The Kings Bay periscope

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00337


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Barracks residents enjoy creating home-cooked meals for themselvesBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsTender grilled chicken with sauted onions and mushrooms. Rigatoni pasta simmering in a creamy Marsala sauce. Fresh-baked bread. A garden salad. Tiramisu for dessert to top it o. Sailors and Marines got a taste of a home-cooked Italian fare Feb. 5 as part of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Moral Welfare Recreation weekly cooking class in the unaccompanied housing barracks. We use the MWR kitchen in 1058 A, where we do what we call e Gathering, said Beth Morrison, MWR Liberty Program manager and overseer of e Gathering. It is a cooking class, but it is also a social environment. e Gathering, which starts at 5 p.m. and lasts about two hours, is a social event aimed at boosting moral and giving Kings Bay Sailors and Marines something to do after working hours. A couple of years ago, Beth Morrison over at MWR came to me with a good idea to get bar racks resi dents out of their rooms, said Mike Gebhardt, the Unaccompanied Housing Manager. e cooking class was one of those ideas. She provides the expertise and the resources, such as food and advertisement. Weve remodeled the kitchens, bought equipment for her, and keep her kitchen reserved for MWR. It rolled from there and has been going on for about 18 months. Morrison said the weekly Wednesday night event is a way for members of dierent Kings Bay commands to get together and socialize in a stress-free environment. We make meals that others recommend, and that usually ends up being a family dish, she said. Its really fun because we get to try dierent ethnic dishes and learn what THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Are you watching the Winter Olympics? Page 9 Space The next frontier for the military Page 12 Sweetheart Valentines Day Run and lunch at galley Pages 5, 9 Cmdr. Robert Wirth stands relieved by Cmdr. Craig GummerFrom Commander, Submarine Group Ten Public Affairse Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) held a change of command at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Feb. 14. Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth was relieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as commanding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold). Not only did I have the best job in the Navy, but was fortunate to have served and led one of the best crews executing our militarys most important mission strategic deterrence, said Wirth, a native of Bualo, N. Y.. To lead a crew of 165 Sailors through four strategic deterrent patrols was challenging, but certainly an extremely rewarding experience. Before relinquishing command, Wirth spoke not only of thanks, but of inspiration in his nal speech as the commanding ocer. He gave recognition to his previous mentors who imparted guidance to the incredible support of Team Kings Bay, and to his crew and to the families of his crew who sacrice daily for our country. USS Alaska is on a good course for continued success, and I feel humbled and honored to have had a part in her accomplishments, Wirth said. A Plaineld, Ind. native, Gummer is serving for the rst time in Kings Bay. His previous assignment was team chief for countering weapons of mass destruction plans at the Defense reat Reduction Agency in Fort Belvoir, Va. During his remarks, Gummer expressed his enthusiasm to work USS Alaska Gold has change of commandNavy photo by EM1 Mark TreenLt. Laura Byrd receives a trophy for being Female Military Athlete of the Year from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr.Byrd, Tyner Kings Bay top athletesSee Cooking, Page 7 ... we get to try dif ferent ethnic dishes and learn what others ate growing up. Beth Morrison MWR The Gathering overseerCounty honored by Coast GuardThe county of Camden and its cities, St. Marys, Kingsland and Woodbine, have received word that they have been approved for the designation as a Coast Guard Community. e designation, endorsed by Congressional committees which have oversight over the Coast Guard and approved by Coast Guard headquarters, Washington, D.C., is made to recognize the outstanding support the community provides to the Coast Guard, its personnel and their families. Camden County and its cities now join 15 other cities throughout the nation to be designated, but Camden the rst to be designated a community. USS Tennessee Golds ETSN Dwayne Wakefield chops garlic. More photos on Page 4.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen The Gathering catching on Camden Partnership By Shelia McNeill Capt. Christopher L. Harkins, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, presents Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth with a Legion of Merit award during the change of command ceremony.Navy photo by MC1 Rex Nelson See Camden, Page 7 See Alaska, Page 3 Trident Ret teams most-winning, earn Captains CupBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMA1 Christopher Tyner and Lt. Lara Byrd were named Male and Female Military Athlete of the Year by Morale, Welfare and Recreation Intramural Sports Feb. 12 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Trident Ret Facility earned the Captains Cup as the top overall team command on board base, during the awards banquet at Magnolias. Bryd was not only an enthusiastic participant in 7-vs.-7 Outdoor Soccer and 5K runs, but also organized community-supporting programs. I am honored to be chosen as the 2013 Female Military Athlete of the Year, she said. While this may appear to be an individual award, its not just about me because I could not have done it without the countless support and dedication of my shipmates, as well as the hard work and commitment of the MWR sta. For those who do not actively participate in MWR activities, you are missing out on an opportunity to meet new people and experience the vast array of activities oered on board Subase. Tyner participated in a variety of IM sports on base. He also was involved in the community in many dierent ways including one of his favorites, bicycle clubs and races. When asked about the award he also wanted to give credit where he felt credit was due. I really appreciate the recognition as Male Military Athlete of the Year, but have to recognize Subase Kings Bay MWR for fully supporting our Sailors by putting on so many dierent sports, Tyner said. e ability to have something for everyone isnt common, but they make it look easy. Coast Guard HS1 Amber Barrick, MT1 Jason Baker, EM1 Cody Guidry and Army Capt. Lauren Seal earned Letters of Recognition for their participation. MWR Intramural Sports Coordinator Tyler Cole said that by their involvement onand o-base, the awardees demonstrated exceptional athletic prowess and reected credit upon (themselves), (their) command, and the United States Navy. Nominees for male athlete of the year and their commands were: MT1 Jason Baker, Trident Training Facility instructor LS1 Ian Clendening, Trident Ret Facility MM2 Jimmy Gee, TRF MASN Jonathan Gonzales, Marine Corps Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Tyner See Athlete, Page 10

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e evenings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and entertainment, is $35 per person. For parade participation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Yankees, Rebels to man Ft. ClinchThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, March 1 and Sunday, March 2 and a Confederate Garrison event on Saturday, March 15 and Sunday, March 16. The programs allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares, fife players and drummer boys bring every part of the Civil War era to life. Entry fees include the $6 per vehicle park entrance fee plus $2 per person fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by membership-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dispersed to local nonprot organizations through the KBSOSA Community Grants program. e community grants are available by application to local nonprot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organization dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to raising funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportunities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. Student scholarships In 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 students, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line application is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or e-mail scholars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of American Sea Power and obtain a recommendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be announced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Councils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea services and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered KB Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League By Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs OfficeWhile TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still available online and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www. humana-military.com, or call (800) 444-5445. Beneciaries can change their primary care manager, compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with permanent change of station orders, its even possible to request a PCM change before leaving the current command. And for patients already residing in the Kings Bay area, PCMs are now available at Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, thanks to the return of sta from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care is improved, with primary care clinics staying open until 6 p.m., Monday to ursday. Patients can securely e-mail their PCM, by signing up at www.relayhealth.com. Patients also can meet BHC Kings Bays PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/NavalHospitalJax by clicking on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port Black and Ma roon teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the Web site or phone, patients can also call or visit TRICARE Health Benets Advisors to discuss options. HBAs work for the branch health clinic, unlike the Web site and phone sta who work for TRICAREs regional contractor Humana Military. So patients need to make any changes at www.tricare.mil, www. humana-military.com or (800) 4445445. Unfortunately, HBAs are unable to do this on patients behalf. HBAs can be reached at (912) 5734228 or (912) 573-1366.TRICARE service on-line, by phone Branch Health Clinic KB By Kristine M. SturkieNavy Exchange Service Command Public Affairse Navy Exchange Service Command announced that customers can now stay connected and even check their e-mail when shopping the NEX, thanks to free Wi-Fi services being provided at more than 50 selling locations worldwide. e landscape of retail is changing and more customers are using their smartphones to shop, nd product information and even product reviews, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, Store Operations. Oering free WiFi is another customer service we provide as part of the NEX shopping experience. One of the locations that features free Wi-Fi is NEX Norfolk, Va. NEX General Manager, Tom Jacobsen said free Wi-Fi is a service the NEX is happy to provide its customers. Whether our customers use our Wi-Fi for price comparison, shopping the NEX web store or simply browsing the Internet, it is a service they deserve, Jacobsen said. Providing free Wi-Fi is another example of the NEX putting our Sailors rst and our commitment to enhancing the time they spend in the store. NEX locations oering the service will have Wi-Fi On Board signing prominently displayed.Wi-Fi coming to Navy Exchange Navy Exchange

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with his Sailors. Crew of Alaska, with your sustained superior performance you have truly set the bar for all others to follow, he said. It is an honor and a privilege to be able to sail with you and strive to push that bar higher still. I could not ask for a better crew with which to stand ready to defend our nation. As USS Alaskas motto states, we will be alert, condent, and able. USS Alaska is the fourth Navy ship to be named for the State of Alaska and the seventh of 18 Ohio-class submarines. USS Alaska was commissioned Jan. 25, 1986. Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth addresses guests and crew members during a change of command ceremony for USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) Feb. 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Chapel.Navy photos by MC1 Rex NelsonRight, Capt. Christopher L. Harkins, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, addresses guests and crew members during a change of command ceremony for USS Alaska (SSBN 732). Below, Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer, left, salutes Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth during the change of command ceremony.AlaskaFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Above, ET3 Dwayne Wakefield puts mushrooms and onions in the oven. Left, Beth Morrison, the MWR Liberty Program manager, helps barracks residents cook a meal every Wednesday. MASN Keith Eagle really enjoys preparing food and hang ing out after dinner. The GatheringLeft, After chopping, pouring, boiling and baking, Sailors living in the unaccompanied housing barracks relax to enjoy a meal made from scratch. Above, the kitchen is always a buzz with the smell of fresh food and the sounds of cooking. Left, Sailors like Mercado love to come hang out, cook and enjoy each others company. STSSN Oswaldo Mercado gets the noodles ready for barracks-cooked Maggianos Rigatoni D. From left, Wakefield, MA3 Matt Rosales, MASN Marissa Davis and MASN Matthew Mullett make preparations. Ph otos by EM1 Mark Treen

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 Sweetheart Run over, the next fundraiser for the Submarine Ball is a March 14 Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. The ball is April 26 at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Cmdr. Richard Dubnansky, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Gold) Commanding Officer, drives a half-full double-stroller up the incline of a bridge. Sweetheart Run Feb. 14, 2014 at Naval Submarine Base Kings BayThe Submarine Ball 5k Sweetheart Run 2014, to raise funds for the ball, was Feb. 14 on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Above, the race started and later finished at the Kings Bay Fitness Center. Left, Mens winner EMC John Gibbons of Trident Training Facility. Right, Navy wife Colleen Steinhauer won the womans event. Sheer numbers helped USS Tennessee win the team event, as the Vols turned out to lead the field in entrees. Winning team USS Tennessee Gold gets a plaque from MMC Todd King of TTF, which managed the event. Navy photos By EM1 Mark Treen

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Fried Catsh w. Tartar Sauce Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Waes w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Muns Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Waes w/ Asst. Syrup Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Waes w/asst. syrups Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliower Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Strogano Fried Catsh w/Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. M enu items subject to change. Companies to hire vets By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceWASHINGTON, Feb. 10, 2014 First Lady Michelle Obama announced Feb. 10 that more than 100 construction industry companies have committed to hiring more than 100,000 military veterans over the next ve years. Obama and Labor Secretary omas E. Perez delivered remarks at the National Symposium on Veterans Employment in Construction, hosted at the Labor Department. e event brought together construction industry ocials, government leaders and education professionals to highlight hiring commitments throughout the industry, and it addressed employment challenges and opportunities for transitioning service members and veterans. e rst lady called the commitment to veterans a huge deal, adding, Its days like today that remind me why Dr. [Jill] Biden and I started Joining Forces in the rst place. Joining Forces is a national initiative championed by the rst lady and the vice presidents wife to engage all sectors of society to give service members and their family members opportunities and support. We did this because we wanted to inspire businesses and organizations across the country to ask themselves one simple question: What more can we do to honor and support our veterans and military families? the rst lady said. And today all of you answered that question with this incredibly strong commitment, Obama said. I know that you all have made this commitment not just because it is the patriotic thing to do, [but also] because you know that Americas military turns our some of the highest-skilled, hardest-working employees this country has ever seen. e kind of work men and women in uniform do every day includes building cities in the middle of deserts halfway around the world, building schools in remote villages, and repairing complex machinery in combat zones in the middle of the night, she said. Our troops have taken on some of the most challenging projects in some of the most inhospitable places under some of the toughest deadlines and constraints, the rst lady said. So when it comes to the attitude and the experience needed to thrive in construction jobs, our men and women in uniform are second to none. As part of Joining Forces, the rst lady and Dr. Biden issued a call to 50 U.S. governors to take executive or legislative action to streamline state licensing for service members, veterans and their spouses by the end of 2015. Today, 44 states have passed legislation that streamlines the process for service members and veterans to obtain civilian certication and licensure, according to a White House fact sheet. In his remarks, Perez noted that the Labor Departments latest employment report indicates the private sector has created 8.5 million jobs over the last 47 months. e construction industry showed one of the most dramatic growth rates, he said, adding more jobs in January than in any month since March 2007. e construction industry is expected to create more than 1.5 million jobs by 2022, Perez said, adding that the industry has long maintained a proven training and employment infrastructure. rough apprenticeships, certication and credentialing programs provided by labor unions and individual employers, veterans can translate their skills into in-demand civilian occupations, the secretary said. Nearly 8 percent of all registered apprentices are veterans, he added, while 23 percent of apprentices are active military members learning skills in over 120 occupations ranging from airframe mechanics to reghters. e rst lady said she and President Barack Obama believe the nations men and women in uniform should be able to start pursuing such careers the minute they hang up their uniforms but that the transition from military to civilian life can be dicult. Too many of our troops get excellent training [but] they dont always know how to translate that military experience into good civilian jobs, she said. ats why in 2012 my husband launched the Department of Defense Military Credentialing and Licensing Task Force, and were already starting to see results. Today, she added, service members nationwide participate in apprenticeships and accredited civilian training programs near their bases, and the Defense Department is working to help them apply military training toward earning civilian credentials, particularly in high-demand elds like plumbing and heating, ventilation and air conditioning. Obama Continued on Page 7NASA photo by Robert MarkowitzNASAs 2013 Astronaut Class from left, Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Nick Hague, Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan, Dr. Jessica Meir, Dr. Christina Hammock, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor J. Glover. Astronauts visit Pentagon By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceOn the E-ring of the Pentagon hangs a picture of the Mercury 7, NASAs rst group of astronauts. All were military test pilots: Marine Corps Maj. John Glenn, Navy Cmdr. Alan Shepherd, Air Force Maj. Gus Grissom, Air Force Maj. Gordon Cooper, Navy Cmdr. Wally Schirra, Navy Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and Air Force Maj. Deke Slayton. e military tie remains strong in the astronaut corps today, as NASAs new class of astronauts has six serving military ofcers. e group visited the Pentagon recently and met with Navy Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta. Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Hague, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh A. Cassada, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor J. Glover, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan are the military members of the class. Drs. Jessica Meir and Christina M. Hammock are the civilians. e military astronauts, like just about anyone else in the services today, bring the experience of operating in Iraq. Hague worked to detect or jam improvised explosive devices. McClain ew helicopters in and around Kirkuk and Tal Afar. Morgan was a ight doctor who deployed with the 3rd Special Forces Group to Iraq. Until the inclusion of this class, the United States had fewer than 50 active astronauts. ey serve in a variety of jobs, including at Mission Control in Houston or as liaisons with commercial space vendors. Others live and work with the Russian space agency. ose astronauts train in Star City outside Moscow, and at the launch facilities at Baikonur. All of the new astronauts are learning Russian, a development that probably would surprise the Mercury astronauts, who were selected at the height of the Cold War. It was a tough process to be selected. More than 6,100 applications went to NASA in 2011. For some, it wasnt the rst experience. Hague, for example, rst applied to be an astronaut in 2003. It boils down to two rounds of interviews, and the interviews consist of a lot of medical screening, Hague said. eres not a lot of time away from service during the selection process. e astronauts have begun their two years of training before their rst ight into space. ere are only a few slots for U.S. astronauts per year aboard the International Space Station. Some could be involved in development and testing of new spacecraft. And one could be landing on Mars someday. You never know where a government job can take you.

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From Coast Guard CompassActor. Musician. Comedian. Coast Guardsman. Today we honor the life and legacy of Sid Caesar. Born in Yonkers, N.Y., Caesar studied saxophone at the Julliard School of Music. He played in a number of prominent Big Bands, including those led by Charlie Spivak and Claude ornhill. Caesar joined the Coast Guard in 1939 after saxophone at Julliard and was assigned to play in military revues and shows, such as Tars and Spars. Early on, he showed a natural penchant for comedy by entertaining other band members with his improvised routines. His comedic character prompted the shows producer Max Liebman to move him from the orchestra and cast him as a stand-up comedian to entertain troops. is jump-started his famed career and after he was released from service by the Coast Guard in 1945 he went on to perform his war routine in both the stage and movie versions of the revue. He continued under Liebman after the war in theatrical performances in the Catskills and Florida.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Feb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial aware ness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops e Coast Guard plays a critical role in the safety and well-being of Camden Countys residents with almost 300 Coast Guard personnel located throughout the community. e two units in Camden County are the Maritime Force Protection Unit, a vital element in the protection of the Navy assets on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, and the Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. MSSTs were established after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in response to heightening security levels and now operate throughout the country. To support its Coast Guard members and their families, e Coast Guard Community of Camden County coordinates community recognition events, and programs. e community, with the lead of e Camden Partnership, advocated for the commissioning of Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. When the community learned of the Coast Guards budget reduction, it joined forces to work together with leaders to lobby on its behalf to restore its budget. e Camden Partnership made visit to 210 congressional oces in support of restoring the Coast Guard budget. Every year the local Navy League honors the Coast Guard Sailor of the Year and works with the Coast Guard units in recognizing the Coast Guard birthday. e Chamber of Commerce sponsors a military member of the month. We applied for this designation 16 months ago after Commandant Adm. Bob Papp spoke to our community. We are just thrilled that we have been approved and that the designation is for the community and not just one of the cities. We will continue to advocate for the national needs of this service which does so much to protect our homeland. A special community feature unlike any other designated city is a motto seen throughout the county on posters with the letters EDICCIMAD, which stands for Every Day in Camden County is Military Appreciation Day. is is not a slogan its a way of life! e public will be invited to celebrate this prestigious honor at a luncheon on April 25, as well as a picnic on Saturday, May 17, at the St Marys Waterfront. ere will be additional information forthcoming about these two events. For more information about the Coast Guard Cities Program visit www. uscg.mil/community/ Coast_Guard_Cities.asp. others ate growing up. After long hours at work, Morrison devised this way for Sailors and Marines to add more to the quality-of-life things they already do. ey are going to eat Wednesday nights anyways, Morrison said. Why not have fun and socialize while they are having dinner? We are trying to make it convenient for them. Cooking is one of the things that culturally bring people together. Its very relaxed and open. Morrison, who gives guidance to the group during the cooking class, described e Gathering as a relaxing and open place, where barracks residents could come in and socialize while cooking dinner. She said that they can come in at any time, and if they dont want to cook they dont have to. e only things she would ask of them is to help clean up afterwards. I just hope that they can get value out of this, she said. Even though their schedule may not be normal, they can still have something thats their own and somewhere that they can express themselves. For more information about e Gathering, contact Beth Morrison at 573-8999.CookingFrom Page 1 CamdenFrom Page 1 e president has assured that veterans can use their Post-9/11 GI Bill benets to pay for career and technical training in construction and other industries, the rst lady said, and veterans and companies can nd jobs and qualied employees in 2,600 American job centers across the country. Todays commitment is about putting highly skilled individuals to work in high-paying careers and providing U.S. companies with the very best workers, but its also about model ing a certain set of values for our communities and for our country, she said. By making these kinds of commitments you all are sending a clear mes sage that in this country we honor those whove sacri ced for us, the rst lady said to company represen tatives in the audience. And to service members and veterans in the audience and watching online, she said, Please know that America has your back, and if you ever need to be reminded of how thankful we are for everything youve done for us, take a look around this room. Youve got representatives from some of the leading companies in America, the rst lady added, many of whom have traveled a very long way to be here. And theyre all here because they want to serve you as well as youve served this country.VetsFrom Page 6 Coast Guard photoThe Coast Guard Brooklyn Barracks Band with Sid Caesar center stage. Caesar saluted THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 By Cpl. Nathan KnapkeMarine Corps Base HawaiiBodysurng the perfect wave is challenging. Finding a big, glassy hollow wave to ride to shore may require more luck than skill. When a bodysurfer nds a wave up to their riding standards, they have to time their launch, pick a direction to swim and position themselves to ow both downward and sideways with the wave. Marine Corps Base Hawaii hosted the 8th annual Pyramid Rock Bodysurng Championship at Pyramid Rock Beach, Jan. 18. e event was open to military personnel and the public, giving everyone the opportunity to nd their perfect wave. e idea for the base to host a bodysurng contest came from Ben Mercier. As a member of the Hawaii State Bodysurng Association and a retired captain with 3rd Marine Regiment, Mercier had the unique perspective needed to build the concept for a contest the installation continues to this day. Keeping with many of his original ideas, all proceeds go to the Wounded Warriors Detachment Hawaii. e tournament was originally a two-day event, but was condensed into one day. At 9 a.m. the sun lled the sky as viewers and competitors began to occupy the parking lots and beach. All participants were placed in one of six groups to even the playing eld. e age groups were: 18-and-under, 19-to25, 26-to-34, 35-to-49, 50-and-up. All female contestants, regardless of age, were grouped into one category. After several heats, the top six or seven contestants from each group competed for top nalist. e top nisher, competed against each other to be the grand champion of the competition. Colored head caps on the competitors helped judges decipher who they were scoring throughout the aorded 15 minutes time limit in each heat. e time increased to 20 minutes in the nal rounds. Judges scored the best three out of 10 waves ridden by each contestant for every round. e score was determined by wave size, length of ride, maneuvers and tube time. A ag system showed participants how much time they had left in each round. A green ag was used to show the start of the heat, a yellow ag represented ve minutes or less and the red ag meant the round was over. Several contestants came from all over Hawaii to participate in the contest. I traveled all the way from the Big Island just for this event, said Je Devins, a retired sailor. Ive been bodysurng for many years now and having the opportunity to come on the Marine Corps base to ride some of the best waves on Oahu is a blessing. Its a great tournament and I think its fantastic that all the proceeds go to wounded warriors. Bodysurfers are a rare and small group. We are dedicated and love the sport. ere isnt much Id rather do. e waves were excellent and perfect for bodysurng, said Ian MacDonald, a base lifeguard and the grand champion who was awarded Hawaiian prizes like wood carvings and paintings. Its good to see that everyone had fun, but Im especially proud that no one got hurt. e only reason Im any good is because of the training I get from lifeguarding. Several lifeguards said this is one of their busiest days of the year. ey agreed the event as a whole went very well and everyone had a safe and fun day. e next bodysurng competition is planned for January 2015.Marine Corps photoA wounded Marine, while he waits for the stretcher bearers to come for him, is given a drink of water from the canteen of a buddy while the Marines fight the enemy in rough country on Peleliu Island.He fell on grenade, lived By Lance Cpl. Garrett WhiteMarine Corps Logistics Base BarstowFew acts of heroism and selessness can match jumping upon a live hand grenade in combat. Designed to kill or injure in a large area, absorbing the entire blast of a grenade with ones own body means almost certain death. It is for this reason that several service members throughout history have received the Medal of Honor for this ultimate act of self-sacrice. Carlton R. Rouh however, is one of very few men who have fallen on a grenade and lived to tell the tale. Born May 11, 1919 in Lindenwold, N.J., Rouh enlisted in the Marine Corps, January 1942, shortly after the outbreak of World War II. Following basic training, Pvt. Rouh was sent to the Pacic eater for combat duty. Rouh received the Silver Star Medal during the Battle of Guadalcanal for carrying wounded men out of enemy re, until he himself was wounded. In addition to this, Rouh was awarded a battleeld commission to second lieutenant for his outstanding leadership and initiative in combat. As an ocer, Rouh was put in command of a weapons platoon during the New Britain Campaign. Rouh was promoted to rst lieutenant prior to the Battle of Peleliu where he performed actions above and beyond the call of duty. On Sept. 15, 1944, during the Battle of Peleliu, Rouh was severely wounded by Japanese re. Two of his fellow Marines managed to pull him away to a safer location and began administering rst aid. While receiving rst aid, Rouh and his men came under erce Japanese re and grenade assault, with one grenade landing in their midst. Despite his injuries, Rouh shoved his two comrades aside and threw his body over the grenade. Rouhs body absorbed the entire blast, leaving his two Marines uninjured. Still conscious, Rouh heard the continuing reght, and was eventually able to be evacuated. For his seless actions, Rouh received the Medal of Honor. Following his evacuation, Rouh was hospitalized to recover from his grievous wounds. Upon his retirement from active duty, Rouh was promoted to captain. Rouh passed away Dec. 8, 1977, but his actions and the actions of service members like him continue to inspire people to this day. Rouh Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Nathan KnapkeJeremy Haldeman, a ground radio repairman for 4th Marine Logistics Group, competes in the 8th annual Pyramid Rock Bodysurfing Championship, Jan. 18.Who needs a surf board?

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I d love to say Ive been watching the Winter Olympics. But I havent seen very much of it at all. It seems like every time Ive turned it on, either the news is on or theres Bob Costas with his pink eye or theyre showing something that for whatever reason Im just not interest ed in. Ill keep trying. But its a bummer. Maybe Ill do bet ter with Rio in 2016. NBC paid the International Olympic Committee $775 million for the broadcast rights. So I went to find out who is watching and enjoying this.Are you watching the Winter Olympics?MM2 Phillip Wellons USS Georgia Blue Miami I have been watching. I like the biathlon. Its pretty neat. ET1 Jorge Quiles Trident Training Facility The Bronx, N.Y. I dont watch sports. I play them. Vivian Jeter Family member Hillard, Fla. I watched the men who ski downhill and the opening ceremony. The jackets were beautiful. FTSN Julian Ballard USS West Virginia Blue Toledo, Ohio I havent watched any. I work so much I just go home and go to sleep. Rebecca R. Family member Parkersburg, W. Va. Ive been watching figure skating, snowboarding and hockey. Its wonderful. John Chestnut Retired Navy St. Louis I watched the luge. These guys are going so fast, and theyre at the mercy of the ice. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Sweetheart LunchPirates Cove Galley at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay served a Sweetheart Lunch of steak and lobster Feb. 14 for Valentines Day. CSC Kevin Bower and his wife, Elizabeth, took the opportunity to enjoy the occasion. From Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffiarsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces and Commander, Navy Installations Command will participate in the exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. is annual exercise will be conducted on at Navy installations, including Kings Bay, located in the continental United States Feb. 24 to 28. is exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security forces to respond to threats to installations and units. e primary focus of SC/CS 14 is to enhance the training and readiness of the Navys anti-terrorism program and naval security force personnel to respond to real-world threats. e value of training events like this cannot be underestimated, there are very limited opportunities to conduct realistic training that enables the validation of memorandum of understandings/ memorandum of agreements with outside the fence line local agencies. is exercise provides this opportunity, said William Clark, Commander, Navy Installation Commands shore exercise program manager. Exercise SC/CS 2014 is not in response to any specic threat, but is a regularly scheduled annual exer-National base security exercise starts Feb. 24See Security, Page 11 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

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From Commander Submarine Force Pacific Public Affairse Navy announced that the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) will change homeports and move to Naval Base Guam. As part of the Navys long range plan to put the most advanced and capable units forward, Topeka will move to Guam upon completion of her Engineered Overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, N.H. In April 2013, then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter announced that a fourth Los Angelesclass submarine would be postured in Guam in an eort to enhance the Navys forward presence as it continues to reposture its forces toward the Pacic. e decision to homeport Topeka in Guam brings that vision to fruition. Topeka and its crew of approximately 15 ocers and 155 enlisted Sailors arrived at PNSY Dec. 16, 2012, from San Diego. While at the shipyard, Topeka underwent a major availability consisting of various maintenance projects and system upgrades making her the most updated and capable ship of the class. Topeka, commissioned Oct. 21, 1989, is the third ship of the United States Navy named for the city of Topeka and is the fourth improved Los Angelesclass nuclear-powered submarine. e improved modications of this class include retractable bow planes, a reinforced sail for under ice operations, vertical launch Tomahawk Cruise Missile capability, ship quieting enhancements, and an integrated combat systems suite. Topekas last Western Pacic deployment was from March through September 2012 in support of the Chief of Naval Operations Maritime Strategy, which includes maritime security, forward presence, sea control, and power projection. During the deployment, Topeka covered more than 35,000 nautical miles and executed missions vital to national security. e security environment in the Indo-AsiaPacic requires that the U.S. Navy station the most capable ships forward. is posture allows the most rapid response times possible for maritime and joint forces, and brings our most capable ships and submarines with the greatest amount of striking power and operational capability to bear in the timeliest manner. Security Force Battalion/ Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic EM1 Cody Guidry, Port Ops Lt. Seth Hooper, USS Florida (SSGN 728) weapons ocer ET2 Eric Johnson, USCG Maritime Force Protection Unit MA2 Gerardo OliverBaez, Kings Bay Security Detachment, military police MM1 Anthony Prince, TRF MM2 Brian Tolbert, TRF ordnance handler MA1 Christopher Tyner, SUBSECDET security LPO e female nominees were: HS1 Amber Barrick, USCG Maritime Safety and Security Team emergency medical Lt. Laura Byrd, Kings Bay Chapel chaplain Army Capt. Lauren Seal, Public Health Command District veterinarian Vying for the Kings Bay Captains Cup were the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, Trident Training Facility and Trident Ret Facility. EM1 Cody Guidry, Port Operations, was less verbose in his response but summarized the enthusiasm of all participants as they look forward to the fun IM will bring in 2014, saying simply, I love sports. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTrident Refit Facility Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Carius, right, and Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., hold up the banner declaring TRF as the Captains Cup winner for 2013.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenNominees and award winners for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Male and Female Athlete of the Year pose after the awards banquet Feb. 12 at Magnolias.AthleteFrom Page 1Navy photo by MC1 David MercilThe Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) will change homeports and move to Naval Base Guam.Sub to homeport in Guam By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceCheating on prociency tests at an Air Force missile base and at the Navys nuclear propulsion school have Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel concerned that systemic issues may be threatening the health of the force and they have his full attention, Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 5. He is concerned about the health of the force and the health of the strong culture of accountability and responsibility that Americans have come to expect from their military, Kirby told Pentagon reporters. Surveys have shown that the military is among the most respected professions in the United States, and these ethical lapses work against that perception. In his weekly meeting with the service secretaries and service chiefs, the secretary told them that ethical behavior will be on the agenda for these meetings from now on, Kirby said. e secretary believes military and Defense Department leaders must take a step back and put renewed emphasis on developing moral character and courage in the force, he added. Hagel gave the service leaders those marching orders just days after Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James reported systemic problems with ICBM launch ocers, Kirby said, but before the Navy reported instances of cheating on tests at the Navy Nuclear Propulsion School in Charleston, S.C. Senior defense leaders have begun work on a plan to x any systemic issues, the press secretary said. A group co-chaired by ocials from the Joint Sta and the Oce of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy is set to deliver a report to Hagel within 60 days. He has made it clear he would certainly welcome the work sooner than that, Kirby said. In addition, Hagel has asked retired Air Force Gen. Larry Welch and retired Navy Adm. John Harvey to lead an independent review of the militarys nuclear enterprise. ey will oer their views on the quality and eectiveness of the action plan, and they will also provide their insights and recommendations on addressing any systemic personnel problems, the admiral said. KirbyDefense boss eyeing ethics 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechanical bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, Tshirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being accepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is limited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at regis tration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sun screen and bug spray. All candidates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 5733990. The Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 5105400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by MC1 Mark TreenScenic Etowah Park is the site for the upcoming March 22 Navy Adventures Unleashed Spring Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Winter Basketball LeagueTeam W L T1t, USS Alaska 4 0 0 1t, MCSFB 4 0 0 1t, USS Wyoming G 3 0 1 4t, USS Georgia 3 1 1 4t, USS West Va. 3 1 1 6, Medical 3 2 0 7t, Gunz Blazin 2 2 0 7t, TTF 2 2 0 7t, Subase 2 2 0 10t, Chosen Few 1 3 0 10t, USS Rhode Is. 1 3 0 10t, Coast Guard 1 3 0 13t, USS Wyoming 0 2 0 13t, NMRD 0 4 0 13t, TRF 0 4 0Players of the Week Ben Drayton, USS Alaska, 32 pts. v. USS Rhode Island Stephon White, USS Wyoming Gold, 27 pts. vs. NRMD Robert Johnson, USS Georgia, 26 points vs. MCSFBUpcoming Spring Softball registration, opens Feb. 24. Intramural Sports By MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Chief of Naval Personnel is scheduled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live at 2 p.m. EST March 5. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that aect them and their families and open the oor to live questions from eet via satellite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin sending in questions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@gmail.com. e programs and policies under the oce of the chief of naval personnel directly impact Sailors and include the following: Pay and allowances Advancements Uniforms Education and training Family Support Policies Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions 21st Century Sailor Initiatives Total Sailor Fitness Personnel Programs and Polices e event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network, Direct to Sailor and e Pentagon Channel. Online streaming will be available on the following Web sites: www.navy.mil; www.pentagonchannel.mil; www.defense.gov.All Hands Call is on-line Morancise. ere will be an increase in activity on and around Navy installations as a result of this planned exercise. Measures have been taken to minimize disruptions to normal base and station operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased trac around bases or delays in base access.SecurityFrom Page 9 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

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By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceSpace is critical to understanding the planet and how the United States safeguards national security, but the costs and diculties of reaching the domain have slowed U.S. eectiveness in space, the director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency said Jan. 13. Speaking at SciTech 2014, a technical conference hosted by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Arati Prabhakar explained that now is an important time to think in fresh ways about how to break that paradigm. In many ways the situation takes Prabhakar back to 1958, she said, when DARPA was established partly because of the technological surprise delivered in 1957 by Sputnik, the worlds rst articial satellite, launched by the Soviet Union and marking the start of the space age. I think were in the middle of a self-in icted surprise in some sense in space to day, the director said. Its a very dierent kind of surprise, but its one that is render ing us ineective and putting us in a place [where] we simply cannot aord to be. DARPA, the Defense Departments research and development enterprise, has a portfolio that includes hypersonic technology in rethinking air dominance for the future, new ways to control the electromagnetic spectrum, new cyber opportunities, big data analytics, brain function, outpacing the threat of infectious disease, and accelerating the development of synthetic biology. Another part of DARPAs portfolio is rethinking national security space, Prabhakar said. Today we are extremely eective at waging a kind of precise lethal war, she added. Its something that is a core element of our national security today, but it is a kind of warghting capability thats simply not possible without the assets that we have on orbit. Around the national security environment, the director said, space is becoming increasingly congested as more commercial activity takes place in orbit and as other nations stake their claims in space. eres also something going on inside the national security community in space thats actually quite troubling, Prabhakar said. at has to do with how slow and costly it is for us today to do anything we need to do on orbit for national security purposes. e director said the situation reminds her of living on a lake in Reston, Va., many years ago and watching ducks on the water in winter. I would look out at the lake, and these ducks would cluster at twilight, and theyd sit in the lake, and they would stop moving, and the lake would start icing up around them. Eventually, they would just freeze in place on this lake, she said. Tragically, thats what it feels like to me when I think about where we are in terms of our ability to react and do what we need to do quickly, cost eectively in space for national security purposes. At DARPA, scientists are working on three projects involving space launch, satellites and real-time domain awareness that the director said she thinks will cre ate a very dierent future for space. It can cost tens of millions of dollars to get even a very small satellite to orbit, and years to schedule the launch, she said, because only a few xed sites around the world can launch such craft. Today at DARPA, were investing in programs that we hope will change that model and allow for the ability to launch on 24-hour call-up from anywhere around the world, Prabhakar said. With DARPAs Airborne Launch Assist Space Access program, called ALASA, the idea is for an aircraft to carry a small satellite and its host-booster inside the plane or externally. At the right altitude and direction, the aircraft would release the satellite and booster and both would continue climbing into space. A key benet of the system is that, within a day of being called up, a satellite launch mission could be conducted from a runway anywhere in the world. Another advantage is the exibility of an aircraft to deliver a satellite into any orbit at any time, according to DARPA. Our ALASA program aims to be able to get a [100-pound] satellite to [lowEarth orbit] for about $1 million. Our new experimental spaceplane program, XS-1, aims to develop a reusable rst stage that enables a cost in the range of $5 million to get 3,000 pounds to 5,000 pounds to LEO, the director said. ese changes are dramatic, she added, because the price would be a revolution in capability and because of the exibility and rapid call-up. ese are important new dimensions and new ways of thinking about launch, Prabhakar said. e second project involves satellites, she added. Today you assemble and create these very complex systems here on the ground. We launch them and when we get to orbit what weve got is what weve sent up, and its a very inexible capability in that regard, she explained. DARPAs Phoenix program is working to create a future in which space robotics technologies can service satellites and even assemble them on orbit, and reuse components of old or nonworking satellites perhaps on orbit. As we develop those capabilities at [geostationary orbit, or GEO] we believe From Naval History and Heritage CommandPhotographic archivists from the Naval History and Heritage Command rediscovered a donation Feb. 5 in their backlog that may not have been seen by the public for more than a century: a box containing about 150 original glass plate photographs from the Spanish-American War. According to Lisa Crunk, NHHCs photo archives branch head, the nd is amazing. e plates were individually wrapped in tissue paper and include full captions and dates, which were likely prepared by the photographer, Douglas White, Crunk said. e glass plates are in perfect condition and housed in a large wooden box with a leather strap, which likely allowed for it to be carried by the shoulder. Further enhancing the provenance of the collection was an etching on the cover of the box: Photographic Slides US Naval Military Activities In and Around Manila Spanish American War 1898 and Philippine Insurrection Douglas White War Correspondent Research on Mr. White discovered that he was a special war correspondent of the San Francisco Examiner during the Philippine War, Crunk said. Crunk says the collection is signicant because the Navy played a central role in nearly every aspect of the Spanish-American war from logistics to diplomacy. American planners and leaders anticipated that the ght with Spain would be primarily a naval war, she said. e U.S. Navys victories at Manila Bay and Santiago de Cuba were pivotal events that turned the course of the war and joint Army-Navy operations at Santiago, Puerto Rico, and Manila sealed the success won by the U.S. Navys command of the seas. e box of glass plates were found in an archival storage space as the photo archive team was preparing for a major renovation project. e entire collection is being rehoused into new archival enclosures and shelving units. e discovery was made by archivists Dave Colamaria and Jon Roscoe during a survey phase of the renovation project. Once it was realized what they had uncovered, there was tremendous excitement amongst the sta, especially the historians, she said. e images are an amazing nd, though they were never really lost, they were simply waiting to be re-discovered. Plans for NHHCs photo collection include high resolution digitization, cataloging and eventual exhibition on the organizations Web site. Its part of ongoing dedication of resources and eort across the entire NHHC enterprise to reduce the commands backlog of history, artifacts and art, renovate its facilities, support its museums, and maintain historic ships and aircraft in its collection. e Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. Naval history and heritage. It is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archaeology, Navy history, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus.Navy Photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordAn undated photo show American troops disembarking from a ship onto small boats near Cavite, Phillipines in 1898 or 1899. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated photo shows soldiers manning a battle signal corps station during the Spanish American War. Navy photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordDavid Colamaria, Naval History and Heritage Commands photographic section archivist, looks at a glass plate photograph of Spanish Adm. Pasqual Cervera taken in 1898 or 1899. Rare Spanish-American War photos foundDOD photoBegun in 2002, the Space Surveillance Telescope program aims to enable groundbased, broad-area search, detection and tracking of small objects in deep space for purposes such as space mission assurance and asteroid detection. DARPA looking to spaceSee Space, Page 13 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 13 that were going to start changing the fundamental dynamics and economics of whats going to be possible in terms of satellite capability, the director said. e third project simply has to do with knowing whats going on in orbit, she added. Space is becoming a real-time domain, and its no longer good enough to sort of know whats up there. We really need to start moving to a future of space trac control, more like ight trac control for the air domain, Prabhakar said. DARPA has several programs that reach for this future, she said. One is the Space Surveillance Telescope, or SST, that can see very dim objects at geostationary orbit across a broad swath of the sky. DARPA has demonstrated this telescope capability in New Mexico and now is in the process of moving to Australia in cooperation with the Australian government. In addition to changing what we do, the director added, I think how we work in space and how we work together to achieve these new capabilities is equally important. DARPA has a long history of working with a broad technical community, spanning universities, companies large and small and labs of all dierent sorts. By Staff Sgt. Tracci Dorgan South Carolina National Guarde mammoth winter storm that sliced through southern and middle-Atlantic states Feb. 12 was keeping about 3,000 National Guard members busy in nine states and the District of Columbia. Soldiers and Airmen were assisting local authorities in Alabama, the District of Columbia, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the National Guard Bureau and other ocials. Guard personnel said that prepositioning resources helped ocials deal with the eects of the ice and snow, which pummeled areas already hard hit by a storm late last month. at storm paralyzed areas of Georgia. We accomplished our objective of getting our units into place before the snow started to fall, and now we are staged and ready to assist with response operations if we are needed, said. Col. James Zollar, director of joint operations for the Virginia National Guard. Typical of the responses was in South Carolina, where Army National Guard wrecker teams moved out in full force to help during the winter storm that made roads dangerous around the Southeast. Wrecker teams were stationed throughout the state to help wherever they were called Wednesday, when the storm began. Sta Sgt. Richard Krause was one of more than 100 Soldiers put on state active duty to support one of 14 wrecker teams from the South Carolina Army National Guard assigned to assist the state Department of Public Safety. Krause is a maintenance sergeant for the 124th Engineer Company in Saluda and was assigned to wrecker team 5. His team was comprised of other soldiers who live and work around the Columbia area, but were tasked with providing assistance in the Ganey area. e team was prepositioned in the upstate o of Interstate 85 to be ready for whatever was needed. We recovered an 18-wheeler that broke down, partially blocking a lane, on I-85, Krause said. He was having transmission problems and couldnt drive anymore. He was stuck for more than three hours before we got the call to help him. We arrived and towed him to the next exit where he was able to park his truck safely and get out of the storm. Krause said no other towing vehicles could reach him so it was important for a larger towing vehicle to get him clear of the road to keep all lanes clear on the highway. e South Carolina Army National Guards 1089 A-1 wrecker weighs about 80,000 pounds, so it was able to safely drive on ice-covered roads. e wrecker team, in addition to Krause, included Sta Sgt. Jeery Shaw, Sgt. Chris Barefoot and Sgt. Chris Grant. ey were able to move the 18-wheeler o the road within 30 minutes of arriving. e team and I were happy we were able use our skills to help our community, Krause said. We were here before we were needed, staged o exit 90 at the Pilot gas station, ready to help. Because of our planning, we were able to respond quickly when we were needed. Krause said he was humbled by the number of people who stopped by and expressed their gratitude to the wrecker team while they waited to respond to calls. roughout the day and into the night, they, along with other wrecker teams also responded to calls for assistance by stranded motorists and other 18-wheelers who were stuck in areas around Spartanburg, Inman, as well as Ganey. It was a great experience to be able to help, said Krause. People who passed us were happy for us just being there.South Carolina National Guard photoSouth Carolina National Guard members support the state Department of Public Safety along I-26 looking for stranded motorists on Feb. 12.Guard turns out in nine states for winter storm DOD: No nukes for Iran By Nick SimeoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceAmid ongoing skepticism among lawmakers about Irans nuclear intentions, a senior Defense Department ocial told Congress Feb. 11 the United States will not allow Tehran to build a nuclear weapon, and that if Iran decided to use nuclear talks as a cover for developing one, Washington would be able to detect it. Elissa Slotkin, principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for international security aairs, told the House Armed Services Committee the military remains prepared for all options if Tehran would decide to secretly develop a bomb while engaging in diplomacy. Any comprehensive agreement that we ever negotiate will emphasize veriable means, Slotkin said. And importantly, we remain condent that we could tell if Iran was making a dash toward a weapon, and if that decision was made, it would take at least a year for a nuclear device to be developed. After years of suspicion about its nuclear program from Western nations, Iran reached an agreement with the international community in November in which it pledged to temporarily halt some of its nuclear activity in exchange for a lifting of some sanctions. Negotiations are set to resume later this month in Vienna on a comprehensive accord that would ensure Iran does not move forward with a nuclear weapons program. But some lawmakers remain skeptical about Tehrans intentions, and measures have been introduced in the Senate to toughen sanctions against the country. We are now focused on testing the prospects for a comprehensive nuclear deal based on veriable actions that convince us and the international community that Iran is not trying to obtain a nuclear bomb, Slotkin said. Iran maintains that its nuclear program is for energy and medical proposes, but U.S. and other Western ocials believe the impact of strong international sanctions account for the countrys interest in negotiations and today. Anne Patterson, the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern aairs, told the committee sanctions have left Irans economy in shreds. ere was also extensive questioning at the hearing of U.S policy toward neighboring Iraq, in particular from lawmakers who asked Slotkin whether a new outbreak of Sunni violence in Anbar province could have been dealt with more quickly if the United States had not withdrawn all combat troops after the two countries failed to reach a status of forces agreement in 2011. Slotkin said the United States is encour aging the Iraqi government to address Sunni grievances, but disputed the notion that a reduced U.S military presence in the country could have made a substantial dierence in the current unrest. At the height of the American presence in Iraq, at the height of the surge, 170,000 troops, we had levels of violence that were seeing right now in Anbar, she said. So, Im not sure that a remaining force of 10,000 would have been able to prevent this. Slotkin DARPA imageDARPAs new Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1) program seeks to lower satellite launch costs by developing a reusable hypersonic unmanned vehicle.SpaceFrom Page 12

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Barracks residents enjoy creating home-cooked meals for themselvesBy MC2 Ashley HedrickNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsTender grilled chicken with sauted onions and mushrooms. Rigatoni pasta simmering in a creamy Marsala sauce. Fresh-baked bread. A garden salad. Tiramisu for dessert to top it o. Sailors and Marines got a taste of a home-cooked Italian fare Feb. 5 as part of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Moral Welfare Recreation weekly cooking class in the unaccompanied housing bar racks. We use the MWR kitchen in 1058 A, where we do what we call e Gathering, said Beth Morrison, MWR Liberty Program manager and overseer of e Gathering. It is a cooking class, but it is also a social environment. e Gathering, which starts at 5 p.m. and lasts about two hours, is a social event aimed at boosting moral and giving Kings Bay Sailors and Marines something to do after working hours. A couple of years ago, Beth Morrison over at MWR came to me with a good idea to get bar racks resi dents out of their rooms, said Mike Gebhardt, the Unaccompanied Housing Manager. e cooking class was one of those ideas. She provides the expertise and the resources, such as food and advertisement. Weve remodeled the kitchens, bought equipment for her, and keep her kitchen reserved for MWR. It rolled from there and has been going on for about 18 months. Morrison said the weekly Wednesday night event is a way for members of dierent Kings Bay commands to get together and socialize in a stress-free environment. We make meals that others recommend, and that usually ends up being a family dish, she said. Its really fun because we get to try dierent ethnic dishes and learn what THEkings bay, georgia Up Periscope Are you watching the Winter Olympics? Page 9 Space The next frontier for the military Page 12 Sweetheart Valentines Day Run and lunch at galley Pages 5, 9 Cmdr. Robert Wirth stands relieved by Cmdr. Craig GummerFrom Commander, Submarine Group Ten Public Affairse Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) held a change of command at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Feb. 14. Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth was re lieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as commanding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold). Not only did I have the best job in the Navy, but was fortunate to have served and led one of the best crews executing our militarys most important mission strategic deterrence, said Wirth, a native of Bualo, N. Y.. To lead a crew of 165 Sailors through four strategic deterrent patrols was challenging, but certainly an extremely rewarding experience. Before relinquishing command, Wirth spoke not only of thanks, but of inspiration in his nal speech as the commanding ocer. He gave recognition to his previous men tors who imparted guidance to the incredible support of Team Kings Bay, and to his crew and to the families of his crew who sacrice daily for our country. USS Alaska is on a good course for continued success, and I feel humbled and honored to have had a part in her accomplishments, Wirth said. A Plaineld, Ind. native, Gum mer is serving for the rst time in Kings Bay. His previous assign ment was team chief for counter ing weapons of mass destruction plans at the Defense reat Reduction Agency in Fort Belvoir, Va. During his remarks, Gummer expressed his enthusiasm to work USS Alaska Gold has change of commandNavy photo by EM1 Mark TreenLt. Laura Byrd receives a trophy for being Female Military Athlete of the Year from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr.Byrd, Tyner Kings Bay top athletesSee Cooking, Page 7 ... we get to try dif ferent ethnic dishes and learn what others ate growing up. Beth Morrison MWR The Gathering overseerCounty honored by Coast GuardThe county of Camden and its cities, St. Marys, Kingsland and Woodbine, have received word that they have been approved for the designation as a Coast Guard Community. e designation, endorsed by Congressional committees which have oversight over the Coast Guard and approved by Coast Guard headquarters, Washington, D.C., is made to recognize the outstanding support the community provides to the Coast Guard, its personnel and their families. Camden County and its cities now join 15 other cities throughout the nation to be designated, but Camden the rst to be designated a community. USS Tennessee Golds ETSN Dwayne Wakefield chops garlic. More pho tos on Page 4.Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen The Gathering catching on Camden Partnership By Shelia McNeill Capt. Christopher L. Harkins, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, presents Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth with a Legion of Merit award during the change of command cer emony.Navy photo by MC1 Rex Nelson See Camden, Page 7 See Alaska, Page 3 Trident Ret teams most-winning, earn Captains CupBy EM1 Mark TreenNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public AffairsMA1 Christopher Tyner and Lt. Lara Byrd were named Male and Female Military Athlete of the Year by Morale, Welfare and Rec reation Intramural Sports Feb. 12 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Trident Ret Facility earned the Captains Cup as the top overall team command on board base, during the awards banquet at Mag nolias. Bryd was not only an en thusiastic participant in 7-vs.-7 Outdoor Soccer and 5K runs, but also organized community-supporting programs. I am honored to be cho sen as the 2013 Female Mili tary Athlete of the Year, she said. While this may appear to be an individual award, its not just about me because I could not have done it without the countless sup port and dedication of my shipmates, as well as the hard work and commitment of the MWR sta. For those who do not actively partici pate in MWR activities, you are missing out on an op portunity to meet new people and experience the vast array of activities oered on board Subase. Tyner participated in a variety of IM sports on base. He also was involved in the community in many dier ent ways including one of his favorites, bicycle clubs and races. When asked about the award he also wanted to give credit where he felt credit was due. I really appreciate the recognition as Male Military Athlete of the Year, but have to recognize Subase Kings Bay MWR for fully support ing our Sailors by putting on so many dierent sports, Tyner said. e ability to have something for everyone isnt common, but they make it look easy. Coast Guard HS1 Amber Barrick, MT1 Jason Baker, EM1 Cody Guidry and Army Capt. Lauren Seal earned Letters of Recognition for their participation. MWR Intramural Sports Coordinator Tyler Cole said that by their involvement onand o-base, the award ees demonstrated exceptional athletic prowess and reected credit upon (them selves), (their) command, and the United States Navy. Nominees for male athlete of the year and their com mands were: MT1 Jason Baker, Trident Training Facility instructor LS1 Ian Clendening, Trident Ret Facility MM2 Jimmy Gee, TRF MASN Jonathan Gonzales, Marine Corps Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Tyner See Athlete, Page 10

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 tenant commands, base military personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event briefs must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publicacode CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714 or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing. the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for accuracy of ads contained herein. Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or patrons. The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, in no way connected with the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202. The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:Kings Bay PeriscopeEllen S. Rykert, Publisher 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202 (904) 359-4168 Advertising Sales LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative (904) 655-1200 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Cmdr. Ed Callahan CMDCM Randy Huckaba Scott Bassett EM1 Mark Treen, MC2 Ashley Hedrick Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay Sub Ball sets activitiesActivities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE changes proceduresTRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.St. Marys Mardis Gras March 1St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e eve nings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and enter tainment, is $35 per person. For parade par ticipation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional informa tion, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Car show registration openKingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852.Fernandina market on Saturdayse Fernandina Beach Market Place farmers market, on N. 7th Street in downtown, historic Fernandina is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, visit the Web site at Fer nandinaBeachMarketPlace.com or call (904) 557-8229.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Yankees, Rebels to man Ft. ClinchThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Garrison event on Saturday, March 1 and Sunday, March 2 and a Confederate Garrison event on Saturday, March 15 and Sunday, March 16. The programs allow visitors to interact with living historians to experi ence life in the fort as it was. The grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in firing demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares, fife players and drummer boys bring every part of the Civil War era to life. Entry fees include the $6 per vehicle park entrance fee plus $2 per person fort admission. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! From the Kings Bay Submarine Officers Spouses Associatione Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association announced Feb. 3 that it will begin accepting applications for grant money from nonprot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas through its Community Grants program. e funds were raised over the past several months by member ship-driven activities, including Make It, Bake It, Fake It auctions and a monthly Bunco social activity. Beginning this year, 25 percent of the proceeds of the 2014 Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction will be dis persed to local nonprot organiza tions through the KBSOSA Commu nity Grants program. e community grants are avail able by application to local nonprot organizations needing as sistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create transformative change. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or to request a grant application, send an e-mail to kbsosagrants@yahoo.com. e KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic nonprot organiza tion dedicated to giving back to our communities while building lifelong friendships. In addition to rais ing funds for the Community Grants program, KBSOSA members have held donation drives for local nonprot organizations in need. e spouses in the group enjoy friendship, mutual support, social activities and charitable opportu nities. For more information about KBSOSA, visit Kings Bay SOSA on Facebook. Student scholarships In 1960, the Submarine Ocers Wives Club established the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. DSF currently sponsors 115 stu dents, and each of these students receives an annual scholarship of $3,400. Funding these scholarships comes, in part, from sales at the Dolphin Store, located on the base under the oversight of Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses As sociation, and the annual Kings Bay Silver and Gold Auction. Eligibility criteria for students is: High school senior or college student Child or stepchild of member or former member of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Unmarried on March 15 Under age 24 on March 15 Scholar must attend a four-year accredited college or university and intend to work toward a BS or BA degree Sponsors must meet one of the following requirements: Sponsor must be qualified in submarines and served on active duty in the Submarine Force for a minimum of eight years. Or, sponsors must have served on active duty in submarine support activities for a minimum of 10 years. e deadline for on-line applica tion is March 15 at www.dolphinscholarship.org. For more information, phone (757) 671-3200 ext. 111 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday; fax (757) 671-3330 or e-mail schol ars@dolphinscholarship.org. From the CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United Statese CamdenKings Bay Council, Navy League of the United States is is oering its 2014 Navy League Youth Scholarship. e $1,000 scholarship is open to graduating seniors in the NJROTC program and dependents of Sail ors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen or Merchant Mariners, active duty or retired, attending Camden County High School, and to graduating seniors in the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, who plan to further their education after high school. e application, available as an interactive PDF, can be downloaded from the Councils Web site at www. kingsbaynavylegue.org, and from the Camden County High School Scholarship Web page. Applicants are required to submit a 500 to 750 word maximum original essay on e Importance of Ameri can Sea Power and obtain a recom mendation from a teacher or from their NJROTC or Sea Cadet unit commander. e scholarship winner will be chosen based on the quality of the essay and the teacher/unit commander recommendation. e complete application must be received by the Navy League Scholarship Committee no later than Apri1 21 to receive consideration. e scholarship winner will be an nounced May 20 at Camden County High Schools Scholarship Night, and presented during the Coun cils June 13 St. Marys River Sunset Cruise. e scholarship recipient and his/her parents will be guests of the Navy League for the event. For more information, contact David Burch at (912) 674-4252. e CamdenKings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States supports the commands and the men and women of the sea ser vices and their families stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and in St. Marys. Additional information can be found on the council Web site at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Civic grants, scholarships oered KB Sub Ocers Spouses Navy League to award scholarship Camden Navy League By Jeanne CaseyNaval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs OfficeWhile TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still available on line and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www. humana-military.com, or call (800) 444-5445. Beneciaries can change their primary care manager, com pare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats covered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with permanent change of station orders, its even possible to request a PCM change before leaving the current com mand. And for patients already residing in the Kings Bay area, PCMs are now available at Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, thanks to the return of sta from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care is improved, with primary care clinics staying open until 6 p.m., Monday to ursday. Patients can securely e-mail their PCM, by signing up at www.relayhealth.com. Patients also can meet BHC Kings Bays PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/NavalHospitalJax by clicking on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port Black and Ma roon teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the Web site or phone, patients can also call or visit TRI CARE Health Benets Advisors to discuss options. HBAs work for the branch health clinic, unlike the Web site and phone sta who work for TRICAREs regional contractor Humana Mili tary. So patients need to make any changes at www.tricare.mil, www. humana-military.com or (800) 4445445. Unfortunately, HBAs are un able to do this on patients behalf. HBAs can be reached at (912) 5734228 or (912) 573-1366.TRICARE service on-line, by phone Branch Health Clinic KB By Kristine M. SturkieNavy Exchange Service Command Public Affairse Navy Exchange Service Command announced that customers can now stay connected and even check their e-mail when shopping the NEX, thanks to free Wi-Fi ser vices being provided at more than 50 selling locations worldwide. e landscape of retail is chang ing and more customers are using their smartphones to shop, nd product information and even prod uct reviews, said Richard Dow, NEXCOM senior vice president, Store Operations. Oering free WiFi is another customer service we provide as part of the NEX shopping experience. One of the locations that features free Wi-Fi is NEX Norfolk, Va. NEX General Manager, Tom Jacobsen said free Wi-Fi is a service the NEX is happy to provide its customers. Whether our customers use our Wi-Fi for price comparison, shop ping the NEX web store or simply browsing the Internet, it is a service they deserve, Jacobsen said. Providing free Wi-Fi is another example of the NEX putting our Sailors rst and our commitment to enhancing the time they spend in the store. NEX locations oering the service will have Wi-Fi On Board signing prominently displayed.Wi-Fi coming to Navy Exchange Navy Exchange

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with his Sailors. Crew of Alaska, with your sus tained superior performance you have truly set the bar for all others to follow, he said. It is an honor and a privilege to be able to sail with you and strive to push that bar higher still. I could not ask for a better crew with which to stand ready to defend our nation. As USS Alaskas motto states, we will be alert, condent, and able. USS Alaska is the fourth Navy ship to be named for the State of Alaska and the seventh of 18 Ohio-class submarines. USS Alaska was commissioned Jan. 25, 1986. Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth addresses guests and crew members during a change of command cer emony for USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) Feb. 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Chapel.Navy photos by MC1 Rex NelsonRight, Capt. Christopher L. Harkins, Commander, Submarine Squadron 20, addresses guests and crew members during a change of command ceremony for USS Alaska (SSBN 732). Below, Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer, left, salutes Cmdr. Robert E. Wirth during the change of command ceremony.AlaskaFrom Page 1 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Above, ET3 Dwayne Wakefield puts mushrooms and onions in the oven. Left, Beth Morrison, the MWR Liberty Program manager, helps barracks residents cook a meal every Wednesday. MASN Keith Eagle really enjoys preparing food and hang ing out after dinner. The GatheringLeft, After chopping, pouring, boiling and baking, Sailors living in the unaccompanied housing barracks relax to enjoy a meal made from scratch. Above, the kitchen is always a buzz with the smell of fresh food and the sounds of cooking. Left, Sailors like Mercado love to come hang out, cook and enjoy each others company. STSSN Oswaldo Mercado gets the noodles ready for barracks-cooked Maggianos Rigatoni D. From left, Wakefield, MA3 Matt Rosales, MASN Marissa Davis and MASN Matthew Mullett make preparations. Ph otos by EM1 Mark Treen

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 Sweetheart Run over, the next fundraiser for the Submarine Ball is a March 14 Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Club. The ball is April 26 at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Cmdr. Richard Dubnansky, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) (Gold) Commanding Officer, drives a half-full double-stroller up the incline of a bridge. Sweetheart Run Feb. 14, 2014 at Naval Submarine Base Kings BayThe Submarine Ball 5k Sweetheart Run 2014, to raise funds for the ball, was Feb. 14 on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Above, the race started and later finished at the Kings Bay Fitness Center. Left, Mens winner EMC John Gibbons of Trident Training Facility. Right, Navy wife Colleen Steinhauer won the womans event. Sheer numbers helped USS Tennessee win the team event, as the Vols turned out to lead the field in entrees. Winning team USS Tennessee Gold gets a plaque from MMC Todd King of TTF, which managed the event. Navy photos By EM1 Mark Treen

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Pirates Cove Galley menus ThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Eggs & Omelets To Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Rolled Oats Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes French Toast / Asst. Syrups Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Italian Wedding Soup Chicken Parmesan Meat Sauce Boiled Spaghetti Roasted Potatoes Steamed Broccoli Italian Kidney Beans Healthy Choice Salad Assorted Salad Dressings Garlic Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Pepper and Onions Chili Cheese Sauce Baked Beans Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwiches Dinner Cream of Broccoli Soup Fried Catsh w. Tartar Sauce Braised Pork Chops Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Tossed Green Rice Fried Okra Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cheesy Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarFridayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets to Order Waes w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Grits Sausage Gravy Biscuits Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Yogurt Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup BBQ Chicken Tempura Battered Shrimp Sweet Potato Fries Baked Mac & Cheese Green Bean Almandine Simmered Succotash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Muns Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Grilled Cheese Burger Grilled Hamburgers BBQ Chicken Pulled Pork BBQ Ribs Bratwurst Cole Slaw Baked Beans Macaroni Salad Potato Salad Burger Bar Dinner Asian Stir Fry Sweet and Sour Pork Oriental Pepper Steak Fried Rice Steamed Rice Chinese Mixed Vegetables Egg Rolls Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSaturdayBrunch Logging Soup Fried Chicken Tenders Corn Dogs Potatoes OBrien Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Oven Fried Bacon Waes w/ Asst. Syrup Eggs & Omelets to Order Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Fruit Flavored Gelatin Assorted Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Asst. Pizza Asst. Wings French Fries Baked Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarSundayBrunch Chicken Noodle Soup Cannonball Sandwich Grilled Polish Sausage French Fries Grilled Peppers and Onions Oven Fried Bacon Eggs to Order Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Grilled Sausage Patties Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Pastry Bar Dinner Asparagus Caliente Roast Prime Rib Fried Shrimp Cocktail sauce Rosemary Potatoes Rice Pilaf Corn on the Cob Simmered Carrots Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarMondayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Asst. Oatmeal Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Eggs to Order Omelets to Order French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Grilled Bacon Fresh Fruit Salad Breakfast Burritos Hash Brown Potatoes Pastry Bar Asst. Breads & Spreads Asst. Fruit Salad Asst. Yogurt Lunch Corn Chowder Country Fried Steak Cream Gravy Baked Fish Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rice Pilaf Steamed Peas and Carrots Louisiana Squash Healthy Choice Salad Bar Asst. Salad Dressings Assorted Fruit Bar Assorted Condiments Hot Rolls Assorted Desserts Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Wings Pizza Potato Bar Dinner Vegetable Soup Baked Ham w/Honey Glaze Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Candied Sweet Potatoes Cajun Style Black-Eye Peas Southern Style Greens Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarTuesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereals Asst. Instant Oatmeal / Grits Waes w/asst. syrups Cream of Wheat Eggs/Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Buttermilk Biscuits Cottage Fried Potatoes Sausage Gravy Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Cheese Potato Soup Pot Roast Chicken Cordon Blue Brown Gravy Wild Rice Au Gratin Potatoes Mixed Vegetables Simmered Cauliower Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Beef Enchiladas Chicken Quesadias Spanish Rice Refried Beans Taco Bar Dinner Minestrone Soup Baked Italian Sausage Meat, Marinara & Clam Sauces Boiled Pasta Calico Corn Steamed Broccoli Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Toasted Garlic Bread Assorted Dessert Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarWednesdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs & Omelets To Order Pancakes w/Asst. Syrups Corned Beef Hash Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs Hash Browned Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Gumbo Fried Fish Grilled Chicken Breast Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Wild Rice Chicken Gravy Pinto Beans Mixed Vegetables Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Corn Bread Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Corn Dogs Grilled Hamburgers Grilled Cheeseburgers French Fries Baked Beans Burger Bar Dinner Beef Rice Soup Steamed Rice Hot & Spicy Chicken Roast Pork Simmered Egg Noodles Yellow Squash Steamed Green Beans Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarThursdayBreakfast Breakfast Juice Bar Ready-to-eat Cereal Eggs and Omelets to Order Grilled Bacon Asst. Instant Oatmeal & Grits Rolled Oats French Toast w/Asst. Syrups Sausage Patties Cottage Fried Potatoes Asst. Yogurt Pastry Bar Lunch Chicken Noodle Soup Fried Shrimp Hot Rolls Creole Macaroni Franconia Potatoes Rice Pilaf Simmered Carrots Steamed Peas Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Assorted Condiments Cocktail Sauce Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage Bar Lunch speed line Chicken Pattie Sandwich Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Grilled Peppers & Onions Baked Beans Chili Cheese Sauce Sandwich Bar Cold Cut Sandwich Dinner Cheddar Cheese Soup Beef Strogano Fried Catsh w/Tartar Sauce Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Buttered Egg Noodles Seasoned Corn Herbed Broccoli Toasted Parmesan Bread Healthy Choice Salad Bar Assorted Salad Dressings Cocktail Sauce Hot Rolls Buttermilk Biscuits Assorted Desserts Asst. Fruit Bar Assorted Breads & Spreads Assorted Beverage BarGalley hoursMonday through Friday Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m. Lunch 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Weekends and holidays No breakfast served Brunch 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Menu items subject to change. Companies to hire vets By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceWASHINGTON, Feb. 10, 2014 First Lady Michelle Obama announced Feb. 10 that more than 100 construction in dustry companies have committed to hiring more than 100,000 military veter ans over the next ve years. Obama and Labor Secretary omas E. Perez delivered remarks at the National Symposium on Veterans Employment in Construction, hosted at the Labor De partment. e event brought together construc tion industry ocials, government leaders and education professionals to high light hiring commitments throughout the industry, and it addressed employment challenges and opportunities for transi tioning service members and veterans. e rst lady called the commitment to veterans a huge deal, adding, Its days like today that remind me why Dr. [Jill] Biden and I started Joining Forces in the rst place. Joining Forces is a national initiative championed by the rst lady and the vice presidents wife to engage all sectors of society to give service members and their family members opportunities and sup port. We did this because we wanted to inspire businesses and organizations across the country to ask themselves one simple question: What more can we do to honor and support our veterans and military families? the rst lady said. And today all of you answered that question with this incredibly strong com mitment, Obama said. I know that you all have made this commitment not just because it is the patriotic thing to do, [but also] because you know that Amer icas military turns our some of the highest-skilled, hardest-working employees this country has ever seen. e kind of work men and women in uniform do every day includes building cities in the middle of deserts halfway around the world, building schools in re mote villages, and repairing complex ma chinery in combat zones in the middle of the night, she said. Our troops have taken on some of the most challenging projects in some of the most inhospitable places under some of the toughest deadlines and constraints, the rst lady said. So when it comes to the attitude and the experience needed to thrive in construction jobs, our men and women in uniform are second to none. As part of Joining Forces, the rst lady and Dr. Biden issued a call to 50 U.S. gov ernors to take executive or legislative ac tion to streamline state licensing for service members, veterans and their spouses by the end of 2015. Today, 44 states have passed legislation that streamlines the process for service members and veterans to obtain civilian certication and licensure, according to a White House fact sheet. In his remarks, Perez noted that the Labor Departments latest employment report indicates the private sector has created 8.5 million jobs over the last 47 months. e construction industry showed one of the most dramatic growth rates, he said, adding more jobs in Janu ary than in any month since March 2007. e construction industry is expected to create more than 1.5 million jobs by 2022, Perez said, adding that the industry has long maintained a proven training and employment infrastructure. rough apprenticeships, certica tion and credentialing programs provided by labor unions and individual employers, veterans can translate their skills into in-demand civilian occupations, the secretary said. Nearly 8 percent of all registered ap prentices are veterans, he added, while 23 percent of apprentices are active mili tary members learning skills in over 120 occupations ranging from airframe mechanics to reghters. e rst lady said she and President Barack Obama believe the nations men and women in uniform should be able to start pursuing such careers the minute they hang up their uniforms but that the transition from military to civilian life can be dicult. Too many of our troops get excel lent training [but] they dont always know how to translate that military experience into good civilian jobs, she said. ats why in 2012 my husband launched the Department of Defense Military Cre dentialing and Licensing Task Force, and were already starting to see results. Today, she added, service members na tionwide participate in apprenticeships and accredited civilian training programs near their bases, and the Defense De partment is working to help them apply military training toward earning civilian credentials, particularly in high-demand elds like plumbing and heating, ventila tion and air conditioning. Obama Continued on Page 7NASA photo by Robert MarkowitzNASAs 2013 Astronaut Class from left, Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Nick Hague, Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan, Dr. Jessica Meir, Dr. Christina Hammock, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor J. Glover. Astronauts visit Pentagon By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceOn the E-ring of the Pentagon hangs a picture of the Mercury 7, NASAs rst group of astronauts. All were military test pilots: Marine Corps Maj. John Glenn, Navy Cmdr. Alan Shepherd, Air Force Maj. Gus Grissom, Air Force Maj. Gordon Coo per, Navy Cmdr. Wally Schirra, Navy Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and Air Force Maj. Deke Slayton. e military tie remains strong in the astronaut corps today, as NASAs new class of astronauts has six serving military of cers. e group visited the Pentagon recently and met with Navy Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta. Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Hague, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh A. Cassada, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor J. Glover, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan are the military members of the class. Drs. Jessica Meir and Christina M. Hammock are the civilians. e military astronauts, like just about anyone else in the services today, bring the experience of operat ing in Iraq. Hague worked to detect or jam impro vised explosive devices. McClain ew helicopters in and around Kirkuk and Tal Afar. Morgan was a ight doc tor who deployed with the 3rd Special Forces Group to Iraq. Until the inclusion of this class, the United States had fewer than 50 active astronauts. ey serve in a variety of jobs, including at Mission Con trol in Houston or as li aisons with commercial space vendors. Others live and work with the Russian space agency. ose astronauts train in Star City outside Mos cow, and at the launch fa cilities at Baikonur. All of the new astronauts are learning Russian, a de velopment that probably would surprise the Mer cury astronauts, who were selected at the height of the Cold War. It was a tough process to be selected. More than 6,100 applications went to NASA in 2011. For some, it wasnt the rst experience. Hague, for example, rst applied to be an astronaut in 2003. It boils down to two rounds of interviews, and the interviews consist of a lot of medical screening, Hague said. eres not a lot of time away from ser vice during the selection process. e astronauts have begun their two years of training before their rst ight into space. ere are only a few slots for U.S. as tronauts per year aboard the International Space Station. Some could be involved in development and test ing of new spacecraft. And one could be landing on Mars someday. You never know where a gov ernment job can take you.

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From Coast Guard CompassActor. Musician. Comedian. Coast Guardsman. Today we honor the life and legacy of Sid Caesar. Born in Yonkers, N.Y., Caesar studied saxophone at the Julliard School of Music. He played in a number of prominent Big Bands, including those led by Charlie Spivak and Claude ornhill. Caesar joined the Coast Guard in 1939 after saxo phone at Julliard and was assigned to play in military revues and shows, such as Tars and Spars. Early on, he showed a natural penchant for comedy by entertaining other band members with his improvised routines. His comedic character prompted the shows pro ducer Max Liebman to move him from the or chestra and cast him as a stand-up comedian to entertain troops. is jump-started his famed career and after he was released from service by the Coast Guard in 1945 he went on to perform his war routine in both the stage and movie versions of the revue. He continued under Liebman after the war in theatrical performances in the Catskills and Florida.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Veterans Affairs rep visits Kings BayA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Feb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Couples Connection: Marriage enrichmentThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day semi nar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be regis tered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a min imum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the chal lenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expectations, communication and financial aware ness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and bene fits. Learn how to interpret job announce ments and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops e Coast Guard plays a critical role in the safety and well-being of Camden Countys residents with almost 300 Coast Guard personnel located throughout the community. e two units in Camden County are the Maritime Force Protection Unit, a vital element in the protection of the Navy assets on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, and the Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. MSSTs were established after the 9/11 ter rorist attacks in response to heightening security levels and now operate throughout the country. To support its Coast Guard members and their families, e Coast Guard Community of Camden County coordinates community recognition events, and programs. e community, with the lead of e Camden Partner ship, advocated for the commissioning of Maritime Safety and Security Team 91108. When the community learned of the Coast Guards budget reduction, it joined forces to work together with leaders to lobby on its behalf to restore its budget. e Camden Partnership made visit to 210 congressional oces in support of restoring the Coast Guard budget. Every year the local Navy League honors the Coast Guard Sailor of the Year and works with the Coast Guard units in recognizing the Coast Guard birthday. e Chamber of Commerce sponsors a military member of the month. We applied for this designation 16 months ago after Commandant Adm. Bob Papp spoke to our community. We are just thrilled that we have been approved and that the designation is for the community and not just one of the cities. We will continue to advocate for the national needs of this service which does so much to protect our homeland. A special community feature unlike any other designated city is a motto seen throughout the county on posters with the letters EDICCIMAD, which stands for Every Day in Camden County is Military Appreciation Day. is is not a slogan its a way of life! e public will be invited to celebrate this prestigious honor at a lun cheon on April 25, as well as a picnic on Saturday, May 17, at the St Marys Waterfront. ere will be additional information forthcoming about these two events. For more information about the Coast Guard Cities Program visit www. uscg.mil/community/ Coast_Guard_Cities.asp. others ate growing up. After long hours at work, Morrison devised this way for Sailors and Marines to add more to the quality-of-life things they already do. ey are going to eat Wednesday nights anyways, Morrison said. Why not have fun and socialize while they are having dinner? We are trying to make it convenient for them. Cooking is one of the things that culturally bring people together. Its very relaxed and open. Morrison, who gives guidance to the group during the cooking class, described e Gathering as a relaxing and open place, where barracks residents could come in and socialize while cook ing dinner. She said that they can come in at any time, and if they dont want to cook they dont have to. e only things she would ask of them is to help clean up afterwards. I just hope that they can get value out of this, she said. Even though their schedule may not be normal, they can still have something thats their own and somewhere that they can express themselves. For more information about e Gathering, contact Beth Morrison at 573-8999.CookingFrom Page 1 CamdenFrom Page 1 e president has as sured that veterans can use their Post-9/11 GI Bill benets to pay for career and technical training in construction and other in dustries, the rst lady said, and veterans and companies can nd jobs and qualied employees in 2,600 American job centers across the country. Todays commitment is about putting highly skilled individuals to work in high-paying careers and providing U.S. companies with the very best workers, but its also about model ing a certain set of values for our communities and for our country, she said. By making these kinds of commitments you all are sending a clear mes sage that in this country we honor those whove sacri ced for us, the rst lady said to company represen tatives in the audience. And to service mem bers and veterans in the audience and watching online, she said, Please know that America has your back, and if you ever need to be reminded of how thankful we are for everything youve done for us, take a look around this room. Youve got representatives from some of the leading companies in America, the rst lady added, many of whom have traveled a very long way to be here. And theyre all here because they want to serve you as well as youve served this country.VetsFrom Page 6 Coast Guard photoThe Coast Guard Brooklyn Barracks Band with Sid Caesar center stage. Caesar saluted THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 By Cpl. Nathan KnapkeMarine Corps Base HawaiiBodysurng the perfect wave is challenging. Finding a big, glassy hollow wave to ride to shore may require more luck than skill. When a bodysurfer nds a wave up to their riding standards, they have to time their launch, pick a direction to swim and position themselves to ow both downward and side ways with the wave. Marine Corps Base Ha waii hosted the 8th annual Pyramid Rock Body surng Championship at Pyramid Rock Beach, Jan. 18. e event was open to military personnel and the public, giving everyone the opportunity to nd their perfect wave. e idea for the base to host a bodysurng contest came from Ben Mer cier. As a member of the Hawaii State Bodysurng Association and a retired captain with 3rd Marine Regiment, Mercier had the unique perspective needed to build the concept for a contest the installation continues to this day. Keeping with many of his original ideas, all proceeds go to the Wounded Warriors Detachment Hawaii. e tournament was originally a two-day event, but was condensed into one day. At 9 a.m. the sun lled the sky as viewers and competitors began to occupy the parking lots and beach. All participants were placed in one of six groups to even the playing eld. e age groups were: 18-and-under, 19-to25, 26-to-34, 35-to-49, 50-and-up. All female contestants, regardless of age, were grouped into one category. After several heats, the top six or seven contes tants from each group competed for top nalist. e top nisher, com peted against each other to be the grand champion of the competition. Colored head caps on the competitors helped judges decipher who they were scoring throughout the aorded 15 minutes time limit in each heat. e time increased to 20 minutes in the nal rounds. Judges scored the best three out of 10 waves ridden by each contestant for every round. e score was deter mined by wave size, length of ride, maneuvers and tube time. A ag system showed participants how much time they had left in each round. A green ag was used to show the start of the heat, a yellow ag represented ve minutes or less and the red ag meant the round was over. Several contestants came from all over Hawaii to participate in the con test. I traveled all the way from the Big Island just for this event, said Je Devins, a retired sailor. Ive been bodysurng for many years now and having the opportunity to come on the Marine Corps base to ride some of the best waves on Oahu is a blessing. Its a great tournament and I think its fantastic that all the proceeds go to wounded warriors. Bodysurfers are a rare and small group. We are dedicated and love the sport. ere isnt much Id rather do. e waves were excel lent and perfect for body surng, said Ian MacDon ald, a base lifeguard and the grand champion who was awarded Hawaiian prizes like wood carvings and paintings. Its good to see that everyone had fun, but Im especially proud that no one got hurt. e only reason Im any good is because of the training I get from lifeguarding. Several lifeguards said this is one of their busi est days of the year. ey agreed the event as a whole went very well and everyone had a safe and fun day. e next bodysurng competition is planned for January 2015.Marine Corps photoA wounded Marine, while he waits for the stretcher bearers to come for him, is given a drink of water from the canteen of a buddy while the Marines fight the enemy in rough country on Peleliu Island.He fell on grenade, lived By Lance Cpl. Garrett WhiteMarine Corps Logistics Base BarstowFew acts of heroism and selessness can match jumping upon a live hand gre nade in combat. Designed to kill or injure in a large area, absorbing the entire blast of a grenade with ones own body means almost cer tain death. It is for this reason that several service members throughout history have re ceived the Medal of Honor for this ulti mate act of self-sacrice. Carlton R. Rouh however, is one of very few men who have fallen on a grenade and lived to tell the tale. Born May 11, 1919 in Lindenwold, N.J., Rouh enlisted in the Marine Corps, January 1942, shortly after the outbreak of World War II. Following basic training, Pvt. Rouh was sent to the Pacic eater for combat duty. Rouh received the Silver Star Medal during the Battle of Guadalcanal for car rying wounded men out of enemy re, until he himself was wounded. In addition to this, Rouh was awarded a battleeld commission to second lieutenant for his outstanding leadership and initia tive in combat. As an ocer, Rouh was put in com mand of a weapons platoon during the New Britain Campaign. Rouh was promoted to rst lieutenant prior to the Battle of Peleliu where he per formed actions above and beyond the call of duty. On Sept. 15, 1944, during the Battle of Peleliu, Rouh was se verely wounded by Japanese re. Two of his fellow Marines managed to pull him away to a safer location and began administering rst aid. While receiving rst aid, Rouh and his men came under erce Japanese re and grenade assault, with one grenade land ing in their midst. Despite his injuries, Rouh shoved his two comrades aside and threw his body over the grenade. Rouhs body absorbed the entire blast, leaving his two Marines uninjured. Still conscious, Rouh heard the con tinuing reght, and was eventually able to be evacuated. For his seless actions, Rouh received the Medal of Honor. Following his evacuation, Rouh was hospitalized to recover from his grievous wounds. Upon his retirement from active duty, Rouh was promoted to captain. Rouh passed away Dec. 8, 1977, but his actions and the actions of service mem bers like him continue to inspire people to this day. Rouh Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Nathan KnapkeJeremy Haldeman, a ground radio repairman for 4th Marine Logistics Group, competes in the 8th annual Pyramid Rock Bodysurfing Championship, Jan. 18.Who needs a surf board?

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I d love to say Ive been watching the Winter Olympics. But I havent seen very much of it at all. It seems like every time Ive turned it on, either the news is on or theres Bob Costas with his pink eye or theyre showing something that for whatever reason Im just not interest ed in. Ill keep trying. But its a bummer. Maybe Ill do bet ter with Rio in 2016. NBC paid the International Olympic Committee $775 million for the broadcast rights. So I went to find out who is watching and enjoying this.Are you watching the Winter Olympics?MM2 Phillip Wellons USS Georgia Blue Miami I have been watching. I like the biathlon. Its pretty neat. ET1 Jorge Quiles Trident Training Facility The Bronx, N.Y. I dont watch sports. I play them. Vivian Jeter Family member Hillard, Fla. I watched the men who ski downhill and the opening ceremony. The jackets were beautiful. FTSN Julian Ballard USS West Virginia Blue Toledo, Ohio I havent watched any. I work so much I just go home and go to sleep. Rebecca R. Family member Parkersburg, W. Va. Ive been watching figure skating, snow boarding and hockey. Its wonderful. John Chestnut Retired Navy St. Louis I watched the luge. These guys are going so fast, and theyre at the mercy of the ice. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Navy photo by EM1 Mark Treen Sweetheart LunchPirates Cove Galley at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay served a Sweetheart Lunch of steak and lobster Feb. 14 for Valentines Day. CSC Kevin Bower and his wife, Elizabeth, took the opportunity to enjoy the occasion. From Commander, Navy Installations Command Public AffiarsCommander, U.S. Fleet Forces and Commander, Navy Installations Command will participate in the exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. is annual exercise will be con ducted on at Navy installations, including Kings Bay, located in the continental United States Feb. 24 to 28. is exercise is designed to en hance the training and readiness of Navy security forces to respond to threats to installations and units. e primary focus of SC/CS 14 is to enhance the training and readi ness of the Navys anti-terrorism program and naval security force personnel to respond to real-world threats. e value of training events like this cannot be underestimated, there are very limited opportunities to conduct realistic train ing that enables the validation of memorandum of understandings/ memorandum of agreements with outside the fence line local agen cies. is exercise provides this opportunity, said William Clark, Commander, Navy Installation Commands shore exercise program manager. Exercise SC/CS 2014 is not in re sponse to any specic threat, but is a regularly scheduled annual exer -National base security exercise starts Feb. 24See Security, Page 11 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

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From Commander Submarine Force Pacific Public Affairse Navy announced that the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) will change homeports and move to Naval Base Guam. As part of the Navys long range plan to put the most advanced and capable units forward, Topeka will move to Guam upon completion of her Engineered Overhaul at Ports mouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, N.H. In April 2013, then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter announced that a fourth Los Angelesclass submarine would be postured in Guam in an eort to enhance the Navys forward presence as it continues to reposture its forces toward the Pacic. e decision to home port Topeka in Guam brings that vision to fruition. Topeka and its crew of approximately 15 ocers and 155 enlisted Sailors arrived at PNSY Dec. 16, 2012, from San Diego. While at the shipyard, Topeka underwent a ma jor availability consisting of various maintenance projects and system up grades making her the most updated and capable ship of the class. Topeka, commissioned Oct. 21, 1989, is the third ship of the United States Navy named for the city of Topeka and is the fourth improved Los Angelesclass nuclear-powered submarine. e improved modications of this class include retractable bow planes, a reinforced sail for under ice operations, vertical launch Tomahawk Cruise Missile capability, ship quieting enhancements, and an integrated combat systems suite. Topekas last Western Pacic deployment was from March through Sep tember 2012 in support of the Chief of Naval Opera tions Maritime Strategy, which includes maritime security, forward pres ence, sea control, and power projection. Dur ing the deployment, Topeka covered more than 35,000 nautical miles and executed missions vital to national security. e security environ ment in the Indo-AsiaPacic requires that the U.S. Navy station the most capable ships forward. is posture allows the most rapid response times possible for maritime and joint forces, and brings our most capable ships and submarines with the greatest amount of strik ing power and operational capability to bear in the timeliest manner. Security Force Battalion/ Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic EM1 Cody Guidry, Port Ops Lt. Seth Hooper, USS Florida (SSGN 728) weap ons ocer ET2 Eric Johnson, USCG Maritime Force Protection Unit MA2 Gerardo OliverBaez, Kings Bay Security Detachment, military police MM1 Anthony Prince, TRF MM2 Brian Tolbert, TRF ordnance handler MA1 Christopher Tyner, SUBSECDET secu rity LPO e female nominees were: HS1 Amber Barrick, USCG Maritime Safety and Security Team emer gency medical Lt. Laura Byrd, Kings Bay Chapel chaplain Army Capt. Lauren Seal, Public Health Command District veterinarian Vying for the Kings Bay Captains Cup were the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, Trident Training Facility and Trident Ret Facility. EM1 Cody Guidry, Port Operations, was less ver bose in his response but summarized the enthusi asm of all participants as they look forward to the fun IM will bring in 2014, saying simply, I love sports. Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenTrident Refit Facility Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Carius, right, and Kings Bay Commanding Officer Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr., hold up the banner declaring TRF as the Captains Cup winner for 2013.Navy photo by EM1 Mark TreenNominees and award winners for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Male and Female Athlete of the Year pose after the awards banquet Feb. 12 at Magnolias.AthleteFrom Page 1Navy photo by MC1 David MercilThe Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Topeka (SSN 754) will change homeports and move to Naval Base Guam.Sub to homeport in Guam By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceCheating on prociency tests at an Air Force missile base and at the Navys nuclear propulsion school have Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel concerned that systemic issues may be threatening the health of the force and they have his full attention, Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 5. He is concerned about the health of the force and the health of the strong culture of accountability and responsibility that Ameri cans have come to expect from their military, Kirby told Pentagon reporters. Surveys have shown that the military is among the most respected profes sions in the United States, and these ethical lapses work against that percep tion. In his weekly meeting with the service secretaries and service chiefs, the secretary told them that ethical behavior will be on the agenda for these meetings from now on, Kirby said. e secretary believes military and De fense Department leaders must take a step back and put renewed emphasis on developing moral character and courage in the force, he added. Hagel gave the service leaders those marching orders just days after Air Force Sec retary Deborah Lee James reported systemic problems with ICBM launch ocers, Kirby said, but before the Navy reported instances of cheating on tests at the Navy Nuclear Propulsion School in Charleston, S.C. Senior defense leaders have begun work on a plan to x any systemic issues, the press secretary said. A group co-chaired by ocials from the Joint Sta and the Oce of the Undersecre tary of Defense for Policy is set to deliver a report to Hagel within 60 days. He has made it clear he would certainly welcome the work sooner than that, Kirby said. In addition, Hagel has asked retired Air Force Gen. Larry Welch and retired Navy Adm. John Harvey to lead an independent review of the militarys nuclear enterprise. ey will oer their views on the quality and eectiveness of the action plan, and they will also provide their insights and recom mendations on addressing any systemic per sonnel problems, the admiral said. KirbyDefense boss eyeing ethics 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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Shamrock e House is 4 to 9 p.m., ursday, March 13 at Finnegans Irish Pub. Morale, Welfare and Recreation is celebrating St. Patricks Day in style. Live music by Spade McQuade is from 4 to 6 p.m., then Milltown Road is performing from 6 to 9 p.m. A photo booth, a mechani cal bull, free food supplied by OBriens, prizes, giveaways, Tshirts and more are oered. For more details, call (912) 573-9492. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for the Spring Softball League. A captains meeting will be held at 5 p.m., March 19 in the Fitness Complex classroom. Play begins March 24 for Mens and Co-ed teams. For more information, stop in or call IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Lifeguard Training Course Registration is now being accepted for this course, held 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, March 31 to April 4, at the Fitness Complex Pool. e deadline to register is March 28, however, class is lim ited to the rst 20 to pre-pay and register. Cost is $175 and class is restricted to ages 15 years and up. Participants must be 15 years old by April 4. Payment is due at regis tration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sun screen and bug spray. All can didates must pass the pre-test given on Monday, March 31, in order to continue the course. For further information, call (912) 573-3001 or (912) 5733990. The Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. e driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All two-person teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is underway! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety during renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refreshments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be limited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with computers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at RackN-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 5105400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call St. Pats party March 13Navy photo by MC1 Mark TreenScenic Etowah Park is the site for the upcoming March 22 Navy Adventures Unleashed Spring Driathlon on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movie is Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Winter Basketball LeagueTeam W L T1t, USS Alaska 4 0 0 1t, MCSFB 4 0 0 1t, USS Wyoming G 3 0 1 4t, USS Georgia 3 1 1 4t, USS West Va. 3 1 1 6, Medical 3 2 0 7t, Gunz Blazin 2 2 0 7t, TTF 2 2 0 7t, Subase 2 2 0 10t, Chosen Few 1 3 0 10t, USS Rhode Is. 1 3 0 10t, Coast Guard 1 3 0 13t, USS Wyoming 0 2 0 13t, NMRD 0 4 0 13t, TRF 0 4 0Players of the Week Ben Drayton, USS Alaska, 32 pts. v. USS Rhode Island Stephon White, USS Wyoming Gold, 27 pts. vs. NRMD Robert Johnson, USS Georgia, 26 points vs. MCSFBUpcoming Spring Softball registration, opens Feb. 24. Intramural Sports By MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public Affairse Chief of Naval Personnel is sched uled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live at 2 p.m. EST March 5. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that aect them and their families and open the oor to live questions from eet via satel lite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin send ing in questions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@gmail.com. e programs and policies under the oce of the chief of naval personnel di rectly impact Sailors and include the following: Pay and allow ances Advancements Uniforms Education and training Family Support Policies Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions 21st Century Sailor Initiatives Total Sailor Fitness Personnel Programs and Polices e event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network, Direct to Sailor and e Pentagon Channel. Online streaming will be available on the following Web sites: www.navy.mil; www.pentagonchannel.mil; www.defense.gov.All Hands Call is on-line Morancise. ere will be an increase in activity on and around Navy installations as a re sult of this planned exer cise. Measures have been taken to minimize dis ruptions to normal base and station operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased trac around bases or delays in base ac cess.SecurityFrom Page 9 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

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By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceSpace is critical to understanding the planet and how the United States safe guards national security, but the costs and diculties of reaching the domain have slowed U.S. eectiveness in space, the director of the Defense Advanced Re search Projects Agency said Jan. 13. Speaking at SciTech 2014, a technical conference hosted by the American In stitute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Arati Prabhakar explained that now is an important time to think in fresh ways about how to break that paradigm. In many ways the situation takes Prab hakar back to 1958, she said, when DAR PA was established partly because of the technological surprise delivered in 1957 by Sputnik, the worlds rst articial sat ellite, launched by the Soviet Union and marking the start of the space age. I think were in the middle of a self-in icted surprise in some sense in space to day, the director said. Its a very dierent kind of surprise, but its one that is render ing us ineective and putting us in a place [where] we simply cannot aord to be. DARPA, the Defense Departments research and development enterprise, has a portfolio that includes hypersonic technology in rethinking air dominance for the future, new ways to control the electromagnetic spectrum, new cyber opportunities, big data analytics, brain function, outpacing the threat of infec tious disease, and accelerating the devel opment of synthetic biology. Another part of DARPAs portfolio is rethinking national security space, Prab hakar said. Today we are extremely eective at waging a kind of precise lethal war, she added. Its something that is a core ele ment of our national security today, but it is a kind of warghting capability thats simply not possible without the assets that we have on orbit. Around the national security environ ment, the director said, space is becoming increasingly congested as more commercial activity takes place in orbit and as other nations stake their claims in space. eres also something going on in side the national security community in space thats actually quite troubling, Prabhakar said. at has to do with how slow and costly it is for us today to do any thing we need to do on orbit for national security purposes. e director said the situation reminds her of living on a lake in Reston, Va., many years ago and watching ducks on the water in winter. I would look out at the lake, and these ducks would cluster at twilight, and theyd sit in the lake, and they would stop moving, and the lake would start icing up around them. Eventually, they would just freeze in place on this lake, she said. Tragically, thats what it feels like to me when I think about where we are in terms of our ability to react and do what we need to do quickly, cost eectively in space for national security purposes. At DARPA, scientists are working on three projects involving space launch, satellites and real-time domain awareness that the director said she thinks will cre ate a very dierent future for space. It can cost tens of millions of dollars to get even a very small satellite to orbit, and years to schedule the launch, she said, because only a few xed sites around the world can launch such craft. Today at DARPA, were investing in programs that we hope will change that model and allow for the ability to launch on 24-hour call-up from anywhere around the world, Prabhakar said. With DARPAs Airborne Launch Assist Space Access program, called ALASA, the idea is for an aircraft to carry a small satellite and its host-booster inside the plane or externally. At the right altitude and direction, the aircraft would release the satellite and booster and both would continue climb ing into space. A key benet of the system is that, within a day of being called up, a satellite launch mission could be conducted from a runway anywhere in the world. Another advantage is the exibility of an aircraft to deliver a satellite into any orbit at any time, according to DARPA. Our ALASA program aims to be able to get a [100-pound] satellite to [lowEarth orbit] for about $1 million. Our new experimental spaceplane program, XS-1, aims to develop a reusable rst stage that enables a cost in the range of $5 million to get 3,000 pounds to 5,000 pounds to LEO, the director said. ese changes are dramatic, she add ed, because the price would be a revolu tion in capability and because of the ex ibility and rapid call-up. ese are important new dimensions and new ways of thinking about launch, Prabhakar said. e second project involves satellites, she added. Today you assemble and create these very complex systems here on the ground. We launch them and when we get to orbit what weve got is what weve sent up, and its a very inexible capabil ity in that regard, she explained. DARPAs Phoenix program is working to create a future in which space robot ics technologies can service satellites and even assemble them on orbit, and reuse components of old or nonworking satellites perhaps on orbit. As we develop those capabilities at [geostationary orbit, or GEO] we believe From Naval History and Heritage CommandPhotographic archivists from the Naval History and Heritage Command rediscovered a donation Feb. 5 in their backlog that may not have been seen by the public for more than a century: a box con taining about 150 original glass plate photographs from the Spanish-American War. According to Lisa Crunk, NHHCs photo ar chives branch head, the nd is amazing. e plates were indi vidually wrapped in tis sue paper and include full captions and dates, which were likely prepared by the photographer, Douglas White, Crunk said. e glass plates are in perfect condition and housed in a large wooden box with a leather strap, which likely allowed for it to be carried by the shoulder. Further enhancing the provenance of the collec tion was an etching on the cover of the box: Photographic Slides US Naval Military Activities In and Around Manila Spanish American War 1898 and Philippine Insur rection Douglas White War Correspondent Research on Mr. White discovered that he was a special war correspondent of the San Francisco Ex aminer during the Philippine War, Crunk said. Crunk says the collec tion is signicant because the Navy played a central role in nearly every aspect of the Spanish-American war from logistics to di plomacy. American planners and leaders anticipated that the ght with Spain would be primarily a naval war, she said. e U.S. Navys victories at Manila Bay and Santiago de Cuba were pivotal events that turned the course of the war and joint Army-Navy operations at Santiago, Puerto Rico, and Manila sealed the success won by the U.S. Navys command of the seas. e box of glass plates were found in an archival storage space as the photo archive team was prepar ing for a major renovation project. e entire collection is being rehoused into new archival enclosures and shelving units. e discovery was made by archivists Dave Co lamaria and Jon Roscoe during a survey phase of the renovation project. Once it was realized what they had uncovered, there was tremendous excitement amongst the sta, especially the historians, she said. e images are an amazing nd, though they were never really lost, they were sim ply waiting to be re-dis covered. Plans for NHHCs photo collection include high resolution digitization, cataloging and eventual exhibition on the organi zations Web site. Its part of ongoing dedication of resources and eort across the entire NHHC enterprise to reduce the commands backlog of history, arti facts and art, renovate its facilities, support its museums, and maintain his toric ships and aircraft in its collection. e Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis, and dissemination of U.S. Naval history and heritage. It is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Archives, the Navy art and artifact col lections, underwater ar chaeology, Navy history, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus.Navy Photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordAn undated photo show American troops disembarking from a ship onto small boats near Cavite, Phillipines in 1898 or 1899. Navy photo courtesy of Naval History and Heritage CommandAn undated photo shows soldiers manning a battle signal corps station during the Spanish American War. Navy photo by MC1 Tim ComerfordDavid Colamaria, Naval History and Heritage Commands photographic section archivist, looks at a glass plate photograph of Spanish Adm. Pasqual Cervera taken in 1898 or 1899. Rare Spanish-American War photos foundDOD photoBegun in 2002, the Space Surveillance Telescope program aims to enable groundbased, broad-area search, detection and tracking of small objects in deep space for purposes such as space mission assurance and asteroid detection. DARPA looking to spaceSee Space, Page 13 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 20, 2014 13 that were going to start changing the fundamental dynamics and economics of whats going to be possible in terms of satellite capability, the director said. e third project simply has to do with knowing whats going on in orbit, she added. Space is becoming a real-time domain, and its no longer good enough to sort of know whats up there. We really need to start moving to a future of space trac control, more like ight trac control for the air domain, Prab hakar said. DARPA has several programs that reach for this future, she said. One is the Space Surveillance Telescope, or SST, that can see very dim objects at geostationary orbit across a broad swath of the sky. DARPA has demonstrated this telescope capability in New Mexico and now is in the process of moving to Australia in cooperation with the Australian gov ernment. In addition to chang ing what we do, the direc tor added, I think how we work in space and how we work together to achieve these new capabilities is equally important. DARPA has a long history of work ing with a broad techni cal community, spanning universities, companies large and small and labs of all dierent sorts. By Staff Sgt. Tracci Dorgan South Carolina National Guarde mammoth winter storm that sliced through southern and middle-At lantic states Feb. 12 was keeping about 3,000 National Guard members busy in nine states and the District of Columbia. Soldiers and Airmen were assisting local authorities in Alabama, the District of Columbia, Del aware, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia, according to the National Guard Bureau and other ocials. Guard personnel said that prepositioning resources helped ocials deal with the eects of the ice and snow, which pum meled areas already hard hit by a storm late last month. at storm paralyzed ar eas of Georgia. We accomplished our objective of getting our units into place before the snow started to fall, and now we are staged and ready to assist with response operations if we are needed, said. Col. James Zollar, director of joint operations for the Virginia National Guard. Typical of the responses was in South Carolina, where Army National Guard wrecker teams moved out in full force to help during the winter storm that made roads dangerous around the Southeast. Wrecker teams were stationed throughout the state to help wherever they were called Wednesday, when the storm began. Sta Sgt. Richard Krause was one of more than 100 Soldiers put on state ac tive duty to support one of 14 wrecker teams from the South Carolina Army National Guard assigned to assist the state Depart ment of Public Safety. Krause is a maintenance sergeant for the 124th En gineer Company in Sa luda and was assigned to wrecker team 5. His team was comprised of other soldiers who live and work around the Columbia area, but were tasked with providing as sistance in the Ganey area. e team was preposi tioned in the upstate o of Interstate 85 to be ready for whatever was needed. We recovered an 18-wheeler that broke down, partially blocking a lane, on I-85, Krause said. He was having trans mission problems and couldnt drive anymore. He was stuck for more than three hours before we got the call to help him. We arrived and towed him to the next exit where he was able to park his truck safely and get out of the storm. Krause said no other towing vehicles could reach him so it was im portant for a larger towing vehicle to get him clear of the road to keep all lanes clear on the highway. e South Carolina Army National Guards 1089 A-1 wrecker weighs about 80,000 pounds, so it was able to safely drive on ice-covered roads. e wrecker team, in addition to Krause, included Sta Sgt. Jeery Shaw, Sgt. Chris Barefoot and Sgt. Chris Grant. ey were able to move the 18-wheeler o the road within 30 minutes of arriving. e team and I were happy we were able use our skills to help our community, Krause said. We were here before we were needed, staged o exit 90 at the Pilot gas station, ready to help. Because of our planning, we were able to respond quickly when we were needed. Krause said he was humbled by the number of people who stopped by and expressed their gratitude to the wrecker team while they waited to re spond to calls. roughout the day and into the night, they, along with other wrecker teams also responded to calls for assistance by stranded motorists and other 18-wheelers who were stuck in areas around Spartanburg, Inman, as well as Ganey. It was a great experi ence to be able to help, said Krause. People who passed us were happy for us just being there.South Carolina National Guard photoSouth Carolina National Guard members support the state Department of Public Safety along I-26 looking for stranded motorists on Feb. 12.Guard turns out in nine states for winter storm DOD: No nukes for Iran By Nick SimeoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceAmid ongoing skepticism among law makers about Irans nuclear intentions, a senior Defense Department ocial told Congress Feb. 11 the United States will not allow Tehran to build a nuclear weapon, and that if Iran decided to use nuclear talks as a cover for developing one, Wash ington would be able to detect it. Elissa Slotkin, principal deputy assis tant secretary of defense for international security aairs, told the House Armed Services Committee the military remains prepared for all options if Tehran would decide to secretly develop a bomb while engaging in diplomacy. Any comprehensive agreement that we ever negotiate will emphasize veri able means, Slotkin said. And impor tantly, we remain condent that we could tell if Iran was making a dash toward a weapon, and if that decision was made, it would take at least a year for a nuclear device to be developed. After years of suspicion about its nuclear program from Western nations, Iran reached an agreement with the interna tional community in November in which it pledged to temporarily halt some of its nuclear activity in exchange for a lifting of some sanctions. Negotiations are set to resume later this month in Vienna on a comprehen sive accord that would ensure Iran does not move forward with a nuclear weapons program. But some lawmakers remain skeptical about Tehrans intentions, and measures have been introduced in the Senate to toughen sanctions against the country. We are now focused on testing the prospects for a comprehensive nuclear deal based on veri able actions that con vince us and the inter national community that Iran is not trying to obtain a nuclear bomb, Slotkin said. Iran maintains that its nuclear program is for energy and medical proposes, but U.S. and other Western ocials believe the impact of strong international sanc tions account for the countrys interest in negotiations and today. Anne Patterson, the assistant secre tary of state for Near Eastern aairs, told the committee sanctions have left Irans economy in shreds. ere was also extensive questioning at the hearing of U.S policy toward neigh boring Iraq, in particular from lawmakers who asked Slotkin whether a new out break of Sunni violence in Anbar prov ince could have been dealt with more quickly if the United States had not withdrawn all combat troops after the two countries failed to reach a status of forces agreement in 2011. Slotkin said the United States is encour aging the Iraqi government to address Sunni grievances, but disputed the notion that a reduced U.S military presence in the country could have made a substantial dierence in the current unrest. At the height of the American pres ence in Iraq, at the height of the surge, 170,000 troops, we had levels of violence that were seeing right now in Anbar, she said. So, Im not sure that a remaining force of 10,000 would have been able to prevent this. Slotkin DARPA imageDARPAs new Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1) program seeks to lower satellite launch costs by developing a reusable hypersonic unmanned vehicle.SpaceFrom Page 12

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