The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00340


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Navy budget proposedTough choices made, forward presence remains priorityFrom The Office of the Chief of Informatione Department of the Navy released its proposed $148 bil lion budget for scal year 2015, March 4. e budget is part of the $495.6 billion defense budget President Barack Obama submitted to Congress the same day. Rear Adm. William Lescher, Deputy Assistant Sec retary of the Navy for Bud get, briefed media at the Department of Defense budget press conference about the Navy and Marine Corps por tion of the budget Our budget comes during a period of increased scal aus terity and uncertainty, and at a time when the Combatant Com manders demand for naval forc es continues at very high levels, Lescher said, ere were tough choices made in developing this budget, but it provides the re sources that allow us to preserve our warghting advantage in a thoughtful, responsible way. is years budget submission prioritizes funding for forward presence and continues to make critical investments in people and future capabilities. e proposed budget sustains presence by providing money for ship steaming, ight hours, maintenance and base opera tions. It funds amphibious ready group and carrier strike group deployments, supports the three ballistic missile defense-capable destroyers joining the USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) in Rota in FY15, and provides continued support for the rebalance to the Pacic, with $46.8 billion overall in operations and maintenance. Additional investments are proposed for retaining Sailors through the Quality of Service initiative. e Navy seeks to re Up Periscope Pick the super hero you would like to be Page 9 Mardi Gras Kings Bay Youth Center celebrates the day Page 4 Milestones Armed Forces salute Womens History Month Page 6Atlantic subs name Sailors of the Year Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Budget, Page 32009 CHINFO Award Winner Lescher Kings Bays Stockton, Heruth, Gee among four honoreesBy Kevin CopelandCommander, Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairse 2013 Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced March 5. ree Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and one Norfolk win ners were recognized by Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Force At lantic, during a luncheon held at the Pennsylvania House, Naval Station Norfolk. No successful force is without engaged Sailors fully focused in their roles as warghters, Con nor said. Today, we are in the company of such Sailors our sea and shore Sailors of the Year. ey represent a genera tion of submarine warghters who have demonstrated the skill and the work ethic to en sure our continued dominance of the Undersea Domain, and continue to be the backbone of the countrys nuclear strategic deterrent. Congratulations to these amazing Sailors and their families. Petty Ocer First Class Joseph A. Stockton was recognized as the 2013 SUBLANT Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a subma rine-qualied and nucleartrained machinists mate assigned to the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Born in Levittown, Pa., the 28-year-old Sailor is a 2004 grad uate of Pennsbury High School in Levittown, and joined the Navy, October 2004. e 2013 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. BarnwellFrom left, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Electricians Mate 1st Class James Gagnon, Machinists Mate 1st Class Joseph Stockton and SUBLANT Force Master Chief Wes Koshoffer. Gee See Sailors, Page 3 For U.S. and allies, DOD ocial tells Congress March 6By Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Departments nuclear deterrent is the ultimate protection for the United States while also assuring distant allies of their security against regional aggression, a senior Pentagon official told Congress March 6. Elaine Bunn, deputy assis tant secretary of defense for nuclear and missile defense policy told the Senate Armed Services Committees strategic forces subcommittee that while Defense Department modernization goals largely have not changed since 2010, some adjustments are on the horizon. One such change, she reported, involves the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty force structure. The administration is con sidering how to reduce nonde ployed strategic delivery vehi cles to comply with the limits of the new START treaty by February 2018, she said, and we will make a final force struc ture decision and inform Congress prior to the start of fiscal year 2015. Bunn expressed concern about Russian activity that appears to be inconsistent with the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. Weve raised the issue with Russia, she told the senators. They provided an answer that was not satisfactory to us, and we told them that the issue is not closed. With regard to recent ethical issues involving Air Force and Navy nuclear personnel, Bunn noted that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has created both internal and external special review panels. Those reviews are not about assigning blame, Nuclear deterrence ultimate protectionSee Nuclear, Page 10 Bunn Navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenSt. Marys Middle School students use a Heads Up Display and Xbox controller to steer machinery inside the main bay of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6. More photos on Page 5. St. Marys Middle Schoolers tour NSBBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsSt. Marys Elementary School students had a tour of science and technology March 7 on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. ey got hands-on experiences at Explosive Ord nance Disposal Facility, using the latest tech to operate bomb disposal robots. At the Indoor Simulation Marksmanship Trainer in Trident Training Facility, they used the latest infrared-based equipment. at was the intent, according to Ashley Hensley, their science teacher. is is a eld trip that gets them to see real world science, she said. at was certainly the eect. While showing them the equipment he uses, EOD1 Matthew Demmer said, Its nice to see them interested in technology and that they get to apply what they learn in school.Students enjoy learning experienceRobots, like this one for handling a simulated bomb, help keep Sailors a safe distance away. They are also a lot of fun.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Sub CSS Hunley topic at MOAAFred Tetor will be the guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers As sociation of American dinner-meeting begin ing at 5:30 p.m. with social hour, March 18 at Osprey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. Tetor works for the Warren Lasch Conserva tion Center in North Charleston, N.C. where the Confederate submarine Hunley is being restored. Dinner is $20 per person and payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. To RSVP contact Maj. Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net by March 11.Tetor guest at Sub League lunchFred Tetor, a Warren Lasch Conservation Center volunteer with the Hunley Project, will be guest speaker at the March 19 meeting of the e Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Sub marine League. e meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Goat Locker on board Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay. e normal business meeting will be short and precede Tetors presentation. Attendance conrmation is needed for lunch. Conrm by phone at (912) 882-8838 or by e-mail at mkevan@tds.net. If you prefer, bring your own lunch brown bag style. Drinks will be available. A ve dollar donation for the Friends of the Hunley is requested.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy. mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aar on.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a fes tival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military heli copter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical perfor mances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniver sary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Op erations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@com cast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 5734719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by member ship-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dis persed to local nonprot organiza tions through the KBSOSA Commu nity Grants program. e community grants are avail able by application to local nonprot organizations needing as sistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organiza tion dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to rais ing funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportu nities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook.Student scholarshipsIn 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF cur rently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses As sociation, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA de gree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line applica tion is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or e-mail schol ars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of Ameri can Sea Power and obtain a recom mendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League College tuition funding available By Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public Affairs e Center for Personal and Pro fessional Development is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education March 3. Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program director, said the expendi ture rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use historical burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After furloughs and a government shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, director of CPPD Support Site Sauey Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spending. He said FY-14 TA execution is cur rently trailing FY-13s execution rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things in uenced our being below the TA budget right now. Our execution rate dropped in October with the government shutdown and thats carried through the year, he said. e usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal budget. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased signicantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benets reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to continue to pursue their education and submit their TA requests. We work hard to allocate every TA dol lar available to give Sailors the most opportunities to use their TA funding allotment for each scal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benets so far this s cal year and emphasized that a Sail ors command is an important part of TA authorizations because theyre the rst step in the process after a Sailor submits a request. Its each commands responsibility to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are comfortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and process each Sailors TA request promptly, he said. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mis sion might not permit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding ocers decision, DAntonio said. He also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approver prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruc tion. Often when we review a TA re quest, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA prerequisites such as a cur rent education counseling by a Navy College Oce or Virtual Education Center counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on le, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constant ly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to sub mit their TA request, he said. In fact, a TA application can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. DAntonio also stressed that Sail ors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educational goals. e VOLED team is here to help, bottom line, he said. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. Center for PPD

PAGE 3

From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Voter Assistance Programe Federal Voting Assistance Program is scheduled to conduct a congressionally mandated Voting Assistance Ocer training work shop for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay VAOs. e workshop is 9 to 11 a.m., Tuesday March 25 at the Trident Training Facility Room 1100A. is workshop is oriented toward VAOs and persons who pro vide voting assistance at Kings Bay, tenant commands and aoat units. Although primarily for VAOs, workshop is open to any interest ed persons. e workshop provides timely information about the absentee registration and voting process for Uniformed Service members and their families, plus resources criti cal to preparing VAOs to eective ly perform their duties in assisting Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act citizens. Both Congress and the De partment of Defense Inspector General have emphasized the importance of all VAOs receiving comprehensive training regarding how to perform their duties. Attendance at an FVAP Work shop is the best way for VAOs to learn this information. e workshop will provide criti cal information, resources and tools for the successful perfor mance of VAO duties and ulti mately the success of the voter in participating in our electoral process.Kings Bay Voter Assistance Ocers meet March 25 at Trident TrainingOcer First Class James R. Gagnon, a submarine-qual ied and nuclear-trained electricians mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Montpelier (SSN 765), home ported in Norfolk, Va. e East Bruns wick, N.J. native graduated from East Brunswick High School in 2001, and joined the Navy in February 2002. As the Senior Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year, Ga gnon and Stockton will represent SUBLANT in the At lantic Fleet Sailor of the Year competition conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. e eet competition will be held later in March with other Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet Sea Sailor of the Year winner from that competition will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet Shore Sailor of the Year winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations competition in Washington, D.C. e 2013 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Gregory A. Heruth, and the 2013 SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Jimmy L. Gee. When nominated, Heruth was a submarine-qualied machinists mate who was assigned to the Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Blue), homeported in Kings Bay. Since his nomination, Heruth transferred to the Cen ter for Security Force Learning Site, Yokosuka, Japan, and was unable to attend the ceremony. Born in Virginia Beach, Va., the 25-year-old Heruth is a 2006 graduate of West Springeld High School in Springeld, Va., and joined the Navy in July 2007. He was also the Commander, Submarine Group Ten Junior Sea Sailor of the Year, headquartered in Kings Bay. Gee is a submarine-qualied machinists mate as signed to the TRIDENT Ret Facility in Kings Bay. A native of Oklahoma City, he is a graduate of Davis High School in Davis, Okla., and joined the Navy in Jan uary 2007. Force Master Chief Wesley Koshoer, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, said he was impressed with this special group of enlisted submariners. Anyone who has concerns about the current generation and their ability to serve in the military or guide us in the future, needs to spend some time around our Sailors, Koshoer said. I am honored to serve along side them and inspired by their incredible performance. ese Sailors are superstars at their commands who continually strive to improve themselves and everyone around them. eir impact goes beyond the Navy ... they contribute in their communities. To say I am proud is an understatement.ey motivate me. I sleep well at night knowing that they are on watch. e other candidates for Senior Sea Sailor of the year were Petty Ocer First Class Avery Farrish, a subma rine-qualied electricians mate assigned to the Ohioclass guided-missile submarine USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold), homeported in Kings Bay, and Petty Ocer First Class Michael Nickel, a submarine-qualied machin ists mate from the Virginia-class attack submarine USS California (SSN 781), home ported in Groton, Conn. Petty Ocer First Class Ryan Hamilton, a submarinequalied re control technician assigned to the Navy Submarine Torpedo Facility, Yorktown, Va., and Petty First Class Anthony Madrid, a surface warfare and ex peditionary warfare-qualied interior communications electrician assigned to the Regional Support Group in Groton, Conn., were the other nalists for Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. e other candidates for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year were Petty Ocer Second Class Kyle Liggett, a subma rine-qualied sonar technician (submarines) currently assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), home ported in Groton, Conn., and Petty Ocer Second Class Jared Fouke, a submarine-qualied machinists mate from the Pre-Commis sioning Unit John Warner, a Virginia-class attack sub marine being built in Newport News, Va. Finalists for Junior Shore Sailor of the Year were Petty Ocer Second Class Scott Burgess, a submarine-qualied logistics technician assigned to the headquarters sta at Commander, Submarine Group Two in Groton, Conn., and Petty Ocer Second Class Amber Miller, an information dominance warfare-qualied information systems technician assigned to the sta of Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic in Norfolk, Va. duce manning gaps at sea and improve the sea-toshore ow of personnel. e Navy has also re quested $38.4 billion for ship, aircraft, weapons and other procurement for programs including Littoral Combat Ship, P-8A Poseidon aircraft, Virginia class submarines and the Mk-48 heavy weight torpedo. Research and development priorities include the Ohio-class re placement submarine, next generation jammer and Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Sur veillance and Strike, as well as developing electro magnetic spectrum and cyber capabilities. e Navy FY15 budget is a $15 billion decrease from the level forecast in last years budget submis sion and is a $38 billion reduction over the Future Year Defense Plan from the FY14 Presidential Budget. Were condent this budget makes the right choices where needed, Lescher said. SailorsFrom Page1BudgetFrom Page 1 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Jamie Ware and Joaquin Newbold are ready for the parade. Mardi Gras Photos by EM1 Mark Treen By Laura Jefferson Special to The PeriscopeIn celebration of Fat Tuesday, or Mardi Gras, the Child Development and Youth Centers came together to provide a festival for their students. On Tuesday, March 4, sta, students and parents braved the frigid wind and overcast skies to aunt their purple, green and gold colors. Child and Youth Program Direc tor Candice Dugan said the parade gave teachers the opportunity for their students to work together in celebration. Teamwork was evident as children proudly walked side-byside with their classmates as they waved their Mardi Gras crafts. e children had a great time, said Sharon Grant, Youth Center director. ey enjoyed making oats, masks and throwing beads to family and friends. ough a humble beginning, Dugan said she hopes the Mardi Gras Festival will be an annual event that will grow with parent involvement, base participation, music and bigger oats. First parade a beginning Kings Bay Youth CentersAnthony Wagner enjoys any occasion to toot his own horn. This was one of those times! Tammy Moore parades with Joshua Sander, left, and her grand daughter, Anaysiah Seymour. Demetrius Johnson sports beads. Preschoolers enjoyed dressing up as royalty. Jathan Simmons and Bradley Parrado take part. A students hand-made mask. Teacher Kadee Brodie wore a mask.

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 In Big Blue, the primary EOD response truck, EODC Kyle Chander shows St. Marys Middle School students the remote display and controls for a large bomb disposal robot. The student in the display just realized a 200-pound robot is headed at him. The students eventually tried splitting the roles. One uses the Heads Up Display, and one controls the robot. EOD1 Matthew Demmer showed examples of dangerous explosives the EOD teams deals with. Jeff Unger and his classmates also got a chance to shoot modified training firearms in the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer at Trident Training Facility. Students and staff at the Bancroft Memorial before their tour with MA1 Hunter McKay, MASNs Alisa Andrews and Gabriel Contreras. EODCS Jeremy Baker explains the use of robots to investigate and disarm harmful explosives. Danielle DeHarne controls a robot. The class got a chance to see how technol ogy can help people and be fun. EODCS Jeremy Baker helps Andrew Wall put on a bomb suit. Students visit Kings Bay Photos by EM1 Mark Treen

PAGE 6

6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By PO2 Walter ShinnFrom Coast Guard Compasse origin of Womens History Month as a national celebration began nearly 120 years before the rst Hispanic-Amer ican woman served in the Coast Guard and its predecessor services. Maria Mestre de los Dolores Andreu assumed the watch as the lighthouse keeper at the St. Augustine Lighthouse after her husband, Juan, passed away in 1859. With a yearly salary of $400 she not only became the rst Hispanic-American woman to serve in the Coast Guard but also to command a federal shore instal lation. Lighthouse keepers helped ensure a looming light on the horizon would be seen by sailors making them aware of a port or hazard to navigation. Lighthouse along shorelines emitted light to mari ners warning them of a potential hazard or port while navigating a relentless and sometimes unforgiving sea in the 19th century was vital lifeline in maintaining safety at sea. Lighthouses were not new in 1859 although the service was then called the Lighthouse Service. e history of the lighthouses began nearly 450 years ago when Don Pedro Menendez claimed Florida as part of Spain in 1565. Over time many lighthouses were built along the east coast of Florida. ey were initially built for lookout stations and warning signal alerting mariners a sandy shoal was nearby. e lighthouses gradually transformed into beacons specically for marine traf c. A keepers responsibility was a di cult job as many of the lighthouses were in isolated locations. Because of the dif culty of the job, keepers of lighthouses held the highest respect with their local community and government. e best keepers are found to be old sailors, who are accustomed to watch at night, who are more likely to turn out in a driving snow storm and nd their way to the light-house to trim their lamps, said Isaiah William Penn Lewis, engineer to the U.S. Light-house Survey. Because in such weather they know by experience the value of a light, while on similar oc casions the landsman keeper would be apt to consider such weather as the best excuse for remaining snug in bed. e responsibilities of a lighthouse keeper were so signicant in the early 19th century only the president of the United States could appoint and dismiss keepers. Keepers were commonly men; however, they often took the initiative to hire an assistant. It wasnt unusual for keepers to have other jobs enabling them to make more money while leaving some responsibilities of lighthouse keeping to their wife or children. Andreu received her experience as a result from assisting her husband who was the rst Hispanic American to serve in the Coast Guard and its predecessor services. She took over in 1859 as keeper of the lighthouse and likely knew of the dicult tasks she was now responsible for after years of learning from her husband. e responsibilities and duties for a lighthouse keeper were not for the lighthearted. Supplies for maintenance of the light were sent by the government regularly, but food wasnt. is required the keepers to not only maintain the light but also to grow their own food and hunt. While keepers had to maintain their own sustainable food supply they also had to ensure the light was continuously lit the throughout night. Additionally, children who lived on the property need ed to be educated. is all took place on an 18-mile long island which wasnt eas ily accessible at the time. Not only did lighthouse keepers have to take care of their families but also for mariners in distress. e eort to reach out to mariners in need of help became rooted into the services daily responsibilities. Civility should be enjoined as a duty to strangers wishing to examine the Lights, and, in case of shipwrecks near, every practical eort required to be made to render reasonable and ecient relief, and all due vigilance exercised to detect and expose every breech of the revenue laws in his neighborhood, said Secretary of the Treasury Levi Woodbury in 1835. Rendering relief to those in need be came second nature to keepers of light houses standing the watch continuously. Andreu stood the watch as keeper of the St. Augustine Lighthouse for three years. In 1862, the Civil War started and the light was extinguished fearing it would aid the Union Navy. e light was dimmed and Andreu moved away from the lighthouse but remained in the region. Maria Andreus leadership and per severance as keeper of the lighthouse in spired generations of women to shine as female employees within federal service through her beacon of light, said retired Lt. Cmdr. Marilyn Dykman, the rst His panic American woman to pilot a Coast Guard aircraft. Andreu opened the doors for women in the Coast Guard like my self and will carry over throughout many generations to come. Maria Andreu set the pace for not just for women serving in the Coast Guard but also for Hispanics. Today, Hispanic-Americans make up approximately 11 percent of the total service. Women in the Coast Guard con tinue honoring the service just as Andreu did 130 years ago. e legacy of Andreus courage con tinues into future generations of women serving in the Coast Guard just as it has over the previous 220 years. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navy joins the nation in celebrating Wom ens History Month during March. Currently more than 59,000 active duty women and more than 9,000 Reserve women serve in the Navy. Making up 18 percent of the Total Force, women make numerous contributions to our Navys mis sion and readiness. Additionally, more than 54,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civilians. Women leading in the Navy Total Force include: 32 active and Reserve ag ocers, 69 Senior Execu tive Service members, 48 command master chiefs, and three command se nior chiefs. In 1908, Congress established the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps. e rst 20 Navy nurses were women, who be came known as the Sa cred Twenty. As one of the Sacred Twenty, Lenah S. Higbee was one of the rst women to serve formally as a member of the Navy. In 1909, Higbee was promoted to Chief Nurse at Norfolk Naval Hospital, and in 1911 she became the Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps, serving throughout the duration of World War I. e Navy recognized Higbees distinguished service as Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps, awarding her the Navy Cross for service in the line of her profession and unusual and conspicuous devotion to duty. In 1944, the Navy com memorated Higbees naval service, naming a ship in her honor. USS Higbee (DD 806) was the rst combatant ship to be named after a woman. e Navys rst enlisted women, more commonly known as yeomen or yeo manettes, provided clerical support during World War I. Capt. Joy Bright Hancock initially enlisted as a yeoman, serving until the end of World War I, by which time she had risen to the rank of chief petty ocer. In 1942, during World War II, she was commis sioned as a lieutenant in the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Ser vice program. Hancock rose to the rank of cap tain and led the WAVES through the 1940s and 1950s, facilitating the ad dition of women as a per manent part of the Navy. Master Chief Yeoman Anna Der-Vartanian entered the Navy through the WAVES. She was not only the rst woman to hold the rank of master chief in the Navy, but also across all armed services. Reecting on her ser vice, Der-Vartanian noted that most of the personnel she led treated her with respect and professionalism. e few exceptions where her authority was challenged, she maintained her professional ism with the saying, Fall in and pipe down! Upon her retirement after 21 years of naval ser -Navy celebrates Womens History MonthNaval History and Heritage CommandThe first 20 Navy Nurses at the Naval Hospital, Washington, D.C., in October 1908. Lenah Higbee is in the front row at right. Naval History and Heritage CommandMarine Capt. Vernice Armour earned her wings in 2001 and was the first female African American combat pilot in the military in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Hancock Higbee Der-Vartanian Iskra Female roles in Corps continue to expandBy Carolyn LeeMarine Corps Base HawaiiFrom the very rst woman Marine to her modernday sisters, each has contributed to the Marine Corps readiness to be rst to ght. It is said that on the night of Oct. 12, 1942, when Gen. omas Holcomb, 17th commandant of the Ma rine Corps, announced a decision to allow women into the Corps during a farewell party at the Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., the portrait of Brig. Gen. Archibald Henderson, fth commandant of the Corps, crashed from the wall onto the buet. Despite the late generals apparent protest and op position from other Marines at the time, the Corps ocially opened to women Feb. 13, 1943. e Corps recruited its earliest female members in response to wartime needs to deploy men overseas from their clerical positions at military headquarters and oces. Be a Marine ... free a Marine to ght, trumpeted posters during World War II, a recruiting strategy that echoed the Corps rst campaign for women, launched in the summer of 1918 when the Corps faced ever-mounting demands to dispatch more Marines to the front lines in France during World War I. Opha Mae Johnson, who had been working as a ci vilian employee at the Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., became the rst woman Marine on Aug. 13, 1918, the rst day of sign-ups for women. From among thousands of applicants, the Corps searched for exceptional clerical and oce skills, out -Photo courtesy of St. Augustine Historical SocietyThe first St. Augustine Lighthouse was built in 1700 and aided mariners for 162 years. Maria Mestre de los Dolores Andreu assumed the watch there in 1859 to become the first Hispanic-American woman to serve in the Coast Guard and to command a federal shore installation. Coast Guard woman on station in 1859See Navy, Page 7 See Marines, Page 7

PAGE 7

Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tyler MainPfc. Christina Fuentes Montenegro prepares to hike to her platoons defensive position during patrol week of Infantry Training Battalion near Camp Geiger, N.C. Fuentes Montenegro is one of the first three females to ever graduate from Infantry Training Battalion. vice, Der-Vartanian continued serving her country by joining the Central In telligence Agency. Darlene Iskra was one of the rst female line of cers to graduate from the Naval School of Diving and Salvage in Washing ton, D.C. Looking back, Iskra said, Dive school was the most physically challenging thing I had ever done to that point in my life. Had it not been for the support of my fellow classmates, especially my roommate and diving partner [pres ent day] Rear Adm. Mar tha Herb, I would have probably quit. As a lieutenant com mander, Darlene Iskra be came the rst Navy wom an to command a ship when she assumed com mand of USS Opportune (ARS 41) in 1990. Iskra took her ship, a Bolster-class rescue and salvage ship, to patrol the Suez Canal during Opera tion Desert Storm, ensur ing the canal remained clear for commerce. Reecting upon her time as the rst female commanding ocer of a naval ship, she now un derstands that being a trailblazer means opening new ground for others to follow and that sometimes there are hazards along the way. Iskra retired in 2000 as a commander, with 21 years of service. Most recently, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was nominated for ap pointment to the rank of admiral and assignment as vice chief of naval operations. She made history as the Navys rst female four-star admiral, and rst African-American and rst woman to serve as the vice chief. e character, courage, and commitment shown by Higbee, Hancock, Der-Vartanian, Iskra, and Howard paved the way for women serving in the con temporary Navy. Today, women in the Navy, both ocer and enlisted, hold leadership positions aboard war ships, of carrier air wings and squadrons, recruiting districts, training stations, and shipyards. As we continue to progress forward, previously closed billets will open to women and the Navy will continue to witness women making history and new rsts. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the con tributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the National Womens History Month theme, Celebrating Women of Character, Cour age, and Commitment, through programs, exhibits, publications, and par ticipation in military and community events. standing character and a neat appearance. e few and the proud, to allude to the Marines current marketing slogan, numbered just 305 women, who were enrolled as reserve Marines. Something kept stick ing in my throat all the time as newly minted Pvt. Martha L. Wilchinski was being sworn in, she wrote in a letter to her boy friend, who was ghting in France. I dont know whether it was my heart or my liver. I had to swal low it several times before I could say, I do. I cant sign myself as aectionately as I used to, Bill, she said in closing. You understand, Im a sol dier now and you wouldnt want me doing anything that wasnt in the (Marine Corps) Manual. Yours till the cows come home. Dicult situations sometimes arose in in teractions with male Ma rines. e other day the lieutenant and I were wait ing to go down in the el evator, Wilchinski said in another letter to Bill. Now heres the question. If I am a lady and hes a gentle man, I go in rst. If hes an ocer and Im a corporal, he goes in rst. It all depends on how you look at it. I didnt know how hed take it, so I thought Id wait and see what hed do ... en he stepped forward and I stepped back. en he stepped back and I stepped forward. en we both stepped back. I was getting pretty dizzy by that time. I guess he was too. en we both squeezed in at the same time. I guess thats what they mean by military tactics. Johnson, Americas rst woman Marine, served as a clerk in the Quarter master Generals Oce, rising to sergeant in three months by the time the war ended Nov. 11, 1918. She and the other women reserve Marines were or dered to inactive status. ey got the same benets as male veterans of the war, including a $60 bonus upon discharge and the right to a military burial in Arlington Na tional Cemetery in Vir ginia. In the decades since Johnson became the rst woman Marine, the Corps has opened up more and more jobs to females. Once limited to clerical work, women can now serve in the Corps as air crew and in armory, artillery and infantry. Last year, then-Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced that women in the military would no longer be banned from roles in direct ground combat. All branches are evaluating performance standards and developing plans to carry out this de cision. I fundamentally believe that our military is more eective when success is based solely on ability, qualications and on performance, Panetta said. Not everyone is go ing to be able to be a com bat soldier. But everyone is entitled to a chance. By committing ourselves to that principle, we are re newing our commitment to American values our service members ght and die to defend.Marines From Page 6NavyFrom Page 6 By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on its goal of providing access to Navy training anytime, anyplace, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Pro gram Oce announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct Internet access to Navy e-Learning content. Most Navy Learners were previously accessing NeL through Navy Knowl edge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. at was a multistep process that is now signicantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, without going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of https://www.aas. prod.nel.training.navy.mil will take you directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management sys tem after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search en gine and that gets you strictly learning-related returns, streamlining nding the course you are looking for. Although direct ac cess to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explor er browser. Many of our courses take advantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning expe rience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compat ibility with these courses, NeL provides conguration guides for many of the latest versions of IE. NeL also provides a plug-in analyzer to help custom ers conrm they are able to access and run the multimedia content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, cus tomers may simply click on the Browser Congu -Training goes on Internet See e-Learn, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014

PAGE 9

Id like to be The Thing, because I love saying, Its clobberin time! To me that trumps This is a job for Superman! or Avengers, Assemble! But more than any super hero, I wanted to be Perry Great Ceasars Ghost White or J.J. Jameson. How great would it be to be the publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper back in the day. You know why super heros worked at newspapers? Because before CNN, the Internet and Twitter, its where you found out what was happening.Which super hero would you like to be?ETSN Soren Jessen USS Alabama Gold Dwight, Ill. Martian Manhunter. Hes smart and his abil ity to shape shift and go through things like a ghost is amusing. ET2 Robert Daugherty Naval Submarine Support Center Bowling Green, Ky. The Flash. It would be like, Honey, bring in the laundry and swoosh Done. Paula Stoner Retired Navy Merrick, N.Y. Ive been Super Woman my whole life. MA1 Dante Johnson NSB Kings Bay Cleveland The Incredible Hulk, because hes big and hes strong. Pfc. Roger Santiago Security Force Battalion Stroudsburg, Pa. The Flash, because hes so fast. He can travel the world in like 2 seconds. MASA Rioval Rodriguez Security Force Battalion Nixon, Texas Captain America. Hes in the military and does a lot for all the citizens of the world. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Fashionable footwearSailors from the USS Georgia (SSBN 729) (Blue) put their best foot forward Saturday morning during the St. Marys Mardi Gras Parade to march against domestic violence. All of the proceeds from Real Men Wear Heels participants supports Domestic Violence Awareness in Camden County and the violence shelter Camden House. Also wearing red womens shoes for the cause were members of the Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team, the USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), USS Alaska (SSBN 732), NSB Kings Bay Security, Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic and the Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic. Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Trees picked for ship repairsBy Bill CouchNaval Facilities Engineering Command Midwest Public AffairsNavy foresters and con tractors from Naval Fa cilities Engineering Command Midwests Public Works Department Crane began harvesting specially designated trees at Naval Support Activity Crane Feb. 20 and 21 in prepara tion for the next planned dry-docking repair of USS Constitution, the worlds oldest commissioned war ship aoat. PWD Crane forestry pro gram manager Trent Os mon oversaw the cutting down of 35 of the nearly 150 GPS-located mature white oaks set aside for future use by Constitution. Everything went smoothly, said Osmon, who manages the bases 53,000 acres of forest. We have a limited win dow each year to harvest timber here because of weather conditions and also because Cranes for est is a home for the en dangered Indiana Bat. e trees will be moved to a covered storage area on base, where they will remain until needed. e dry-docking and repair is planned for 2014 through 2018, and now was the time to begin the process of harvesting, milling and shaping the special wood to match Old Ironsides original white oak. Navy photo by Bill CouchWorkmen and Cmdr. James Stewart, commanding officer of Naval Support Activity Crane, assess a white oak tree set aside for future use in repairing USS Constitution. Pay to increase for ship service By Chief of Naval Personnel, Public AffairsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced March 4 an increase in Ca reer Sea Pay and Career Sea Pay Pre mium for eligible Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. ose Sailors and Marines on sea duty, deployed away from home around the world, are the backbone of the Navy and Marine Corps, and en able us to provide and maintain our global presence, said Mabus. is change to Career Sea Pay will both improve critical sea-duty manning and reward those who take these challenging sea-going as signments. is increase is long overdue and is meant to reward our Sailors and Marines for their continued sac rices as part of Americas Away Team. CSP and CSP-P are funds earned by Sailors and Ma rines on top of their base pay, to compensate them for time at sea. CSP rates are based upon a members pay grade and cumulative years of sea duty. CSP-P is an additional incentive for members who ex ceed 36 consecutive months at sea. By law, CSP and CSP-P may not exceed $750 and $350 respectively. Mabus Navy aides searchBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe United States continues to assist the Malaysian government in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared the night of March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing. The USS Pinckney and USS Kidd, both Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, are on station in the Gulf See Pay, Page 10 See Tree, Page 10 See Search, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

PAGE 10

10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Repairs will be done at Naval History and Heritage Commands Boston Detachment, known as the Charlestown Navy Yard, a 213-year old for mer Navy shipyard, now part of Boston National Historical Park, which maintains Constitution. Cranes white oak trees will be used to replace de teriorated hull planking and supporting structures called knees on Old Ironsides, which was built in 1797 and was previously brought into dry dock for major repairs in 1991. Constitution earned the nickname Old Ironsides while engaging British ships during the War of 1812. British sail ors observed cannon balls bouncing o Constitutions hull and exclaimed her sides must have been made of iron. Even after more than 200 years, around 12 per cent of Constitutions wood is original. According to the ships caretak ers in Boston, the keel, the bottom frames, and the bottom 13 planks of the hull have never had to be replaced. According to Osmons research, white oak trees at Crane were rst approved to be set aside in November 1973, following work on Constitution with lumber purchased from the private sector, which proved to be very expen sive, as white oak of that size is very valuable. White oak is one of the more sought-after timber species for its attractive grain and color, and is mainly used nowadays for veneers, said PWD Crane forester Rhett Steele. A grove of trees at Crane was ocially named Constitution Grove May 8, 1976, during the United States bicentennial. is small ceremonial area of trees includes a few white oaks and provides visitors a representation of the bases widely dispersed inventory of the species. Osmon said that Crane and NAVFAC have continued to support the ship over the years, including for its bicentennial. In preparation for the ships 200th birthday in 1997, the ship was brought into dry dock for repairs in 1991, said Osmon. When they brought her up, she was in need of more work than originally thought, so Crane was contacted to see if any timber could be provided. en-forest er Terry Hobson located all the suitable white oak trees scattered through out the base and chose the very best to send. Were very proud to be part of this, said Cmdr. James Stewart, commanding ocer of NSA Crane. e ship is such a big deal, such an important part of the Navys heritage, and Crane is very proud to have this tie to Constitution. All pay grades with at least three years of cumulative sea duty will receive a 25 per cent increase in regular CSP, while service members who exceed 36 months of con secutive sea duty will receive an increase in CSP-P from $100 to $200 per month. Consistent with current policy, in lieu of receiving CSP-P, Sailors and Marines in grades E5-E9 with eight years of cumu lative sea duty receive a higher CSP rate, equivalent to receiving CSP-P whenever assigned to a ship regardless of consecu tive sea time. is is the rst increase of CSP and CSP-P since 2001. Approxi mately 100,000 Sailors receive CSP and approximately 13,000 receive CSP-P; this special pay increase is expected to cost $66 million per year. It is expected that the new CSP and CSP-P rates will take eect early this summer. An announcement on the exact date is forthcoming.PayFrom Page 9 she said. Theyre about identify ing, assessing, and correcting any systemic deficiencies that we may uncover and in applying the best practices for carrying out our nuclear mission across the nuclear force. Bunn also said the recently released 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review makes clear the key role of nuclear forces in the DOD strategy. It supports our ability to proj ect power by communicating to potential nuclear-armed adversar ies that they cannot escalate their way out of failed conventional aggression, Bunn said. The departments budget request for fiscal year 2015 supports DODs nuclear policy goals as laid out in the 2010 nuclear posture review, in the presidents June 2013 nuclear employment strategy, and in the 2014 QDR. Pentagon officials will continue to ensure that administra tions have suitable options for deter ring, responding to and managing a diverse range of situations, including regional deterrence challenges. We continue to work closely with our allies, some of whom live in very dangerous neighborhoods, to ensure continuing confidence in our shared national security goals, including assurance of our extended nuclear deterrence commitments, she told the Senate panel. Critical to maintaining a safe, secure and effective force is the pres ervation of the nuclear triad: strate gic bombers, intercontinental ballis tic missiles and submarine-launched ballistic missiles, Bunn said. TreeFrom Page 9 NuclearFrom Page 1 By Lance Cpl. Sarah A. LunaMarine Corps Base Quanticoe unfailing contribu tions of those enslaved in the United States more than 154 years ago were commemorated at Mount Vernon during the month of February to honor of black history month. e Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union was founded in 1853 by Ann Pamela Cunningham, she gathered 11 other women and they took over George Washingtons mansion in 1860 which later became known as George Washingtons Mount Vernon, home of the rst president of the United States just 25 miles from Marine Corps Base Quantico. George Washington was born into a slaveholding society. Although his thoughts about slav ery changed as he grew older, his Mount Vernon consisted of 318 enslaved people at the time of his death in 1799. For the most part, Mount Vernon was run by the slave community, said Maria Morgan, history in terpreter for GWMV. Slaves had jobs from cooking, blacksmithing, making hats, overseeing and more. eir work days were from sun up to sun down. In the summer, work days could last up to 14 hours. Beth Hosier, a history interpreter for GWMV, said that Washington was up before the sun rose and felt, that if he was up, there was no reason his workers shouldnt be. Washingtons home was known for the great hospi tality guests would receive. In Virginia, it was a known custom to accept all guests without asking questions. It was even inappropriate to ask how long a guest would be staying. e longest a guest is known to have stayed at the Washingtons mansion is 11 months. eyre taking care of the guests in the house, said Morgan. Twelve household slaves were used to keep that place in running order and make that hospitality for which they were so famous, pos sible. Despite the hard work that slaves devoted to the Washington mansion, their living conditions werent ideal. Up to 90 people, including children, occupied the slave quarters. e quarters were no bigger than half of a bas ketball gym. Morgan said there was a point when Washington had to raise the amount of food he would give to his slaves due to them n ishing their weekly por tions by Wednesday and complaining that it wasnt enough. ey were given ve sh and a peck of corn meal each week before he raised their portions. Some of the innovations that Washington introduced were ideas that came from the actions or ideas of his slaves; such as, Washingtons 16-sided barn. ese human beings contributed so heavily, not only the success of Mount Vernon, but this country, said Jonathan Wood, an actor who plays the role of Washingtons personal servant at GWMV. Visit George Washing tons Mount Vernon any day of the week from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. e closing time will change to 5 p.m. in March. e active duty admis sions fee is $14 with mili tary identication.Mount Vernon slave quarters reconstructedMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Sarah Luna A reconstruction of womans slave quarters at George Washingtons Mount Vernon. Women raised their chil dren in these quarters.

PAGE 11

Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live mu sic by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 5739492. 24th Annual Southeast Military Travel Fair and Expo Its coming 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Fri day, March 14 inside Bldg. 1039. Complimentary food samples by US Foods, more than 70 dis plays and vendors, give-a-ways and lots of door prizes includ ing a Kindle Fire HDX 8.9-inch, iPad Mini and grand prize of a PS4. You need not be present to win. MWR employees and their family members are not eligible to en ter drawings. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being ac cepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is lim ited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at reg istration. Bring your lunch, tow el, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Fes tival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun, including orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex, cost is $15 for each team of two, which includes t-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together. All bike types are welcome. e event is limited to 15 teams per wave. After, join in the fun at Lake D with the festival in full swing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with lots of fun things to do, including a zipline, halo jumper, rock wall, obstacle inatable, kids shing, geocaching and more. Food will be available for purchase. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regu lations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new venture and is cer tain that you, the patron, will en joy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowl ing you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Over the Hedge shown Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photoMorale, Welfare and Recreations Shamrock The House will be celebrated March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend movies for March are Over the Hedge March 15 and 16, Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters March 22 and 23, Es cape from Planet Earth March 29 and 30 and The Smurfs 2 Monday, March 31. Mov ies are at 1 p.m., every Satur day and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years oldmust be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call 912-573-4548. Just for kids Winter Basketball1, West Virginia (Champion) 2, Gunz Blazin (Runner-Up) 3, USS Alaska7x7 Soccer LeagueTeam W L T1, MFPUGC 4 0 0 2t, Kings Bay United 2 1 0 2t, USS Florida Gold 2 1 0 2t, Turf Toe 2 0 0 5t, Danger Zone 1 1 0 5t, Trident Training 1 1 1 7t, Black Sails 1 2 0 7t, The Agency 1 2 0 9t, TRF FC 1 3 0 9t, Ballbusters 1 3 0 11, Slow Attack 0 1 1 10t, Coast Guard 0 2 0Upcoming Spring Softball registration is open. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m., in the Fitness Center classroom. Pick up roster sheets now at the Intramural Sports office. Intramural Sports Photo courtesy of MWR Intramural SportsThe USS West Virginia won the championship of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 2014 Winter Basketball League. Gunz Blazin was runnerup. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

PAGE 12

12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. of Thailand conduct ing search-and-rescue operations, Army Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters March 10. The ships are using a creeping-line search method, Warren said. The Pinckney investigated a possible debris field yes terday, he added, but it was not the missing aircraft. Two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters are flying off the ships to aid the search, using forward-looking infrared pods to search at night. A P-3 Orion from Kadena Air Base, Japan, also is being employed in the search, Warren said. The Orion, operating in the western search area, brings long-range search, radar and communica tions capabilities to the efforts. It can loiter about nine hours at a time. In addition, the USNS John Ericsson, a fleet replenishment oiler, is providing logistics sup port for the U.S. effort. American ships are work ing with ships from Malaysia, China and Singapore in the search effort. Air traffic controllers lost the signal about two hours after the Boeing 777-200 airliner took off with 239 people aboard. Earlier reports of an oil slick in the Gulf of Thailand proved to not be from the aircraft, Malaysian aviation offi cials in Kuala Lumpur told reporters. Flight MH370, a Boeing 777-200 aircraft, departed Kuala Lumpur at 12:41 a.m. Saturday local time and was scheduled to land at Beijing International Airport at 6:30am Beijing time. The flight has 227 passengers from 14 nations, mainly China, and 12 crewmembers. Three Americans report edly were also aboard. ration link, located in the NeL Help section, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. NeL is the worlds larg est learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Train ing, including the newlyupdated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Challenge Course, Reeves said. Last year, the Cy ber Awareness Challenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than 4 million comple tions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to oer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO. Although NKO was designed as a one-stopshop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense.SearchFrom Page 9 e-LearnFrom Page 7

PAGE 13

Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To reg ister, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be reg istered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foun dation for productive financial commu nication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employ ment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a min imum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014



PAGE 1

Navy budget proposedTough choices made, forward presence remains priorityFrom The Office of the Chief of Informatione Department of the Navy released its proposed $148 billion budget for scal year 2015, March 4. e budget is part of the $495.6 billion defense budget President Barack Obama submitted to Congress the same day. Rear Adm. William Lescher, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Budget, briefed media at the Department of Defense budget press conference about the Navy and Marine Corps portion of the budget Our budget comes during a period of increased scal austerity and uncertainty, and at a time when the Combatant Commanders demand for naval forces continues at very high levels, Lescher said, ere were tough choices made in developing this budget, but it provides the resources that allow us to preserve our warghting advantage in a thoughtful, responsible way. is years budget submission prioritizes funding for forward presence and continues to make critical investments in people and future capabilities. e proposed budget sustains presence by providing money for ship steaming, ight hours, maintenance and base operations. It funds amphibious ready group and carrier strike group deployments, supports the three ballistic missile defense-capable destroyers joining the USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) in Rota in FY15, and provides continued support for the rebalance to the Pacic, with $46.8 billion overall in operations and maintenance. Additional investments are proposed for retaining Sailors through the Quality of Service initiative. e Navy seeks to reUp Periscope Pick the super hero you would like to be Page 9 Mardi Gras Kings Bay Youth Center celebrates the day Page 4 Milestones Armed Forces salute Womens History Month Page 6Atlantic subs name Sailors of the Year Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Budget, Page 32009 CHINFO Award Winner Lescher Kings Bays Stockton, Heruth, Gee among four honoreesBy Kevin CopelandCommander, Submarine Force Atlantic Public Affairse 2013 Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced March 5. ree Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and one Norfolk winners were recognized by Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, during a luncheon held at the Pennsylvania House, Naval Station Norfolk. No successful force is without engaged Sailors fully focused in their roles as warghters, Connor said. Today, we are in the company of such Sailors our sea and shore Sailors of the Year. ey represent a generation of submarine warghters who have demonstrated the skill and the work ethic to ensure our continued dominance of the Undersea Domain, and continue to be the backbone of the countrys nuclear strategic deterrent. Congratulations to these amazing Sailors and their families. Petty Ocer First Class Joseph A. Stockton was recognized as the 2013 SUBLANT Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. He is a submarine-qualied and nucleartrained machinists mate assigned to the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Born in Levittown, Pa., the 28-year-old Sailor is a 2004 graduate of Pennsbury High School in Levittown, and joined the Navy, October 2004. e 2013 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Navy photo by MC1 Shannon D. BarnwellFrom left, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Electricians Mate 1st Class James Gagnon, Machinists Mate 1st Class Joseph Stockton and SUBLANT Force Master Chief Wes Koshoffer. Gee See Sailors, Page 3 For U.S. and allies, DOD ocial tells Congress March 6By Amaani Lyle American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Departments nuclear deterrent is the ultimate protection for the United States while also assuring distant allies of their security against regional aggression, a senior Pentagon official told Congress March 6. Elaine Bunn, deputy assis tant secretary of defense for nuclear and missile defense policy told the Senate Armed Services Committees strategic forces subcommittee that while Defense Department modernization goals largely have not changed since 2010, some adjustments are on the horizon. One such change, she reported, involves the new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty force structure. The administration is con sidering how to reduce nondeployed strategic delivery vehi cles to comply with the limits of the new START treaty by February 2018, she said, and we will make a final force struc ture decision and inform Congress prior to the start of fiscal year 2015. Bunn expressed concern about Russian activity that appears to be inconsistent with the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. Weve raised the issue with Russia, she told the senators. They provided an answer that was not satisfactory to us, and we told them that the issue is not closed. With regard to recent ethical issues involving Air Force and Navy nuclear personnel, Bunn noted that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has created both internal and external special review panels. Those reviews are not about assigning blame, Nuclear deterrence ultimate protectionSee Nuclear, Page 10 Bunn Navy photos by EM1 Mark TreenSt. Marys Middle School students use a Heads Up Display and Xbox controller to steer machinery inside the main bay of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 6. More photos on Page 5. St. Marys Middle Schoolers tour NSBBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsSt. Marys Elementary School students had a tour of science and technology March 7 on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. ey got hands-on experiences at Explosive Ordnance Disposal Facility, using the latest tech to operate bomb disposal robots. At the Indoor Simulation Marksmanship Trainer in Trident Training Facility, they used the latest infrared-based equipment. at was the intent, according to Ashley Hensley, their science teacher. is is a eld trip that gets them to see real world science, she said. at was certainly the eect. While showing them the equipment he uses, EOD1 Matthew Demmer said, Its nice to see them interested in technology and that they get to apply what they learn in school.Students enjoy learning experienceRobots, like this one for handling a simulated bomb, help keep Sailors a safe distance away. They are also a lot of fun.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BAY, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Sub CSS Hunley topic at MOAAFred Tetor will be the guest speaker at the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers As sociation of American dinner-meeting begin ing at 5:30 p.m. with social hour, March 18 at Osprey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. Tetor works for the Warren Lasch Conserva tion Center in North Charleston, N.C. where the Confederate submarine Hunley is being restored. Dinner is $20 per person and payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. To RSVP contact Maj. Jack Briggs, USAF (Ret.), at (912) 674-8821 or jbriggs@tds.net by March 11.Tetor guest at Sub League lunchFred Tetor, a Warren Lasch Conservation Center volunteer with the Hunley Project, will be guest speaker at the March 19 meeting of the e Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Submarine League. e meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Goat Locker on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e normal business meeting will be short and precede Tetors presentation. Attendance conrmation is needed for lunch. Conrm by phone at (912) 882-8838 or by e-mail at mkevan@tds.net. If you prefer, bring your own lunch brown bag style. Drinks will be available. A ve dollar donation for the Friends of the Hunley is requested.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy. mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aar on.run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a festival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military helicopter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical performances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Battle of Midway dinner June 7 e Navy League of Mayports 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program, starts at 5 p.m., Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort, St. Augustine. e invited speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway have been invited. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65, civilians and retirees, $65. Tickets are mandatory. Seating is reserved. Sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 246-9982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 794-7814 or anuday00@ aol.com.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 5734719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook.Student scholarshipsIn 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or e-mail scholars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League College tuition funding available By Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public Affairs e Center for Personal and Professional Development is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education March 3. Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program director, said the expenditure rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use historical burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After furloughs and a government shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, director of CPPD Support Site Sauey Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spending. He said FY-14 TA execution is currently trailing FY-13s execution rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things inuenced our being below the TA budget right now. Our execution rate dropped in October with the government shutdown and thats carried through the year, he said. e usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal budget. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased signicantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benets reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to continue to pursue their education and submit their TA requests. We work hard to allocate every TA dol lar available to give Sailors the most opportunities to use their TA funding allotment for each scal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benets so far this scal year and emphasized that a Sailors command is an important part of TA authorizations because theyre the rst step in the process after a Sailor submits a request. Its each commands responsibility to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are comfortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and process each Sailors TA request promptly, he said. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mission might not permit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding ocers decision, DAntonio said. He also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approver prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruction. Often when we review a TA request, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA prerequisites such as a current education counseling by a Navy College Oce or Virtual Education Center counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on le, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constant ly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to sub mit their TA request, he said. In fact, a TA application can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. DAntonio also stressed that Sailors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educational goals. e VOLED team is here to help, bottom line, he said. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. Center for PPD

PAGE 3

From Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Voter Assistance Programe Federal Voting Assistance Program is scheduled to conduct a congressionally mandated Voting Assistance Ocer training workshop for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay VAOs. e workshop is 9 to 11 a.m., Tuesday March 25 at the Trident Training Facility Room 1100A. is workshop is oriented toward VAOs and persons who provide voting assistance at Kings Bay, tenant commands and aoat units. Although primarily for VAOs, workshop is open to any interested persons. e workshop provides timely information about the absentee registration and voting process for Uniformed Service members and their families, plus resources critical to preparing VAOs to eectively perform their duties in assisting Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act citizens. Both Congress and the Department of Defense Inspector General have emphasized the importance of all VAOs receiving comprehensive training regarding how to perform their duties. Attendance at an FVAP Workshop is the best way for VAOs to learn this information. e workshop will provide critical information, resources and tools for the successful performance of VAO duties and ultimately the success of the voter in participating in our electoral process.Kings Bay Voter Assistance Ocers meet March 25 at Trident TrainingOcer First Class James R. Gagnon, a submarine-qualied and nuclear-trained electricians mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Montpelier (SSN 765), home ported in Norfolk, Va. e East Brunswick, N.J. native graduated from East Brunswick High School in 2001, and joined the Navy in February 2002. As the Senior Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year, Gagnon and Stockton will represent SUBLANT in the Atlantic Fleet Sailor of the Year competition conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. e eet competition will be held later in March with other Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet Sea Sailor of the Year winner from that competition will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet Shore Sailor of the Year winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations competition in Washington, D.C. e 2013 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Gregory A. Heruth, and the 2013 SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Jimmy L. Gee. When nominated, Heruth was a submarine-qualied machinists mate who was assigned to the Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Blue), homeported in Kings Bay. Since his nomination, Heruth transferred to the Center for Security Force Learning Site, Yokosuka, Japan, and was unable to attend the ceremony. Born in Virginia Beach, Va., the 25-year-old Heruth is a 2006 graduate of West Springeld High School in Springeld, Va., and joined the Navy in July 2007. He was also the Commander, Submarine Group Ten Junior Sea Sailor of the Year, headquartered in Kings Bay. Gee is a submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the TRIDENT Ret Facility in Kings Bay. A native of Oklahoma City, he is a graduate of Davis High School in Davis, Okla., and joined the Navy in January 2007. Force Master Chief Wesley Koshoer, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, said he was impressed with this special group of enlisted submariners. Anyone who has concerns about the current generation and their ability to serve in the military or guide us in the future, needs to spend some time around our Sailors, Koshoer said. I am honored to serve alongside them and inspired by their incredible performance. ese Sailors are superstars at their commands who continually strive to improve themselves and everyone around them. eir impact goes beyond the Navy ... they contribute in their communities. To say I am proud is an understatement.ey motivate me. I sleep well at night knowing that they are on watch. e other candidates for Senior Sea Sailor of the year were Petty Ocer First Class Avery Farrish, a submarine-qualied electricians mate assigned to the Ohioclass guided-missile submarine USS Florida (SSGN 728) (Gold), homeported in Kings Bay, and Petty Ocer First Class Michael Nickel, a submarine-qualied machinists mate from the Virginia-class attack submarine USS California (SSN 781), home ported in Groton, Conn. Petty Ocer First Class Ryan Hamilton, a submarinequalied re control technician assigned to the Navy Submarine Torpedo Facility, Yorktown, Va., and Petty First Class Anthony Madrid, a surface warfare and expeditionary warfare-qualied interior communications electrician assigned to the Regional Support Group in Groton, Conn., were the other nalists for Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. e other candidates for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year were Petty Ocer Second Class Kyle Liggett, a submarine-qualied sonar technician (submarines) currently assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), home ported in Groton, Conn., and Petty Ocer Second Class Jared Fouke, a submarine-qualied machinists mate from the Pre-Commissioning Unit John Warner, a Virginia-class attack submarine being built in Newport News, Va. Finalists for Junior Shore Sailor of the Year were Petty Ocer Second Class Scott Burgess, a submarine-qualied logistics technician assigned to the headquarters sta at Commander, Submarine Group Two in Groton, Conn., and Petty Ocer Second Class Amber Miller, an information dominance warfare-qualied information systems technician assigned to the sta of Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic in Norfolk, Va. duce manning gaps at sea and improve the sea-toshore ow of personnel. e Navy has also requested $38.4 billion for ship, aircraft, weapons and other procurement for programs including Littoral Combat Ship, P-8A Poseidon aircraft, Virginia class submarines and the Mk-48 heavy weight torpedo. Research and development priorities include the Ohio-class replacement submarine, next generation jammer and Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike, as well as developing electromagnetic spectrum and cyber capabilities. e Navy FY15 budget is a $15 billion decrease from the level forecast in last years budget submission and is a $38 billion reduction over the Future Year Defense Plan from the FY14 Presidential Budget. Were condent this budget makes the right choices where needed, Lescher said. SailorsFrom Page1BudgetFrom Page 1 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Jamie Ware and Joaquin Newbold are ready for the parade. Mardi Gras Photos by EM1 Mark Treen By Laura Jefferson Special to The PeriscopeIn celebration of Fat Tuesday, or Mardi Gras, the Child Development and Youth Centers came together to provide a festival for their students. On Tuesday, March 4, sta, students and parents braved the frigid wind and overcast skies to aunt their purple, green and gold colors. Child and Youth Program Director Candice Dugan said the parade gave teachers the opportunity for their students to work together in celebration. Teamwork was evident as children proudly walked side-byside with their classmates as they waved their Mardi Gras crafts. e children had a great time, said Sharon Grant, Youth Center director. ey enjoyed making oats, masks and throwing beads to family and friends. ough a humble beginning, Dugan said she hopes the Mardi Gras Festival will be an annual event that will grow with parent involvement, base participation, music and bigger oats. First parade a beginning Kings Bay Youth CentersAnthony Wagner enjoys any occasion to toot his own horn. This was one of those times! Tammy Moore parades with Joshua Sander, left, and her grand daughter, Anaysiah Seymour. Demetrius Johnson sports beads. Preschoolers enjoyed dressing up as royalty. Jathan Simmons and Bradley Parrado take part. A students hand-made mask. Teacher Kadee Brodie wore a mask.

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 In Big Blue, the primary EOD response truck, EODC Kyle Chander shows St. Marys Middle School students the remote display and controls for a large bomb disposal robot. The student in the display just realized a 200-pound robot is headed at him. The students eventually tried splitting the roles. One uses the Heads Up Display, and one controls the robot. EOD1 Matthew Demmer showed examples of dangerous explosives the EOD teams deals with. Jeff Unger and his classmates also got a chance to shoot modified training firearms in the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer at Trident Training Facility. Students and staff at the Bancroft Memorial before their tour with MA1 Hunter McKay, MASNs Alisa Andrews and Gabriel Contreras. EODCS Jeremy Baker explains the use of robots to investigate and disarm harmful explosives. Danielle DeHarne controls a robot. The class got a chance to see how technol ogy can help people and be fun. EODCS Jeremy Baker helps Andrew Wall put on a bomb suit. Students visit Kings Bay Photos by EM1 Mark Treen

PAGE 6

6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By PO2 Walter ShinnFrom Coast Guard Compasse origin of Womens History Month as a national celebration began nearly 120 years before the rst Hispanic-American woman served in the Coast Guard and its predecessor services. Maria Mestre de los Dolores Andreu assumed the watch as the lighthouse keeper at the St. Augustine Lighthouse after her husband, Juan, passed away in 1859. With a yearly salary of $400 she not only became the rst Hispanic-American woman to serve in the Coast Guard but also to command a federal shore installation. Lighthouse keepers helped ensure a looming light on the horizon would be seen by sailors making them aware of a port or hazard to navigation. Lighthouse along shorelines emitted light to mariners warning them of a potential hazard or port while navigating a relentless and sometimes unforgiving sea in the 19th century was vital lifeline in maintaining safety at sea. Lighthouses were not new in 1859 although the service was then called the Lighthouse Service. e history of the lighthouses began nearly 450 years ago when Don Pedro Menendez claimed Florida as part of Spain in 1565. Over time many lighthouses were built along the east coast of Florida. ey were initially built for lookout stations and warning signal alerting mariners a sandy shoal was nearby. e lighthouses gradually transformed into beacons specically for marine trafc. A keepers responsibility was a dicult job as many of the lighthouses were in isolated locations. Because of the difculty of the job, keepers of lighthouses held the highest respect with their local community and government. e best keepers are found to be old sailors, who are accustomed to watch at night, who are more likely to turn out in a driving snow storm and nd their way to the light-house to trim their lamps, said Isaiah William Penn Lewis, engineer to the U.S. Light-house Survey. Because in such weather they know by experience the value of a light, while on similar occasions the landsman keeper would be apt to consider such weather as the best excuse for remaining snug in bed. e responsibilities of a lighthouse keeper were so signicant in the early 19th century only the president of the United States could appoint and dismiss keepers. Keepers were commonly men; however, they often took the initiative to hire an assistant. It wasnt unusual for keepers to have other jobs enabling them to make more money while leaving some responsibilities of lighthouse keeping to their wife or children. Andreu received her experience as a result from assisting her husband who was the rst Hispanic American to serve in the Coast Guard and its predecessor services. She took over in 1859 as keeper of the lighthouse and likely knew of the dicult tasks she was now responsible for after years of learning from her husband. e responsibilities and duties for a lighthouse keeper were not for the lighthearted. Supplies for maintenance of the light were sent by the government regularly, but food wasnt. is required the keepers to not only maintain the light but also to grow their own food and hunt. While keepers had to maintain their own sustainable food supply they also had to ensure the light was continuously lit the throughout night. Additionally, children who lived on the property needed to be educated. is all took place on an 18-mile long island which wasnt easily accessible at the time. Not only did lighthouse keepers have to take care of their families but also for mariners in distress. e eort to reach out to mariners in need of help became rooted into the services daily responsibilities. Civility should be enjoined as a duty to strangers wishing to examine the Lights, and, in case of shipwrecks near, every practical eort required to be made to render reasonable and ecient relief, and all due vigilance exercised to detect and expose every breech of the revenue laws in his neighborhood, said Secretary of the Treasury Levi Woodbury in 1835. Rendering relief to those in need became second nature to keepers of lighthouses standing the watch continuously. Andreu stood the watch as keeper of the St. Augustine Lighthouse for three years. In 1862, the Civil War started and the light was extinguished fearing it would aid the Union Navy. e light was dimmed and Andreu moved away from the lighthouse but remained in the region. Maria Andreus leadership and perseverance as keeper of the lighthouse inspired generations of women to shine as female employees within federal service through her beacon of light, said retired Lt. Cmdr. Marilyn Dykman, the rst Hispanic American woman to pilot a Coast Guard aircraft. Andreu opened the doors for women in the Coast Guard like myself and will carry over throughout many generations to come. Maria Andreu set the pace for not just for women serving in the Coast Guard but also for Hispanics. Today, Hispanic-Americans make up approximately 11 percent of the total service. Women in the Coast Guard continue honoring the service just as Andreu did 130 years ago. e legacy of Andreus courage continues into future generations of women serving in the Coast Guard just as it has over the previous 220 years. From Chief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens History Month during March. Currently more than 59,000 active duty women and more than 9,000 Reserve women serve in the Navy. Making up 18 percent of the Total Force, women make numerous contributions to our Navys mission and readiness. Additionally, more than 54,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civilians. Women leading in the Navy Total Force include: 32 active and Reserve ag ocers, 69 Senior Executive Service members, 48 command master chiefs, and three command senior chiefs. In 1908, Congress established the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps. e rst 20 Navy nurses were women, who became known as the Sa cred Twenty. As one of the Sacred Twenty, Lenah S. Higbee was one of the rst women to serve formally as a member of the Navy. In 1909, Higbee was promoted to Chief Nurse at Norfolk Naval Hospital, and in 1911 she became the Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps, serving throughout the duration of World War I. e Navy recognized Higbees distinguished service as Superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps, awarding her the Navy Cross for service in the line of her profession and unusual and conspicuous devotion to duty. In 1944, the Navy commemorated Higbees naval service, naming a ship in her honor. USS Higbee (DD 806) was the rst combatant ship to be named after a woman. e Navys rst enlisted women, more commonly known as yeomen or yeomanettes, provided clerical support during World War I. Capt. Joy Bright Hancock initially enlisted as a yeoman, serving until the end of World War I, by which time she had risen to the rank of chief petty ocer. In 1942, during World War II, she was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service program. Hancock rose to the rank of captain and led the WAVES through the 1940s and 1950s, facilitating the addition of women as a permanent part of the Navy. Master Chief Yeoman Anna Der-Vartanian entered the Navy through the WAVES. She was not only the rst woman to hold the rank of master chief in the Navy, but also across all armed services. Reecting on her service, Der-Vartanian noted that most of the personnel she led treated her with respect and professionalism. e few exceptions where her authority was challenged, she maintained her professionalism with the saying, Fall in and pipe down! Upon her retirement after 21 years of naval ser-Navy celebrates Womens History MonthNaval History and Heritage CommandThe first 20 Navy Nurses at the Naval Hospital, Washington, D.C., in October 1908. Lenah Higbee is in the front row at right. Naval History and Heritage CommandMarine Capt. Vernice Armour earned her wings in 2001 and was the first female African American combat pilot in the military in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Hancock Higbee Der-VartanianIskra Female roles in Corps continue to expandBy Carolyn LeeMarine Corps Base HawaiiFrom the very rst woman Marine to her modernday sisters, each has contributed to the Marine Corps readiness to be rst to ght. It is said that on the night of Oct. 12, 1942, when Gen. omas Holcomb, 17th commandant of the Marine Corps, announced a decision to allow women into the Corps during a farewell party at the Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., the portrait of Brig. Gen. Archibald Henderson, fth commandant of the Corps, crashed from the wall onto the buet. Despite the late generals apparent protest and opposition from other Marines at the time, the Corps ocially opened to women Feb. 13, 1943. e Corps recruited its earliest female members in response to wartime needs to deploy men overseas from their clerical positions at military headquarters and oces. Be a Marine ... free a Marine to ght, trumpeted posters during World War II, a recruiting strategy that echoed the Corps rst campaign for women, launched in the summer of 1918 when the Corps faced ever-mounting demands to dispatch more Marines to the front lines in France during World War I. Opha Mae Johnson, who had been working as a civilian employee at the Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C., became the rst woman Marine on Aug. 13, 1918, the rst day of sign-ups for women. From among thousands of applicants, the Corps searched for exceptional clerical and oce skills, out-Photo courtesy of St. Augustine Historical SocietyThe first St. Augustine Lighthouse was built in 1700 and aided mariners for 162 years. Maria Mestre de los Dolores Andreu assumed the watch there in 1859 to become the first Hispanic-American woman to serve in the Coast Guard and to command a federal shore installation. Coast Guard woman on station in 1859See Navy, Page 7 See Marines, Page 7

PAGE 7

Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tyler MainPfc. Christina Fuentes Montenegro prepares to hike to her platoons defensive position during patrol week of Infantry Training Battalion near Camp Geiger, N.C. Fuentes Montenegro is one of the first three females to ever graduate from Infantry Training Battalion. vice, Der-Vartanian continued serving her country by joining the Central Intelligence Agency. Darlene Iskra was one of the rst female line ofcers to graduate from the Naval School of Diving and Salvage in Washington, D.C. Looking back, Iskra said, Dive school was the most physically challenging thing I had ever done to that point in my life. Had it not been for the support of my fellow classmates, especially my roommate and diving partner [present day] Rear Adm. Martha Herb, I would have probably quit. As a lieutenant commander, Darlene Iskra became the rst Navy woman to command a ship when she assumed command of USS Opportune (ARS 41) in 1990. Iskra took her ship, a Bolster-class rescue and salvage ship, to patrol the Suez Canal during Operation Desert Storm, ensuring the canal remained clear for commerce. Reecting upon her time as the rst female commanding ocer of a naval ship, she now understands that being a trailblazer means opening new ground for others to follow and that sometimes there are hazards along the way. Iskra retired in 2000 as a commander, with 21 years of service. Most recently, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was nominated for appointment to the rank of admiral and assignment as vice chief of naval operations. She made history as the Navys rst female four-star admiral, and rst African-American and rst woman to serve as the vice chief. e character, courage, and commitment shown by Higbee, Hancock, Der-Vartanian, Iskra, and Howard paved the way for women serving in the contemporary Navy. Today, women in the Navy, both ocer and enlisted, hold leadership positions aboard warships, of carrier air wings and squadrons, recruiting districts, training stations, and shipyards. As we continue to progress forward, previously closed billets will open to women and the Navy will continue to witness women making history and new rsts. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the National Womens History Month theme, Celebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment, through programs, exhibits, publications, and participation in military and community events. standing character and a neat appearance. e few and the proud, to allude to the Marines current marketing slogan, numbered just 305 women, who were enrolled as reserve Marines. Something kept sticking in my throat all the time as newly minted Pvt. Martha L. Wilchinski was being sworn in, she wrote in a letter to her boyfriend, who was ghting in France. I dont know whether it was my heart or my liver. I had to swallow it several times before I could say, I do. I cant sign myself as aectionately as I used to, Bill, she said in closing. You understand, Im a sol dier now and you wouldnt want me doing anything that wasnt in the (Marine Corps) Manual. Yours till the cows come home. Dicult situations sometimes arose in interactions with male Marines. e other day the lieutenant and I were waiting to go down in the elevator, Wilchinski said in another letter to Bill. Now heres the question. If I am a lady and hes a gentleman, I go in rst. If hes an ocer and Im a corporal, he goes in rst. It all depends on how you look at it. I didnt know how hed take it, so I thought Id wait and see what hed do ... en he stepped forward and I stepped back. en he stepped back and I stepped forward. en we both stepped back. I was getting pretty dizzy by that time. I guess he was too. en we both squeezed in at the same time. I guess thats what they mean by military tactics. Johnson, Americas rst woman Marine, served as a clerk in the Quartermaster Generals Oce, rising to sergeant in three months by the time the war ended Nov. 11, 1918. She and the other women reserve Marines were ordered to inactive status. ey got the same benets as male veterans of the war, including a $60 bonus upon discharge and the right to a military burial in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. In the decades since Johnson became the rst woman Marine, the Corps has opened up more and more jobs to females. Once limited to clerical work, women can now serve in the Corps as air crew and in armory, artillery and infantry. Last year, then-Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced that women in the military would no longer be banned from roles in direct ground combat. All branches are evaluating performance standards and developing plans to carry out this decision. I fundamentally believe that our military is more eective when success is based solely on ability, qualications and on performance, Panetta said. Not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. But everyone is entitled to a chance. By committing ourselves to that principle, we are renewing our commitment to American values our service members ght and die to defend.Marines From Page 6NavyFrom Page 6 By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on its goal of providing access to Navy training anytime, anyplace, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Program Oce announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct Internet access to Navy e-Learning content. Most Navy Learners were previously accessing NeL through Navy Knowledge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. at was a multistep process that is now signicantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, without going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of https://www.aas. prod.nel.training.navy.mil will take you directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management system after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search engine and that gets you strictly learning-related returns, streamlining nding the course you are looking for. Although direct access to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer browser. Many of our courses take advantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning expe rience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compat ibility with these courses, NeL provides conguration guides for many of the latest versions of IE. NeL also provides a plug-in analyzer to help custom ers conrm they are able to access and run the multimedia content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, cus tomers may simply click on the Browser Congu -Training goes on Internet See e-Learn, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014

PAGE 9

Id like to be The Thing, because I love saying, Its clobberin time! To me that trumps This is a job for Superman! or Avengers, Assemble! But more than any super hero, I wanted to be Perry Great Ceasars Ghost White or J.J. Jameson. How great would it be to be the publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper back in the day. You know why super heros worked at newspapers? Because before CNN, the Internet and Twitter, its where you found out what was happening.Which super hero would you like to be?ETSN Soren Jessen USS Alabama Gold Dwight, Ill. Martian Manhunter. Hes smart and his ability to shape shift and go through things like a ghost is amusing. ET2 Robert Daugherty Naval Submarine Support Center Bowling Green, Ky. The Flash. It would be like, Honey, bring in the laundry and swoosh Done. Paula Stoner Retired Navy Merrick, N.Y. Ive been Super Woman my whole life. MA1 Dante Johnson NSB Kings Bay Cleveland The Incredible Hulk, because hes big and hes strong. Pfc. Roger Santiago Security Force Battalion Stroudsburg, Pa. The Flash, because hes so fast. He can travel the world in like 2 seconds. MASA Rioval Rodriguez Security Force Battalion Nixon, Texas Captain America. Hes in the military and does a lot for all the citizens of the world. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Fashionable footwearSailors from the USS Georgia (SSBN 729) (Blue) put their best foot forward Saturday morning during the St. Marys Mardi Gras Parade to march against domestic violence. All of the proceeds from Real Men Wear Heels participants supports Domestic Violence Awareness in Camden County and the violence shelter Camden House. Also wearing red womens shoes for the cause were members of the Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team, the USS West Virginia (SSBN 736), USS Alaska (SSBN 732), NSB Kings Bay Security, Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic and the Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic. Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Trees picked for ship repairsBy Bill CouchNaval Facilities Engineering Command Midwest Public AffairsNavy foresters and contractors from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Midwests Public Works Department Crane began harvesting specially designated trees at Naval Support Activity Crane Feb. 20 and 21 in preparation for the next planned dry-docking repair of USS Constitution, the worlds oldest commissioned warship aoat. PWD Crane forestry program manager Trent Osmon oversaw the cutting down of 35 of the nearly 150 GPS-located mature white oaks set aside for future use by Constitution. Everything went smoothly, said Osmon, who manages the bases 53,000 acres of forest. We have a limited window each year to harvest timber here because of weather conditions and also because Cranes forest is a home for the endangered Indiana Bat. e trees will be moved to a covered storage area on base, where they will remain until needed. e dry-docking and repair is planned for 2014 through 2018, and now was the time to begin the process of harvesting, milling and shaping the special wood to match Old Ironsides original white oak. Navy photo by Bill CouchWorkmen and Cmdr. James Stewart, commanding officer of Naval Support Activity Crane, assess a white oak tree set aside for future use in repairing USS Constitution. Pay to increase for ship service By Chief of Naval Personnel, Public AffairsSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced March 4 an increase in Career Sea Pay and Career Sea Pay Premium for eligible Sailors and Marines serving aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. ose Sailors and Marines on sea duty, deployed away from home around the world, are the backbone of the Navy and Marine Corps, and enable us to provide and maintain our global presence, said Mabus. is change to Career Sea Pay will both improve critical sea-duty manning and reward those who take these challenging sea-going assignments. is increase is long overdue and is meant to reward our Sailors and Marines for their continued sacrices as part of Americas Away Team. CSP and CSP-P are funds earned by Sailors and Marines on top of their base pay, to compensate them for time at sea. CSP rates are based upon a members pay grade and cumulative years of sea duty. CSP-P is an additional incentive for members who exceed 36 consecutive months at sea. By law, CSP and CSP-P may not exceed $750 and $350 respectively. Mabus Navy aides searchBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe United States continues to assist the Malaysian government in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared the night of March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing. The USS Pinckney and USS Kidd, both Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, are on station in the Gulf See Pay, Page 10 See Tree, Page 10 See Search, Page 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

PAGE 10

10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Repairs will be done at Naval History and Heritage Commands Boston Detachment, known as the Charlestown Navy Yard, a 213-year old former Navy shipyard, now part of Boston National Historical Park, which maintains Constitution. Cranes white oak trees will be used to replace deteriorated hull planking and supporting structures called knees on Old Ironsides, which was built in 1797 and was previously brought into dry dock for major repairs in 1991. Constitution earned the nickname Old Ironsides while engaging British ships during the War of 1812. British sailors observed cannon balls bouncing o Constitutions hull and exclaimed her sides must have been made of iron. Even after more than 200 years, around 12 percent of Constitutions wood is original. According to the ships caretakers in Boston, the keel, the bottom frames, and the bottom 13 planks of the hull have never had to be replaced. According to Osmons research, white oak trees at Crane were rst approved to be set aside in November 1973, following work on Constitution with lumber purchased from the private sector, which proved to be very expensive, as white oak of that size is very valuable. White oak is one of the more sought-after timber species for its attractive grain and color, and is mainly used nowadays for veneers, said PWD Crane forester Rhett Steele. A grove of trees at Crane was ocially named Constitution Grove May 8, 1976, during the United States bicentennial. is small ceremonial area of trees includes a few white oaks and provides visitors a representation of the bases widely dispersed inventory of the species. Osmon said that Crane and NAVFAC have continued to support the ship over the years, including for its bicentennial. In preparation for the ships 200th birthday in 1997, the ship was brought into dry dock for repairs in 1991, said Osmon. When they brought her up, she was in need of more work than originally thought, so Crane was contacted to see if any timber could be provided. en-forester Terry Hobson located all the suitable white oak trees scattered throughout the base and chose the very best to send. Were very proud to be part of this, said Cmdr. James Stewart, commanding ocer of NSA Crane. e ship is such a big deal, such an important part of the Navys heritage, and Crane is very proud to have this tie to Constitution. All pay grades with at least three years of cumulative sea duty will receive a 25 per cent increase in regular CSP, while service members who exceed 36 months of con secutive sea duty will receive an increase in CSP-P from $100 to $200 per month. Consistent with current policy, in lieu of receiving CSP-P, Sailors and Marines in grades E5-E9 with eight years of cumulative sea duty receive a higher CSP rate, equivalent to receiving CSP-P whenever assigned to a ship regardless of consecutive sea time. is is the rst increase of CSP and CSP-P since 2001. Approximately 100,000 Sailors receive CSP and approximately 13,000 receive CSP-P; this special pay increase is expected to cost $66 million per year. It is expected that the new CSP and CSP-P rates will take eect early this summer. An announcement on the exact date is forthcoming.PayFrom Page 9 she said. Theyre about identify ing, assessing, and correcting any systemic deficiencies that we may uncover and in applying the best practices for carrying out our nuclear mission across the nuclear force. Bunn also said the recently released 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review makes clear the key role of nuclear forces in the DOD strategy. It supports our ability to project power by communicating to potential nuclear-armed adversar ies that they cannot escalate their way out of failed conventional aggression, Bunn said. The departments budget request for fiscal year 2015 supports DODs nuclear policy goals as laid out in the 2010 nuclear posture review, in the presidents June 2013 nuclear employment strategy, and in the 2014 QDR. Pentagon officials will continue to ensure that administra tions have suitable options for deter ring, responding to and managing a diverse range of situations, including regional deterrence challenges. We continue to work closely with our allies, some of whom live in very dangerous neighborhoods, to ensure continuing confidence in our shared national security goals, including assurance of our extended nuclear deterrence commitments, she told the Senate panel. Critical to maintaining a safe, secure and effective force is the pres ervation of the nuclear triad: strate gic bombers, intercontinental ballis tic missiles and submarine-launched ballistic missiles, Bunn said. TreeFrom Page 9 NuclearFrom Page 1 By Lance Cpl. Sarah A. LunaMarine Corps Base Quanticoe unfailing contributions of those enslaved in the United States more than 154 years ago were commemorated at Mount Vernon during the month of February to honor of black history month. e Mount Vernon Ladies Association of the Union was founded in 1853 by Ann Pamela Cunningham, she gathered 11 other women and they took over George Washingtons mansion in 1860 which later became known as George Washingtons Mount Vernon, home of the rst president of the United States just 25 miles from Marine Corps Base Quantico. George Washington was born into a slaveholding society. Although his thoughts about slavery changed as he grew older, his Mount Vernon consisted of 318 enslaved people at the time of his death in 1799. For the most part, Mount Vernon was run by the slave community, said Maria Morgan, history interpreter for GWMV. Slaves had jobs from cooking, blacksmithing, making hats, overseeing and more. eir work days were from sun up to sun down. In the summer, work days could last up to 14 hours. Beth Hosier, a history interpreter for GWMV, said that Washington was up before the sun rose and felt, that if he was up, there was no reason his workers shouldnt be. Washingtons home was known for the great hospitality guests would receive. In Virginia, it was a known custom to accept all guests without asking questions. It was even inappropriate to ask how long a guest would be staying. e longest a guest is known to have stayed at the Washingtons mansion is 11 months. eyre taking care of the guests in the house, said Morgan. Twelve household slaves were used to keep that place in running order and make that hospitality for which they were so famous, possible. Despite the hard work that slaves devoted to the Washington mansion, their living conditions werent ideal. Up to 90 people, including children, occupied the slave quarters. e quarters were no bigger than half of a basketball gym. Morgan said there was a point when Washington had to raise the amount of food he would give to his slaves due to them nishing their weekly portions by Wednesday and complaining that it wasnt enough. ey were given ve sh and a peck of cornmeal each week before he raised their portions. Some of the innovations that Washington introduced were ideas that came from the actions or ideas of his slaves; such as, Washingtons 16-sided barn. ese human beings contributed so heavily, not only the success of Mount Vernon, but this country, said Jonathan Wood, an actor who plays the role of Washingtons personal servant at GWMV. Visit George Washingtons Mount Vernon any day of the week from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. e closing time will change to 5 p.m. in March. e active duty admissions fee is $14 with military identication.Mount Vernon slave quarters reconstructedMarine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Sarah Luna A reconstruction of womans slave quarters at George Washingtons Mount Vernon. Women raised their children in these quarters.

PAGE 11

Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 5739492. 24th Annual Southeast Military Travel Fair and Expo Its coming 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, March 14 inside Bldg. 1039. Complimentary food samples by US Foods, more than 70 displays and vendors, give-a-ways and lots of door prizes including a Kindle Fire HDX 8.9-inch, iPad Mini and grand prize of a PS4. You need not be present to win. MWR employees and their family members are not eligible to enter drawings. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being ac cepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is lim ited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at reg istration. Bring your lunch, tow el, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun, including orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex, cost is $15 for each team of two, which includes t-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together. All bike types are welcome. e event is limited to 15 teams per wave. After, join in the fun at Lake D with the festival in full swing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with lots of fun things to do, including a zipline, halo jumper, rock wall, obstacle inatable, kids shing, geocaching and more. Food will be available for purchase. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Fitness Attire To provide an atmosphere that is healthy, clean and family friendly, NSB Kings Bay has elected to adopt a dress code for patrons using the Fitness Center. is dress code has been approved and is supported by the NSB Kings Bay Command. It is the same dress code being used at some of the other bases across the Navy and at CNIC. We would ask that all patrons abide by the new regulations beginning March 10. Triplex is coming The rebranding of Building 1039 is almost complete and could be up and running as early as May 1. MWR is looking forward to this exciting new venture and is cer tain that you, the patron, will en joy the easy accessible and userfriendly areas. MWR appreciates your patience and understanding during this process. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Over the Hedge shown Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photoMorale, Welfare and Recreations Shamrock The House will be celebrated March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend movies for March are Over the Hedge March 15 and 16, Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters March 22 and 23, Es cape from Planet Earth March 29 and 30 and The Smurfs 2 Monday, March 31. Mov ies are at 1 p.m., every Satur day and Sunday and during school breaks or holidays. Movie schedule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years oldmust be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one else comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call 912-573-4548. Just for kids Winter Basketball1, West Virginia (Champion) 2, Gunz Blazin (Runner-Up) 3, USS Alaska7x7 Soccer LeagueTeam W L T1, MFPUGC 4 0 0 2t, Kings Bay United 2 1 0 2t, USS Florida Gold 2 1 0 2t, Turf Toe 2 0 0 5t, Danger Zone 1 1 0 5t, Trident Training 1 1 1 7t, Black Sails 1 2 0 7t, The Agency 1 2 0 9t, TRF FC 1 3 0 9t, Ballbusters 1 3 0 11, Slow Attack 0 1 1 10t, Coast Guard 0 2 0Upcoming Spring Softball registration is open. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m., in the Fitness Center classroom. Pick up roster sheets now at the Intramural Sports office. Intramural Sports Photo courtesy of MWR Intramural SportsThe USS West Virginia won the championship of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 2014 Winter Basketball League. Gunz Blazin was runnerup. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

PAGE 12

12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. of Thailand conduct ing search-and-rescue operations, Army Col. Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters March 10. The ships are using a creeping-line search method, Warren said. The Pinckney investigated a possible debris field yes terday, he added, but it was not the missing aircraft. Two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters are flying off the ships to aid the search, using forward-looking infrared pods to search at night. A P-3 Orion from Kadena Air Base, Japan, also is being employed in the search, Warren said. The Orion, operating in the western search area, brings long-range search, radar and communica tions capabilities to the efforts. It can loiter about nine hours at a time. In addition, the USNS John Ericsson, a fleet replenishment oiler, is providing logistics sup port for the U.S. effort. American ships are work ing with ships from Malaysia, China and Singapore in the search effort. Air traffic controllers lost the signal about two hours after the Boeing 777-200 airliner took off with 239 people aboard. Earlier reports of an oil slick in the Gulf of Thailand proved to not be from the aircraft, Malaysian aviation offi cials in Kuala Lumpur told reporters. Flight MH370, a Boeing 777-200 aircraft, departed Kuala Lumpur at 12:41 a.m. Saturday local time and was scheduled to land at Beijing International Airport at 6:30am Beijing time. The flight has 227 passengers from 14 nations, mainly China, and 12 crewmembers. Three Americans report edly were also aboard. ration link, located in the NeL Help section, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. NeL is the worlds largest learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Training, including the newlyupdated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Challenge Course, Reeves said. Last year, the Cyber Awareness Challenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than 4 million completions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to oer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO. Although NKO was designed as a one-stopshop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense.SearchFrom Page 9 e-LearnFrom Page 7

PAGE 13

Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial communication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 13, 2014