the Albany, Ga. area, accessibility to health care services has been expanded and enhanced thanks to an agreement between Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the Department of Veterans Aairs. e agreement relocates VA health care providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic Albany onboard the Marine Corps Logistics Base. Combining Navy Medicine and VA resources will bring the best in patient care for our active duty and veterans in Albany, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, NH Jacksonvilles commanding ocer. Our collaboration not only expands and enhances care, but we are able to deliver that care in a cost-eective way as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. e VA relocation to BHC Albanys 22,179 square-foot building provides veterans a state-of-the-art facility and access to new ancillary services such as pharmacy, laboratory and radiology. ey will also have expanded access to services from primary care to mental health. For existing BHC Albany service members, new services will include podiatry and optometry and increased stang of existing services. e jointly staed clinic will provide high quality, ecient and convenient care to patients in the region. e joint clinic will complement an existing agreement the VA has with MCLB Albany, entered into May 16, 2013, that provides a separate building near BHC Albany. Carl Vinson VA Medical Center director John S. Goldman was enthusiastic about the move. In addition to oering primary care, we will expand services for veterans and active duty military to include optometry, audiology, mental health, podiatry, and physical rehabilitation, Goldman said. NH Jacksonville has another joint eort with the VA at its BHC in Key West, Fla. for mental health and physical therapy care. is latest partnership with the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., and the Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin, Ga., combines resources to open a VA community-based outpatient clinic aboard the base. is oers the promise of greater access for veterans and activeduty military, while maximizing existing resources and oering potential expansion of medical services in a joint eort, said Marine Col. Don Davis, MCLB Albanys commanding ocer. Navy, Marines, VA work in harmony at BHC Albany

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Registration open for Lifeguard Training, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to prepay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun, including orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex, cost is $15 for each team of two, which includes t-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together. All bike types are welcome. e event is limited to 15 teams per wave. After, join in the fun at Lake D with the festival in full swing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with lots of fun things to do, including a zipline, halo jumper, rock wall, obstacle inatable, kids shing, geocaching and more. Food will be available for purchase. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new venture and is cer tain that you, the patron, will en joy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free kids movies shown Liberty call Lifeguard class nearingFree Movies for the Kids Weekend movies for March are Percy Jackson: Sea of Mon sters March 22 and 23, Escape from Planet Earth March 29 and 30 and The Smurfs 2 Mon day, March 31. Movies are at 1 p.m., every Saturday and Sun day and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years old must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes af ter the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Intramural Sports MWR Intramural Sports photoAs the 7-vs-7 Spring Soccer season nears its end, registration is open for Average Joes Bowling. The captains meeting is March 25 in the Fitness Center classroom. Play begins April 4.7x7 Soccer LeagueTeam W L T1, MFPUGC 5 0 0 2t, Turf Toe 3 1 1 2t, Danger Zone 3 1 0 4, Kings Bay United 3 2 0 5t, USS Florida Gold 2 2 1 5t, Slow Attack 1 1 1 7, Ballbusters 2 3 0 8, Black Sails 2 4 0 9t, Trident Training 1 3 1 9t, The Agency 1 3 0 11, TRF FC 1 4 0 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Used and non-authentic counterfeit electronic components are widespread throughout the defense supply chain. Over the past two years alone, more than one million suspect parts have been associated with known supply chain compromises. e problem is pervasive, with both expensive and inexpensive electronic parts being targeted. Counterfeit, or otherwise suspect electronic components, present a critical risk for the Department of Defense, where a malfunction of a single part could lead to system failures that can put warfighter lives and missions at risk. A new DARPA program seeks to develop a tool to verify, without disrupting or harming the system, the trustworthiness of a protected electronic component. e DARPA Supply Chain Hardware Integrity for Electronics Defense program seeks proposals to develop a small (100 micron x 100 micron) component, or dielet, that authenticates the provenance of electronics components. Proposed dielets should contain a full encryption engine, sensors to detect tampering and would readily ax to todays electronic components such as microchips. Successful development of SHIELD technology would provide 100 percent assurance against common threat modes: Recycled components that are sold as new Unlicensed overproduction of authorized components Test rejects and substandard components sold as high-quality Parts marked with falsely elevated reliability or newer date of manufacture Clones and copies, which may be of low quality, or may include hidden functionality Components that are covertly repackaged for unauthorized applications SHIELD demands a tool that costs less than a penny per unit, yet makes counterfeiting too expensive and technically dicult to do, said Kerry Bernstein, DARPA program manager. e dielet will be designed to be robust in operation, yet fragile in the face of tampering. What SHIELD is seeking is a very advanced piece of hardware that will oer an on-demand authentication method never before available to the supply chain. e dielet will be inserted into the electronic components package at the manufacturing site or axed to existing trusted components, without any alteration of the host components design or reliability. ere is no electrical connection between the dielet and the host component. Authenticity testing could be done anywhere with a handheld probe or with an automated one for larger volumes. Probes need to be close to the dielet for scanning. After a scan, an inexpensive appliance perhaps a smartphone uploads a serial number to a central, industry-owned server. e server sends an unencrypted challenge to the dielet, which sends back an encrypted answer and data from passive sensors like light exposure that could indicate tampering. e Department of Defense puts severe demands on electronics, which is why a trusted supply chain is so important Bernstein said. SHIELD is a technology demonstration leveraging the asymmetry of scaling for security. While the program is being funded by DARPA, industry will adapt future implementations to make the technology scalable to the industry and the Defense supply chain. SHIELD is seeking proposals that revolutionize electronic authentication with potential scalability and advanced technology not available today. DARPA imageAn artists concept of Supply Chain Hardware Integrity for Electronics Defense tech.DARPA hunts fake tech NASA photoOne of the booster rockets that will power NASAs Orion spacecraft.Booster rockets make trip From the National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationTwo of the boosters that will help send NASAs Orion spacecraft into space for the rst time have made their way to Florida. Orion will launch on top of a Delta IV rocket this fall, and two of the rockets three boosters were rolled out of the United Launch Alliance facility in Decatur, Ala., and loaded onto a Mariner cargo barge Feb 21. ULA is constructing the Delta IV for the ight test of Orion, called Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. From ULA, the boosters arrived at Cape Canaveral, Fla., in early March for nal processing prior to the launch. A third booster is still in fabrication at the Decatur facility. is is a very exciting time for NASA, said Bill Hill, NASA assistant deputy associate administrator for exploration systems. EFT-1 is a big milestone for us, and is the start of venturing further into space than we ever have before. Seeing these rocket boosters roll out headed for the Cape is a testament of the hard work taking place to help further NASAs space exploration goals. During the ight test, Orion will travel 3,600 miles into space farther than a spacecraft built for humans has been in more than 40 years and orbit the Earth twice. e capsule will re-enter Earths atmosphere at speeds approaching 20,000 mph, generating temperatures as high as 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, before splashing down in the Pacic Ocean. e uncrewed ight will provide engineers with important data about Orions heat shield and other elements, including the spacecraft adapters performance. e spacecraft adapter will connect Orion to the Delta IV and also will connect Orion to NASAs new rocket, the Space Launch System, on its rst mission in 2017. e adapter was completed earlier this month at NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center and will be delivered to ULA in mid-March. SLS, NASAs new rocket, will be capable of taking humans to deep space missions, including Mars. NASA and our partners have worked very hard to get Orion ready for EFT-1, said Paul Marshall, NASAs Orion assistant program manager. It truly is a team eort, and that has been showcased here today. We really cant wait to see Orion y this fall on the Delta IV, and use that data to get us ready for the rst SLS ight in 2017.

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Coast Guard photo by PO2 Patrick KelleyCoast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp provides testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security March 12. Papp talks budget request By Cmdr. Rick WesterFrom Coast Guard CompassCoast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp testied March 12 before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security on the Coast Guards Fiscal Year 2015 budget request. e Commandant led his opening statement by thanking both the Subcommittee and Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson for their continued support of Coast Guardsmen. I will be eternally indebted to all of you for your hard work behind the scenes to make sure our people are taken care of, said the Commandant. e Commandant also thanked the subcommittee for their support of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 which helped to relieve the erosive eects of sequestration on the Coast Guard, restoring front line operations and badly needed training hours. In his testimony, the Commandant focused on the need for cutter recapitalization eorts to allow the Coast Guard to better serve our maritime nation. We rely on the safe, secure and free ow of goods across the seas and into our ports and waterways, said the Commandant. Every day the Coast Guard acts to both prevent and respond to an array of threats that, if left unchecked, would impede trade, weaken our economy and create instability. During scal year 2013 the Coast Guard saved 3,200 lives, seized 88 metric tons of cocaine and 37 metric tons of marijuana, responded to 11,146 reports of pollution, interdicted more than 2,000 undocumented migrants and detained 190 suspected smugglers. As the nations maritime governance force, the Coast Guard aims to interdict threats as far from U.S. shores as possible per DHS layered security strategy, and a capable oshore eet of cutters is critical. However, the average Reliance Class Medium Endurance Cutter is 46 years old, and the oldest turns 50 this year. I sailed aboard one of these cutters, the Valiant, as a cadet at the Coast Guard Academy, said Adm. Papp, who graduated from the Coast Guard Academy in 1975. Due solely to the determination of our cuttermen, naval engineers and our modernized mission support system, Valiant will still be sailing when I retire this May. Recently the Coast Guard awarded the preliminary and contract design contracts for the Oshore Patrol Cutter eet which will replace the aging Medium Endurance Cutters. In his recent State of the Coast Guard Address, the Commandant called this the most important shipbuilding initiative in the services 223-year history. We now sit at a critical point in time where the vital necessity to recapitalize our aging oshore eet connects with the expertise and strong competition to Old salts mentor SailorsBy MC3 Karl AndersonUSS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Public AffairsSailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) are helping one another using a mentorship program that pairs veteran Sailors with less experienced Sailors to help foster career development and professional growth. Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Randy Caras is a mentorship program coordinator. He said it is important to nd the right mentor to guide you personally and professionally. Its always good to have someone else provide insight from their experiences, he said. Regardless of where you are in your career, you can always benet from a mentor. Caras said mentoring is part of Harry S. Trumans command culture and is an integral aspect of naval leadership. Senior Sailors have a responsibility to pass down their experience, wisdom and expertise to junior Sailors, he said. When Hospitalman Herbert Navarro reported to Harry S. Truman, he knew exactly what he wanted in a mentor. I looked for someone to inspire me to push harder and try to do better in all aspects of my life and career, he said. Someone with experience more than anything else. He found such a mentor in Chief Mass Communication Specialist Harold Nance. Chief Nance is like a big brother mixed with a career counselor, Navarro said. He doesnt let me slide and he doesnt shoot from the hip. If he doesnt have the facts hell nd them. Navarro said he and Nance help each other accomplish their goals. Chief Nance makes sure Im on track to accomplish my goals, but this is not a one-sided relationship, said Navarro. I help him accomplish his goals as well. Even though hes had a successful career, he still has his own goals and ambitions. I admire that. It keeps me motivated. Navarro said everyone can benet from a mentor, regardless of rank or age. Its always nice to know that you have at least one person in your corner, said Navarro. If for no other reason, at least you know youre not by yourself. Nance said mentorship is not only about professional guidance, but helping Sailors in all aspects of their life. When a Sailor is dealing with problems at home, you oer a dierent perspective to make the situation better, said Nance. Not necessarily how they can x the problem, but you give them the tools to make it better. He said a mentor is pertinent to success-they are the glue that binds everything together. e whole goal of the mentorship program is to set the precedent that you are not alone. Nobody can live and operate in the world alone, said Nance. No matter how successful you are, nobody knows everything. Even as a chief petty ocer, I can learn something from the junior Sailors. You have to be open for the opportunity to learn. at is what is rewarding. e return is much more than the give. Navy photo by MC3 Taylor M. DiMartinoSailors onboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) have a mentoring program that fosters career development and professional growth. See Papp, Page 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014 By Claudette RouloAmerican Forces Press Servicee Defense Departments chief information ocer unveiled the Pentagons strategy for addressing the ever-increasing demand for wireless spectrum to achieve national security goals Feb. 20. All of our joint functions, our ability to ght, our movement and maneuver, res, command and control, intelligence, protection and sustainment are accomplished with systems that depend on spectrum, Teri Takai said. e strategy announcement puts DOD on the path to developing a comprehensive implementation plan that will address spectrum shortages, she said. e safety and security of U.S. citizens, the eectiveness of our U.S. combat forces, and the lives of our U.S. military members, our allies, and noncombatants depend on spectrum access more than ever, Takai said. Wireless technologies can be found in practically every piece of electronics currently available. Televisions, refrigerators and even cars are communicating via Wi-Fi, and DOD is seeing the same exponential growth of wireless usage in its equipment. I used to say that everythings connected to the network except for if you carry around a weapon, and I was very quickly corrected that no, in fact, most of our weaponry is facilitated by position navigation and timing or what youd call GPS, Takai said in an interview with American Forces Press Service. All of that is dependent upon the networks, which are when we use wireless, dependent upon spectrum. Spectrum is a nite resource, she said. Every new device places an additional demand on the network. While wireless devices are governed by a standard that directs what frequencies they can use, each additional device takes up a certain amount of space on its assigned set of frequencies. Most of the time, theres enough room in the device standard for many connections, but as the number of wireless devices increases, so does the potential for conict, she said. is can lead to slow or inaccessible networks, and it can become a public safety risk or a threat to national security. For example, numerous problems were reported with cellphone networks overwhelmed by a surge in trac following the bombings at the Boston Marathon last year. So, in 2010, President Barack Obama signed an executive order directing federal agencies to make 500 MHz of federal and nonfederal spectrum available over the next 10 years, suitable for both mobile and xed wireless broadband use. e spectrum strategy outlines the departments objectives for achieving the presidents vision, Takai said. e DOD is examining a number of options for freeing up bandwidth continuous sets of frequencies on the wireless spectrum. Among the challenges facing DOD is the fact that parts of the wireless spectrum are unsuitable for national security purposes, she said. To overcome this challenge, Takai said, the rst goal of the strategy is to improve the technology in DODs spectrum-dependent systems. Technologies currently in development could manage network demands by allowing for dynamic sharing of frequencies, more eciently compressing data or by using time-based frequency sharing. e second objective is to improve the exibility of DODs spectrum operations, she said. Simply put, DOD spectrum-based operations must be able to move with and adjust to the spectrum environment as it changes, Takai said, noting that this process begins with acquisitions. ird, she said, is increasing the participation of the DOD in spectrum regulatory policy discussions. Eective engagement in the development of policies helps us to better inuence new regulatory developments in a way that enhances sharing opportunities and increases the agility of our spectrum use, Takai said. e release of the spectrum strategy is just the rst step, she said. Over the next six months, the department will develop an implementation plan that will take into account the strategys goals as well as the practical issues inherent in reallocating space on the electromagnetic spectrum. Ideally, Takai said, the coming changes to spectrum allocation will be invisible to the warghter. e whole idea behind the spectrum strategy is to try to get ahead of this increasing demand so that they dont have to operate with radios that are either more dicult to use or that have to be recalibrated. Instead, the next generation of devices that operate on the wireless spectrum would contain technology exible enough to adjust to the frequency requirements of the operational environment, Takai said. e department is partnering with the private sector to develop new technologies that will provide warghters with the exibility they need to operate in the next battlespace. If we can work together on commercial technologies and innovative technologies, those technologies are going to be applicable to us just as they are applicable to industry, Takai said. e eort to nd better ways to use the wireless spectrum isnt just about freeing up bandwidth. Its really about enabling one of our key industries. Special Ops eye threatsBy Amaani LyleAmerican Forces Press ServiceWhile the scale of the homeland security threat has diminished, overseas threats to U.S. interests con tinue to grow, the militarys top special operations leaders said on Capitol Hill March 12. Michael D. Lumpkin, assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conict, and Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, told the Senate Armed Services Committees emerging threats and capabilities subcommittee that al-Qaida still retains sanctuaries in remote areas of Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, with burgeoning sects in Syria, North Africa and the Sahel. e threat continues to evolve, Lumpkin said. We must maintain pressure on terrorist organizations. Despite austere scal conditions, Lumpkin said, the Defense Department has provided counterinsurgency training and humanitarian assistance in Colombia, not only bringing security and prosperity to the region, but also helping it emerge as an expert in regional security. Similar opportunities exist in Africa and the Middle East, Lumpkin reported. Our support to the French in [Africas Sahel region] has been critical in stemming the tide of extremism in Mali, he noted. Modest support to [the African Union Mission in Somalia troops in] the Horn of Africa have helped to reverse the trajectory of [terrorist group] al-Shabab. In Yemen, we have had successes, but require a more robust and sustained eort to turn the tide of [al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsulas] expansion. McRaven said special operations will continue to meet priority demands globally, to prepare for current and future conicts, and to take of its people, despite scal turbulence. Globally, we are developing plans to better serve the geographic combatant commanders who, owing to the past 12 years of engagement in Iraq and Afghanistan, have gone under-resourced with [special operations] forces, the admiral said. McRaven stressed the importance of maintaining readiness as the United States and its partners continue to sustain forces around the world, with people in 84 countries and 7,000 people deployed globally. e future of special operations will be in helping to build partner capacity with willing nations who share U.S. interests, McRaven said. No nation alone can stem the rise of extremism, he added. By Lt. j.g. Jeff BrauserUSS Russell Public Affairse ocers and crew of the guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) remembered the life of Dr. Barry Friedman, a World War II veteran, author and special friend of the crew during a special memorial service held on board the ship, March 9. Receiving a commission in the Navy Reserve in June 1941, Friedman was called to active duty as the medical ocer aboard USS Russell (DD 414) in the Pacic eater during World War II and kept close ties with the Navy until his passing. During his service on board DD 414 during World War II, Friedman saw action during campaigns in the Aleutian Islands, the Gilbert and Marshall Island invasions, New Guinea, and Leyte and Lingayen Gulf actions in the Philippines and Okinawa. After leaving the Navy, Friedman practiced medicine as an orthopedic surgeon for more than 40 years and authored 12 books. His most recently published book Survivor chronicles his experiences as the medical ocer on board DD 414 during World War II. During the eulogy, Friedmans children expressed what they described as their fathers proudest moments while serving aboard DD 414. Coming to the aid of Sailors in need after the sinking of USS Lexington (CV 2) and USS Yorktown, as well as many other ships, the crew of DD 414 would save the lives of more than 1,200 Sailors during the war. Friedmans ties to the crew of the current USS Russell began when the ship arrived in San Diego Jan. 9, 2013 after having been previously homeported at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Hawaii. Its a privilege to be able to honor a man as special as Dr. Friedman, said Cmdr. James Harney, Russells commanding ofcer. When we learned of his passing, we started working immediately to put together a memorial to honor such a great man, who gave so much to the world, and who chose to spend his later years becoming part of our family. e Russells crew, knew Friedman well and he had last joined the crew as the guest of honor during the ships change of command ceremony Jan. 24. He was an incredible man, part of the Greatest Generation, said Masterat-Arms 1st Class Joseph Cook. is day, while somber, reminds you why we do this, to be part of something bigger than yourself that will span generations. Following the memorial serve there was a small reception in the wardroom where guests shared stories of Friedman. Russell is currently undergoing a 12-month, $70 million Extended Dry Dock Selective Restrictive Availability at the BAE Shipyard in San Diego. Russell is assigned as part of Destroyer Squadron 1.Naval History and Heritage CommandDr. Barry Friedman served on board this USS Russell (DD 414) during World War II.Navy photo by MC2 Robert StirrupThe guided-missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Russell mourns shipmateNavy photo by Mc2 Martin CareyNavy SEALs climb a caving ladder during training on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story. McRavenNavy photo by MC2 Kiona MillerNaval District Washington officials present their smart grid pilot to John Conger, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment, during a presentation at the Washington Navy Yard. The team displayed energy conservation technology, such as the Energy Guard, a wireless sensor interface device for digital control systems and the Virtual Fence, a wireless video sensor for critical infrastructure protection. Takai New strategy evolvesdo so aordably, the Commandant said. To lose this opportunity would aect the very shape of our service and impact our ability to conduct our missions for the next 40 years. As important as the Oshore Patrol Cutter recapitalization project is, Adm. Papp noted that his top priority over the past two years has been eliminating sexual harassment from the service. We started a military campaign ofce to oversee the implementation of our Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Strategic Plan and I have personally talked to about 35,000 Coast Guardsmen over the last 18 months during all hands meetings, the Commandant said. Even though the number of reports are going up, I feel that is a sign that victims are now trusting the system, and allowing us to vigorously hold the perpetrators accountable.PappFrom Page 13

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 20, 2014