The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00338


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Karzai balks at signingAfghan boss forgoes agreement with U.S. despite urging By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense ocials continue to urge Afghan President Hamid Karzai to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement with the United States, Pentagon press secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. We continue to believe it would be enormously helpful to have a bilateral security agreement as soon as possible, Kirby said during a Pentagon news conference. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said he would like to have the agreement signed by an upcoming NATO De fense Ministerial. at meeting is next week, Kirby said. Karzai has said he will leave it to his successor to sign the document, which if done soon will allow for the United States and other NATO nations to plan for Operation Resolute Support the train, advise and assist mission that is set to begin Jan. 1. 2015. Without an agreement were going to have to start planning for a complete withdrawal, but were not at that point right now, Kirby said. Pentagon ocials are also studying a Center for Naval Analysis report commissioned by the Defense Department that concludes the Taliban will strengthen after the NATO combat mission ends, and that the Afghan military should be larger than currently projected. One of the reasons why the alliance is interested in the resolute support mission post-2014 is to help improve the capabilities of the Afghan national security forces, the admiral said in response to questions about the reports conclusions. Its a commitment we made long ago. Its a commitment were trying to make now on THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Sit or stand on the job ... your call Page 9 Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield drill at Kings Bay Pages 4, 5 Honeybees Transferred from base in Georgia Page 9 Excellence honors for community outreach programsBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay recently earned rst-place Awards of Excellence in the Personal Excellence Partnership and the Campaign Drug-Free categories from Navy Region Southeast. Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr. honored Securitys MA1 Johnny Archer, Port Operations EM1 Cody Guidry and Securitys MA1 Christopher Tyner, as well as Lt. Barbara Johns, U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps, Commanding Ofcer of the Training Contingent, and Ensign Lorene Hendricks, USNSCC, Defy administrative ocer. Scott Bassett, public aairs ofcer for NSB Kings Bay said the award for Personal Excellence Kings Bay earns regional awards See Awards, Page 6Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Karzai, Page 3 Level III awarded for patient-centric care by NCQABy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital Jacksonville was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home Feb. 14. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of recognition for patient-centric care, was awarded to all primary care clinics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) at the hospital and all ve of its branch health clinics. e Navys approach to the Patient-Centered Medical Home is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors to nurses and case managers-led by the primary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-for-prot organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning e Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval during its re-accreditation process in January, NH Jacksonville was recognized for its continuing compliance with e Joint Commissions state-of-the-art, national standards of care. In achieving Joint Commission accreditation, Naval Hospital Jacksonville has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients, said Mark G. Pelletier, e Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certication Operations chief operating ocer. e Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. rough sequestration, reduced budgets and civilian furloughs this past year, Naval Hospital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, NH Jacksonville commanding ocer. is recognition and accreditation demonstrates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive dierence in the lives of our patients. e MEDIG team, after reviewing 60 programs (from reCourtesy photoAn artists rendering of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. NH Jax was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home Feb. 14, the nations highest level of recognition for patient-centric care. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMaster Chief of the Navy visits NSB Kings BayMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Friday, Feb. 21. Stevens spoke to Kings Bay Chief Petty Officers during a CPO All Hands meeting at the Kings Bay Chapel. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer, Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., congratulates Lt. Barbara Johns for her part in earning excellence awards from Southeast Region. EM1 Cody Guidry, left, MA1 Christopher Tyner, behind Guffey, and Ensign Lorene Hendricks look on.NH Jacksonville earns highest ranking Kirby See NH Jax, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Changes at Kings Bay Pet Clinice Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment Facility is under-going changes, with a new computer system, which makes your pets records easily accessible to your new veterinarian when you move. But, your patience is asked for as sta works through the transition and the challenges of a new system. In addition, changes are being made to the prescription rell policy. Pet owners will now need to call to rell a medication, and it will take two business days to ll them. When you call, the following information is needed: last name, pets name and name of medication. ere we also will be changes to some prices. is is controlled at the Public Health Command level, and anticipated changes are not drastic, but be aware some things may require more or less than you are used to.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e evenings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and entertainment, is $35 per person. For parade participation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ofcers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. Student scholarships In 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in subma rine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or email scholars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on their goal of providing access to Navy training anytime, anyplace, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Program Oce announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct Internet access to Navy e-Learning content. Most Navy Learners were previously accessing NeL through Navy Knowledge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. at was a multi-step process that is now signicantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, without going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of www. aas.prod.nel.training.navy.mil will take you directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management system after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search engine and that gets you strictly learningrelated returns, streamlining nding the course you are looking for. Although direct access to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer browser. Many of our courses take advantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning experience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compatibility with these courses, NeL provides conguration guides for many of the latest versions of IE. NeL also provides a plugin analyzer to help customers conrm they are able to access and run the multi-media content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, customers may simply click on the Browser Conguration link, located in the NeL Help section, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. According to Reeves, NeL is the worlds largest learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Training, including the newly-updated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Challenge Course, Reeves said. Last year, the Cyber Awareness Challenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than 4 million completions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to oer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO, added Reeves. Although NKO was designed as a one-stop-shop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense. Since 2001, Sailors have depended on Navy e-Learning to help advance their careers and stay current with training requirements. Courses range from Privacy and Personally Identiable Information Awareness Training required of all Sailors, Marines, civilians and contractors to specic training for individual units. Trainees using NeL complete between four and ve million online courses annually from an oering of more than 8, 700 courses. e Naval Education and Training Command relies on NeL for use in schoolhouses for individual skills and skill refresher training.e-Learning now has direct access Navy Ed and Training

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Midway dinner June 7From The Navy League of Mayport, Fla. e Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. is is an all-service event featuring a joint Color Guard, an All Service Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. e invited keynote speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former prisoners of war from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty also will be in attendance. e evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacic. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65. Prices for civilians and retirees is $65. e evening includes ne dining and a memora ble program. Uniform will be O4 and above, dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below, dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 2469982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 7947814 or anuday00@aol. com Navy History and Heritage Command photoDouglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese crusier Mikuma during the Battle of Midway. search ethics to patient access) in January, oered a resounding endorsement of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. e command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and ve branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 61,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. the ground in Afghanistan to improve their capacity and capability. Afghan forces are in the lead for combat operations throughout the country, the admiral said. ey, and NATO, never dismiss the Taliban insurgency or the threat the Taliban pose not just to the United States and its allies, but to the Af ghan people. e CNA report will inform DOD leaders as the mission continues, Kirby said.NH JaxFrom Page 1 KarzaiFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 The good guys pre vail. MA2 Martino Peoples handcuffs the simulated dead assailant. They werent taking any chances. Below left, active duty security force personnel quickly respond to a 911 call and hunt down the assailant. This is a drill! Solid Curtain Citadel Shield 2014Active shooter role player EODCS Jeremy Baker, Kings Bay EOD Mobile Ghikas, and other injured role players, helplessly lays on the ground. Kings Bay Patrolmen JeanPaul J.P Curtis responds to the call. Patrolman Shawn Doyle and Rex Peters clear the way for innocents to escape. The shooter is just right of center in the back ground. Multiple Integrated LASER Engagement System (MILES) is used to simulate a real gun fight. Weapons fire with a gunshot noise and shells drop to the floor, but the hit is registered by LASER. simulated shot to the leg and hopes the good guys win soon. fortunate the simulated bullet only grazed his head.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 Photos by EM1 Mark Treen With the shooter down, the first innocents are allowed to exit the Commissary. Above and left, MA1 Jabril Muhammad takes charge to make sure the threat is over and the commissary is safe. After security says its safe, Kings Bay Emergency Medical Technicians can enter. They begin by tagging each person by color to show how badly they are hurt. Marshalls leg shot wound gives him a red tag, signifying a serious injury. Right, injured sailors are brought outside the Commissary where a team of Kings Bay EMTs treats their injuries. Above, those with serious injuries are placed on the red mat. Left, Camden County Fire Rescue responded as well to the drill scenario. Camden Countys Michael Yonn lifts the an injured Sailor to be transported to the hospital.

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Navy helps host robotics contest By MC1 Jacob L. DillonNavy Recruiting District Houston Public AffairsHigh school students from across southeast Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and the Florida panhandle battled for underwater superiority at the Houston Regional SeaPerch Challenge Feb. 15 at the Pearland Recreation Center in Pearland, Texas. e Navy City Outreach oce, in collaboration with Houston Communication, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics organization hosted more than 350 students in the three-part event including a heist deep-water transfer, a speed-course obstacle course and a display/panel interview. SeaPerch, an Oce of Naval Research-sponsored program, is an innovative underwater robotics program that equips teachers and students with the resources they need to build an underwater remotely operated vehicle in an in-school or out-of-school setting to promote interest in STEM related elds. SeaPerch rollout is a primary eort of the Navys city outreach program which falls under the Navy Recruiting Commands diversity division, located in Millington, Tenn. STEM programs are important to the future of the Navy said Lt. Cmdr. Jaye Jones, a Navy city outreach ocer for Navy Recruiting Command. ese participants are the future of the Navy, Jones said. We are making sure we protect that future. Todays Navy demands greater high-tech skills and men and women with strong math and science backgrounds. rough the Navy city outreach program and these types of collaborative eorts, we build stronger STEM foundations for tomorrow. e two big winners were the Passmore Elementary School SeaPals and the Alvin Junior High Aquabots, both from Alvin, Texas. ese two teams tied for rst place in the overall competition. Because of this, each school received a fully-funded trip to the nals courtesy of the TechStreet Houston organization.SeaPerch photoStudents work on an underwater robot during a SeaPerch Challenge. eir inventions helped all society By Lance Cpl. Norman EcklesMarine Corps Logistics Base BarstowSince 1976, February has been dedicated to the achievements and contributions that African Americans have made but everyone knows that; what impact have those had on society and where would we be without them? Without some of the essential innovations African Americans have come up with and are still coming up with today, contemporary society would be a disaster. Ask yourself this, what would a day in life be like if these men and women did not create such inuential inventions? Imagine waking up bright and early from a good nights rest and going into your kitchen to make a healthy breakfast then realizing your food is rotten. Without the innovative idea of John Standard, the refrigerator wouldnt be what it is today, and this scenario would often be the case. In 1891, Standard improved the way refrigerators kept food colder longer by adding a compartment that held ice, which had to be manually put into the compartment. After nding out your refrigerator wasnt working, you decide to go to the store to buy more groceries. You put your child in the car seat and head for the store. On the way to the store, you get into a car accident because there are no trac lights to let you know when to stop or go. In 1923, a man by the name of Garrett Morgan re ceived a patent for a threepositioned traffic light. He was motivated to create it after witnessing a car acci dent in order to save lives. Now that you have gotten into a car accident, you have no car and have to walk from place to place. Being a parent, you dont want to leave your child at home. But imagine having to carry your baby everywhere. You say, I have a stroller but without African American innovation, you dont. William H. Richardson improved and patented the baby buggy in 1889. He brought the idea form England and improved it so you can walk your child down the street without having to carry them the whole time. After your walk, you decide to relax for a while; however, its a typical High Dessert summer day out. Without a certain inventor, you would be relaxing while drenched in sweat. During World War II, an inventor named Fredrick McKinley designed and created air conditioners for mil itary units out in the eld to store blood serum for trans fusions and medicines. is very uncomfortable, dangerous and inconvenient day would be the case everyday if it werent for African American ingenuity. is is only to name a few, there are thousands of other inventions we use daily made from people who were once enslaved and thought to be incompetent by society. Morgan Partnership bundles support to the community in enriching youth programs and outreach, like the Adopt-A-School (program) and special events like Red Ribbon Week. e number of participants and impact of the programs are outstanding. e Adopt-A-School program helps 11 commands on base reach about 10,000 local school children. Scouting, Naval Junior Reserve Ocer Training Corps, Sea Cadets and Midshipmen training impact more than 1,000 children and young adults. Last years Special Olympics involved volunteers from every command on base. ose 1,000 volunteers helped approximately 450 athletes from eight Georgia counties. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard service members participate in career day events at three local elementary schools and have talked to an estimated 600 youths, describing their jobs and experiences while serving in the military. e Campaign Drug-Free category was awarded for the bases participation in Drug Education for Youth Program and the Red Ribbon Week Campaign. When asked about DEFY, Sally Galleon of Fleet and Family Support Center said, Military children tend to travel a lot and to be able to connect with other military children and leadership. ose connections and positive activities help them to be more resistant to drugs and alcohol. e USNSCC uses the DEFY program, typically for ages 10 to 11, as an opportunity for Sea Cadets, ages 13 and 14, to learn leadership skills as they serve. It (DEFY) has an exceptional impact on the community, Hendricks said. It brings (Sea Cadets) and gives them skills that (DEFY participants) look up to. e Red Ribbon Week Campaign is an annual weekly observance. It involves eight elementary schools which participated in e Best Me Is Drug Free poster contest. Navy drug and alcohol counselors and Navy Military Working Dog teams gave presentations to nine elementary schools which had. We did a lot in 2013 but expect an equally impactful 2014, Bassett said. We look forward to continuing the excellent partnerships we have with the community, local schools, Habitat for Humanity, local churches and assistance to charities.AwardsFrom Page 1 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being accepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swim suit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 5733001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 5738972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renova tion and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety dur ing renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refresh ments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with comput ers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by MC1 Mark Treen Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. e cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civil ians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. e Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots avail able. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-onone with their children, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. e program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids While he works to protect our count ry,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospit al works to save his son from a deadly disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Bees invade Georgia base By Nathan L. Hanks Jr.Marine Corps Logistics Base AlbanyHoneybee populations may be shrinking around the world but that is not the case at Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany. ousands of honeybees were found Feb. 14 when a worker opened a lid to a wooden crate outside of Building 1261 located at the south end of warehouse row. Georgia Master Beekeeper Dale Richter was called in Feb. 17 to assist with the removal of the entire colony including a large amount of wax honeycomb. He estimated there were 40,000 of the buzzing creatures, weighing an average of a tenth of a gram and about 1/2 to 5/8 inch in length, found inside the crate. Richter was recommended because he is considered an expert in his eld and works closely with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, Julie Robbins, natural resource manager, Environmental Branch, Installation and Environment Division, MCLB Albany, said. We know he has the equipment to catch the whole hive alive. We also know he could have the bees tested to make sure they are not Africanized bees. Before approaching the crate, Richter donned his bee suit, which looks more like a space suit, and a pair of plastic gloves. He red up his smoker, lled with smoldering pine needles, and gave the bees a couple of blasts. When bees detect smoke, they think the hive is threatened by re, he said. e bees then gorge themselves on honey until theyre lulled into a state in which theyre less likely to sting. Richter opened the lid and carefully propped it up against the box trying not to disturb the bees attached to the comb on the lid. Richter then employed a special vacuum that gently pulled the live bees into a round wire cage. He then turned his attention to the box where he vacuumed thousands of live bees crawling on the waxy comb. Using a putty knife, Richter separated the cells, oozing with wild honey, away from the walls of the crate. He then placed the hive, one piece at a time, into a plastic bin and the wire cage of thousands of bees in the back of his pickup truck for transport to a property where the bees can establish new territory or be incorporated into an existing bee colony. Richter estimates there was nearly 60 to 80 pounds of honey and wax on the comb inside the crate. Robbins said it is encouraging to know the base has a good population of honeybees. She attributes it to the bases prescribed burning practices and other management that encourage vegetation that bees depend upon. Some of our eorts to assist the bees habitat include prescribed burning, which helps improve forage bases such as wild owers, she said. Additionally, the clover planted in the pecan orchard provides an ideal food source for bees.Having been a reporter most of my career, Ive spent plenty of time sitting at a desk. But Ive also spent a lot of time getting out of the office and covering stories. It truly is the best of both worlds doing some of each. Ive also had part-time or temp jobs where I either stood or sat. When I was younger, I would have said I would rather stand. But now, sitting is just fine. If today I had to be on my feet all day, like I have at times in my life, it would just about kill me.Would you rather sit or stand on the job?MTSA Anthony Ramos Trident Training Facility The Bronx, N.Y. Stand all day. You get the blood pumping in your legs. Jennifer Sherrill Family member Del Rio, Texas Id rather stand all day. Those kind of jobs seem more exciting to me. EM1 Michael Sterling USS Alaska Gold Birmingham, Ala. Probably sit. But why not have the best of both worlds? MTSN Brandon McQueen Trident Training Facility Garner, N.C. Stand all day. It seems like youre doing more work. MA1 Zachary Newcomb Kings Bay Police Suffolk, Va. Id rather be walking around. I sit in a patrol car all day, but when I get the chance I get out and walk around. Bill Kempton Retired Navy Provincetown, Mass. Sit. I drove a patrol car for 20 years on St. Simons Island and for Glynn County. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Photo by Nathan L. Hanks Jr.Georgia Master Beekeeper Dale Richter estimates nearly 60-80 pounds of honey and wax on the comb was found Feb. 14 inside a crate on Logistics Base Albany, Ga. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 4, 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered March 5 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplating marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. March 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 4 and 5. For more information and to register call 573-4513.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Time Management teaches you to planHave you ever worked hard all day, but were unsure of what you had actually done? This class will focus on strategies and ideas that will help you get the most out of your day and teach you how to prioritize what needs to get done. This class is 10 a.m. to noon March 6. For more information and to register call, 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 10 to 14. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 10 Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 18 and OCONUS 10 a.m. to noon March 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Job search workshop scheduled for March 12A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., March 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial communication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to successfully transition from a military to a civilian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate partner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11 Coast Guard Capt. Winslow Buxton was 100 years young Feb. 14! Living in Bellevue, Wash., he remains aable, pert and active. He was born in New London, Conn., and attended the Coast Guard Academy from 1934 to 1938. In honor of his birthday, Coast Guard historian Dr. Dave Rosen sat down with Buxton as the veteran recounted his World War II adventures.Recorded by Dr. Dave Rosen1942: Lt. Buxton as executive ocer of Coast Guard Cutter Comanche e 1942 Greenland mission of the 165-foot cutter consisted of guarding the cryolite mine at Ivigtut, setting up the Beach Head Station, icebreaking, looking for any enemy personnel and helping chart the coast. May: Comanche crossed the Arctic Circle just as the winter ice melted, escorting the cargo ship SS Bridgeport. It transited the 90-miles long Sondre Strom Fjord en route to the Bluie West Eight airbase at its inland end, about 35 miles north of the Arctic Circle. e delivery of aviation gasoline to the airbase enabled the trans-Atlantic ights to begin. Buxton was accepted into the Sons of the Polar Seas. June: Comanche served as the visual aide and radio beacon at the fjord entrance to the main airbase, Narsarsuak, for the rst U.S. Air Force trans-Atlantic ight of B-17s while the air control system was still being installed. e ship logged the arrival of 26 B17s on that rst day, from 2:40 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. July: Comanche served as plane guard at BW-1 at Tungliark Fjord, performing rescue duty for arriving and departing craft in case of ditching or crashing. On July 15 the famous Lost Squadron landed on the Ice Cap after attempting to y from Greenland to Iceland. e Lost Squadron: Two B-17E Flying Fortress bombers and six P-38F Lightning ghters bellied in on top of the Greenland ice cap July 15, 1942. e airplanes were being ferried across the Atlantic in 1942 bound for Reykjavik, Iceland. e planes encountered bad weather. Bogus radio transmissions, traced to an illegal German radio station in northeast Greenland sending false weather information only added to the squadrons woes. Running low on gas, they decided to crash land on the ice cap. To assist rescue, the entire squadron stayed together. e rst plane failed in an attempt to land with the wheels down, and the remaining ight went in with wheels up, sliding a considerable distance before coming to a stop. On the fourth day after the crash landing the crews managed to make their SOS heard. Search and rescue planes located the crash site and dropped special clothing and food necessary for survival on the ice cap. e pilots and crew had to hike 17 miles to the coast, where they were picked up by the Cutter Northland on July 14, which had been on patrol looking for German radio and weather stations. e Importance of the Norden Bombsight: Left behind in one of the B-17s was the top secret Norden bombsight. e Norden was a tachometric bombsight used by the U.S. Army Air Forces and the U.S. Navy during World War II. It aided the crew of bomber aircraft in dropping bombs accurately. Key to the operation of the Norden were two features: a mechanical computer that calculated the bombs trajectory based on current ight conditions, and a linkage to the bombers autopilot that let it react quickly and accurately to changes in the wind or other eects. Together, these features allowed for unprecedented accuracy in day bombing from high altitudes. In test runs the Norden demonstrated a circular error probability of 75 feet, an astonishing performance for the era. is accuracy allowed direct attacks on ships, factories, and other point targets. Both the Navy and the Air Force saw this as a means to achieve war aims through high-altitude bombing, without resorting to area bombing, as proposed by European forces. To achieve these aims, the Norden was granted the utmost secrecy well into the war, and was part of a then-unprecedented production eort on the same scale as the Manhattan Project which launched the development of the atomic bomb. It was critically important that the Norden not fall into the hands of the enemy. e Recovery of the Norden Bombsight: Operations in Greenland were kept secret. Ship Coast Guard photoCoast Guard Cutter Comanche (WPG-76), about 1943, with its added war-time armament and camouflage. Coast Guard veteran recalls his adventures Coast Guard photoCoast Guard veteran Capt. Winslow Buxton at his home in Bellevue, Wash. Air Force photo by John TurnerA Norden Bombsight sits on display at the Malmstrom Museum.How good was the Norden bombsight? By Christopher Kratzer Air University Public Affairse bombsight, developed by Carl Norden, a Swiss engineer, was used by the Navy and Army Air Forces beginning in World War II until its retirement during the Vietnam War. Norden believed the device would lower the suering and death toll from war by allowing pinpoint accuracy during bombing runs. e device had an incredible moral importance to Norden, because Norden was a committed Christian, said Malcolm Gladwell, author of e Strange Tale of the Norden Bombsight. What did the Norden Bombsight do? It allowed you to bomb only those things which you absolutely needed and wanted to bomb. e Norden, essentially an analog calculator, could adjust for air density, wind drift, the bomb-Air Force Art CollectionA P-38 Lightning painting by Dick Kramer. Six P-38s were members of The Lost Squadron after crashing in Greenland. See Norden, Page 13 See Buxton, Page 13 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceIf the detainees the Afghan government released over NATO objections rejoin the ght, they do so at their own peril, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said at a news conference Feb. 14. e press secretary said the 65 detainees released in Afghanistan recently are dangerous, and that releasing them was a bad decision for the Afghan people. Some of those released have American blood on their hands, the admiral said, but he added that he is not sure that thats the only metric that matters here. e men should not be free, Kirby said. We had strong evidence on all of them, evidence that has been ignored. And thats unsatisfactory to us, he told reporters. Its not just United States forces in Af ghanistan who are now victims of this, but so are the Afghan people, because many of these individuals killed innocent Af ghans. eyre criminals, terrorists. ey need to be detained, and they are not now, and obviously, thats a decision that the Afghan government made. U.S. forces are not mobilizing to go after these individuals, Kirby said, but will continue to go after enemies targeting NATO forces and the Afghan people. Should one of these detainees rejoin the ght, they need to know that they do it at their own peril, he said. e U.S-led International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan said some of the individuals previously released by the Afghan government have already returned to the ght and that additional released detainees may continue to ll the ranks of the insurgency. Afghan President Hamid Karzai made the unilateral decision to release these individuals, Kirby noted. ey are still very dangerous individuals who should have remained locked up, he added. Now they are not. eres not going to be an active targeting cam paign to go after them. at said, if they choose to return to the ght, they become legitimate enemies and legitimate targets. Army Col. Steve Warren said that of the 37 detainees released Jan. 17, 17 are linked to the production of or attacks using improvised explosive devices, three participated in or had knowledge of direct attacks wounding or killing 11 Afghan national security forces members, and four participated in or had knowledge of direct attacks wounding or killing 42 U.S. or coalition service members.DOD warns released detainees

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 third-heat run of 56.98 seconds in the Olympic two-man bobsled event at Sanki Sliding Centre, Feb. 17. Sgt. Matthew Mortensen, on top and Sgt. Preston Griffall round a curve during an Olympic luge doubles practice, Feb. 16. Cory Butner and brakeman Capt. Chris Fogt clock a second run time of 57.11 seconds in the second of four heats in the two-man bobsled. From left, Army World Class Athlete Program bobsledder Cory Butner get set for the start of the third heat of the Olympic two-man bobsled, Feb. 17. Army training, sir! Soldiers, ex-GIs take to the iceArmy bobsledder Sgt. Dallas Robinson, center with arms upraised, and teammate Capt. Chris Fogt, at Robinsons right with arms upraised, march into Fisht Olympic Stadium during the opening ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Games Feb. 7. Army photos by Tim HippsFormer Army bobsledder Steven Holcomb and Steve Langton of Melrose, Mass., hoist flowers and display their bronze medals during the Olympic two-man bobsled medal ceremony Feb. 18. Inset, Holcomb bites his bronze medal.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13 crew members were neither permitted to take cameras on operations, nor keep a diary during their ships travels. During these early operations two Army Air Corps ocers joined then-lieutenant Buxton aboard the Comanche, Capt. Alan InnisTaylor and Maj. Norman Vaughn. Both of these two ocers were also with the Byrd Antarctic expeditions in 1928-30 and 1933-35. After receiving an encrypted message, the ship returned to the base at Narssarssuak, Greenland. Several dog teams, motor sleds and extra lumber were immediately loaded onto the ship. Capt. Von Paulsen, the Base Operations Ocer, also sailed as the ship set course for the east coast of Greenland. Instead of taking the usual sea route around Cape Farewell, a shortcut was made via the Inside Passage with sheer clis rising several thousand feet and cross currents making steering dicult. After passing Angmagsslik on the east coast the ships navigator noticed the coast line began to dier from the navigation charts. Where the charts indicated glacier ice owing down to the sea, the ship was on an open body of water, which appeared to be a bay. With the ships lifeboat preceding the ship, the depth was sounded and the unknown bay was shown to provide an excellent anchorage. e bay was charted and later named after the Comanche. Lt. Buxtons Wild Ride: e Comanche anchored in the bay and the dog teams and motor sleds were unloaded. Taylor, Vaughn and Buxton began their trek up the ice cap to the crash site of the B-17 on motor sleds. On reaching the site at 2,500-feet elevation, the Norden bombsight was found and removed from the wrecked B-17. Buxton returned on skis lashed to the dogsled with the bombsight. e trip was a wild 17 mile downhill run from the glacier on the hill to the coast. e lieutenant jumped over crevasses and rode the moguls. is was his rst time on skis. Buxton vividly remembers this ride 70 years later as one of the highlights of his Coast Guard career. 1943: Lt. Buxton as executive ocer on the Joseph T. Dickman. e Coast Guard-manned attack transport Joseph T. Dickman participated in the Italian campaign. In July it assisted the amphibious landings in Sicily and in September at Salerno. In Sicily the ship was bombed by enemy planes as it disembarked troops and picked up wounded. Buxton recalls the holes in the bridge and the explosion of a nearby merchant ship. At Salerno, the enemy artillery was dug in on the shore. Troops were landed at night to minimize casualties amidst the shell re. e Dickman faced mines and enemy E-Boats, very fast patrol craft with a wooden hull designed to avoid magnetic mines. After a destroyer sank nearby, the Dickman helped rescue the crew. 1944-45: Lt. Cmdr. Buxton as the commanding ocer of the Pride. e Coast Guard-manned destroyer-escort USS Pride escorted convoys across the Atlantic. Early in 1945 the Pride joined a hunter-killer group and was one of three Coast Guard destroyer escorts that sank the U-866 in the North Atlantic on March 18. Buxton received a letter of commendation as well as a bronze star on his combat ribbon. He nished the war handling anti-submarine training in Panama. 1945-66: After V-J Day, Buxton served as executive ocer of Coast Guard Cutter Mocoma, at a time there was no commanding ocer. Later he commanded the Yakutat in Portland, Me; the Klamath in Puget Sound; and the Ingham in Norfolk. In 1964 Buxton became captain of the port of Seattle. He retired from the Coast Guard in 1966 and worked as marine superintendant at the port until 1978. Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sandwiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestr one Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. DOD photoA B-17 Flying Fortress, belonging to the 8th Air Force, flies over a Focke Wulf fighter plant bombed by the bombers. BuxtonFrom Page 11 ers airspeed and groundspeed while controlling the bombers nal run on the target. It was called the single most complicated mechanical device ever manufactured, according to Stephan Wilkinson in his book, Man and Machine. Despite being highly sophisticated, the bombsight was not as accurate as reported. Even though Army Air Forces information ocers claimed the bombsight could drop a bomb into a pickle barrel from 30,000 feet, reality told a dierent story, according to Avers Don Sherman, a writer who studied the Norden saga. e Norden had only a 20-power telescope, so you couldnt even see a pickle barrel from 30,000 feet, much less hit it. You could make out a factory, but that was about it, Sherman said. It was also very easy to defeat the Norden when it was used at high altitudes. Smoke screens worked just ne, ground fog was a barrier and the simple fact was that the year of the most disastrous B-17 raids, 1943, saw an unusual amount of bad weather over Europe. One of the most famous failings of the Norden Bombsight came in 1944 when the Allies bombed a chemical plant in Leuna, Germany. is chemical plant comprised 757 acres. Over the course of 22 bombing missions, the Allies dropped 85,000 bombs on the 757-acre chemical plant using the Norden Bombsight. What percentage of the bombs do you think landed in the perimeter of this 757-acre plant? Ten percent, and of those 10 percent that landed 60 percent didnt even go o. ey were duds, Gladwell said. e Leuna chemical plant, after one of the most extensive bombings in the history of the war, was up and running within weeks. e bombsight was heavily guarded and shrouded in secrecy to keep the technology out of the hands of Germany. Bombardiers were required to take an oath saying they would protect the bombsight with their lives if necessary, and the device was loaded with thermite, melting the device into a lump of metal. All these measures proved unnecessary since Germany became aware of the bombsight in 1938, according to Gladwell. Carl Norden, as a proper Swiss man, was enamored by German engineers. In the 1930s he hired a bunch of them, including a man named Herman Long, who in 1938 gave a complete set of the plans for the Norden Bombsight to the Nazis, Gladwell said. ey had their own Norden Bombsight throughout the entire war, which also, by the way, didnt work very well. Gladwell uses the story of the bombsight to show how technol ogy doesnt solve all our problems and often ultimately gives us unforeseen consequences. I have not described to you a success story, Gladwell said. Ive described to you the opposite of a success story. is is the problem of our infatuation with the things we make. We think that things we make can solve our problems, but our problems are much more complex than that. e issue isnt the accuracy of the bombs you have, its how you use the bombs you have and more importantly, whether you ought to use bombs at all. is proved to be true for Norden and his bombsight. On August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber called the Enola Gay used a Norden Bombsight to drop an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. e bomb missed its target by 800 feet, but of course it didnt matter, and thats the greatest irony of all, Gladwell said. e air forces $1.5 billion bomb sight was used to drop its $3 billion bomb, which didnt need a bombsight at all. No one told Carl Norden that his bombsight had been used over Hiroshima. He was a committed Christian. He thought he had designed something that would reduce the toll and suering in war. It would have broken his heart.NordenFrom Page 11

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama will award 24 Army veterans the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry during a White House ceremony March 18. ese veterans will receive the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, according to a White House news release. Each of these soldiers bravery was previously recognized by award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nations second highest military award. at award will be upgraded to the Medal of Honor in recognition of their gallantry, intrepidity and heroism above and beyond the call of duty. In 2002, Congress, through the Defense Authorization Act, called for a review of Jewish American and Hispanic American veteran war records from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, to ensure those deserving the Medal of Honor were not denied because of prejudice, according to the release. During the review, records of several soldiers of neither Jewish nor Hispanic descent were also found to display criteria worthy of the Medal of Honor. e 2002 Act was amended to allow these soldiers to be honored with the upgrade, in addition to the Jewish and Hispanic American soldiers. e President will award the Medal of Honor to: Spc. 4 Santiago J. Erevia will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as radio telephone operator in Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) during search and clear mission near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. Sta Sgt. Melvin Morris will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as commander of a strike force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam, on September 17, 1969. Sgt. First Class Jose Rodela will receive the Medal of Honor for his cou rageous actions while serving as the company commander, Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on September 1, 1969. e President will posthumously award the Medal of Honor to the following individuals who distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Vietnam War: Sgt. Candelario Garcia will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as an acting team leader for Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam, on Dec. 8, 1968. Spc. 4 Leonard L. Alvarado will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a rieman with Company D, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on Aug. 12, 1969. Sta Sgt. Felix M. Conde-Falcon will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting Platoon Leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Ap Tan Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on April 4, 1969. Spc. 4 Ardie R. Copas will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a Machinegunner in Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia, on May 12, 1970. Spc. 4 Jesus S. Duran will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting M-60 machine gunner in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on April 10, 1969. e following individuals distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Korean War: Cpl. Joe R. Baldonado will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting machine gunner in 3rd Squad, 2nd Platoon, Company B, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kangdong, Korea, on Nov. 25, 1950. Cpl. Victor H. Espinoza will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an Acting Rieman in Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Chorwon, Korea, on Aug. 1, 1952. Sgt. Eduardo C. Gomez will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Tabu-dong, Korea, on Sept. 3, 1950. Pfc. Leonard M. Kravitz will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner with Company M, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Yangpyong, Korea, on March 6 and 7, 1951. Master Sgt. Juan E. Negron will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company L, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kalma-Eri, Korea, on April 28, 1951. Master Sgt. Mike C. Pena will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his cou rageous actions while serving as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Waegwan, Korea, on Sept. 4, 1950. Pvt. Demensio Rivera will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rieman with 2nd Platoon, Company G, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Changyong-ni, Korea, on May 23, 1951. Pvt. Miguel A. Vera will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rieman with Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in Chorwon, Korea, on Sept. 21, 1952. Sgt. Jack Weinstein will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while leading 1st Platoon, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in Kumsong, Korea, on Oct. 19, 1951. e following individuals distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during World War II: Pvt. Pedro Cano will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company C, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Schevenhutte, Germany, on Dec. 3, 1944. Pvt. Joe Gandara will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing with Company D, 2d Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Amfreville, France, on June 9, 1944. Pvt. First Class Salvador J. Lara will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as the squad leader of a rie squad with 2d Platoon, Company L, 180th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Aprilia, Italy, on May 27 and 28, 1944. Sgt. William F. Leonard will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a squad leader in Company C, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near St. Die, France, on Nov. 7, 1944. Sta Sgt. Manuel V. Mendoza will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company B, 350th Infantry, 88th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy on Mt. Battaglia, Italy, on Oct. 4, 1944. Sgt. Alfred B. Nietzel will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a section leader for Company H, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Heistern, Germany on Nov. 18, 1944. 1st Lieutenant Donald K. Schwab will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as the commander of Company E, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, during combat operations against an armed enemy near Lure, France, on Sept. 17, 1944. e Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the Armed Forces who distinguish themselves conspicuous ly by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; engaged in military operations involving conict with an opposing foreign force; serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. Imperial War Museum photo the invasion of Normandy. Pvt. Joe Gandara will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with the 17th Airborne Division there on June 9, 1944.24 Soldiers to get MOHArmy photoA Soldier fires a .50 caliber machine gun at Communist-held positions during the Korean War. Nine Soldiers from that war will receive the Medal of Honor. National ArchivesA Soldier is lowered into a tunnel by members of the reconnaissance platoon during the Vietnam War in 1967. Three living and five posthumous Medals of Honor will be awarded Vietnam vets.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014



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Karzai balks at signingAfghan boss forgoes agreement with U.S. despite urging By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense ocials continue to urge Afghan President Hamid Karzai to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement with the United States, Pentagon press secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. We continue to believe it would be enormously helpful to have a bilateral security agree ment as soon as possible, Kirby said during a Pentagon news conference. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said he would like to have the agreement signed by an upcoming NATO De fense Minis terial. at meeting is next week, Kirby said. Karzai has said he will leave it to his succes sor to sign the document, which if done soon will allow for the United States and other NATO nations to plan for Operation Resolute Support the train, advise and assist mission that is set to begin Jan. 1. 2015. Without an agreement were going to have to start planning for a complete withdrawal, but were not at that point right now, Kirby said. Pentagon ocials are also studying a Center for Naval Analysis report commissioned by the Defense Department that concludes the Taliban will strengthen after the NATO com bat mission ends, and that the Afghan military should be larger than currently projected. One of the reasons why the alliance is interested in the reso lute support mission post-2014 is to help improve the capabili ties of the Afghan national se curity forces, the admiral said in response to questions about the reports conclusions. Its a commitment we made long ago. Its a commit ment were trying to make now on THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Sit or stand on the job ... your call Page 9 Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield drill at Kings Bay Pages 4, 5 Honeybees Transferred from base in Georgia Page 9 Excellence honors for community outreach programsBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay recently earned rst-place Awards of Excellence in the Per sonal Excellence Partnership and the Campaign Drug-Free categories from Navy Region Southeast. Capt. Harvey L. Guey, Jr. honored Securitys MA1 Johnny Archer, Port Operations EM1 Cody Guidry and Securitys MA1 Christopher Tyner, as well as Lt. Barbara Johns, U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps, Commanding Of cer of the Training Contingent, and Ensign Lorene Hendricks, USNSCC, Defy administrative ocer. Scott Bassett, public aairs of cer for NSB Kings Bay said the award for Personal Excellence Kings Bay earns regional awards See Awards, Page 6Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com See Karzai, Page 3 Level III awarded for patient-centric care by NCQABy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital Jacksonville was awarded the National Com mittee for Quality Assurance Level III recognition for its Pa tient-Centered Medical Home Feb. 14. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of recognition for patient-centric care, was awarded to all primary care clin ics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) at the hospital and all ve of its branch health clinics. e Navys approach to the Patient-Centered Medical Home is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors to nurses and case managers-led by the pri mary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-for-prot organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning e Joint Commis sion Gold Seal of Approval dur ing its re-accreditation process in January, NH Jacksonville was recognized for its continuing compliance with e Joint Com missions state-of-the-art, national standards of care. In achieving Joint Commis sion accreditation, Naval Hos pital Jacksonville has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its pa tients, said Mark G. Pelletier, e Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certication Operations chief operating ocer. e Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. rough sequestration, re duced budgets and civilian fur loughs this past year, Naval Hos pital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaer, NH Jacksonville commanding ocer. is recogni tion and accreditation demon strates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive dierence in the lives of our pa tients. e MEDIG team, after re viewing 60 programs (from re Courtesy photoAn artists rendering of Naval Hospital Jacksonville. NH Jax was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home Feb. 14, the nations highest level of recognition for patient-centric care. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenMaster Chief of the Navy visits NSB Kings BayMaster Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens visited Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Friday, Feb. 21. Stevens spoke to Kings Bay Chief Petty Officers during a CPO All Hands meeting at the Kings Bay Chapel. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer, Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., congratulates Lt. Barbara Johns for her part in earning excellence awards from Southeast Region. EM1 Cody Guidry, left, MA1 Christopher Tyner, behind Guffey, and Ensign Lorene Hendricks look on.NH Jacksonville earns highest ranking Kirby See NH Jax, Page 3

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, curacy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. in no way connected with the Department of Defense, 000. 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Changes at Kings Bay Pet Clinice Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Veteri nary Treatment Facility is under-going chang es, with a new computer system, which makes your pets records easily accessible to your new veterinarian when you move. But, your patience is asked for as sta works through the transition and the challenges of a new system. In addition, changes are being made to the prescription rell policy. Pet owners will now need to call to rell a medication, and it will take two business days to ll them. When you call, the following information is needed: last name, pets name and name of medication. ere we also will be changes to some prices. is is controlled at the Public Health Com mand level, and anticipated changes are not drastic, but be aware some things may require more or less than you are used to.Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e eve nings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and enter tainment, is $35 per person. For parade par ticipation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional informa tion, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Of cers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Com munity Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by member ship-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social ac tivity. Beginning this year, 25 per cent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auc tion will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transforma tive change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@ya hoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot or ganization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building life-long friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held do nation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more informa tion about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. Student scholarships In 1960, the Submarine O cers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Founda tion. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these stu dents receives an annual schol arship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of mem ber or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in subma rine support activities for a mini mum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line appli cation is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or email scholars@dolphinscholar ship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of Ameri can Sea Power and obtain a recom mendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on their goal of provid ing access to Navy training anytime, anyplace, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Program Oce announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct In ternet access to Navy e-Learning content. Most Navy Learners were previously accessing NeL through Navy Knowledge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. at was a multi-step process that is now signicantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, without going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of www. aas.prod.nel.training.navy.mil will take you directly to the My Learn ing and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management sys tem after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search engine and that gets you strictly learningrelated returns, streamlining nding the course you are looking for. Although direct access to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card is still re quired for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer browser. Many of our courses take ad vantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning ex perience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compatibility with these courses, NeL provides conguration guides for many of the latest ver sions of IE. NeL also provides a plugin analyzer to help customers conrm they are able to access and run the multi-media content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, customers may simply click on the Browser Conguration link, located in the NeL Help sec tion, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. According to Reeves, NeL is the worlds largest learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Training, including the newly-updated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Chal lenge Course, Reeves said. Last year, the Cyber Awareness Chal lenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than 4 million completions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to oer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO, added Reeves. Although NKO was de signed as a one-stop-shop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense. Since 2001, Sailors have depend ed on Navy e-Learning to help advance their careers and stay current with training requirements. Courses range from Privacy and Personally Identiable Information Awareness Training required of all Sailors, Marines, civilians and contractors to specic training for individual units. Trainees using NeL complete between four and ve million online courses annually from an oering of more than 8, 700 courses. e Naval Education and Training Command relies on NeL for use in schoolhous es for individual skills and skill re fresher training.e-Learning now has direct access Navy Ed and Training

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Midway dinner June 7From The Navy League of Mayport, Fla. e Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration Dinner and Program. is is an all-service event featuring a joint Color Guard, an All Ser vice Missing Person Table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numer ous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event, which will be held Saturday, June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. e invited keynote speaker is Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Chief of Naval Operations. Numerous veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches of the military who served in prior conicts and those currently serving have been invited to attend this years event. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and for mer prisoners of war from the local area who have heroically answered the call of duty also will be in attendance. e evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provides an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacic. Ticket prices for Active Duty and Spouses E-6 and below are $25; E-7 to O3, $40; O4 to O5, $50, O6 and above, $65. Prices for civilians and retirees is $65. e evening includes ne dining and a memora ble program. Uniform will be O4 and above, dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below, dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., dinner is served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales will end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to Navy League Midway Dinner. Tickets may be pur chased from the following locations: Navy League Mayport, Bob Price, (904) 2469982, (904) 718-2118 or bpricex4@comcast.net Navy League St. Augustine. Bill Dudley, (904) 806-4712, (904) 7947814 or anuday00@aol. com Navy History and Heritage Command photoDouglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers fly over the burning Japanese crusier Mikuma during the Battle of Midway. search ethics to patient access) in January, oered a resounding endorse ment of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. NH Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. e command is com prised of the Navys third largest hospital and ve branch health clinics across Florida and Geor gia. Of its patient population about 163,000 ac tive and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their fam ilies more than 61,000 are enrolled with a prima ry care manager at one of its facilities. the ground in Afghanistan to improve their capacity and capability. Afghan forces are in the lead for combat operations throughout the country, the admiral said. ey, and NATO, never dismiss the Taliban insurgency or the threat the Taliban pose not just to the United States and its allies, but to the Af ghan people. e CNA report will in form DOD leaders as the mission continues, Kirby said.NH JaxFrom Page 1 KarzaiFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 The good guys pre vail. MA2 Martino Peoples handcuffs the simulated dead assailant. They werent taking any chances. Below left, active duty security force personnel quickly respond to a 911 call and hunt down the assailant. This is a drill! Solid Curtain Citadel Shield 2014Active shooter role player EODCS Jeremy Baker, Kings Bay EOD Mobile Ghikas, and other injured role players, helplessly lays on the ground. Kings Bay Patrolmen JeanPaul J.P Curtis responds to the call. Patrolman Shawn Doyle and Rex Peters clear the way for innocents to escape. The shooter is just right of center in the back ground. Multiple Integrated LASER Engagement System (MILES) is used to simulate a real gun fight. Weapons fire with a gunshot noise and shells drop to the floor, but the hit is registered by LASER. simulated shot to the leg and hopes the good guys win soon. fortunate the simulated bullet only grazed his head.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 Photos by EM1 Mark Treen With the shooter down, the first innocents are allowed to exit the Commissary. Above and left, MA1 Jabril Muhammad takes charge to make sure the threat is over and the commissary is safe. After security says its safe, Kings Bay Emergency Medical Technicians can enter. They begin by tagging each person by color to show how badly they are hurt. Marshalls leg shot wound gives him a red tag, signifying a serious injury. Right, injured sailors are brought outside the Commissary where a team of Kings Bay EMTs treats their injuries. Above, those with serious injuries are placed on the red mat. Left, Camden County Fire Rescue responded as well to the drill scenario. Camden Countys Michael Yonn lifts the an injured Sailor to be transported to the hospital.

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Navy helps host robotics contest By MC1 Jacob L. DillonNavy Recruiting District Houston Public AffairsHigh school students from across southeast Tex as, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and the Florida panhandle battled for underwater superiority at the Houston Regional SeaPerch Challenge Feb. 15 at the Pearland Recreation Center in Pearland, Texas. e Navy City Outreach oce, in collaboration with Houston Communication, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics organization hosted more than 350 students in the three-part event in cluding a heist deep-water transfer, a speed-course obstacle course and a display/panel interview. SeaPerch, an Oce of Naval Research-sponsored program, is an innovative underwater robotics pro gram that equips teachers and students with the re sources they need to build an underwater remotely operated vehicle in an in-school or out-of-school set ting to promote interest in STEM related elds. SeaPerch rollout is a primary eort of the Navys city outreach program which falls under the Navy Recruiting Commands diversity division, located in Millington, Tenn. STEM programs are important to the future of the Navy said Lt. Cmdr. Jaye Jones, a Navy city outreach ocer for Navy Recruiting Command. ese participants are the future of the Navy, Jones said. We are making sure we protect that future. Todays Navy demands greater high-tech skills and men and women with strong math and science backgrounds. rough the Navy city outreach pro gram and these types of collaborative eorts, we build stronger STEM foundations for tomorrow. e two big winners were the Passmore Elementary School SeaPals and the Alvin Junior High Aquabots, both from Alvin, Texas. ese two teams tied for rst place in the overall competition. Because of this, each school received a fully-fund ed trip to the nals courtesy of the TechStreet Hous ton organization.SeaPerch photoStudents work on an underwater robot during a SeaPerch Challenge. eir inventions helped all society By Lance Cpl. Norman EcklesMarine Corps Logistics Base BarstowSince 1976, February has been dedicated to the achievements and contributions that African Amer icans have made but ev eryone knows that; what impact have those had on society and where would we be without them? Without some of the es sential innovations Afri can Americans have come up with and are still coming up with today, con temporary society would be a disaster. Ask yourself this, what would a day in life be like if these men and women did not create such inuential inventions? Imagine waking up bright and early from a good nights rest and going into your kitchen to make a healthy breakfast then realizing your food is rot ten. Without the innova tive idea of John Standard, the refrigerator wouldnt be what it is today, and this scenario would often be the case. In 1891, Standard improved the way refrigerators kept food colder longer by adding a com partment that held ice, which had to be manually put into the compartment. After nding out your refrigerator wasnt work ing, you decide to go to the store to buy more grocer ies. You put your child in the car seat and head for the store. On the way to the store, you get into a car accident because there are no trac lights to let you know when to stop or go. In 1923, a man by the name of Garrett Morgan re ceived a patent for a threepositioned traffic light. He was motivated to create it after witnessing a car acci dent in order to save lives. Now that you have got ten into a car accident, you have no car and have to walk from place to place. Being a parent, you dont want to leave your child at home. But imagine having to carry your baby everywhere. You say, I have a stroller but without African American innovation, you dont. William H. Richardson improved and patented the baby buggy in 1889. He brought the idea form England and improved it so you can walk your child down the street without having to carry them the whole time. After your walk, you de cide to relax for a while; however, its a typical High Dessert summer day out. Without a certain inventor, you would be relaxing while drenched in sweat. During World War II, an inventor named Fredrick McKinley designed and created air conditioners for mil itary units out in the eld to store blood serum for trans fusions and medicines. is very uncomfortable, dangerous and inconvenient day would be the case everyday if it werent for African American ingenuity. is is only to name a few, there are thousands of other inventions we use daily made from people who were once enslaved and thought to be incom petent by society. Morgan Partnership bundles support to the community in enriching youth programs and outreach, like the Adopt-A-School (program) and special events like Red Ribbon Week. e number of participants and impact of the programs are out standing. e Adopt-A-School program helps 11 commands on base reach about 10,000 local school children. Scouting, Naval Junior Reserve Ocer Training Corps, Sea Cadets and Midshipmen training impact more than 1,000 children and young adults. Last years Special Olympics involved volunteers from every command on base. ose 1,000 volunteers helped approximately 450 athletes from eight Georgia counties. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard service members participate in career day events at three local elementary schools and have talked to an estimated 600 youths, describing their jobs and experiences while serving in the military. e Campaign Drug-Free cat egory was awarded for the bases participation in Drug Education for Youth Program and the Red Ribbon Week Campaign. When asked about DEFY, Sally Galleon of Fleet and Family Sup port Center said, Military chil dren tend to travel a lot and to be able to connect with other military children and leadership. ose connections and positive activities help them to be more resistant to drugs and alcohol. e USNSCC uses the DEFY program, typically for ages 10 to 11, as an opportunity for Sea Ca dets, ages 13 and 14, to learn lead ership skills as they serve. It (DEFY) has an exceptional impact on the community, Hen dricks said. It brings (Sea Cadets) and gives them skills that (DEFY participants) look up to. e Red Ribbon Week Cam paign is an annual weekly obser vance. It involves eight elementary schools which participated in e Best Me Is Drug Free poster con test. Navy drug and alcohol coun selors and Navy Military Working Dog teams gave presentations to nine elementary schools which had. We did a lot in 2013 but expect an equally impactful 2014, Bas sett said. We look forward to con tinuing the excellent partnerships we have with the community, lo cal schools, Habitat for Humanity, local churches and assistance to charities.AwardsFrom Page 1 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a me chanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, T-shirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meet ing will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being accepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at regis tration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swim suit, sunscreen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further infor mation, call (912) 5733001 or (912) 573-3990. e Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes ori enteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 5738972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renova tion and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety dur ing renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refresh ments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with comput ers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by MC1 Mark Treen Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. e cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civil ians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. e Start Smart Sports Devel opment Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots avail able. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-onone with their children, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. e program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids While he works to protect our count ry,St. Jude Childrens Research Hospit al works to save his son from a deadly disease. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 7

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Bees invade Georgia base By Nathan L. Hanks Jr.Marine Corps Logistics Base AlbanyHoneybee populations may be shrinking around the world but that is not the case at Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany. ousands of honeybees were found Feb. 14 when a worker opened a lid to a wooden crate outside of Building 1261 lo cated at the south end of warehouse row. Georgia Master Beekeeper Dale Richter was called in Feb. 17 to assist with the removal of the entire colony including a large amount of wax honeycomb. He estimated there were 40,000 of the buzzing creatures, weighing an average of a tenth of a gram and about 1/2 to 5/8 inch in length, found inside the crate. Richter was recommended because he is considered an expert in his eld and works closely with the Georgia De partment of Agriculture, Julie Robbins, natural resource manager, Environmental Branch, Installation and Environment Division, MCLB Albany, said. We know he has the equipment to catch the whole hive alive. We also know he could have the bees tested to make sure they are not Africanized bees. Before approaching the crate, Richter donned his bee suit, which looks more like a space suit, and a pair of plastic gloves. He red up his smoker, lled with smoldering pine needles, and gave the bees a couple of blasts. When bees detect smoke, they think the hive is threatened by re, he said. e bees then gorge themselves on hon ey until theyre lulled into a state in which theyre less likely to sting. Richter opened the lid and carefully propped it up against the box trying not to disturb the bees attached to the comb on the lid. Richter then employed a special vacuum that gently pulled the live bees into a round wire cage. He then turned his attention to the box where he vacuumed thousands of live bees crawling on the waxy comb. Using a putty knife, Richter separated the cells, oozing with wild honey, away from the walls of the crate. He then placed the hive, one piece at a time, into a plastic bin and the wire cage of thousands of bees in the back of his pickup truck for transport to a property where the bees can establish new terri tory or be incorporated into an existing bee colony. Richter estimates there was nearly 60 to 80 pounds of honey and wax on the comb inside the crate. Robbins said it is encouraging to know the base has a good population of hon eybees. She attributes it to the bases prescribed burning practices and other management that encourage vegetation that bees depend upon. Some of our eorts to assist the bees habitat include prescribed burning, which helps improve forage bases such as wild owers, she said. Additionally, the clover planted in the pecan orchard provides an ideal food source for bees.Having been a reporter most of my career, Ive spent plenty of time sitting at a desk. But Ive also spent a lot of time getting out of the office and covering stories. It truly is the best of both worlds doing some of each. Ive also had part-time or temp jobs where I either stood or sat. When I was younger, I would have said I would rather stand. But now, sitting is just fine. If today I had to be on my feet all day, like I have at times in my life, it would just about kill me.Would you rather sit or stand on the job?MTSA Anthony Ramos Trident Training Facility The Bronx, N.Y. Stand all day. You get the blood pumping in your legs. Jennifer Sherrill Family member Del Rio, Texas Id rather stand all day. Those kind of jobs seem more exciting to me. EM1 Michael Sterling USS Alaska Gold Birmingham, Ala. Probably sit. But why not have the best of both worlds? MTSN Brandon McQueen Trident Training Facility Garner, N.C. Stand all day. It seems like youre doing more work. MA1 Zachary Newcomb Kings Bay Police Suffolk, Va. Id rather be walking around. I sit in a patrol car all day, but when I get the chance I get out and walk around. Bill Kempton Retired Navy Provincetown, Mass. Sit. I drove a patrol car for 20 years on St. Simons Island and for Glynn County. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Photo by Nathan L. Hanks Jr.Georgia Master Beekeeper Dale Richter estimates nearly 60-80 pounds of honey and wax on the comb was found Feb. 14 inside a crate on Logistics Base Albany, Ga. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 4, 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportu nity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered March 5 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplating marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communi cation, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. March 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more infor mation call 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 4 and 5. For more information and to register call 573-4513.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandat ed, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 17 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the mili tary lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and termi nology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Time Management teaches you to planHave you ever worked hard all day, but were unsure of what you had actually done? This class will focus on strategies and ideas that will help you get the most out of your day and teach you how to prioritize what needs to get done. This class is 10 a.m. to noon March 6. For more information and to register call, 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 10 to 14. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 10 Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relo cations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 18 and OCONUS 10 a.m. to noon March 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Job search workshop scheduled for March 12A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., March 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating mil itary and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, March 19. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 5734513.Talking Money With Your Honey scheduledThis workshop will provide couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foun dation for productive financial commu nication. This workshop will require both spouses to attend. This training will be 2 to 4 p.m., March 19. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 20. Preregistration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Capstone transition training scheduledThe purpose of the Capstone event is to evaluate your preparedness to success fully transition from a military to a civil ian career and to validate that you have met the Career Readiness Standards. If you need additional assistance you will receive a referral to the appropriate part ner agency. The next Capstone event is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 21. Registration by Command Career Counselor required. For more information call 573-4513.Anger management seminar March 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 26. It can help you focus on identi fying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employ ment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., March 27. Registration required by calling 5734513.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11 Coast Guard Capt. Winslow Buxton was 100 years young Feb. 14! Liv ing in Bellevue, Wash., he remains aable, pert and active. He was born in New London, Conn., and attended the Coast Guard Academy from 1934 to 1938. In honor of his birth day, Coast Guard historian Dr. Dave Rosen sat down with Buxton as the veteran recounted his World War II adventures.Recorded by Dr. Dave Rosen1942: Lt. Buxton as ex ecutive ocer of Coast Guard Cutter Comanche e 1942 Greenland mission of the 165-foot cutter consisted of guarding the cryolite mine at Ivigtut, setting up the Beach Head Station, ice breaking, looking for any enemy personnel and helping chart the coast. May: Comanche crossed the Arctic Cir cle just as the winter ice melted, escorting the cargo ship SS Bridgeport. It transited the 90-miles long Sondre Strom Fjord en route to the Bluie West Eight airbase at its inland end, about 35 miles north of the Arctic Circle. e delivery of aviation gasoline to the airbase enabled the trans-Atlantic ights to begin. Buxton was accepted into the Sons of the Polar Seas. June: Comanche served as the visual aide and ra dio beacon at the fjord en trance to the main airbase, Narsarsuak, for the rst U.S. Air Force trans-Atlantic ight of B-17s while the air control system was still being installed. e ship logged the arrival of 26 B17s on that rst day, from 2:40 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. July: Comanche served as plane guard at BW-1 at Tungliark Fjord, per forming rescue duty for arriving and departing craft in case of ditching or crashing. On July 15 the famous Lost Squadron landed on the Ice Cap af ter attempting to y from Greenland to Iceland. e Lost Squadron: Two B-17E Flying Fortress bombers and six P-38F Lightning ghters bellied in on top of the Greenland ice cap July 15, 1942. e airplanes were being fer ried across the Atlantic in 1942 bound for Reykjavik, Iceland. e planes encountered bad weather. Bogus ra dio transmissions, traced to an illegal German ra dio station in northeast Greenland sending false weather information only added to the squadrons woes. Running low on gas, they decided to crash land on the ice cap. To assist rescue, the en tire squadron stayed together. e rst plane failed in an attempt to land with the wheels down, and the remaining ight went in with wheels up, sliding a considerable distance before coming to a stop. On the fourth day after the crash landing the crews managed to make their SOS heard. Search and rescue planes located the crash site and dropped special clothing and food necessary for survival on the ice cap. e pilots and crew had to hike 17 miles to the coast, where they were picked up by the Cut ter Northland on July 14, which had been on patrol looking for German radio and weather stations. e Importance of the Norden Bombsight: Left behind in one of the B-17s was the top secret Norden bombsight. e Norden was a tachometric bombsight used by the U.S. Army Air Forces and the U.S. Navy during World War II. It aided the crew of bomber aircraft in dropping bombs accurately. Key to the operation of the Norden were two features: a mechanical com puter that calculated the bombs trajectory based on current ight condi tions, and a linkage to the bombers autopilot that let it react quickly and ac curately to changes in the wind or other eects. To gether, these features allowed for unprecedented accuracy in day bombing from high altitudes. In test runs the Norden demonstrated a circular error probability of 75 feet, an astonishing perfor mance for the era. is accuracy allowed direct attacks on ships, factories, and other point targets. Both the Navy and the Air Force saw this as a means to achieve war aims through high-altitude bombing, without resorting to area bombing, as proposed by European forces. To achieve these aims, the Norden was granted the utmost secrecy well into the war, and was part of a then-unprec edented production eort on the same scale as the Manhattan Project which launched the development of the atomic bomb. It was critically impor tant that the Norden not fall into the hands of the enemy. e Recovery of the Norden Bombsight: Operations in Greenland were kept secret. Ship Coast Guard photoCoast Guard Cutter Comanche (WPG-76), about 1943, with its added war-time armament and camouflage. Coast Guard veteran recalls his adventures Coast Guard photoCoast Guard veteran Capt. Winslow Buxton at his home in Bellevue, Wash. Air Force photo by John TurnerA Norden Bombsight sits on display at the Malmstrom Museum.How good was the Norden bombsight? By Christopher Kratzer Air University Public Affairse bombsight, developed by Carl Norden, a Swiss engineer, was used by the Navy and Army Air Forces beginning in World War II until its retire ment during the Vietnam War. Norden believed the device would lower the suering and death toll from war by allowing pinpoint accuracy during bombing runs. e device had an incredible moral importance to Norden, because Norden was a committed Christian, said Malcolm Gladwell, author of e Strange Tale of the Norden Bombsight. What did the Norden Bombsight do? It allowed you to bomb only those things which you absolutely needed and wanted to bomb. e Norden, essentially an analog calculator, could adjust for air density, wind drift, the bomb-Air Force Art CollectionA P-38 Lightning painting by Dick Kramer. Six P-38s were members of The Lost Squadron after crashing in Greenland. See Norden, Page 13 See Buxton, Page 13 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceIf the detainees the Afghan government released over NATO objections rejoin the ght, they do so at their own peril, Pen tagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said at a news conference Feb. 14. e press secretary said the 65 detain ees released in Afghanistan recently are dangerous, and that releasing them was a bad decision for the Afghan people. Some of those released have American blood on their hands, the admiral said, but he added that he is not sure that thats the only metric that matters here. e men should not be free, Kirby said. We had strong evidence on all of them, evidence that has been ignored. And thats unsatisfactory to us, he told reporters. Its not just United States forces in Af ghanistan who are now victims of this, but so are the Afghan people, because many of these individuals killed innocent Af ghans. eyre criminals, terrorists. ey need to be detained, and they are not now, and obviously, thats a decision that the Afghan government made. U.S. forces are not mobilizing to go af ter these individuals, Kirby said, but will continue to go after enemies targeting NATO forces and the Afghan people. Should one of these detainees rejoin the ght, they need to know that they do it at their own peril, he said. e U.S-led International Security As sistance Force in Afghanistan said some of the individuals previously released by the Afghan government have already re turned to the ght and that additional re leased detainees may continue to ll the ranks of the insurgency. Afghan President Hamid Karzai made the unilateral decision to release these individuals, Kirby noted. ey are still very dangerous individuals who should have remained locked up, he added. Now they are not. eres not going to be an active targeting cam paign to go after them. at said, if they choose to return to the ght, they become legitimate enemies and legitimate targets. Army Col. Steve Warren said that of the 37 detainees released Jan. 17, 17 are linked to the production of or attacks us ing improvised explosive devices, three participated in or had knowledge of di rect attacks wounding or killing 11 Af ghan national security forces members, and four participated in or had knowledge of direct attacks wounding or killing 42 U.S. or coalition service members.DOD warns released detainees

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 third-heat run of 56.98 seconds in the Olympic two-man bobsled event at Sanki Sliding Centre, Feb. 17. Sgt. Matthew Mortensen, on top and Sgt. Preston Griffall round a curve during an Olympic luge doubles practice, Feb. 16. Cory Butner and brakeman Capt. Chris Fogt clock a second run time of 57.11 seconds in the second of four heats in the two-man bobsled. From left, Army World Class Athlete Program bobsledder Cory Butner get set for the start of the third heat of the Olympic two-man bobsled, Feb. 17. Army training, sir! Soldiers, ex-GIs take to the iceArmy bobsledder Sgt. Dallas Robinson, center with arms upraised, and teammate Capt. Chris Fogt, at Robinsons right with arms upraised, march into Fisht Olympic Stadium during the opening ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Games Feb. 7. Army photos by Tim HippsFormer Army bobsledder Steven Holcomb and Steve Langton of Melrose, Mass., hoist flowers and display their bronze medals during the Olympic two-man bobsled medal ceremo ny Feb. 18. Inset, Holcomb bites his bronze medal.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13 crew members were neither permitted to take cameras on operations, nor keep a diary during their ships travels. During these early operations two Army Air Corps ocers joined then-lieutenant Buxton aboard the Co manche, Capt. Alan InnisTaylor and Maj. Norman Vaughn. Both of these two ocers were also with the Byrd Antarctic expeditions in 1928-30 and 1933-35. After receiving an en crypted message, the ship returned to the base at Narssarssuak, Greenland. Several dog teams, mo tor sleds and extra lumber were immediately loaded onto the ship. Capt. Von Paulsen, the Base Operations Ocer, also sailed as the ship set course for the east coast of Greenland. Instead of taking the usual sea route around Cape Farewell, a shortcut was made via the Inside Passage with sheer clis rising several thousand feet and cross currents making steering dicult. After passing Angmagsslik on the east coast the ships navigator no ticed the coast line began to dier from the naviga tion charts. Where the charts indicated glacier ice owing down to the sea, the ship was on an open body of water, which appeared to be a bay. With the ships lifeboat preced ing the ship, the depth was sounded and the unknown bay was shown to provide an excellent anchorage. e bay was charted and later named after the Comanche. Lt. Buxtons Wild Ride: e Comanche anchored in the bay and the dog teams and motor sleds were unloaded. Taylor, Vaughn and Bux ton began their trek up the ice cap to the crash site of the B-17 on motor sleds. On reaching the site at 2,500-feet elevation, the Norden bombsight was found and removed from the wrecked B-17. Buxton returned on skis lashed to the dogsled with the bombsight. e trip was a wild 17 mile downhill run from the glacier on the hill to the coast. e lieutenant jumped over crevasses and rode the moguls. is was his rst time on skis. Buxton vividly remembers this ride 70 years later as one of the highlights of his Coast Guard career. 1943: Lt. Buxton as executive ocer on the Joseph T. Dickman. e Coast Guard-manned at tack transport Joseph T. Dickman participated in the Italian campaign. In July it assisted the amphibious landings in Sicily and in September at Salerno. In Sicily the ship was bombed by enemy planes as it disembarked troops and picked up wounded. Buxton recalls the holes in the bridge and the explo sion of a nearby merchant ship. At Salerno, the enemy artillery was dug in on the shore. Troops were landed at night to minimize casu alties amidst the shell re. e Dickman faced mines and enemy E-Boats, very fast patrol craft with a wooden hull designed to avoid magnetic mines. Af ter a destroyer sank near by, the Dickman helped rescue the crew. 1944-45: Lt. Cmdr. Bux ton as the commanding ocer of the Pride. e Coast Guard-manned destroyer-escort USS Pride escorted convoys across the Atlantic. Early in 1945 the Pride joined a hunter-killer group and was one of three Coast Guard destroyer es corts that sank the U-866 in the North Atlantic on March 18. Buxton received a letter of commendation as well as a bronze star on his combat ribbon. He nished the war handling anti-submarine training in Panama. 1945-66: After V-J Day, Buxton served as execu tive ocer of Coast Guard Cutter Mocoma, at a time there was no commanding ocer. Later he com manded the Yakutat in Portland, Me; the Klamath in Puget Sound; and the Ingham in Norfolk. In 1964 Buxton became captain of the port of Se attle. He retired from the Coast Guard in 1966 and worked as marine super intendant at the port until 1978. Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Stroganoff Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs to Order Grits Omelets to Order Blueberry Pancakes w/ Syrup Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Links Hashed Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch New England Clam Chowder BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Fish French Fries Baked Macaroni & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheeseburgers Grilled Hamburgers Baked Beans Burger Bar BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Dinner Doubly Good Chicken Soup Roast Turkey Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Steamed Rice Savory Bread Dressing Seasoned Corn Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Cream of Chicken Soup Chili Dogs / Hot Dog Bar Chili w/o beans Chicken Nuggets French Fries Steamed Broccoli Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Eggs & Omelets to Order Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Dog Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Pastry Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Tomato Soup Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Grilled Ham & Cheese Sand wiches French Fries Oven Fried Bacon Lyonnais Carrots Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Chicken Rice Soup Prime Rib au Jus Fried Shrimp Cocktail Sauce Twice Baked Potatoes Wild Rice Cheese Sauce Steamed Broccoli Corn on the Cob Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Assorted Oatmeal French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Omelets to Order Ready-to-eat Cereal Grits Eggs to Order Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Bacon Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Asst. Beverage Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Crab Bisque Fried Fish Beef Brisket Roasted Red Potatoes Orange Rice Hush Puppies Glazed Carrots Simmered Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Tartar Sauce French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Asst. Pizza Potato Bar Chicken Tenders Dinner Asian Stir Fry Soup Beef w/ Broccoli Sweet and Sour Chicken Shrimp Fried Rice Boiled Pasta Stir Fired Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Cream of Wheat Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Omelets to Order Texas Hash Cottage Fried Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Texas Tortilla Soup BBQ Ribs Grilled Chicken Breast Chicken Gravy Steamed Rice Mac & Cheese Simmered Green Beans Steamed Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Tacos Beef Tacos Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Beef Noodle Soup Chicken Alfredo Blackened Salmon Wild Rice Buttered Linguine Corn OBrien Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Corn Beef Hash Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Grilled Steak Pancakes w/ Asst. Syrup Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Hash Brown Potatoes Lunch White Bean Chicken Chili Baked Italian Fish Chicken Parmesan Cream Gravy Rice Pilaf Boiled Pasta Mixed Vegetables Club Spinach Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings French Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Hot Dogs Grilled Hamburger Grilled Cheese Burger French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Chicken Noodle Soup Meatloaf Turkey Pot Pie Egg Noodle Mashed Potatoes Brown Gravy California Medley Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Sausage Patties Hash Brown Potatoes French Toast w/ Asst. Syrup Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Black Bean Soup Fried Pork Chops Grilled Salmon Noodles Jefferson Mashed Sweet Potatoes Steamed Green Beans Steamed Zucchini Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cornbread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Minestrone Soup Meat Lasagna Grilled Italian Sausage Marinara Sauce Bow Tie Pasta Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. DOD photoA B-17 Flying Fortress, belonging to the 8th Air Force, flies over a Focke Wulf fighter plant bombed by the bombers. BuxtonFrom Page 11 ers airspeed and groundspeed while controlling the bombers nal run on the target. It was called the single most compli cated mechanical device ever manufactured, according to Stephan Wilkinson in his book, Man and Machine. Despite being highly sophis ticated, the bombsight was not as accurate as reported. Even though Army Air Forces infor mation ocers claimed the bombsight could drop a bomb into a pickle barrel from 30,000 feet, reality told a dierent sto ry, according to Avers Don Sher man, a writer who studied the Norden saga. e Norden had only a 20-power telescope, so you couldnt even see a pickle barrel from 30,000 feet, much less hit it. You could make out a factory, but that was about it, Sherman said. It was also very easy to defeat the Norden when it was used at high altitudes. Smoke screens worked just ne, ground fog was a barrier and the simple fact was that the year of the most disastrous B-17 raids, 1943, saw an unusual amount of bad weather over Europe. One of the most famous fail ings of the Norden Bombsight came in 1944 when the Allies bombed a chemical plant in Leuna, Germany. is chemical plant com prised 757 acres. Over the course of 22 bombing mis sions, the Allies dropped 85,000 bombs on the 757-acre chemical plant using the Norden Bombsight. What percentage of the bombs do you think landed in the perimeter of this 757-acre plant? Ten percent, and of those 10 percent that landed 60 per cent didnt even go o. ey were duds, Gladwell said. e Leuna chemical plant, after one of the most extensive bombings in the history of the war, was up and running within weeks. e bombsight was heavily guarded and shrouded in secrecy to keep the technology out of the hands of Germany. Bombar diers were required to take an oath saying they would protect the bombsight with their lives if necessary, and the device was loaded with thermite, melting the device into a lump of metal. All these measures proved unnecessary since Germany became aware of the bombsight in 1938, according to Gladwell. Carl Norden, as a proper Swiss man, was enamored by German engineers. In the 1930s he hired a bunch of them, in cluding a man named Her man Long, who in 1938 gave a complete set of the plans for the Norden Bombsight to the Nazis, Gladwell said. ey had their own Norden Bomb sight throughout the entire war, which also, by the way, didnt work very well. Gladwell uses the story of the bombsight to show how technol ogy doesnt solve all our problems and often ultimately gives us unforeseen consequences. I have not described to you a success story, Gladwell said. Ive described to you the oppo site of a success story. is is the problem of our infatuation with the things we make. We think that things we make can solve our problems, but our problems are much more complex than that. e issue isnt the accuracy of the bombs you have, its how you use the bombs you have and more importantly, whether you ought to use bombs at all. is proved to be true for Norden and his bombsight. On August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber called the Enola Gay used a Norden Bombsight to drop an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. e bomb missed its target by 800 feet, but of course it didnt matter, and thats the greatest irony of all, Gladwell said. e air forces $1.5 billion bomb sight was used to drop its $3 billion bomb, which didnt need a bombsight at all. No one told Carl Norden that his bombsight had been used over Hiroshima. He was a committed Christian. He thought he had designed something that would reduce the toll and suering in war. It would have broken his heart.NordenFrom Page 11

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014 American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama will award 24 Army veterans the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry during a White House ceremony March 18. ese veterans will receive the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, according to a White House news release. Each of these soldiers bravery was previously recognized by award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nations second highest military award. at award will be upgraded to the Medal of Honor in recognition of their gallantry, intrepidity and heroism above and be yond the call of duty. In 2002, Congress, through the Defense Authorization Act, called for a review of Jewish American and Hispanic Ameri can veteran war records from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, to ensure those deserving the Medal of Honor were not de nied because of prej udice, according to the release. During the review, records of several soldiers of neither Jewish nor Hispanic descent were also found to display criteria worthy of the Medal of Honor. e 2002 Act was amended to allow these soldiers to be honored with the upgrade, in addition to the Jewish and His panic American soldiers. e President will award the Medal of Honor to: Spc. 4 Santiago J. Erevia will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as radio telephone operator in Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) during search and clear mission near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. Sta Sgt. Melvin Morris will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as commander of a strike force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam, on September 17, 1969. Sgt. First Class Jose Rodela will receive the Medal of Honor for his cou rageous actions while serving as the company commander, Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on September 1, 1969. e President will posthumously award the Medal of Honor to the following individuals who distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Vietnam War: Sgt. Candelario Garcia will receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as an acting team leader for Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam, on Dec. 8, 1968. Spc. 4 Leonard L. Alvarado will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a rieman with Company D, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on Aug. 12, 1969. Sta Sgt. Felix M. Conde-Falcon will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting Platoon Leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Ap Tan Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on April 4, 1969. Spc. 4 Ardie R. Copas will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a Machinegunner in Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia, on May 12, 1970. Spc. 4 Jesus S. Duran will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his coura geous actions while serving as an acting M-60 machine gunner in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) dur ing combat oper ations against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on April 10, 1969. e following individuals distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intre pidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Korean War: Cpl. Joe R. Baldonado will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting machine gunner in 3rd Squad, 2nd Platoon, Company B, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment during com bat operations against an armed enemy in Kangdong, Korea, on Nov. 25, 1950. Cpl. Victor H. Espinoza will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an Acting Rieman in Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Chorwon, Korea, on Aug. 1, 1952. Sgt. Eduardo C. Gomez will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Tabu-dong, Korea, on Sept. 3, 1950. Pfc. Leonard M. Kravitz will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner with Company M, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Yangpyong, Korea, on March 6 and 7, 1951. Master Sgt. Juan E. Negron will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company L, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kalma-Eri, Korea, on April 28, 1951. Master Sgt. Mike C. Pena will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his cou rageous actions while serving as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Waegwan, Korea, on Sept. 4, 1950. Pvt. Demensio Rivera will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rieman with 2nd Platoon, Company G, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Changyong-ni, Korea, on May 23, 1951. Pvt. Miguel A. Vera will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rieman with Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in Chorwon, Korea, on Sept. 21, 1952. Sgt. Jack Weinstein will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while leading 1st Platoon, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in Kumsong, Korea, on Oct. 19, 1951. e following individuals distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intre pidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during World War II: Pvt. Pedro Cano will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company C, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Schevenhutte, Germany, on Dec. 3, 1944. Pvt. Joe Gandara will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing with Company D, 2d Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Amfreville, France, on June 9, 1944. Pvt. First Class Salvador J. Lara will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as the squad leader of a rie squad with 2d Platoon, Company L, 180th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Aprilia, Italy, on May 27 and 28, 1944. Sgt. William F. Leonard will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a squad leader in Company C, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near St. Die, France, on Nov. 7, 1944. Sta Sgt. Manuel V. Mendoza will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company B, 350th Infantry, 88th Infantry Division during combat opera tions against an armed enemy on Mt. Battaglia, Italy, on Oct. 4, 1944. Sgt. Alfred B. Nietzel will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a section leader for Company H, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Heistern, Germany on Nov. 18, 1944. 1st Lieutenant Donald K. Schwab will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as the commander of Company E, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, during combat operations against an armed enemy near Lure, France, on Sept. 17, 1944. e Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the Armed Forces who distinguish themselves conspicuous ly by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; engaged in military operations involving conict with an opposing foreign force; serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. Imperial War Museum photo the invasion of Normandy. Pvt. Joe Gandara will receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving with the 17th Airborne Division there on June 9, 1944.24 Soldiers to get MOHArmy photoA Soldier fires a .50 caliber machine gun at Communist-held positions during the Korean War. Nine Soldiers from that war will receive the Medal of Honor. National ArchivesA Soldier is lowered into a tunnel by members of the reconnaissance platoon during the Vietnam War in 1967. Three living and five posthumous Medals of Honor will be awarded Vietnam vets.

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 27, 2014