The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00339


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From The Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Submarine LeagueFred Tetor, a Warren Lasch Conservation Center volunteer, will be guest speaker and share his ex periences with the Hunley Project at the March 19 meeting of the e Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Submarine League. e meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Goat Locker on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e normal business meeting will be short and precede Tetors presentation. Tetor has been conduct ing Hunley tours since they started in 2000. H. L. Hunley is the Confederate subma rine that was the worlds rst successful subma rine. It sank the Union sloopof-war, USS Housatonic, on the night of Feb. 17, 1864. Even though the Hunley was successful in completing its mission, it also subsequently sank nearby with the loss of all aboard. e laboratory where Tetor volunteers was named after Warren Lasch, the chairman of Friends of the Hunley. Lasch was charged with raising nearly $16 million it would take to recover Hunley from the bottom of the Atlantic. Additionally Lasch spearheaded not only the recovery of the Hunley, but also the establishment of the laboratory facility that houses the pioneer Civil War submarine. e innovative handcranked vessel was raised in 2000 and delivered to the Warren Lasch Con servation Center, where an international team of scientists are at work to conserve the submarine for future generations and piece together clues to solve the mystery of her disappearance. e Hunley Project is conducted through a part nership with the Clem Up Periscope Money, love or power ... what do you want? Page 9 Nimitz World War II leader remembered by Navy Page 12 NJROTC Camden County unit drills at Kings Bay Pages 4, 5 Chapel All Hands Call; speaker at luncheon; wife, MCPON visit By EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsAdm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations, and Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens will visit the Navy Region Southeast area for an All Hands Calls at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 18. Greenert will visit the Kings Bay Chapel to speak and to paticipate in re-enlistment and promotion ceremonies. He will then speak at a luncheon sponsored by e Camden Partnership, the Submarine League, the Navy League and other community organizations at Magnolias. e CNOs wife, Darleen Greenert, will be touring Kings Bay as well, seeing all the aspects of the base that impact a Sailors life, including base housing and the Branch Health Clinic. Greenert is a native of Butler, Pa. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1975 and complet ed studies in nuclear power for service as a submarine ocer. His career as a submariner in cludes assignments aboard USS Flying Fish (SSN 673), USS Tau tog (SSN 639), Submarine NR-1 and USS Michigan (SSBN 72) (Gold), culminating in command of USS Honolulu (SSN 718) from March 1991 to July 1993. Subsequent eet command assignments include Commander, Submarine Squadron 11; Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Marianas; Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet August 2004 to September 2006; and, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Septem ber 2007 to July 2009. Greenert has served in vari ous eet support and nancial management positions, includ-CNO Greenert coming to NSB Kings Bay Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Hunley, Page 6 A labor of loveMA1 Brian omas love of canines led to training service dogs for wounded warriorsBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsWhen an over-seas service member is wounded, they make a sacrice, whether physical or emotional or both. Sometimes, it can be a huge sacrice. What can anyone do to help that service member though? One Sailor knows. Master at Arms First Class Brian omas is investing 18 months to raise and train a dog that will be given to a wounded service member. Its a service dog that will accompany the warrior and help with their dayto-day needs. Hes raising Georgia, an 11-week-old Golden Retriever-Poodle mix. He found raising the service dog a nat ural t, much the same way he began his Navy career as a Military Working Dog handler. It found me, omas said. e 32-year-old from Louisville, Ky. has been around dogs since childhood. About raising them, he said, I was born with it in my blood. omas is the leading petty ocer at the kennel here on board Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay. His fondness for dogs helps explain some of his motivation for volunteering to raise Georgia. But its not all. omas has done ve tours in either Iraq or Afghanistan. He knows what its like being deployed and what challenges are faced. Hes seen a lot of his fellow ser vice members returning with physical injuries or with post-traumatic stress dis order. Overseas he always worried about how that person was going to cope back in the states. What help is oered? Listen to what returning Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jerey Calla han said about how his service dog helped Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas and Georgia, the dog he is training to become a service dog. GreenertNational ArchivesA painting of CSS Hunley on a pier in Charleston, S.C., harbor during the Civil War. Hunley expert speaker at Goat Locker March 19 Naval History and Heritage CommandThe Hunley was raised from Charleston Harbor in August, 2000. Tetor Stevens2009 CHINFO Award Winner See Dog, Page 6 See CNO, Page 6 Eyes shi focus to UkraineObama, Hagel phone Russian counterparts regarding invasionAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called their Russian counterparts March 1 to express their concerns over recent events in Ukraine, according to White House and Defense Department news releases issued today. Obama spoke for 90 minutes this afternoon with Russian President Vladimir Putin about the situation in Ukraine, accord ing to the White House release. Obama expressed his deep concern over Russias clear vio lation of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity, which is a breach of international law, including Russias obligations under the U.N. Charter, and of its 1997 military basing agree ment with Ukraine, and which is inconsistent with the 1994 Budapest Memorandum and Obama See Ukraine, Page 6

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsSailors working on completing a degree should ensure their school has the appropriate type of accredi tation or it could cost them money later, said Center for Personal and Professional Development educa tion professionals Feb. 24. Most students know the school they attend should have some sort of accreditation as a way of ensur ing the quality of their education, but they dont understand how im portant the type of accreditation is in their school selection, said Ernest DAntonio, director of Navy Voluntary Education at the Center for Personal and Professional De velopment. Ive seen way too many examples of service members using their tuition assistance or G.I. Bill education benets to earn a degree at a school whose credits arent transferrable to or recognized by other schools. And when a Sailors benet is spent, its spent. According to Raymond Sayre, di rector of the Navy College Oce in San Diego, there are three kinds of accreditation. One is regional, which is grant ed by an accrediting organization in one of six regions in the United States. Regional accrediting organizations review educational institutions as a whole, he said. Schools with regionally accredited programs focus on academic theory for a full range of degrees from accounting to zoology at all educational levels. National accreditation is another type. Sayre said nationally accredit ed institutions ll a dierent educa tional need than those with regional accreditation. e real dierence is that national accrediting bodies focus on operational/technical skills. ese accreditors tend to focus on a par ticular discipline such as business or technical skills, or distance learn ing, he said. e third kind is accreditation for specialized programs and sin gle-purpose organizations. A specialized accreditation is typically granted for a particular section or discipline within a regionally ac credited educational institution, such as for a schools law, medical or engineering program. Its confusing because its compli cated, according to DAntonio. e key for Sailors is to understand how accreditation directly relates to their educational goals, he said. is is part of why Navy College Program education professionals exist to help Sailors make the best choice for them. Sayre pointed out that one type of accreditation isnt necessarily better than the others; it is simply contin gent on the students objectives. It depends on what professional path Sailors are choosing, he said. If they want a hands-on career in the vocational or technical world such as auto repair, electronics, nu clear technician, etc., they may benet by choosing a school with na tional accreditation. If their choice is the academic world teacher, law, business or doctor, for example they ought to choose regional accreditation. Many nationally ac credited schools oer advanced vo cational or technical education and training programs that are excellent and meet the needs for which they were designed. A handful of schools have both regional and national accreditation, but Sayre said it isnt common. Gary Henwood, an educational services specialist at Navy College Oce Whidbey Island, Wash., said its important for Sailors to view tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Changes at Kings Bay Pet Clinice Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veteri nary Treatment Facility is under-going chang es, with a new computer system, which makes your pets records easily accessible to your new veterinarian when you move. But, your patience is asked for as sta works through the transition and the challenges of a new system. In addition, changes are being made to the prescription rell policy. Pet owners will now need to call to rell a medication, and it will take two business days to ll them. When you call, the following information is needed: last name, pets name and name of medication. ere we also will be changes to some prices. is is controlled at the Public Health Com mand level, and anticipated changes are not drastic, but be aware some things may require more or less than you are used to.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a fes tival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military heli copter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical perfor mances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Of cers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Com munity Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by member ship-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social ac tivity. Beginning this year, 25 per cent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auc tion will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transforma tive change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@ya hoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot or ganization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held do nation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more informa tion about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook.Student scholarshipsIn 1960, the Submarine O cers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Founda tion. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these stu dents receives an annual schol arship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of mem ber or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a fouryear accredited college or uni versity and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in subma rine support activities for a mini mum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line appli cation is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or email scholars@dolphinscholar ship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of Ameri can Sea Power and obtain a recom mendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Check on college accreditations Center for PPD See College, Page 3

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From The Navy League of Mayport, Fla. e Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. is is an all-service event featuring a joint Color Guard, an All Ser vice Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numer ous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. e invited keynote speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty also will be in attendance. e evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacic. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65. Prices for civilians and retirees is $65. e evening includes ne dining and a memora ble program. Uniform will be O4 and above, dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below, dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be pur chased from the following locations: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 2469982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 7947814 or anuday00@aol. com. Navy History and Heritage Command photoDouglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese crusier Mikuma during the Battle of Midway. Battle of Midway dinner June 7their school choice in the broader spectrum of their current and future educational goals. When Sailors apply for commissioning programs such as Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program or Seaman-to-Admiral 21, the participating uni versities and colleges are regionally accredited and may not accept credits from nationally accredited schools. For this reason, Hen wood advises Sailors specically trying for a commission to ensure they attend an accredited school whose credits are transferrable to other pro grams since its up to each school what transfer cred its it will accept. Sailors not applying for a commissioning program should still carefully con sider how theyre using the Tuition Assistance program to complete classes toward their degree, or it could result in bad news. Henwood gave an ex ample of a Sailor he worked with last year who completed a Bachelor of Science in Business from a nationally accredited school, which he used Navy Tuition Assistance to complete. He then applied to a regionally accredited schools MBA program, but that school didnt honor his bachelors de gree. Because the Navy only pays for one bachelors degree, he will have to go back and pay out-ofpocket for a regionally ac credited degree program or return to the original school for its MBA, which limits his choices, Hen wood said. CollegeFrom Page 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Above, Arthur Duran has enjoyed watching submarines moored on the Kings Bay waterfront from shore and likes the different view. Left, the cadets sea legs are quickly put to the test as the pilot rocks the boat back and forth. Above, Cadents Yvonne Dolloff and Mathew Hendrick are in the C-Tractors pilot house piloting. Left, Tre Montgomery enjoys the view. He cant wait for a chance to serve like his dad does. C-Tractor 2 normally helps move subs, but today its crew will take Camden County High School Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadets on a sea cruise.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 Michael Brooks is happy because this ride will earn him and his peers their Sea Service ribbon. Cadets Micheal Brooks, left, put his hand up to ask about what its like to be out to sea. EM2s classic response, Its like a family. The troops are kept in step by the loud, melodious Collin Faulkner call ing cadence. Its a beautiful day to march on the waterfront! Tre Montgomery and Samuel Rohrer enjoyed the ride from the folks at the Port Operations center, which can be seen in the background. EM2 Brock Dowers explains the role of Port Ops in combating any hazardous liquid spill. Cadet Makayla Conn anxiously awaits Navy chow.

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the Helsinki Final Act. e United States condemns Russias military intervention into Ukrainian territory, the White House release said. Hagel spoke by phone with Russias Minister of Defense Sergey Shoygu this morning, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said in the DOD news release. Secretary Hagel expressed deep con cern about Russias military interven tion in Ukraine, Kirby said in the DOD release. He reminded Minister Shoygu that these activities ran counter to Rus sias international treaty obligations and stated position that it would respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. Following a Ukrainian pro-democra cy coalitions recent ouster of Ukraines pro-Russian government, the Russian military has been reported to be operat ing in and around the Crimea region in southeastern Ukraine, where the Russian Navys Black Sea Fleet has its principal base in Sevastopol on the Black Sea. e Crimea region is home to an ethnic-Rus sian majority populace. In the DOD release, Kirby noted that Hagel stressed that, without a change on the ground, Russia risks further instabil ity in the region, isolation in the interna tional community and an escalation that would threaten European and international security. e United States calls on Russia to de-escalate tensions by withdrawing its forces back to bases in Crimea and to refrain from any interference elsewhere in Ukraine, the White House release said. We have consistently said that we rec ognize Russias deep historic and cultural ties to Ukraine and the need to protect the rights of ethnic Russian and minority populations within Ukraine, the White House release said. e Ukrainian gov ernment has made clear its commitment to protect the rights of all Ukrainians and to abide by Ukraines international commitments, and we will continue to urge them to do so. Obama also told Putin today that if Russia has concerns about the treatment of ethnic Russian and minority popula tions in Ukraine, the appropriate way to address them is peacefully through di rect engagement with the government of Ukraine and through the dispatch of in ternational observers under the auspices of the United Nations Security Council or the Organization for Security and Coop eration in Europe, the White House re lease said. As a member of both organizations, Russia would be able to participate, the White House release added. Obama urged an immediate eort to initiate a dialogue between Russia and the Ukrainian government, the White House release said, with international facilitation, as appropriate. e United States is prepared to participate. Obama made clear that Russias con tinued violation of Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity would negatively impact Russias standing in the inter national community, the White House release said. In the coming hours and days, the release said, the United States will urgently consult with allies and part ners in the U.N. Security Council, the North Atlantic Council, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and with the signatories of the Budapest Memorandum. e United States will suspend upcoming participation in preparatory meetings for the G-8, according to the White House release. Going forward, the release said, Russias continued violation of interna tional law will lead to greater political and economic isolation. e people of Ukraine have the right to determine their own future, the White House release said, and Obama has directed his administration to continue working urgently with international part ners to provide support for the Ukrainian government, including urgent technical and nancial assistance. Going forward, the White House re lease said, we will continue consult ing closely with allies and partners, the Ukrainian government and the Inter national Monetary Fund, to provide the new [Ukrainian] government with signi cant assistance to secure nancial stabil ity, to support needed reforms, to allow Ukraine to conduct successful elections, and to support Ukraine as it pursues a democratic future. Also, Obama spoke separately to day with President Francois Hollande of France and Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada, according to another White House release issued today. e leaders, that release said, agreed that Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity must be respected, and they ex pressed their grave concern over Russias intervention in Ukraine. ing deputy chief of Naval Operations for Integration of Capabilities and Resources (N8); deputy commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet; chief of sta, U.S. 7th Fleet; head, Navy Programming Branch and direc tor, Operations Division Navy Comptroller. Most recently he served as 36th vice chief of naval operations August 2009 to August 2011. He is a recipient of various personal and campaign awards including the Dis tinguished Service Medal (six awards), Defense Superior Service Medal and Legion of Merit (four awards). In 1992 he was awarded the Vice Ad miral Stockdale Award for inspirational leadership. He considers those awards earned throughout his career associated with unit performance to be most satis fying and representative of naval service. Greenert became the 30th Chief of Na val Operations Sep. 23, 2011. navy.mil contributed to this story.CNOFrom Page 1 Naval History and Heritage CommandA cutaway view of Huntley shows the crew turning a crankshaft to propel the craft. him when he returned from Iraq. By having my service dog Belle, I have been able to get back into soci ety. Before I got her I had been pretty much shut away from everything and everyone. Belle has gotten me back out there. I know when were out she always has my back, whether it is letting me know someone is coming up behind me, making me stop and pet her when my anxiety is bad or by waking me up from my nightmares. I know she is always there to help me. So with good reasons to raise a service dog, what is the cost to omas? Simply a lot of time and patience. e dog has to be taught to perform tasks like opening doors, help ing a service member get up o the ground and to be social, while not seek ing attention. One teaching tool is having a young puppy play with keys. An older dog often will have an aver sion to picking up metal objects in its mouth. What happens if a wounded warrior drops his keys? omas puppy already has been taught to pick up keys. It was one of Geor gias rst lessons. en theres taking the puppy dierent places so it can become acclimated to surroundings. Geor gia already has been to a memorial service, church and the zoo. Often times, it can be hard to go into the con venience store to pick up milk when everyone wants to pet the cute puppy. at can take a lot of time, but it comes with its own re wards. Now omas can take that worry he had for de parting fellow warriors and help them. He can be a warrior helping a war rior. e organization that omas trains Georgia for is Patriot Service Dogs in Jacksonville, Fla. Patriot got Georgia from a breed er in North Georgia. Georgia also has a spon sor through Patriot, the Blair family in St. Marys. ey pay vet bills and other costs covering the dog. ey picked Georgias name and will be there for graduation, when the dog is matched with the ser vice member. When omas sees those injured now paired with a service dog he feels the most rewarded. Hes nally able to do something to help them. What can you do to help? If you want to help, Patriot needs a permanent location to conduct train ing in Jacksonville at 7 p.m. on ursdays. But the biggest need is for those willing to sponsor a ser vice dog. For more information, visit www.patriotservicedogs.org. son University Restoration Institute, South Carolina Hunley Commission, Naval History & Heritage Command, and Friends of the Hunley. Friends of the Hunley recently conducted cer emonies commemorat ing the 150th anniversary of the Hunleys againstall-odds mission that changed naval warfare for all time. Mark your calendars and plan to attend. Conrmation is needed for lunch. Conrm by phone at (912) 882-8838 or by email at mkevan@tds.net. If you prefer, bring your own lunch brown bag style. Drinks will be available. A ve dollar donation for the Friends of the Hun ley is requested.HunleyFrom Page 1DogFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas works with service dog Georgia on board NSB Kings Bay. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas teach es Georgia to sit and stay during a training session.UkraineFrom Page 1 Joint U.S.-Russian activities on holdAmerican Forces Press Servicee Defense Department has put on hold military-to-military activi ties with Russia, Pentagon Press Sec retary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said March 3. In a statement released to reporters, Kirby said the suspended activities include exercises, bilateral meetings, port visits and planning conferences. Although the Defense Department nds value in the military-to-military relationship developed in recent years with the Russian Federation to increase transparency, build understanding and reduce the risk of military miscalculation, Kirby said, we have, in light of recent events in Ukraine, put on hold all military-tomilitary engagements between the United States and Russia. e Defense Department is closely monitoring the situation and remains in close contact with the State Department and other government agencies, as well as with allies, part ners and NATO, the admiral said. We call on Russia to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine and for Russian forces in Crimea to return to their bases, as required under the agreements gov erning the Russia Black Sea Fleet, he added. ough some media outlets are speculating on possible ship move ments in the region, Kirby said, there has been no change to U.S. military posture in Europe or the Mediterra nean Sea. Our Navy units continue to conduct routine, previously planned op erations and exercises with allies and partners in the region, the press sec retary said. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechani cal bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more in formation, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being ac cepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and regis ter. Cost is $175 and class is re stricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Fes tival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and in cludes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenScenic Etowah Park is the site for the upcoming March 22 Navy Adventures Unleashed Spring Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. e cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civil ians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. e Start Smart Sports Devel opment Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots avail able. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-onone with their children, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. e program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Please visit JDRF.org today. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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You really can overthink this one. Like, I dont think power or money can really get you love. But, power may be able to get you money. Its like a dog chasing its tail. Anyway, when I was a kid and the Beatles were big, I bought into, I dont care too much for money. Money cant buy me love. Now that Im old and cynical, Im selling on love. All I can hear now is the dulcit warbeling of the great Steve Miller telling me to, Go on, take the money and run. Oh yeah!Money, power or love ... which is better?MA2 Rondu McMaster Branch Health Clinic El Paso, Texas Id rather have love. Money comes and goes. Power only lasts so long. But love is an eternal bond. ETC Jean Micourt Submarine Group Ten Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Power. You can use power to get the other two. ET1 William Thompson USS Florida Gold Knoxville, Tenn. Love. The other two dont mean anything without it. Beth Gajewski Family member Strongsville, Ohio Obviously, its love. There are a lot of people with money and power who are miserable. MASN Casey Turgeon Security Force Battalion Wilbrahm, Mass. Love, because you dont come home and fall asleep with money every night. MASN Kevin Noell Security Force Battalion Logansville, Ga. Im going to say money. Money buys power and love follows money. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Addresses recent rash of bad decisions by military membersFrom Navy Public Affairs Support Element EastManslaughter, drunk driving, sexual assault, exam compromising and inappropriate relationships have one command theme all have been recent headlines in the news in the past six months. e Navys top enlisted leader visited Hampton Roads chief petty ocers Feb. 20 to discuss ethics and integrity within the CPO community and the Navy as a whole. In the past 30 days, reports have broken in three of the ser vices involving a wide range of questionable ethical behavior, and the CPO community has not been immune. Results of Special and General Courts-Martials included nine CPOs. e charges ranged from fraternization to possession of a controlled substance. When you think about all of that, maybe one case doesnt raise too much of an alarm said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. But when you put them all together, imag ine yourself as the secretary of defense and all of these cases are coming across your desk. You will probably sit down and ask yourself if we have a problem and is that problem systemic. ere are approximately 323,000 Sailors around the eet. Ninty-nine percent of those Sail ors are living up to the Navys core values. e CNO and I do not believe we have a systemic problem with integrity, Stevens said, But we have a few Sailors who have made poor choices so we do recognize there is a problem. MCPON shines spotlight on personal integritySee Stevens, Page 13 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Friday, Feb. 21. Stevens spoke to Kings Bay Chief Petty Officers during a CPO All Hands meeting at the Kings Bay Chapel. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceIn aircraft hangars at two dierent military bases in southeastern Virginia Feb. 25, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel stood before several hundred airmen and soldiers, highlighting priorities in the Defense Departments s cal year 2015 budget request and taking questions. e budget request which Hagel and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, previewed Feb. 24 at the Pentagon is the rst in 13 years that doesnt reect a defense enterprise engaged in a foreign war, and in some of those years, two wars. With the defense budget poised to shrink by more than $75 billion over the next two years, the funding request recommends cuts in military spending in the coming year that include further reductions in troop strength and force structure in every military service. Questions from the airmen at Langley Air Force Base and soldiers at Fort Eustis ranged from the plight of vet erans, the future of the military retirement system and the lifespan of the current force reduction to problems that could arise from a pre-World-War-II-sized Army, and how DOD will be able to keep quality soldiers in such an austere scal environment. Hagel told the service members he wanted to address the budgets pay, compensation and retirement issues, because they are on the minds of service members and their families. He began with retirement, saying depart ment leaders decided not to recommend changes on retirement until a retirement commission empaneled by Congress reports back to Congress and the Defense Department. On the issue of pay, he said, the department will con tinue to recommend pay increases. ere will be a slight decrease in those increases, but its a cost of growth in a growth-of-increase recommen dation, he said, so make sure you understand that. On compensation and benets, Hagel said, the De fense Department would not close commissaries. Moving to the TRICARE health care plan, Hagel said the department is recommending consolidating its three systems into one system that will be more eective and ecient. is [will happen over a period of time and wont af fect anything on base in health care, he said. Nor would it limit preferred provider options or change health care quality, he added. On health care co-pay increases, Hagel said, the budget request contains no recommended changes for activeduty service members. Family members and working-age retirees already have co-pay amounts, depending on their geographic locations and medical services, he noted.Defense secretary explains budget request during base visits 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 10, 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To reg ister, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the mili tary lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and termi nology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 10 to 14. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 10 Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 18 and OCONUS 10 a.m. to noon March 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Job search workshop scheduled for March 12A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., March 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating mil itary and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foun dation for productive financial commu nication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employ ment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a min imum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By MC2 Jacquelyn D. ChildsUSS Nimitz Public Affairse aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) celebrat ed the life of its namesake, Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz, during the week of Feb. 24 to 28. Chester Nimitz was born in Fredericksburg, Texas, Feb. 24, 1885. After graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1905, he served at a variety of various commands that led up to his selection to admiral. He played a huge role in the success of the U.S. in the war in the Pacic dur ing World War II when he consequently received his promotion to eet admiral Dec. 19, 1944. Adm. Nimitz would go on to act as the U.S. signatory to the Japanese surrender aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay the following year. During his long and successful career he de veloped an incomparable leadership style that continued long after the war ended. He passed away Feb. 20, 1966, just days shy of his 81st birthday, and two years later the construc tion began of the rst in a new class of super-carriers to bear his name. We are so proud to share a legacy with such an admirable leader, said Capt. Je Ruth, commanding ocer of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. While it sets the bar high, the ship and its crew continue to perform as leaders in the carrier community, honorably paving the way as the rst in its class. Sailors on board celebrated in a few ways including sharing various unique multimedia products with the world, a message over the ships announcement system, and a cake-cutting on the mess decks. Adm. Nimitz grandson Chet Lay, son of Cathe rine Nimitz Lay, provided products and a notewor thy interview over the phone. e eet admirals el dest daughter Catherine smashed the champagne bottle on the aircraft car riers bow May 13, 1972 christening USS Nimitz. Since that day she has continued to share a spe cial bond with the ship, one that she has passed down to her children as well. She wants to thank all of you for keeping the country so strong and so safe, Chet Lay said on behalf of his mother dur ing the interview. And she feels that Nimitz is her ship and always will be and she is very proud of all of you. Other Sailors are just as eager to participate in the signicant celebration. is is a great day in history, said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Ken dra Bellinger at the Feb. 24 cake-cutting ceremony. Its the birth of one of the greatest admirals in his tory and we are celebrat ing his hard work and life today. Feb. 24 the ship was ready to post a link to a set of never-before published photos of Adm. Nimitz with family and friends. All of the items were pro vided by Chet Lay. Feb. 25 brought an audio interview, providing a unique look into Nimitz personal life. Feb. 26, viewers saw a photo album containing the rare photos along with caption information. Feb. 27 the ship published a special edition of its weekly publication Nimitz News with a more in-depth history of Adm. Nimitz leadership techniques and accomplishments. Feb. 28, Nimitz posted the link to Fleet Adm. Nimitz Gray Book, digitized and published by the Naval War College. e book, named simply for the color of its cover, is a collection of communications between Nimitz and other commanders during World War II. e journal, originally classied as top secret, was declassied in 1972 and provides an in-depth look into U.S. strategies and actions during the war.Navy photoAdm. Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, standing, confers with, from left, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Adm. William D. Leahy concerning future moves in the war against Japan in 1944.Nimitz Sailors celebrate their namesakeNavy photo by MC3 Katarzyna KobiljakThe aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) arrives at Naval Air Station North Island. Nimitz Graybook goes digital online From Naval War College Public Affairse Naval War College unveiled the public online digitization project of Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitzs 4,000 page operational diary, known as e Nimitz Graybook, during an evening lecture, Feb. 24 at NWC in Newport, R.I. Covering activities and corre spondence of the Pacic Com mand from Dec. 7, 1941 to Aug. 31, 1945, the Graybook is a his torical record of operations and planning in the Pacic during World War II and serves as a win dow into Nimitzs decision mak ing process during the war. We can trace the planning pro cess, a lot of which was pioneered here at the Naval War College, for large-scale operations and watch the war unfold almost as if we were in the room, said Craig L. Symonds, U.S. Naval Academy profes sor emeritus of history, during the evening lecture. Symonds said Nimitz proclaimed that the wargaming experience and education he received here at NWC were central to his success in the Pacic war. Chester Nimitz once declared that he never en countered an event in the entire war that had not been anticipated at some level during the war-gam ing practices that they had here at the Naval War College, except the kamikaze, Symonds said. Following the war, Nimitzs Graybook remained classied for 30 years and even after it was declassi ed in 1972, scholars had to travel great distances to what is now, the Naval History and Heritage Com mand at Washington Navy Yard, to access the docu ment. Following the events of 9/11, scholars not as sociated with the Department of Defense now had to leap more barriers in security to gain access the source. In 2009, thanks to the generosity of the American Naval Records Society, the Naval Order of the United States and the Naval War College Foundation, the Graybook contents were scanned so that a CD-ROM version became available. is proved helpful but making copies of carbon paper proved imperfect. It was evident that a fully digitized version, the version we celebrate and welcome this evening, was Navy photoDuring the surrender of Japan in Tokyo Bay, Sept. 2, 1945, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, signs the Instrument of Surrender as United States Representative, aboard USS Missouri (BB-63). Standing behind him are, from left, General of the Army Douglas MacArthur; Adm. William F. Halsey and Rear Adm. Forrest Sherman. See Graybook, Page 13 Nimitz

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From the National Aeronautics and Space Administratione National Aeronautics and Space Adminis trations Kepler mission announced Feb. 26 the discovery of 715 new plan ets. ese newly-veried worlds orbit 305 stars, re vealing multiple-planet systems much like our own solar system. Nearly 95 percent of these planets are smaller than Neptune, which is almost four times the size of Earth. is discovery marks a signicant increase in the number of known smallsized planets more akin to Earth than previously identied exoplanets, which are planets outside our solar system. e Kepler team con tinues to amaze and ex cite us with their planet hunting results, said John Grunsfeld, associate ad ministrator for NASAs Science Mission Director ate in Washington. at these new planets and solar systems look some what like our own, por tends a great future when we have the James Webb Space Telescope in space to characterize the new worlds. Since the discovery of the rst planets outside our solar system roughly two decades ago, verication has been a laborious planet-by-planet process. Now, scientists have a statistical technique that can be applied to many planets at once when they are found in systems that harbor more than one planet around the same star. To verify this bounty of planets, a research team co-led by Jack Lissauer, planetary scientist at NA SAs Ames Research Cen ter in Moett Field, Calif., analyzed stars with more than one potential planet, all of which were detected in the rst two years of Keplers observations May 2009 to March 2011. e research team used a technique called veri cation by multiplicity, which relies in part on the logic of probability. Kepler observes 150,000 stars, and has found a few thousand of those to have planet candidates. If the candidates were random ly distributed among Keplers stars, only a handful would have more than one planet candidate. However, Kepler observed hundreds of stars that have multiple planet candidates. rough a careful study of this sample, these 715 new planets were veried. is method can be lik ened to the behavior we know of lions and lionesses. In our imaginary savannah, the lions are the Kepler stars and the lionesses are the planet candidates. e lionesses would sometimes be observed grouped together whereas lions tend to roam on their own. If you see two lions it could be a lion and a lioness or it could be two lions. But if more than two large felines are gathered, then it is very likely to be a lion and his pride. us, through multi plicity the lioness can be reliably identied in much the same way multiple planet candidates can be found around the same star. Four years ago, Ke pler began a string of announcements of rst hundreds, then thousands, of planet candidates, but they were only candidate worlds, Lissauer said. Weve now developed a process to verify multiple planet candidates in bulk to deliver planets whole sale, and have used it to unveil a veritable bonanza of new worlds. ese multiple-planet systems are fertile grounds for studying individual planets and the congu ration of planetary neigh borhoods. is provides clues to planet formation. Four of these new plan ets are less than 2.5 times the size of Earth and or bit in their suns habit able zone, dened as the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet may be suitable for life-giving liquid water. One of these new habit able zone planets, called Kepler-296f, orbits a star half the size and 5 per cent as bright as our sun. Kepler-296f is twice the size of Earth, but scientists do not know whether the planet is a gaseous world, with a thick hydrogenhelium envelope, or it is a water world surrounded by a deep ocean. From this study we learn planets in these multi-systems are small and their orbits are at and circular, resembling pancakes, not your classical view of an atom, said Jason Rowe, research sci entist at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif., and co-leader of the re search. e more we ex plore the more we nd fa miliar traces of ourselves amongst the stars that remind us of home. is latest discovery brings the conrmed count of planets outside our solar system to nearly 1,700. As we continue to reach toward the stars, each discovery brings us one step closer to a more accurate understanding of our place in the galaxy. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the rst NASA mission to nd po tentially habitable Earthsize planets. Discoveries include more than 3,600 planet candidates, of which 961 have been veried as bona-de worlds.Kepler nds 715 planetsfar more desirable and es sential, Symonds said. During the evening lec ture, on the anniversary of Nimitzs 129th birthday, Symonds provided insight to the contents of the Gray book, and Nimitzs leader ship and decision making process. Reading it pulls aside the curtain of history, Symonds said. What do we see when we part aside that curtain? It becomes evident that one essential key to Allied and American success in the Pacic was Nimitzs personal role as a theater commander and in particular, his calm and even temperament. Behind those cool blue eyes was the calculating mind of a man who weighed the odds and made plans ac cordingly. Following the Battle of Coral Sea and Doolittle Raid, Nimitz had lost two of his four carriers in the Pacic. In May 1942, Nimitz learned from his code breaking team that the Japanese were planning an assault of Midway Atoll. Nimitz was faced with a decision. Wait for repair of his carriers and preserve the only two carriers left in the Pacic, or lay a trap for the Japanese and risk the only thing standing be tween them and the west coast of the U.S. Was Midway, that out post of coral and sand, worth risking the few car riers he had? Did Nimitz want to bet his career on an unlikely victory? Yes he did, Symonds said. Nimitz believed he could repair the Yorktown quickly and use Midways airstrip as an immobile fourth carrier that couldnt be sunk. Instead of being sur prised by the Japanese as had happened at Pearl Harbor, Nimitz could sur prise them and send some of their carriers, and as it turned out, all of their car riers to the bottom. Its hard today, aware of how this battle turned out, to ap preciate what a bold deci sion that was. It seems like a gamble. But in Nimitzs mind, it was not a gamble. He did not throw the dice carelessly or thoughtlessly. Nimitz fully expected to win and of course he did, spectacularly. More than any other single individual, Chester Nimitz was the man who won the war in the Pacic for the Allies. Now, thanks to the public availability of the Graybook, we can see and understand how he did it. e digitization of the collection is the product of collaboration between the NWC and NHHC, funded generously through the Na val War College Foundation. We see this as a pi lot program, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, director of NHHC. e method in which e Graybook was digitized and cross-refer enced is going to give us a path forward in making documents together that are accessible to scholars and the American public. Anytime we have a Sailor who violates their core values, we have a problem. e Bluejackets Manual dated 1917 has 60 pages dedicated to the Chief Petty Of cer. Written is: Unless you recognize it is your duty to instruct your juniors and unless you do instruct them, and unless your endeavor to inculcate in them the knowledge of how things should be done; of how they should conduct themselves, you will have failed in your duties. Chief petty ocers are in a position to impact the entire chain of command from the most junior Sailor to the most senior ocer, Stevens said. Our inac tion can be interpreted as unspoken per mission. We have to make up our minds to control what we own. I am convinced that we can put this issue of integrity to rest quickly and maintain a steady drum beat. e Navy Ethos states, Integrity is the foundation of our conduct; respect for oth ers is fundamental to our character; deci sive leadership is crucial to our success. Stevens told the audience he is not perfect. He related his story of as a young aviation structural mechanic who took great pride in xing a plane that had ex perienced a malfunction in ight. It was a common practice for the air crew team to keep certain consumable spare parts in their helmet bag because they would eventually need them. Stevens was no exception. One day a warrant ocer stopped him. Stevens, I heard you got some stu in your helmet bag. He knew he shouldnt have the extra stu in his helmet bag so he admitted he did. is was the quality assurance warrant, and he told Stevens to stop by at the end of the day at which time Stevens received a counseling chit. Sometimes we wait too long to treat the symptoms and then it becomes a fatal disease, Stevens said. All it might take is pulling a shipmate to the side and tell ing them to do the right thing. You might say hey I dont think its a big deal, but I dont think its the right thing to do and we really need to stop now. Im asking you to take control within good order and discipline of what you own and help us put out this brush re.StevensFrom Page 9 Naval History and Heritage Command photoAdmiral Chester W. Nimitz presents awards on board USS Grayling (SS-209) at the Pearl Harbor Submarine Base, following ceremonies in which he took command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, Dec. 31, 1941. Nimitz spent 6 years in the submarine force early in his career. GraybookFrom Page 12NASA imageThe artist concept depicts multiple-transiting planet systems, which are stars with more than one planet. The planets eclipse or transit their host star from the vantage point of the observer. This angle is called edge-on. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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DuncanCenter for EOD and Diving Public AffairsFollowing feedback from the eet re garding the need for course updates, the Center for Explosive Ordnance and Div ing in Panama City announced Feb. 25 the availability of the Navy Diver Salvage Course on Navy e-Learning. Previously available as one master course, the NDSC has been broken into four individual course modules: Navy Diver Salvage Fundamentals, Naval Ar chitecture, Operations, and Scenarios. Diving Advisory 14-02 announced the promulgation of the new course and transition date for personnel enrolled in the previous version. Completion of the NDSC course is a prerequisite for Master Diver evaluation and for Diving Warrant Ocer applicants. According to CENEODDIVE Learning Standards Ocer Melanie Hinson, this course redesign enables Sailors to complete their online training in more manageable modules, and also provides just-in-time training for Sailors who may need refresher training on specic salvage topics. e previous edition was one long course that contained 92 hours of training. e new modularized training empowers the learner to focus on related topics which result in greater under standing of the material and enhanced comprehension, Hinson said. A pri mary emphasis of the revision dealt with making the mathematical computations easier to follow through the use of indepth, step-by-step examples that provide a crawl, walk, run approach to the learning experience for our Sailors. e NDSC Scenarios course module, while ungraded, provides a look at dier ent types of actual salvage projects and illustrates how the information in the other three course modules applies to real-world salvage operations. Course update project tasks were ac complished by Subject Matter Experts who performed this review and course upgrade in addition to their normal du ties, CENEODDIVE Master Chief Navy Diver William Hargaray said. Using SMEs current with down-range opera tions allowed the course fundamentals, graphics, training sequence, math calcu lations, assessments, and references to align with the needs of the eet. Capt. James Beene, commanding o cer of CENEODDIVE noted that the up dated courses are more than just a periodic review. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsFirefighters with the Miramar Fire Department look over a 1944 International Harvester FFN-3 fire and crash crew engine at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum warehouse aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Feb. 12. Old re truck on comeback road By Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsMarine Corps Air Station Miramar e Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum ac quired an International Harvester FFN-3 re and crash crew engine in run ning condition, Nov. 13. e museums sta began researching the seven decades-old re engine immediately and is begin ning the restoration process in earnest at last. is particular World War II-era engine was rst used to ght re aboard Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, Calif., during 1944, making it a piece of MCAS Miramar, Calif., and the communitys history. is is part of [the air stations] heritage, said Steve Smitty Smith, curator with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Mu seum. ere arent a lot of these engines around anymore and for us to nd one that used to serve aboard El Toro is just amazing; and how often does anyone get to see a vintage World War II re engine? Fireghters with the Mi ramar Fire Department paid a visit to the museum to see a bit of that history rsthand and one re ghter couldnt contain his interest in the rusty, red engine. Its great that this truck could even be found, let alone in working condition, said Dan Regis, an engineer with Engine 60 at the Miramar Fire Depart ment. I like that you can nd something that still has its originality; it hasnt been hacked to pieces or modied and this is just about as original as it gets. is will allow people to really see what state-ofthe-art was back in this trucks day and what we have come to today. e Marine Corps Mechanized Museum aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., undertook this project to aid the aviation museum by providing parts and leads to where more need ed parts for the re engine can be found. All that remains now is to nd able-bodied volunteers to help in its res toration, and also more researchers to help docu ment the markings and history of this particular vehicle. [We] arent re engine and crash crew specialists by any means, said Smith. We arent sure whether this truck was an [instal lation] asset or if they de ployed with squadrons during WWII and Korea. We do know this truck is in rough shape, but is a part of our history, and we would love some help re storing it. is project requires volunteers with experience in body work, brake-system repair or any other kind of vehicle maintenance or restora tion to see to a timely con clusion for display in the San Diego County Fair in June. In the past two years at the fair, weve noticed the rst weekend is about the re departments, said Smith. We really want to get this truck out there to share its history with the community and reght ers to pay homage not just to them, but to their past as remen. Volunteers who want to be a part of restoring his tory are encouraged to contact the Flying Leath erneck Aviation Museum for opportunities in not only this project, but many others. American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama Feb. 25 informed Afghan President Hamid Karzai that because the Afghan leader has demonstrated that it is un likely that he will sign the bilateral security agree ment on a U.S. military presence in Afghanistan beyond this year, he has asked the Pentagon to ensure that it has adequate plans in place to accom plish an orderly with drawal by the end of the year should the United States not keep any troops in Afghanistan after 2014. In a summary of the Obama-Karzai phone call released to reporters, White House ocials said Obama is leaving open the possibility of concluding a bilateral security agree ment with Afghanistan later this year. However, the longer we go without a BSA, the more challenging it will be to plan and execute any U.S. mission, they added. Furthermore, the longer we go without a BSA, the more likely it will be that any post-2014 U.S. mis sion will be smaller in scale and ambition. Soon after, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel released a statement ex pressing his strong sup port for the presidents decision. is is a prudent step, given that President Kar zai has demonstrated that it is unlikely that he will sign the bilateral security agreement, which would provide DOD personnel with critical protections and authorities after 2014, the secretary said. He also commended the eorts of Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commander of U.S. forces and the NATO-led Interna tional Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, and other military leaders to provide flex ibility to the president as the United States works to determine the future of the U.S. pres ence in Afghanistan. As the United States military continues to move people and equip ment out of the Afghan theater, our force pos ture over the next several months will provide various options for political leaders in the United States and NATO, Ha gel said in his statement. And during this time, DOD will still continue planning for U.S. par ticipation in a NATO-led mission focused on train ing, advising, and assist ing Afghan security forc es, as well as a narrowly focused counterterrorism mission. e United States will consult closely with NATO allies and ISAF partners in the months ahead, he added, noting that he looks forward to discussing U.S. planning with NATO and ISAF defense ministers in Brussels this week.Exit plan made for Afghanistan ObamaDiver course on internet Navy photo by MC2 Blake Midnight Students at Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center conduct training opera tions in the facilitys 12-foot pool. NDSTC, the largest diving facility in the world, trains more than 1200 military divers from every branch of service each year. Accident claims twoFrom EOD Group 2 Public AffairsNavy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., died while conducting dive operations at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Aberdeen, Md., Feb. 26. Harris and Reyher were assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, located at Joint Expedition ary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story. EODGRU-2 is conducting an inves tigation into the deaths of the Sailors. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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From The Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Submarine LeagueFred Tetor, a Warren Lasch Conservation Center volunteer, will be guest speaker and share his experiences with the Hunley Project at the March 19 meeting of the e Atlantic Southeast Chapter of the Submarine League. e meeting will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Goat Locker on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e normal business meeting will be short and precede Tetors presentation. Tetor has been conducting Hunley tours since they started in 2000. H. L. Hunley is the Confederate subma rine that was the worlds rst successful submarine. It sank the Union sloopof-war, USS Housatonic, on the night of Feb. 17, 1864. Even though the Hunley was successful in completing its mission, it also subsequently sank nearby with the loss of all aboard. e laboratory where Tetor volunteers was named after Warren Lasch, the chairman of Friends of the Hunley. Lasch was charged with raising nearly $16 million it would take to recover Hunley from the bottom of the Atlantic. Additionally Lasch spearheaded not only the recovery of the Hunley, but also the establishment of the laboratory facility that houses the pioneer Civil War submarine. e innovative handcranked vessel was raised in 2000 and delivered to the Warren Lasch Conservation Center, where an international team of scientists are at work to conserve the submarine for future generations and piece together clues to solve the mystery of her disappearance. e Hunley Project is conducted through a partnership with the Clem Up Periscope Money, love or power ... what do you want? Page 9 Nimitz World War II leader remembered by Navy Page 12 NJROTC Camden County unit drills at Kings Bay Pages 4, 5 Chapel All Hands Call; speaker at luncheon; wife, MCPON visit By EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsAdm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations, and Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens will visit the Navy Region Southeast area for an All Hands Calls at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, March 18. Greenert will visit the Kings Bay Chapel to speak and to paticipate in re-enlistment and promotion ceremonies. He will then speak at a luncheon sponsored by e Camden Partnership, the Submarine League, the Navy League and other community organizations at Magnolias. e CNOs wife, Darleen Greenert, will be touring Kings Bay as well, seeing all the aspects of the base that impact a Sailors life, including base housing and the Branch Health Clinic. Greenert is a native of Butler, Pa. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1975 and completed studies in nuclear power for service as a submarine ocer. His career as a submariner in cludes assignments aboard USS Flying Fish (SSN 673), USS Tau tog (SSN 639), Submarine NR-1 and USS Michigan (SSBN 72) (Gold), culminating in command of USS Honolulu (SSN 718) from March 1991 to July 1993. Subsequent eet command assignments include Commander, Submarine Squadron 11; Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Marianas; Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet August 2004 to September 2006; and, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Septem ber 2007 to July 2009. Greenert has served in various eet support and nancial management positions, includ-CNO Greenert coming to NSB Kings Bay Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Hunley, Page 6 A labor of loveMA1 Brian omas love of canines led to training service dogs for wounded warriorsBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsWhen an over-seas service member is wounded, they make a sacrice, whether physical or emotional or both. Sometimes, it can be a huge sacrice. What can anyone do to help that service member though? One Sailor knows. Master at Arms First Class Brian omas is investing 18 months to raise and train a dog that will be given to a wounded service member. Its a service dog that will accompany the warrior and help with their dayto-day needs. Hes raising Georgia, an 11-week-old Golden Retriever-Poodle mix. He found raising the service dog a natural t, much the same way he began his Navy career as a Military Working Dog handler. It found me, omas said. e 32-year-old from Louisville, Ky. has been around dogs since childhood. About raising them, he said, I was born with it in my blood. omas is the leading petty ocer at the kennel here on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. His fondness for dogs helps explain some of his motivation for volunteering to raise Georgia. But its not all. omas has done ve tours in either Iraq or Afghanistan. He knows what its like being deployed and what challenges are faced. Hes seen a lot of his fellow service members returning with physical injuries or with post-traumatic stress disorder. Overseas he always worried about how that person was going to cope back in the states. What help is oered? Listen to what returning Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jerey Callahan said about how his service dog helped Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas and Georgia, the dog he is training to become a service dog. GreenertNational ArchivesA painting of CSS Hunley on a pier in Charleston, S.C., harbor during the Civil War. Hunley expert speaker at Goat Locker March 19 Naval History and Heritage CommandThe Hunley was raised from Charleston Harbor in August, 2000. Tetor Stevens2009 CHINFO Award Winner See Dog, Page 6 See CNO, Page 6 Eyes shi focus to UkraineObama, Hagel phone Russian counterparts regarding invasionAmerican Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called their Russian counterparts March 1 to express their concerns over recent events in Ukraine, according to White House and Defense Department news releases issued today. Obama spoke for 90 minutes this afternoon with Russian President Vladimir Putin about the situation in Ukraine, according to the White House release. Obama expressed his deep concern over Russias clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity, which is a breach of international law, including Russias obligations under the U.N. Charter, and of its 1997 military basing agreement with Ukraine, and which is inconsistent with the 1994 Budapest Memorandum and Obama See Ukraine, Page 6

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By Susan D. HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsSailors working on completing a degree should ensure their school has the appropriate type of accreditation or it could cost them money later, said Center for Personal and Professional Development education professionals Feb. 24. Most students know the school they attend should have some sort of accreditation as a way of ensuring the quality of their education, but they dont understand how important the type of accreditation is in their school selection, said Ernest DAntonio, director of Navy Voluntary Education at the Center for Personal and Professional Development. Ive seen way too many examples of service members using their tuition assistance or G.I. Bill education benets to earn a degree at a school whose credits arent transferrable to or recognized by other schools. And when a Sailors benet is spent, its spent. According to Raymond Sayre, director of the Navy College Oce in San Diego, there are three kinds of accreditation. One is regional, which is granted by an accrediting organization in one of six regions in the United States. Regional accrediting organizations review educational institutions as a whole, he said. Schools with regionally accredited programs focus on academic theory for a full range of degrees from accounting to zoology at all educational levels. National accreditation is another type. Sayre said nationally accredited institutions ll a dierent educational need than those with regional accreditation. e real dierence is that national accrediting bodies focus on operational/technical skills. ese accreditors tend to focus on a particular discipline such as business or technical skills, or distance learning, he said. e third kind is accreditation for specialized programs and single-purpose organizations. A specialized accreditation is typically granted for a particular section or discipline within a regionally accredited educational institution, such as for a schools law, medical or engineering program. Its confusing because its complicated, according to DAntonio. e key for Sailors is to understand how accreditation directly relates to their educational goals, he said. is is part of why Navy College Program education professionals exist to help Sailors make the best choice for them. Sayre pointed out that one type of accreditation isnt necessarily better than the others; it is simply contingent on the students objectives. It depends on what professional path Sailors are choosing, he said. If they want a hands-on career in the vocational or technical world such as auto repair, electronics, nuclear technician, etc., they may benet by choosing a school with national accreditation. If their choice is the academic world teacher, law, business or doctor, for example they ought to choose regional accreditation. Many nationally accredited schools oer advanced vocational or technical education and training programs that are excellent and meet the needs for which they were designed. A handful of schools have both regional and national accreditation, but Sayre said it isnt common. Gary Henwood, an educational services specialist at Navy College Oce Whidbey Island, Wash., said its important for Sailors to view tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Changes at Kings Bay Pet Clinice Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment Facility is under-going changes, with a new computer system, which makes your pets records easily accessible to your new veterinarian when you move. But, your patience is asked for as sta works through the transition and the challenges of a new system. In addition, changes are being made to the prescription rell policy. Pet owners will now need to call to rell a medication, and it will take two business days to ll them. When you call, the following information is needed: last name, pets name and name of medication. ere we also will be changes to some prices. is is controlled at the Public Health Command level, and anticipated changes are not drastic, but be aware some things may require more or less than you are used to.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.Women in Military to be honoredIn honor of Womens History Month, the Greater Jacksonville Area USO will host a festival 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 saluting past and present women in the military. Salute to Women in the Military: Past & Present will be at the Navy Federal Credit Union across the street from the main gate of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the rst women to earn their Golden Wings and become Naval Aviators. Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund (Ret.), the rst female military helicopter pilot, will be the guest of honor. ere will be activities for families, musical performances by Blenton Blout and Jade Novah. e festival is free and open to the public. March 29, Mavericks at the Landing will host a USO benet concert, A Country Salute to Women in the Military. For more, visit jaxuso.org.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ofcers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook.Student scholarshipsIn 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a fouryear accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in subma rine support activities for a mini mum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or email scholars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League Check on college accreditations Center for PPD See College, Page 3

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From The Navy League of Mayport, Fla. e Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. is is an all-service event featuring a joint Color Guard, an All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. e invited keynote speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former prisoners of war from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty also will be in attendance. e evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacic. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65. Prices for civilians and retirees is $65. e evening includes ne dining and a memora ble program. Uniform will be O4 and above, dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below, dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 2469982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 7947814 or anuday00@aol. com. Navy History and Heritage Command photoDouglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese crusier Mikuma during the Battle of Midway. Battle of Midway dinner June 7their school choice in the broader spectrum of their current and future educational goals. When Sailors apply for commissioning programs such as Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program or Seaman-to-Admiral 21, the participating universities and colleges are regionally accredited and may not accept credits from nationally accredited schools. For this reason, Henwood advises Sailors specically trying for a commission to ensure they attend an accredited school whose credits are transferrable to other programs since its up to each school what transfer credits it will accept. Sailors not applying for a commissioning program should still carefully consider how theyre using the Tuition Assistance program to complete classes toward their degree, or it could result in bad news. Henwood gave an example of a Sailor he worked with last year who completed a Bachelor of Science in Business from a nationally accredited school, which he used Navy Tuition Assistance to complete. He then applied to a regionally accredited schools MBA program, but that school didnt honor his bachelors degree. Because the Navy only pays for one bachelors degree, he will have to go back and pay out-ofpocket for a regionally accredited degree program or return to the original school for its MBA, which limits his choices, Henwood said. CollegeFrom Page 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 Above, Arthur Duran has enjoyed watching submarines moored on the Kings Bay waterfront from shore and likes the different view. Left, the cadets sea legs are quickly put to the test as the pilot rocks the boat back and forth. Above, Cadents Yvonne Dolloff and Mathew Hendrick are in the C-Tractors pilot house piloting. Left, Tre Montgomery enjoys the view. He cant wait for a chance to serve like his dad does. C-Tractor 2 normally helps move subs, but today its crew will take Camden County High School Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadets on a sea cruise.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 Michael Brooks is happy because this ride will earn him and his peers their Sea Service ribbon. Cadets Micheal Brooks, left, put his hand up to ask about what its like to be out to sea. EM2s classic response, Its like a family. The troops are kept in step by the loud, melodious Collin Faulkner call ing cadence. Its a beautiful day to march on the waterfront! Tre Montgomery and Samuel Rohrer enjoyed the ride from the folks at the Port Operations center, which can be seen in the background. EM2 Brock Dowers explains the role of Port Ops in combating any hazardous liquid spill. Cadet Makayla Conn anxiously awaits Navy chow.

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the Helsinki Final Act. e United States condemns Russias military intervention into Ukrainian territory, the White House release said. Hagel spoke by phone with Russias Minister of Defense Sergey Shoygu this morning, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said in the DOD news release. Secretary Hagel expressed deep concern about Russias military intervention in Ukraine, Kirby said in the DOD release. He reminded Minister Shoygu that these activities ran counter to Russias international treaty obligations and stated position that it would respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. Following a Ukrainian pro-democracy coalitions recent ouster of Ukraines pro-Russian government, the Russian military has been reported to be operating in and around the Crimea region in southeastern Ukraine, where the Russian Navys Black Sea Fleet has its principal base in Sevastopol on the Black Sea. e Crimea region is home to an ethnic-Russian majority populace. In the DOD release, Kirby noted that Hagel stressed that, without a change on the ground, Russia risks further instability in the region, isolation in the international community and an escalation that would threaten European and international security. e United States calls on Russia to de-escalate tensions by withdrawing its forces back to bases in Crimea and to refrain from any interference elsewhere in Ukraine, the White House release said. We have consistently said that we recognize Russias deep historic and cultural ties to Ukraine and the need to protect the rights of ethnic Russian and minority populations within Ukraine, the White House release said. e Ukrainian government has made clear its commitment to protect the rights of all Ukrainians and to abide by Ukraines international commitments, and we will continue to urge them to do so. Obama also told Putin today that if Russia has concerns about the treatment of ethnic Russian and minority populations in Ukraine, the appropriate way to address them is peacefully through direct engagement with the government of Ukraine and through the dispatch of international observers under the auspices of the United Nations Security Council or the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the White House release said. As a member of both organizations, Russia would be able to participate, the White House release added. Obama urged an immediate eort to initiate a dialogue between Russia and the Ukrainian government, the White House release said, with international facilitation, as appropriate. e United States is prepared to participate. Obama made clear that Russias continued violation of Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity would negatively impact Russias standing in the international community, the White House release said. In the coming hours and days, the release said, the United States will urgently consult with allies and partners in the U.N. Security Council, the North Atlantic Council, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and with the signatories of the Budapest Memorandum. e United States will suspend upcoming participation in preparatory meetings for the G-8, according to the White House release. Going forward, the release said, Russias continued violation of international law will lead to greater political and economic isolation. e people of Ukraine have the right to determine their own future, the White House release said, and Obama has directed his administration to continue working urgently with international partners to provide support for the Ukrainian government, including urgent technical and nancial assistance. Going forward, the White House release said, we will continue consulting closely with allies and partners, the Ukrainian government and the International Monetary Fund, to provide the new [Ukrainian] government with signicant assistance to secure nancial stability, to support needed reforms, to allow Ukraine to conduct successful elections, and to support Ukraine as it pursues a democratic future. Also, Obama spoke separately today with President Francois Hollande of France and Prime Minister Stephen Harper of Canada, according to another White House release issued today. e leaders, that release said, agreed that Ukraines sovereignty and territorial integrity must be respected, and they expressed their grave concern over Russias intervention in Ukraine. ing deputy chief of Naval Operations for Integration of Capabilities and Resources (N8); deputy commander, U.S. Pacic Fleet; chief of sta, U.S. 7th Fleet; head, Navy Programming Branch and director, Operations Division Navy Comptroller. Most recently he served as 36th vice chief of naval operations August 2009 to August 2011. He is a recipient of various personal and campaign awards including the Distinguished Service Medal (six awards), Defense Superior Service Medal and Legion of Merit (four awards). In 1992 he was awarded the Vice Admiral Stockdale Award for inspirational leadership. He considers those awards earned throughout his career associated with unit performance to be most satisfying and representative of naval service. Greenert became the 30th Chief of Naval Operations Sep. 23, 2011. navy.mil contributed to this story.CNOFrom Page 1 Naval History and Heritage CommandA cutaway view of Huntley shows the crew turning a crankshaft to propel the craft. him when he returned from Iraq. By having my service dog Belle, I have been able to get back into society. Before I got her I had been pretty much shut away from everything and everyone. Belle has gotten me back out there. I know when were out she always has my back, whether it is letting me know someone is coming up behind me, making me stop and pet her when my anxiety is bad or by waking me up from my nightmares. I know she is always there to help me. So with good reasons to raise a service dog, what is the cost to omas? Simply a lot of time and patience. e dog has to be taught to perform tasks like opening doors, helping a service member get up o the ground and to be social, while not seeking attention. One teaching tool is having a young puppy play with keys. An older dog often will have an aversion to picking up metal objects in its mouth. What happens if a wounded warrior drops his keys? omas puppy already has been taught to pick up keys. It was one of Georgias rst lessons. en theres taking the puppy dierent places so it can become acclimated to surroundings. Georgia already has been to a memorial service, church and the zoo. Often times, it can be hard to go into the convenience store to pick up milk when everyone wants to pet the cute puppy. at can take a lot of time, but it comes with its own rewards. Now omas can take that worry he had for departing fellow warriors and help them. He can be a warrior helping a warrior. e organization that omas trains Georgia for is Patriot Service Dogs in Jacksonville, Fla. Patriot got Georgia from a breeder in North Georgia. Georgia also has a sponsor through Patriot, the Blair family in St. Marys. ey pay vet bills and other costs covering the dog. ey picked Georgias name and will be there for graduation, when the dog is matched with the service member. When omas sees those injured now paired with a service dog he feels the most rewarded. Hes nally able to do something to help them. What can you do to help? If you want to help, Patriot needs a permanent location to conduct training in Jacksonville at 7 p.m. on ursdays. But the biggest need is for those willing to sponsor a service dog. For more information, visit www.patriotservicedogs.org. son University Restoration Institute, South Carolina Hunley Commission, Naval History & Heritage Command, and Friends of the Hunley. Friends of the Hunley recently conducted ceremonies commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Hunleys againstall-odds mission that changed naval warfare for all time. Mark your calendars and plan to attend. Conrmation is needed for lunch. Conrm by phone at (912) 882-8838 or by email at mkevan@tds.net. If you prefer, bring your own lunch brown bag style. Drinks will be available. A ve dollar donation for the Friends of the Hunley is requested.HunleyFrom Page 1DogFrom Page 1 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas works with service dog Georgia on board NSB Kings Bay. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMA1 Brian Thomas teaches Georgia to sit and stay during a training session.UkraineFrom Page 1 Joint U.S.-Russian activities on holdAmerican Forces Press Servicee Defense Department has put on hold military-to-military activities with Russia, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said March 3. In a statement released to reporters, Kirby said the suspended activities include exercises, bilateral meetings, port visits and planning conferences. Although the Defense Department nds value in the military-to-military relationship developed in recent years with the Russian Federation to increase transparency, build understanding and reduce the risk of military miscalculation, Kirby said, we have, in light of recent events in Ukraine, put on hold all military-tomilitary engagements between the United States and Russia. e Defense Department is closely monitoring the situation and remains in close contact with the State Department and other government agencies, as well as with allies, partners and NATO, the admiral said. We call on Russia to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine and for Russian forces in Crimea to return to their bases, as required under the agreements governing the Russia Black Sea Fleet, he added. ough some media outlets are speculating on possible ship movements in the region, Kirby said, there has been no change to U.S. military posture in Europe or the Mediterranean Sea. Our Navy units continue to conduct routine, previously planned operations and exercises with allies and partners in the region, the press secretary said. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being ac cepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and regis ter. Cost is $175 and class is re stricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenScenic Etowah Park is the site for the upcoming March 22 Navy Adventures Unleashed Spring Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. e cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civil ians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. e Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots avail able. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-onone with their children, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. e program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Please visit JDRF.org today. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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You really can overthink this one. Like, I dont think power or money can really get you love. But, power may be able to get you money. Its like a dog chasing its tail. Anyway, when I was a kid and the Beatles were big, I bought into, I dont care too much for money. Money cant buy me love. Now that Im old and cynical, Im selling on love. All I can hear now is the dulcit warbeling of the great Steve Miller telling me to, Go on, take the money and run. Oh yeah!Money, power or love ... which is better?MA2 Rondu McMaster Branch Health Clinic El Paso, Texas Id rather have love. Money comes and goes. Power only lasts so long. But love is an eternal bond. ETC Jean Micourt Submarine Group Ten Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Power. You can use power to get the other two. ET1 William Thompson USS Florida Gold Knoxville, Tenn. Love. The other two dont mean anything without it. Beth Gajewski Family member Strongsville, Ohio Obviously, its love. There are a lot of people with money and power who are miserable. MASN Casey Turgeon Security Force Battalion Wilbrahm, Mass. Love, because you dont come home and fall asleep with money every night. MASN Kevin Noell Security Force Battalion Logansville, Ga. Im going to say money. Money buys power and love follows money. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Addresses recent rash of bad decisions by military membersFrom Navy Public Affairs Support Element EastManslaughter, drunk driving, sexual assault, exam compromising and inappropriate relationships have one command theme all have been recent headlines in the news in the past six months. e Navys top enlisted leader visited Hampton Roads chief petty ocers Feb. 20 to discuss ethics and integrity within the CPO community and the Navy as a whole. In the past 30 days, reports have broken in three of the services involving a wide range of questionable ethical behavior, and the CPO community has not been immune. Results of Special and General Courts-Martials included nine CPOs. e charges ranged from fraternization to possession of a controlled substance. When you think about all of that, maybe one case doesnt raise too much of an alarm said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. But when you put them all together, imagine yourself as the secretary of defense and all of these cases are coming across your desk. You will probably sit down and ask yourself if we have a problem and is that problem systemic. ere are approximately 323,000 Sailors around the eet. Ninty-nine percent of those Sailors are living up to the Navys core values. e CNO and I do not believe we have a systemic problem with integrity, Stevens said, But we have a few Sailors who have made poor choices so we do recognize there is a problem. MCPON shines spotlight on personal integritySee Stevens, Page 13 Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Friday, Feb. 21. Stevens spoke to Kings Bay Chief Petty Officers during a CPO All Hands meeting at the Kings Bay Chapel. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Ham, Egg & Cheese Biscuit Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch French Onion Soup Southern Fried Chicken Stuffed Fish Mashed Potatoes Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Black-eyed Peas Southern Style Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burgers Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken BBQ Ribs Pulled Pork Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Vegetable Soup Grilled Steak Grilled Crab Cakes Baked Potatoes Honey Glazed Carrots Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Chicken Philly Sandwiches French Fries Grilled Hoagies Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Steamed Broccoli Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Asst. Pizza Buffalo Chicken Strips French Fries Green Beans Mashed Potatoes Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Knickerbockers Soup Fried Chicken Sandwich Fishwich Sandwich Tater Tots Mixed Vegetables Tartar Sauce Cole Slaw Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads and Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner New England Clam Chowder Prime Rib au Jus Garlic Butter Shrimp Twice-Baked Potatoes Rice Pilaf Sauted Mushrooms & Onions Broccoli Parmesan Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Asst. Oatmeal Grits Eggs & Omelets to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Fresh Fruit Salad Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Gumbo Blackened Chicken Kalua Pulled Pork Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes Red Beans & Rice Steamed Corn Collard Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Chicken Wings Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup BBQ Ribs Rice Pilaf Hush Puppies Club Spinach Simmered Pinto Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Grilled Sausage Links Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Spanish Soup Salisbury Steak Raosted Chicken Brown Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mac & Cheese Simmered Carrots Fried Cabbage w/ Bacon Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Quesadias Beef Enchiladas Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Chili Baked Ham Chicken Pot Pie Egg Noodles Steamed Rice Simmered Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/Asst. Syrup Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Corned Beef Hash Hash Browned Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch California Chicken Soup Roast Beef Stuffed Flounder Brown Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Rice Pilaf Mixed Vegetables Simmered Lima Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Egg Drop Soup Sweet & Sour Pork Teriyaki Chicken Filipino Rice Fried Lumpia Stir Fried Vegetables Steamed Asparagus Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Sesame Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. W eekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceIn aircraft hangars at two dierent military bases in southeastern Virginia Feb. 25, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel stood before several hundred airmen and soldiers, highlighting priorities in the Defense Departments scal year 2015 budget request and taking questions. e budget request which Hagel and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, previewed Feb. 24 at the Pentagon is the rst in 13 years that doesnt reect a defense enterprise engaged in a foreign war, and in some of those years, two wars. With the defense budget poised to shrink by more than $75 billion over the next two years, the funding request recommends cuts in military spending in the coming year that include further reductions in troop strength and force structure in every military service. Questions from the airmen at Langley Air Force Base and soldiers at Fort Eustis ranged from the plight of veterans, the future of the military retirement system and the lifespan of the current force reduction to problems that could arise from a pre-World-War-II-sized Army, and how DOD will be able to keep quality soldiers in such an austere scal environment. Hagel told the service members he wanted to address the budgets pay, compensation and retirement issues, because they are on the minds of service members and their families. He began with retirement, saying department leaders decided not to recommend changes on retirement until a retirement commission empaneled by Congress reports back to Congress and the Defense Department. On the issue of pay, he said, the department will continue to recommend pay increases. ere will be a slight decrease in those increases, but its a cost of growth in a growth-of-increase recommendation, he said, so make sure you understand that. On compensation and benets, Hagel said, the Defense Department would not close commissaries. Moving to the TRICARE health care plan, Hagel said the department is recommending consolidating its three systems into one system that will be more eective and ecient. is [will happen over a period of time and wont affect anything on base in health care, he said. Nor would it limit preferred provider options or change health care quality, he added. On health care co-pay increases, Hagel said, the budget request contains no recommended changes for activeduty service members. Family members and working-age retirees already have co-pay amounts, depending on their geographic locations and medical services, he noted.Defense secretary explains budget request during base visits 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 10, 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 10 to 14. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 10 Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 18 and OCONUS 10 a.m. to noon March 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Job search workshop scheduled for March 12A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., March 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial communication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By MC2 Jacquelyn D. ChildsUSS Nimitz Public Affairse aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) celebrated the life of its namesake, Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz, during the week of Feb. 24 to 28. Chester Nimitz was born in Fredericksburg, Texas, Feb. 24, 1885. After graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1905, he served at a variety of various commands that led up to his selection to admiral. He played a huge role in the success of the U.S. in the war in the Pacic during World War II when he consequently received his promotion to eet admiral Dec. 19, 1944. Adm. Nimitz would go on to act as the U.S. signatory to the Japanese surrender aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay the following year. During his long and successful career he developed an incomparable leadership style that continued long after the war ended. He passed away Feb. 20, 1966, just days shy of his 81st birthday, and two years later the construction began of the rst in a new class of super-carriers to bear his name. We are so proud to share a legacy with such an admirable leader, said Capt. Je Ruth, commanding ocer of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. While it sets the bar high, the ship and its crew continue to perform as leaders in the carrier community, honorably paving the way as the rst in its class. Sailors on board celebrated in a few ways including sharing various unique multimedia products with the world, a message over the ships announcement system, and a cake-cutting on the mess decks. Adm. Nimitz grandson Chet Lay, son of Catherine Nimitz Lay, provided products and a noteworthy interview over the phone. e eet admirals eldest daughter Catherine smashed the champagne bottle on the aircraft carriers bow May 13, 1972 christening USS Nimitz. Since that day she has continued to share a special bond with the ship, one that she has passed down to her children as well. She wants to thank all of you for keeping the country so strong and so safe, Chet Lay said on behalf of his mother during the interview. And she feels that Nimitz is her ship and always will be and she is very proud of all of you. Other Sailors are just as eager to participate in the signicant celebration. is is a great day in history, said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Kendra Bellinger at the Feb. 24 cake-cutting ceremony. Its the birth of one of the greatest admirals in history and we are celebrating his hard work and life today. Feb. 24 the ship was ready to post a link to a set of never-before published photos of Adm. Nimitz with family and friends. All of the items were provided by Chet Lay. Feb. 25 brought an audio interview, providing a unique look into Nimitz personal life. Feb. 26, viewers saw a photo album containing the rare photos along with caption information. Feb. 27 the ship published a special edition of its weekly publication Nimitz News with a more in-depth history of Adm. Nimitz leadership techniques and accomplishments. Feb. 28, Nimitz posted the link to Fleet Adm. Nimitz Gray Book, digitized and published by the Naval War College. e book, named simply for the color of its cover, is a collection of communications between Nimitz and other commanders during World War II. e journal, originally classied as top secret, was declassied in 1972 and provides an in-depth look into U.S. strategies and actions during the war.Navy photoAdm. Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, standing, confers with, from left, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Adm. William D. Leahy concerning future moves in the war against Japan in 1944.Nimitz Sailors celebrate their namesakeNavy photo by MC3 Katarzyna KobiljakThe aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) arrives at Naval Air Station North Island. Nimitz Graybook goes digital online From Naval War College Public Affairse Naval War College unveiled the public online digitization project of Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitzs 4,000 page operational diary, known as e Nimitz Graybook, during an evening lecture, Feb. 24 at NWC in Newport, R.I. Covering activities and correspondence of the Pacic Com mand from Dec. 7, 1941 to Aug. 31, 1945, the Graybook is a his torical record of operations and planning in the Pacic during World War II and serves as a win dow into Nimitzs decision mak ing process during the war. We can trace the planning pro cess, a lot of which was pioneered here at the Naval War College, for large-scale operations and watch the war unfold almost as if we were in the room, said Craig L. Symonds, U.S. Naval Academy profes sor emeritus of history, during the evening lecture. Symonds said Nimitz proclaimed that the wargaming experience and education he received here at NWC were central to his success in the Pacic war. Chester Nimitz once declared that he never en countered an event in the entire war that had not been anticipated at some level during the war-gam ing practices that they had here at the Naval War College, except the kamikaze, Symonds said. Following the war, Nimitzs Graybook remained classied for 30 years and even after it was declassi ed in 1972, scholars had to travel great distances to what is now, the Naval History and Heritage Com mand at Washington Navy Yard, to access the docu ment. Following the events of 9/11, scholars not as sociated with the Department of Defense now had to leap more barriers in security to gain access the source. In 2009, thanks to the generosity of the American Naval Records Society, the Naval Order of the United States and the Naval War College Foundation, the Graybook contents were scanned so that a CD-ROM version became available. is proved helpful but making copies of carbon paper proved imperfect. It was evident that a fully digitized version, the version we celebrate and welcome this evening, was Navy photoDuring the surrender of Japan in Tokyo Bay, Sept. 2, 1945, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, signs the Instrument of Surrender as United States Representative, aboard USS Missouri (BB-63). Standing behind him are, from left, General of the Army Douglas MacArthur; Adm. William F. Halsey and Rear Adm. Forrest Sherman. See Graybook, Page 13 Nimitz

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From the National Aeronautics and Space Administratione National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Kepler mission announced Feb. 26 the discovery of 715 new planets. ese newly-veried worlds orbit 305 stars, revealing multiple-planet systems much like our own solar system. Nearly 95 percent of these planets are smaller than Neptune, which is almost four times the size of Earth. is discovery marks a signicant increase in the number of known smallsized planets more akin to Earth than previously identied exoplanets, which are planets outside our solar system. e Kepler team continues to amaze and excite us with their planet hunting results, said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for NASAs Science Mission Directorate in Washington. at these new planets and solar systems look somewhat like our own, portends a great future when we have the James Webb Space Telescope in space to characterize the new worlds. Since the discovery of the rst planets outside our solar system roughly two decades ago, verication has been a laborious planet-by-planet process. Now, scientists have a statistical technique that can be applied to many planets at once when they are found in systems that harbor more than one planet around the same star. To verify this bounty of planets, a research team co-led by Jack Lissauer, planetary scientist at NASAs Ames Research Center in Moett Field, Calif., analyzed stars with more than one potential planet, all of which were detected in the rst two years of Keplers observations May 2009 to March 2011. e research team used a technique called verication by multiplicity, which relies in part on the logic of probability. Kepler observes 150,000 stars, and has found a few thousand of those to have planet candidates. If the candidates were randomly distributed among Keplers stars, only a handful would have more than one planet candidate. However, Kepler observed hundreds of stars that have multiple planet candidates. rough a careful study of this sample, these 715 new planets were veried. is method can be likened to the behavior we know of lions and lionesses. In our imaginary savannah, the lions are the Kepler stars and the lionesses are the planet candidates. e lionesses would sometimes be observed grouped together whereas lions tend to roam on their own. If you see two lions it could be a lion and a lioness or it could be two lions. But if more than two large felines are gathered, then it is very likely to be a lion and his pride. us, through multiplicity the lioness can be reliably identied in much the same way multiple planet candidates can be found around the same star. Four years ago, Kepler began a string of announcements of rst hundreds, then thousands, of planet candidates, but they were only candidate worlds, Lissauer said. Weve now developed a process to verify multiple planet candidates in bulk to deliver planets wholesale, and have used it to unveil a veritable bonanza of new worlds. ese multiple-planet systems are fertile grounds for studying individual planets and the conguration of planetary neighborhoods. is provides clues to planet formation. Four of these new planets are less than 2.5 times the size of Earth and orbit in their suns habitable zone, dened as the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet may be suitable for life-giving liquid water. One of these new habitable zone planets, called Kepler-296f, orbits a star half the size and 5 percent as bright as our sun. Kepler-296f is twice the size of Earth, but scientists do not know whether the planet is a gaseous world, with a thick hydrogenhelium envelope, or it is a water world surrounded by a deep ocean. From this study we learn planets in these multi-systems are small and their orbits are at and circular, resembling pancakes, not your classical view of an atom, said Jason Rowe, research scientist at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif., and co-leader of the research. e more we explore the more we nd familiar traces of ourselves amongst the stars that remind us of home. is latest discovery brings the conrmed count of planets outside our solar system to nearly 1,700. As we continue to reach toward the stars, each discovery brings us one step closer to a more accurate understanding of our place in the galaxy. Launched in March 2009, Kepler is the rst NASA mission to nd potentially habitable Earthsize planets. Discoveries include more than 3,600 planet candidates, of which 961 have been veried as bona-de worlds.Kepler nds 715 planetsfar more desirable and es sential, Symonds said. During the evening lec ture, on the anniversary of Nimitzs 129th birthday, Symonds provided insight to the contents of the Gray book, and Nimitzs leader ship and decision making process. Reading it pulls aside the curtain of history, Symonds said. What do we see when we part aside that curtain? It becomes evident that one essential key to Allied and American success in the Pacic was Nimitzs personal role as a theater commander and in particular, his calm and even temperament. Behind those cool blue eyes was the calculating mind of a man who weighed the odds and made plans ac cordingly. Following the Battle of Coral Sea and Doolittle Raid, Nimitz had lost two of his four carriers in the Pacic. In May 1942, Nimitz learned from his code breaking team that the Japanese were planning an assault of Midway Atoll. Nimitz was faced with a decision. Wait for repair of his carriers and preserve the only two carriers left in the Pacic, or lay a trap for the Japanese and risk the only thing standing be tween them and the west coast of the U.S. Was Midway, that out post of coral and sand, worth risking the few car riers he had? Did Nimitz want to bet his career on an unlikely victory? Yes he did, Symonds said. Nimitz believed he could repair the Yorktown quickly and use Midways airstrip as an immobile fourth carrier that couldnt be sunk. Instead of being sur prised by the Japanese as had happened at Pearl Harbor, Nimitz could sur prise them and send some of their carriers, and as it turned out, all of their car riers to the bottom. Its hard today, aware of how this battle turned out, to ap preciate what a bold deci sion that was. It seems like a gamble. But in Nimitzs mind, it was not a gamble. He did not throw the dice carelessly or thoughtlessly. Nimitz fully expected to win and of course he did, spectacularly. More than any other single individual, Chester Nimitz was the man who won the war in the Pacic for the Allies. Now, thanks to the public availability of the Graybook, we can see and understand how he did it. e digitization of the collection is the product of collaboration between the NWC and NHHC, funded generously through the Na val War College Foundation. We see this as a pi lot program, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, director of NHHC. e method in which e Graybook was digitized and cross-refer enced is going to give us a path forward in making documents together that are accessible to scholars and the American public. Anytime we have a Sailor who violates their core values, we have a problem. e Bluejackets Manual dated 1917 has 60 pages dedicated to the Chief Petty Ofcer. Written is: Unless you recognize it is your duty to instruct your juniors and unless you do instruct them, and unless your endeavor to inculcate in them the knowledge of how things should be done; of how they should conduct themselves, you will have failed in your duties. Chief petty ocers are in a position to impact the entire chain of command from the most junior Sailor to the most senior ocer, Stevens said. Our inaction can be interpreted as unspoken permission. We have to make up our minds to control what we own. I am convinced that we can put this issue of integrity to rest quickly and maintain a steady drum beat. e Navy Ethos states, Integrity is the foundation of our conduct; respect for oth ers is fundamental to our character; deci sive leadership is crucial to our success. Stevens told the audience he is not perfect. He related his story of as a young aviation structural mechanic who took great pride in xing a plane that had experienced a malfunction in ight. It was a common practice for the aircrew team to keep certain consumable spare parts in their helmet bag because they would eventually need them. Stev ens was no exception. One day a warrant ocer stopped him. Stevens, I heard you got some stu in your helmet bag. He knew he shouldnt have the extra stu in his helmet bag so he admitted he did. is was the quality assurance warrant, and he told Stevens to stop by at the end of the day at which time Stevens received a counseling chit. Sometimes we wait too long to treat the symptoms and then it becomes a fatal disease, Stevens said. All it might take is pulling a shipmate to the side and telling them to do the right thing. You might say hey I dont think its a big deal, but I dont think its the right thing to do and we really need to stop now. Im asking you to take control within good order and discipline of what you own and help us put out this brush re.StevensFrom Page 9 Naval History and Heritage Command photoAdmiral Chester W. Nimitz presents awards on board USS Grayling (SS-209) at the Pearl Harbor Submarine Base, following ceremonies in which he took command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, Dec. 31, 1941. Nimitz spent 6 years in the submarine force early in his career. GraybookFrom Page 12NASA imageThe artist concept depicts multiple-transiting planet systems, which are stars with more than one planet. The planets eclipse or transit their host star from the vantage point of the observer. This angle is called edge-on. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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DuncanCenter for EOD and Diving Public AffairsFollowing feedback from the eet regarding the need for course updates, the Center for Explosive Ordnance and Diving in Panama City announced Feb. 25 the availability of the Navy Diver Salvage Course on Navy e-Learning. Previously available as one master course, the NDSC has been broken into four individual course modules: Navy Diver Salvage Fundamentals, Naval Architecture, Operations, and Scenarios. Diving Advisory 14-02 announced the promulgation of the new course and transition date for personnel enrolled in the previous version. Completion of the NDSC course is a prerequisite for Master Diver evaluation and for Diving Warrant Ocer applicants. According to CENEODDIVE Learning Standards Ocer Melanie Hinson, this course redesign enables Sailors to complete their online training in more manageable modules, and also provides just-in-time training for Sailors who may need refresher training on specic salvage topics. e previous edition was one long course that contained 92 hours of training. e new modularized training empowers the learner to focus on related topics which result in greater understanding of the material and enhanced comprehension, Hinson said. A primary emphasis of the revision dealt with making the mathematical computations easier to follow through the use of indepth, step-by-step examples that provide a crawl, walk, run approach to the learning experience for our Sailors. e NDSC Scenarios course module, while ungraded, provides a look at dierent types of actual salvage projects and illustrates how the information in the other three course modules applies to real-world salvage operations. Course update project tasks were accomplished by Subject Matter Experts who performed this review and course upgrade in addition to their normal duties, CENEODDIVE Master Chief Navy Diver William Hargaray said. Using SMEs current with down-range operations allowed the course fundamentals, graphics, training sequence, math calculations, assessments, and references to align with the needs of the eet. Capt. James Beene, commanding ocer of CENEODDIVE noted that the updated courses are more than just a periodic review. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsFirefighters with the Miramar Fire Department look over a 1944 International Harvester FFN-3 fire and crash crew engine at the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum warehouse aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., Feb. 12. Old re truck on comeback road By Lance Cpl. Christopher JohnsMarine Corps Air Station Miramar e Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum acquired an International Harvester FFN-3 re and crash crew engine in running condition, Nov. 13. e museums sta began researching the seven decades-old re engine immediately and is beginning the restoration process in earnest at last. is particular World War II-era engine was rst used to ght re aboard Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, Calif., during 1944, making it a piece of MCAS Miramar, Calif., and the communitys history. is is part of [the air stations] heritage, said Steve Smitty Smith, curator with the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum. ere arent a lot of these engines around anymore and for us to nd one that used to serve aboard El Toro is just amazing; and how often does anyone get to see a vintage World War II re engine? Fireghters with the Miramar Fire Department paid a visit to the museum to see a bit of that history rsthand and one reghter couldnt contain his interest in the rusty, red engine. Its great that this truck could even be found, let alone in working condition, said Dan Regis, an engineer with Engine 60 at the Miramar Fire Department. I like that you can nd something that still has its originality; it hasnt been hacked to pieces or modied and this is just about as original as it gets. is will allow people to really see what state-ofthe-art was back in this trucks day and what we have come to today. e Marine Corps Mechanized Museum aboard Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., undertook this project to aid the aviation museum by providing parts and leads to where more needed parts for the re engine can be found. All that remains now is to nd able-bodied volunteers to help in its restoration, and also more researchers to help document the markings and history of this particular vehicle. [We] arent re engine and crash crew specialists by any means, said Smith. We arent sure whether this truck was an [installation] asset or if they deployed with squadrons during WWII and Korea. We do know this truck is in rough shape, but is a part of our history, and we would love some help restoring it. is project requires volunteers with experience in body work, brake-system repair or any other kind of vehicle maintenance or restoration to see to a timely conclusion for display in the San Diego County Fair in June. In the past two years at the fair, weve noticed the rst weekend is about the re departments, said Smith. We really want to get this truck out there to share its history with the community and reghters to pay homage not just to them, but to their past as remen. Volunteers who want to be a part of restoring history are encouraged to contact the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum for opportunities in not only this project, but many others. American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama Feb. 25 informed Afghan President Hamid Karzai that because the Afghan leader has demonstrated that it is un likely that he will sign the bilateral security agree ment on a U.S. military presence in Afghanistan beyond this year, he has asked the Pentagon to ensure that it has adequate plans in place to accom plish an orderly with drawal by the end of the year should the United States not keep any troops in Afghanistan after 2014. In a summary of the Obama-Karzai phone call released to reporters, White House ocials said Obama is leaving open the possibility of concluding a bilateral security agreement with Afghanistan later this year. However, the longer we go without a BSA, the more challenging it will be to plan and execute any U.S. mission, they added. Furthermore, the longer we go without a BSA, the more likely it will be that any post-2014 U.S. mission will be smaller in scale and ambition. Soon after, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel released a statement expressing his strong support for the presidents decision. is is a prudent step, given that President Kar zai has demonstrated that it is unlikely that he will sign the bilateral security agreement, which would provide DOD personnel with critical protections and authorities after 2014, the secretary said. He also commended the eorts of Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commander of U.S. forces and the NATO-led Interna tional Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, and other military leaders to provide flex ibility to the president as the United States works to determine the future of the U.S. pres ence in Afghanistan. As the United States military continues to move people and equip ment out of the Afghan theater, our force pos ture over the next several months will provide various options for political leaders in the United States and NATO, Hagel said in his statement. And during this time, DOD will still continue planning for U.S. par ticipation in a NATO-led mission focused on train ing, advising, and assist ing Afghan security forc es, as well as a narrowly focused counterterrorism mission. e United States will consult closely with NATO allies and ISAF partners in the months ahead, he added, noting that he looks forward to discussing U.S. planning with NATO and ISAF defense ministers in Brussels this week.Exit plan made for Afghanistan ObamaDiver course on internet Navy photo by MC2 Blake Midnight Students at Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center conduct training operations in the facilitys 12-foot pool. NDSTC, the largest diving facility in the world, trains more than 1200 military divers from every branch of service each year. Accident claims twoFrom EOD Group 2 Public AffairsNavy Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 28, of Caldwell, Ohio, and Navy Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 23, of Gladstone, Mo., died while conducting dive operations at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Aberdeen, Md., Feb. 26. Harris and Reyher were assigned to Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2, located at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Ft. Story. EODGRU-2 is conducting an investigation into the deaths of the Sailors. 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 6, 2014