The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00336


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CHINFO Award Winner USS Simpson, HSL-46Visits Malta Pages 4-5 Military Saves WeekAt NS Mayport Page 7 USS Hu City MemorialFor Namesake Battle Page 9 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Preps For Solid CurtainFrom StaffPreparations for the regularly scheduled Force Protection and AntiTerrorism exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 are underway and there could be delays at the gate during the exercise. Personnel should expect increased security measures at Navy Station Mayport between Feb. 1828, accord ing to Installation Training Officer Willie Green. SC-CS 14 is a Force Protection exer cise conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy installa tions in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security personnel, as well as establish a learning environment for security personnel to exercise functional plans and operational capabilities. Solid Curtain is an exercise focused on command, control and communication (C3) between all echelons Navywide. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emer gency. The primary purpose of this years exercise is to validate and evaluate communication, personnel awareness and preplanned responses to a variety of security situations, including a planned Active Shooter drill and waterfront attack scenarios, Green said. The elevation of Force Protection Conditions (FPCONs) and increased security measures can be anticipated at all Navy installations for the duration of the exercise. While mitigations to alle viate traffic are in place, Naval Station Mayport and tenant commands should emphasize the potential for base-access delays within to visitors, retirees, the workforce, Sailors and their families. Personnel Warned To Expect DelaysHalyburton, HSM-46 Help In Rescue Of Crashed Panamanian Helicopter -Photo by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettLt j.g. Brian Stong prepares for flight operations in flight control aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. By Lt. Mark DayUSS Halyburton Public AffairsA Panamanian helicop ter crashed killing one and injuring eight while working together with USS Halyburton (FFG 40) conducting operations in support of Operation Martillo in the 4th Fleet area of operations, Feb. 6. The names of the vic tims will not be released until after notifica tion of the next of kin and released by the Panamanian authorities. There were no U.S. service members or personnel hurt in this incident. The Panamanian heli copter, a Bell 412, had arrived in the vicinity of the beached small craft and assumed monitor ing activities from the U.S. helicopter when it crashed with nine people onboard. Halyburton, a guidedmissile frigate, immedi ately assumed the role of search and rescue on-scene commander. While Cutlass 466, the MH-60R attached to the Halyburton from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46, returned to the area to begin search and rescue operations. Halyburtons helicopter Cutlass 466 transported six of the wounded to a hospital in Panama, while Panamanian forces rescued and are transporting the other two survivors. Halyburton is cur rently deployed in the Caribbean Sea conduct ing counter illicit traffick ing operations in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo targets illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus, and is an international, inter agency operation which includes the participation of 14 countries commit ted to a regional approach against transnational criminal organizations moving illicit cargo. This deployment is Halyburtons last deploy More Commands Approved For Type III NWUsFrom From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel announced the following uniform changes in a NAVADMIN released Feb 7. Wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment training has been approved for the following 12 commands: *Joint Staff J7 Coalition Warfighting Division; *USCENTCOM Headquarters; *Military Sealift Command, Central Command; Naval Strike Air Warfare Center; Helicopter Sea Combat Wing, US Pacific Fleet; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron TWO ONE Detachment Five; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron TWO FIVE Detachment Five; Office of Military Commissions; Fleet Logistics Support Wing, and all subordi nate squadrons; Navy Element, Defense Intelligence Agency; Department of Defense Inspector General; Navy Information Operations Command, Bahrain; Joint Task Force Horn of Africa; United States Southern Command. Navy Chaplains serving in units authorized to wear the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and III can wear the Chaplain Corps Staff Insignia on these uniforms. The embroidered insignia will be sewn above the rank tab on the shirt. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will sell ing the insignia beginning in April. Navy Expeditionary Supply Corps Officer (NESCO) Warfare Insignia was approved for wear by Supply Corps officers with a 310X, 651X, or 751X designator that are assigned to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command or Naval Special Warfare units and who have successfully completed the qualification requirements outlined in OPNAVINST 1412.15. A new Navy Security Forces Badges (NESCO) Balfour Beatty Hosts Chili Cook OffFrom Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities is hosting its first Chili Cook-Off on Feb. 28 from 5-7 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. In honor of National Chili Month, we are inviting all of our residents to participate in our Chili CookOff. Bring a crockpot full of your best chili to have a chance to win 1st, 2nd or 3rd place! All participants will receive a special gift! Serving bowls, utensils and drinks will be provided for the competition. Our very own Resident Specialist, Chelsey Littleton, will be competing with her Texas Tornado Chili she claims is the Best of the Best! Do you think you have what it takes to beat her? If you do not wish to compete, please stop by and try out all of the recipes! We need you to be the judge! To enter the cook-off, please email jennis@bbc grp.com no later than February 26th. For more details, please call 904-372-4702.-Photo by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettSailors conduct a fresh water wash down to the MH-60R Seahawk assigned to the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HMS) 46 detachment 4 aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. See Rescue, Page 10 See Uniform, Page 12 See Exercise, Page 11

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall ..........................................................................................Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ...............................................................................................Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ...............................................................................Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ......................................................................................Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann...............................................................................................................................Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A Shipmates, Naval Station Mayport has a strong history of environmental stewardship thanks to the hard working folks that comprise our Environmental team. Im proud to announce that the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Jacksonville will recognize their efforts next month during a ceremony where they will be presented the 2014 Environmental Excellence Award. This award highlights Naval Station Mayports partnership with our local community and affirms our proactive approach towards environ mental compliance, sustainability, protection and conservation of our natural resources. BZ to Cheryl Mitchell and her entire team! I would like to congratulate MWRs Pelicans Roost RV Park, which was recently voted 2013s #1 RV Park by the Special Military Active Retired Travel Club (SMART). SMART is a recreational vehicle social club for active, retired, and honorably discharged military veterans and their spouses. Pelicans Roost has long been recognized as one of the best facilities in the Navy. SMART presented a plaque to the MWR staff last Thursday that will be proudly displayed at the RV Park clubhouse for years to come. Great job! On Friday, I helped celebrate the 20th anniversary of MWRs Child Development Center (CDC) Rainbow Center and presented longevity awards to many of the childcare providers working there. The continuity of excellent care is comforting and has been main tained due to their devotion to Mayport, our Sailors and their families. These men and women are entrusted with our Sailors most precious possessions. It is one of the most important jobs here at Mayport and without their service and continued trust; we simply couldnt get our jobs done here or at sea. Thank you for caring for our future. On Monday, I signed a proclama tion in support of Military Saves Week onboard Naval Station Mayport. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encour age service members to make respon sible financial decisions and to devel op personal strategies to build wealth and reduce debt. The Fleet and Family Support Center, along with the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society, offer classes to service members, retirees and their spouses to teach good financial habits. I strongly recommend every Sailor take advantage of these classes to ensure their future financial security and well being. I want to invite everyone to the Base Chapel today at 1300 to listen to the Edward Waters Concert Choir in cel ebration of African American/Black History Month. I have heard amazing things about the choir and Im looking forward to the program organized by our Multicultural Committee. Our Oasis Galley is also serving a special meal from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in recognition of African American/ Black History month. Construction on the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project began Monday. The West bound portion of the roadway will remain closed to traf fic while they work on improvements on that side of the road. The parking lot behind the Water Treatment Plant and in front of the Delta/Echo piers on Massey will be closed until the April timeframe. This project will impact traffic flow for several months and I must reiterate that drivers should be patient and watch out for pedestrians crossing the road during this time. Final plans are being made for this years Force Protection and AntiTerrorism exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (February 18-28.) Everyone should expect increased security mea sures during this time, which may impact base access and cause delays at our gates. You may also see increased military activity during the exercise. Some of the training events that may take place include active shooter drills, waterfront threats, and unauthorized personnel trying to gain to our installation and tenant commands. If you have not already done so, please register for the AtHoc wide area alert network that notifies you in the event of emergencies, changes in force protection conditions and other real life and exercise related events. Please continue sending your sugges tions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERAre you interested in having your child attend a Duval magnet school for the 2014-2015 school year using your military preference? Did you know the eli gibility for military dependent students has changed? Do you understand the new eligibility rules for military dependent stu dents? If you answered Yes to the first question and No to one of the other questions, you might consider attending the Parent Program on School Choice, Thursday, Feb. 13th, 6:00 PM at the USO on Mayport Road. Topics will include bility rules and process, Scholarships, and Student Transfers (Special Assignments). Each of the choice options has its own spe cial deadline and appli cation process. You are encouraged to attend this event if you are consid ering a Choice Option in this district. Magnet Applications Magnet applications for the 2014-2015 school year must be received or post marked by the February 28, 2014 deadline to be processed in the magnet lottery. If you meet the deadline and the eligibil ity rules listed below, you WILL receive your first choice of school. If you do submit a late appli cation, it will be filed according to the date it is received. If there is space in the school requested or if space becomes available later in the summer, notification will be sent. New Magnet Eligibility Rules Students seeking a transfer as a military dependent student must meet the following crite ria: a full-time active duty member of the uniformed service of the United States, including National Guard and Reserve on active duty orders; and, dent in kindergarten through 12th grade who resides in the household of the active-duty mem ber; and, from one duty station to another duty station. A student is eligible for a period of 12 months after a school assignment is impacted by the trans fer. Or, a student is eligible for one month before a deployment and up to six months after return to the home station after a deployment. The option to transfer as a transitioning military dependent student may be exercised only one time per change of duty station. Special Transfer Option Applications A special transfer option application is required for most nonmagnet choice programs. The exceptions include Charter Schools and High School Acceleration Programs. You may sub mit a Special Transfer Option application to the School Choice Office on or before May 16, 2014. A Military Transfer Request Form must be completed and attached to any other required application. If you wish to learn more and have the opportunity to ask questions, join us to learn on Feb. 13th at 6:00 PM at the USO, 2560 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233. The program facilitator will be an expert from Duval Schools School Choice Office, Anthony Copeland. He will go over the deadlines for the 2014-2015 school year and how to access and fill out the applications, including required mili tary documentation. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office in Building One. Duval Schools Magnet Applications Due Feb. 28Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingTHE ROPESI really dont mean to be a bummer, but I just googled Saint Valentine and learned that, not only was he not the patron saint of lovers, February 14th marks the date that he was imprisoned, tor tured and beheaded in Rome in 269 A.D. Real romantic, huh? Apparently, the Feast of St. Valentine (a.k.a. Valentines Day) was not intended to celebrate romantic love until some crusty old fourteenth century English histo rians began propagat ing the legend that Saint Valentine was martyred because he was caught secretly marrying perse cuted Christians behind Emperor Claudius back. So, as much as we want to point the fin ger at Hallmark, Brachs, Whitmans Samplers, The Melting Pot, FTD and the rest of the blood-suck ing consumer industry, apparently they are not to blame for inventing Valentines Day. Regardless, theres cer tainly nothing wrong with reserving one day a year to recognize love, right? As a little kid, Valentines Day was a fun affair filled with construction paper hearts, lace doilies, cards imprinted with Ziggy, and red heart lollipops with white edi ble paint. In high school, the mere chance of getting a $1 Valentine carnation from a secret admirer was thrilling. Just in case, my best friend and I always sent each other a secret carnation, which was smart, considering our dating track records. It wasnt until my senior year that I received a Valentine flower from an actual boy, but unfortunately, it was from a kid nicknamed Goober. Mercifully, I was final ly able to experience Valentines Day bliss after meeting my Navy husband. There is noth ing quite like the feel ing of true love, and in the early years, we spent hours picking out cards for each other, covering every square millimeter with hand written words professing how doggone happy we were to have found our soul mates. And we meant every sappy word of it. Still do. However, after 20 years of marriage, the manda tory traditions of this manufactured holiday can seem like the torture endured by St. Valentine back in Rome. I know, I know, buying a card and planning a romantic eve ning with a loved one shouldnt be compared to being stoned and behead-Valentines Is Little Bit Torture, Little Bit SweetLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEed. But when youve got the afternoon carpool, the minivan is caked with black snow, you have to get a stool sample for the vet, and the water heat er is on the fritz again; Valentines Day can seem more like a day in hell. Unfortunately, mid dle aged couples get so bogged down with the relentless demands of life teen angst, mort gage payments, slowing metabolisms, routine oil changes, lost retain ers, low water pressure, stray chin hairs extra neous holidays become just another item on our already unmanageable To Do lists. These days, despite our best intentions, we do a lousy job of taking a day out to celebrate love on Valentines Day. My husband hurriedly runs into the 7-11 to grab any old card on his way home from work. Before getting out of the car, he finds a pen between the seats and scribbles a generic sentiment such as Love ya bunches, Honey! XOXO in large writing to take up space. He finds me in the kitchen, frantically trying to feed the kids and dog, while folding the laundry and helping our daughter study for her Chemistry test. We exchange a quick kiss and our hastily scribbled cards inside enve lopes with still-wet glue. He rushes to change out of his military uniform, and I spritz on perfume to hide the scent of frozen tater tots. We dole out the requi site bedtime threats to the kids, climb into our dirty minivan, and fight the traffic to make our reser vation. At the restaurant, we make our best effort at romance, ordering wine, canoodling and shar ing dessert. But thanks to middle-aged fluctuations in blood sugar, we start yawning before the clock strikes nine. I dont think that this hurry-up-and-beromantic-before-I-fallasleep routine is what the Pope had in mind when he crowned poor St. Valentine the patron saint of love, but its the best we can muster on a weeknight. Besides, even the most tortured sched ule should include a little time for tenderness. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com 2 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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The Greater Beaches Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3270 will celebrate its 75th anniversary, helping veterans and their causes, at noon on Feb. 15 at Post Headquarters, 915 8 th Ave South in Jacksonville Beach. It is the citys old est continuous veterans organization since 1939, The Post will open its ceremonies outside the Post headquarters with Post Commander Jim Durnal welcoming all to this auspicious occasion. It will be followed by BMCM (SW) Ret Jones reciting the very inspiring A Toast to the Flag, leading to the raising of Old Glory with a gun salute by the Beaches Honor Guard. Following this, guests will reassemble within the Post to hear our programs keynote speaker, VFW Florida Commander Chester Pyatt. Refreshments will be available and veteran guests will have special priced cocktails available after the ceremony. Commemorative mugs and pins will be available for your convenience. The VFW traces its roots back to 1898 when veterans of the Spanish American War of 1898 and the Philippine Insurrection of 1899 founded local organiza tions to secure rights and benefits for their members who returned wounded and sick. There were no medical care or pensions, and they were left to care for themselves. These veterans band ed together and formed what has became known as Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. Since that time the orga nization, along with its auxiliaries, have grown to around 2,000,000 mem bers. The VFW has been instrumental in estab lishing the Veterans Administration; creat ing the GI Bill for the 20th century; develop ing a National Cemetery system, among other achievements benefiting all of Americas heroes. If you are eligible through wartime over seas service, please bring your DD 214 and join these Band of Brothers who support your service needs. Jack Berry VFW Post 3270 Letter To The EditorMake Energy Conservation A Habit On BaseBy Anne DavisDeputy Commander, Navy Installations CommandEnergy conserva tion is important to me and critical to our Navy. Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) is initiating this blog and using medi ums like BRITEs (the Navys Shore Energy Conservation mascot) social media sites (www. facebook.com/navybrite and www.twitter.com/ navybrite) to get the word out and influence the Navys energy consump tion culture. I want you to play a role in conserving energy in our Navy. Get your story out or partici pate in our conversation by liking Navy BRITE on Facebook or following him on Twitter today. Energy is the single largest cost for our installations. Energy bills consume about 28% of our annual shore budget. The Navy is embarked on an aggressive approach to shore energy man agement to meet the aggressive energy con servation goals set by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). When our energy rates or consumption increases, we are forced to cut back elsewhere. Ultimately, there are only two places we can go to get the funding for these must pay bills operations and training. SECNAV said it best. When energy costs go up, you fly less, you steam less, Marines go to the field less. Or, if the bill gets big enough, you have to start taking it out of platforms. The Navy must reduce our energy costs to free up scarce budget dollars to support train ing and fleet operations. Energy consumption reduction is a strategic imperative! SECNAV set goals for the Navy Shore Energy Program to reduce our shore energy by 50% by 2020, while providing reliable energy for Navy critical assets. These targets require the reduction of shore energy consump tion by 50% and require production of at least 50% of shore based energy requirements from alter native sources. Working with our Naval Facilities Engineering Command partners, I intend for us to meet this goal. Initial results of our energy conservation pro gram are impressive. The Navy has reduced shore energy consumption by 19% since 2003 and cur rently produces or con sumes 23% of shore energy from renewable sources. In addition, nontactical vehicle (NTV) petroleum consumption is down more than 20% since 2005. These sav ings are equal to 83,000 flight hours for an F/A-18 Hornet or 3,000 days at sea for a DDG 51 destroyer. I am further encour aged by the energy con servation best practices that are taking place at bases across the Navy shore enterprise. Below are a couple of highlights Night Audits: Naval Support Activity (NSA) Mid-South Public Works Department conducted a night audit of base build ings that resulted in energy awareness and sav ings programs that could total more than $100K in savings over the fiscal year. The audits purpose was three-fold: over night energy awareness, Building Energy Monitor (BEM) accountability, and decreased energy usage. The night audits were instrumental in bringing energy awareness to the forefront of ten ant commands and our CNIC team. Some initia tives that came about as a result of the night time audits are: de-lamping the water tower-saved $1,000 over the fiscal year, installation of timers on lights and equipment: removing underutilized refrigera tors. These savings may seem small, but if everyone followed this practice across the shore enter prise, the savings would add up quickly. NSA Mid-South saved 8.8% in energy from FY12 to FY13. Bravo Zulu! Reduce Excess Footprint: Through aggressive consolida tion efforts and work with a Space Allocation Committee, NAS Key West identified more than 52,000 square feet of excess space. To date, 25000 square feet was vacated and power removed, with the other 25,000 square feet expected to be cleared by the end of FY14. This dives titure will result in an estimated minimum saving of $150,000 to $200,000 in annual electric costs beginning this fiscal year. Less is more! While there are a lot of great things going on in our shore energy pro gram, we need to do a lot more. The Navys energy conservation effort is both a challenge and an opportunity. The workplace accounts for most of the energy use at our Navy installations and it offers a unique opportunity for people to make a signifi cant impact on conserva tion by putting into prac tice some of the following energy saving actions: puters, monitors and noncomputing equipment when not in use when possible use task lighting appropriate clothing side of the paper Energy-efficiency tech niques as mentioned above remain the cheap est and quickest way to save energy. They should be pursued aggressively on a daily basis. Workers must take time to review their routines to conserve energy in our buildings; its what the occupants do when theyre at work matters. Every dollar saved on energy is a dollar that can be spent on operations and training. I look forward to con tinuing this conversation on energy throughout the year and if you have a best energy conservation practice please share it with us at energy@cnichq.org. Thanks for all you do for the shore enterprise. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Simpson Sailors Connect With Malta CultureBy Ensign Jamar MilesUSS Simpson PAOThe guided missile frigate USS Simpson (FFG56) recently conducted a port visit in Valletta, Malta during its deployment in the US 6th Fleet area of operation. The visit was designed to continue Naval Forces Europe-Africas efforts to strengthen mari time partnerships with European nations in order to enhance regional sta bility. During the course of the visit, Simpson and her crew participated in a variety of events with the Maltese including ship tours, a community rela tions volunteer project and going head-to-head in a friendly soccer game against the Armed Forces of Malta. Simpson is grateful to have had this time to experience the rich history and culture of Malta, said Cmdr. Christopher Follin, Simpsons commanding officer. This port visit was a perfect opportunity to strengthen -Photos by PS1(SW/FMF) Anthony J PetryElectronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Jonathan Salas shakes hands with a Maltese Armed Forcesmember during a day of VBSS training. See Simpson, Page 5 Lt. Sarah Sparks Air Training Officer of the embarked HSM 46 Det 8 gives a tour of Simpsons helicopter hangars and the aircraft on board. Ensign Andrew Hahn leads a tour of Simpsons pilot house. Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) (SW) Eric Aguirre leads a tour of Simpsons engineering central control station for Maltese visitors. Seaman Andre Jackson paints at the community relations project. GSM2 (SW) Courtney Hougabook painting at the community relations project.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 our partnership with Malta as we collectively work to improve safety and security in the Mediterranean. The first day of the visit was filled with activity starting with tours on the ship for local associations. Visitors were given a unique look into how each of Simpsons departments con tributes to its operation at sea. The Maltese were very pleased to have such an inti mate view of a U.S. Navy ves sel and her Sailors, said Lt.j.g. Andrew Mauney, Simpsons Auxiliaries Officer. The second day allowed Simpsons crew to share tac tics and techniques in medi cal, damage control, Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), and sea-based aviation employment. Members from the Armed Forces of Malta, as well as Simpson Sailors, felt that the exchange allowed for greater professional understanding in each of the demonstrated skill sets. It is great to exchange stan dard operating procedures whilst making new friends that operate out at sea, said a Maltese Sailor that participated in the training. Members of the Maltese Special Detachment Enhanced Boarding Team showcased their skills in maritime interdiction operations as they boarded Simpson. The display high lighted the use of both forces tactics and equipment. I found it exciting to com pare tactics with the Maltese, said Ensign Andrew Hahn of Simpsons Visit Board Search and Seizure team. Damage control demonstra tions included processes for detection of fire and other haz ards while at sea. Simpsons Damage Control Assistant, Lt.j.g. Marco Arroyo, walked Maltese Sailors through the ships repair lockers to familiarize them with the tools used to counter fire, flooding and toxic gas. The training culminated in a crash and salvage drill which simulated the required response for a helicopter crash on the flight deck. I was very impressed with the how well the Maltese Sailors performed, said Arroyo. Maltese Medics were given training in expeditionary medi cine and were able to test their capabilities to rapidly treat combat wounds in conflict scenarios or incidents out at sea. It was very interesting to have a chance to compare critical life saving techniques, while indentifying the differ ences between Western and European medical practices, said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mathew Robichaux. While the tours were being conducted on board the ship, more than two dozen members of Simpsons crew, along with volunteers from the American Embassy in Malta, participated in a community relations volunteer project. The Sailors tackled the challenge of painting a local shelter for victims of domes tic abuse. The project was a huge success and left a positive impression on the community. Participants were able to lend a helping hand by refreshing the interior appearance of the shelter. Due to the lack of staff resources, it would have taken months to complete what was finished in a day, said one Maltese shelter volunteer. Following the community relations project, Simpson Sailors saw action on the soccer field as they took on members of the Armed Forces of Malta in a friendly competition. Both teams welcomed the chance to showcase teamwork and sportsmanship in the host countrys favorite past time. The final event of the day was a reception hosted on board the ship. The afternoon wel comed several Maltese digni taries as well as the American Ambassador to Malta and sev eral members of the U.S. mili tary attach. The guest of honor was the American Ambassador of Malta Gina Abercrombie Winstanley. Members of Simpsons wardroom, crew and their distinguished guests shared a memorable afternoon over gourmet food prepared by the ships culinary specialists. I was very impressed and honored to be in attendance of such a remarkable event and in the presence of so many esteemed guests, said Gunners Mate 1st (SW) Enrique Cruz, Simpsons Sailor of the Year. Simpson deployed to the 6th Fleet area in September of 2013 and will continue its mission until their scheduled return to home port.From Page 4Simpson Simpsons mascot the Falcon at the reception hosted on board. Yoeman 2nd Class (SW) James Callis plays against members of the Armed Forces of Malta soccer team. Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley, the American Ambassador of Malta, enjoys the great food pre pared by Simpsons culinary specialists at a special reception held on Simpson. Cmdr. Christopher Follin, commanding officer of USS Simpsonand Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley cut the cake at the reception held on the ship.

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Williamson Signs Military Saves ProclamationBy MC1 (SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of Military Saves Week on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intend ed to encourage service members to make responsible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The procla mation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial situations. Personal financial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Williamson said. Its very difficult for Sailors and families who are expe riencing financial dif ficulties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage everyone to assess their financial situation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have financial advisors and resourc es available through the Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military fami lies to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggres sive in promoting auto matic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. The campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and fam ily life coordinator. If a Sailor has a certain financial goal, whether its set ting up an emergency cash fund, getting out of debt or saving for retire ment, Military Saves can help them develop those goals and take action. The program focuses on helping service mem bers achieve their finan cial goals by providing savings advice, financial tools and resources, and motivation. According to Lucius, the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circum stances. Deployments and fre quent moves can be big financial strains on mili tary households and good financial planning for both events is essential for success, Lucius said. FFSC personal financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive financial planning work sheet to illustrate their current financial situation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good finan cial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal finan cial readiness of our ser vice members and their families directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stabil ity within a military fam ily, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop financial skills. The Military Youth Saves program is specifically designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Williamson, raising awareness about Military Saves and promoting effective financial plan ning and decision mak ing is the responsibility of all leaders throughout the region, not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I think its impor tant for leaders at all lev els of the chain of com mand to spread aware ness about the Military Saves program and the resources available to our Sailors, Williamson said. While we look to observe Military Saves Week later on this month, responsible financial planning is a year-round effort and there is always somewhere to turn for Sailors in need of assist ance. I encourage leaders throughout the region to make sure that message is heard. Service members or dependents that would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organi zations who would like to find out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more information is available at http://www.militarysaves. org/ -Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation recognizing Military Saves Week in front of members of the Commander, Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness Program. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to build wealth and reduce debt. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 6 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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Workshops, Classes Offered To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 19, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Bldg. 1, Room 1124 Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Come learn new tech niques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communication. Mayport Team Ready To Help You Save-Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wesley McCall and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, kneeling, are joined by members of Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and Navy Federal Credit Union and pledging to help service members learn how to save dur ing Military Saves Week. All the organizations have classes and personel ready to help Sailors and their families learn about good spending habits.Right, McCall signs a proclamation for Military Saves Week on Feb. 10. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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Hu City Honors Battle VeteransBy Lt.j.g. Colin RyanUSS Hu CityThe United States Navy honors its military past by naming the Ticonderoga Class Cruisers after important battles from the annals of American history. Namesake wor thy battles were cho sen from every era of American military his tory starting with Bunker Hill, the seminal battle of the Revolutionary War. However, only the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City has the honor of carrying the legacy of the Vietnam War. This unique situation has given the ship an oppor tunity to enjoy something that few other ships have the opportunity to do: enjoy a relationship with veterans who fought in the namesake battle. USS Hu City strength ened this relationship even further by holding its annual Battle of Hu Memorial Ceremony at the NS Mayport Chapel on Feb. 2. Before approximately 150 Marines from Battle of Hu, their fami lies, and many Sailors of his own ship, Capt. Dan Uhls, Hu Citys com manding officer, paid homage to all those who have served our country, especially those who died at Hu, during Tet in 1968. We have come here for a memorial, not a celebration, he stated, then added the values dem onstrated the Marines at Hu served as a model for his own Sailors need ed during back-to-back deployments into the Arabian Gulf. Following Capt. Uhls, Nicholas Warr, a promi nent Vietnam War histo rian and a Junior Officer who fought at Hu, addressed the audience. In an emotional speech, he recognized several of his fellow Marines who showed exceptional cour age during the battle; several of these individuals stood to be recognized, while others were not able to do so since they paid the ultimate sacrifice in Southeast Asia nearly a half-century ago. Following the speeches, a Hu veteran and Hu City Sailor present ed a wreath of flowers in memoriam of those who fought and died in the effort to bring freedom to Vietnam. Meanwhile, the hymn Eternal Father played in the background while five bell strikes and Taps recognized those who have died while serving in the four branches of the United States Armed Forces and also in rec ognition of the allies that fought along side the vet erans. To further commemo rate fallen comrades, vet erans were invited to sign a placard with the names of those with whom they fought who did not sur vive the battle. The Battle of Hu was an excep tionally bloody struggle, one in which, Capt. Uhls pointed out, 70 percent of all participating Marines earned a Purple Heart. Before the ceremony, Hu veterans had ample time to interact with the Sailors of the ship named after the battle in which they fought. On Friday night there was a meetand-greet at Bogeys, and on Saturday many enjoyed a round of golf while others attended a picnic and had the opportunity to tour the ship. The weekend also gave veterans an oppor tunity to reunite with each other. Lt.j.g. Devan Gurecki was the organizer Cpl. (Ret.) Jonathan Slater, left, and Chief Hospital Corpsman(SW/AW) Robert Murray of USS Hu City, carry a wreath during a wreath laying ceremony in honor of the Battle of Hu City during a Memorial Ceremony on NS Mayport. The ship honors the two U.S. Army battalions, and three understrength U.S. Marine Corps battalions who defeated 10 battalions of the People's Army of Vietnam and the Viet Cong during the Battle of Hue City. -Photos by MC2 Damian BergStaff Sgt. (Ret.) John Mother Mullan writes down the names of his friends that were killed in action during the Battle of Hue City while attending the Hue City Memorial Ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. USS Hue City (CG 66) honors the two U.S. Army battalions, and three understrength U.S. Marine Corps battalions who defeated 10 battalions of the People's Army of Vietnam and the Viet Cong during the Battle of Hue City.of the events, herself the daughter of a Marine who fought at Hu. My dad thought he wouldnt recognize many people there, she claimed, but he was very surprised by the network of veterans that he knew and fought alongside decades ago! USS Hu City and the veterans of the Battle of Hu have nurtured a strong bond since the ships commissioning. This bond has given ser vice members past and present greater insight into why and how they sacrifice so much for greater ideals. History has given USS Hu City the chance to connect to those whose name she honors by holding a Hu Memorial in every non-deployed year since 1992. Hu City pays tribute to the past, ensures security in the present, and promises freedom in the future. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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During the SC-CS14 exercise, installation per sonnel and the surround ing communities may see an increase in delay at installation entry control points. Local area residents may also see increased military activity, and pos sible traffic/pedestrian congestion, associated with the exercise. Some of the training events that will be tak ing place are waterfront threats, personnel try ing to gain unauthorized access to installations, among others. Personnel should reg ister for the AtHoc wide area alert network if they have not already done so in order to be aware of force protection conditions and other emer gency, environmental, or exercise related impacts on the area. Instructions for add ing and updating contact information to the Wide Area Alert Notification WAAN using the AtHoc self service client are: AtHoc Self service client (Purple Globe) Icon in the desktop toolbar at the bottom of the computer screen vice from the pop-up menu info tab and update your last name, first name and display name, then save. Do not enter PIN infor mation. tab and enter your contact information in the appro priate fields. Staggered entry and exit times for personnel working on installations should be considered in order to limit traffic at entry control points. Personnel should also familiarize themselves with their command or tenant command antiterrorism plan to better know what to expect dur ing the exercise.From Page 1ExerciseUS, French Navies Conclude Combined OpsFrom Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs CSG) and French Navy five weeks of combined carrier strike group operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet began conducting inte in the Gulf of Oman and have operated together in the northern Arabian Sea and the Arabian Gulf to enhance regional mari time security and stability. Ships participating in the combined opera tions included USS Harry guided-missile cruisers and USS San Jacinto (CG destroyers USS Bulkeley included French aircraft and replenishment oiler array of operations together with the Charles de Gaulle strike group, Sweeney, commander, flight operations from Charles de Gaulle as well as carrier landing quali fications on both aircraft carriers. an F/A-18 pilot assigned Strike Fighter Squadron who had the opportuni ty to land on Charles de Gaulle. Charles DeGaulle was a terrific experience, said able how similar it was to ly professional and the transition was seamless. ing officer, said it was a unique experience being able to execute flight operations with jets and pilots from the French carrier. ducting actual missions together in this region brought our two fight ing units closer together, aviation cultures are very similar, so the mutual real-world missions were executed using familiar tactics, but with a unique mix of platforms. Carrier from Charles de Gaulle, Super Etendards landed and launched effortlessly good team and I look forward to the next oppor tunity to operate with our trusted French allies. Sweeney said operajust the aircraft carriers. copter deck landing qualifications on our smaller ships. We executed boarding exercises, live-fire gunnery exercises, air defense exercises and combat search and res cue training all types of missions we could be called upon to do at any moment. We even executed what we call a had the Forbin providing actual air defense con Gettysburg providing the same defense for Charles de Gaulle. Sweeney highlighted that the combined opera tions not only improved interoperability between the French and U.S. navies, but they also pro vided reassurance to regional partners. designed to enhance our levels of cooperation and interoperability, he though, it helps promote long-term regional sta bility and through our continuous presence, we build trust and con fidence throughout the region. CSG chief of staff, echoed the significance of conducting the combined operations in the region. these cooperative relationships both contrib ute to safeguarding the global economy, said Combes. Personnel from most of the U.S. and French ships also had the opportunity to visit other ships to meet with counterparts and learn how they do their jobs on their respective ships. -French navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Bruno GaudryThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and the guided missile destroyer USS Gettysburg (DDG 64), left, sail in formation with the aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91) and destroyer FS Forbin (D 620), right, Harry S. Truman, part of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group, is conducting operations with ships assigned to French Task Force 473 to enhance levels of cooperation and interoperability, enhance mutual maritime capabilities and promote long-term regional stability in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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warfare insignia will available for purchase in NEXCOM and Navy Exchange Uniform Centers and the Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center this June. To ensure proper control and authenticity of the new NSF metal badges, the fourth scroll (line 4) of the badge will be engraved with a four digit number by Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support (DLA-TS). Metal badges are authorized to be worn on all uniforms. Embroidered badges are autho rized to be worn on the Navy Working Uniform (NWU Type I, II, and III) only. Deadline for the mandatory wear of the new NSF badge and patches is Oct. 1. Fleet feedback directly impacts uniform changes. Sailors may send a letter with uniform policy change recommendations through their chain of command to the Uniform Board. Recommendations should reflect Navy-wide application with an eye towards standardization and uniform policy reduction. Endorsements of uniform change proposals are required by each echelon.From Page 1UniformAuto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double payouts on all hard cards, free desserts, extra $1000 Sweetheart Game, plus, when you bring your sig nificant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 15: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Sign up by Feb. 14, trans portation only. Feb. 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by Feb. 14. Feb. 17: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or have fun. Feb. 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all others; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Feb. 24. Feb. 14: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians chil dren ages 7-14 (soc cer) and 4-12 (baseball). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Registration deadline is Mar. 17. For more infor mation, please call (904) 270-5018 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy. mil. Intramural Sports Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Soccer Begins. Season Ends April 17. 270-5451 Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) 12 THE MIRROR, NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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CHINFO Award Winner USS Simpson, HSL-46Visits Malta Pages 4-5 Military Saves WeekAt NS Mayport Page 7 USS Hu City MemorialFor Namesake Battle Page 9 Check us out Online! mayportmirror.com Mayport Preps For Solid CurtainFrom StaffPreparations for the regularly scheduled Force Protection and AntiTerrorism exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 are underway and there could be delays at the gate during the exercise. Personnel should expect increased security measures at Navy Station Mayport between Feb. 1828, accord ing to Installation Training Officer Willie Green. SC-CS 14 is a Force Protection exer cise conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy installa tions in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security personnel, as well as establish a learning environment for security personnel to exercise functional plans and operational capabilities. Solid Curtain is an exercise focused on command, control and communication (C3) between all echelons Navywide. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emer gency. The primary purpose of this years exercise is to validate and evaluate com munication, personnel awareness and preplanned responses to a variety of security situations, including a planned Active Shooter drill and waterfront attack scenarios, Green said. The elevation of Force Protection Conditions (FPCONs) and increased security measures can be anticipated at all Navy installations for the duration of the exercise. While mitigations to alle viate traffic are in place, Naval Station Mayport and tenant commands should emphasize the potential for base-access delays within to visitors, retirees, the workforce, Sailors and their families. Personnel Warned To Expect DelaysHalyburton, HSM-46 Help In Rescue Of Crashed Panamanian Helicopter -Photo by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettLt j.g. Brian Stong prepares for flight operations in flight control aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. Halyburton is currently deployed to the 4th fleet area of responsibility. By Lt. Mark DayUSS Halyburton Public AffairsA Panamanian helicop ter crashed killing one and injuring eight while working together with USS Halyburton (FFG 40) conducting operations in support of Operation Martillo in the 4th Fleet area of operations, Feb. 6. The names of the vic tims will not be released until after notifica tion of the next of kin and released by the Panamanian authorities. There were no U.S. service members or personnel hurt in this incident. The Panamanian heli copter, a Bell 412, had arrived in the vicinity of the beached small craft and assumed monitor ing activities from the U.S. helicopter when it crashed with nine people onboard. Halyburton, a guidedmissile frigate, immedi ately assumed the role of search and rescue on-scene commander. While Cutlass 466, the MH-60R attached to the Halyburton from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 46, returned to the area to begin search and rescue operations. Halyburtons helicopter Cutlass 466 transported six of the wounded to a hospital in Panama, while Panamanian forces res cued and are transporting the other two survivors. Halyburton is cur rently deployed in the Caribbean Sea conduct ing counter illicit traffick ing operations in support of Operation Martillo. Operation Martillo targets illicit traffick ing routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus, and is an international, inter agency operation which includes the participation of 14 countries commit ted to a regional approach against transnational criminal organizations moving illicit cargo. This deployment is Halyburtons last deploy More Commands Approved For Type III NWUsFrom From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel announced the fol lowing uniform changes in a NAVADMIN released Feb 7. Wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment training has been approved for the following 12 commands: *Joint Staff J7 Coalition Warfighting Division; *USCENTCOM Headquarters; *Military Sealift Command, Central Command; Naval Strike Air Warfare Center; Helicopter Sea Combat Wing, US Pacific Fleet; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron TWO ONE Detachment Five; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron TWO FIVE Detachment Five; Office of Military Commissions; Fleet Logistics Support Wing, and all subordi nate squadrons; Navy Element, Defense Intelligence Agency; Department of Defense Inspector General; Navy Information Operations Command, Bahrain; Joint Task Force Horn of Africa; United States Southern Command. Navy Chaplains serving in units authorized to wear the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and III can wear the Chaplain Corps Staff Insignia on these uniforms. The embroidered insignia will be sewn above the rank tab on the shirt. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will sell ing the insignia beginning in April. Navy Expeditionary Supply Corps Officer (NESCO) Warfare Insignia was approved for wear by Supply Corps officers with a 310X, 651X, or 751X designator that are assigned to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command or Naval Special Warfare units and who have successfully completed the qualifica tion requirements outlined in OPNAVINST 1412.15. A new Navy Security Forces Badges (NESCO) Balfour Beatty Hosts Chili Cook OffFrom Balfour Beatty CommunitiesBalfour Beatty Communities is hosting its first Chili Cook-Off on Feb. 28 from 5-7 p.m. at the Ribault Bay Community Center. In honor of National Chili Month, we are inviting all of our residents to participate in our Chili CookOff. Bring a crockpot full of your best chili to have a chance to win 1st, 2nd or 3rd place! All participants will receive a special gift! Serving bowls, utensils and drinks will be provided for the competition. Our very own Resident Specialist, Chelsey Littleton, will be competing with her Texas Tornado Chili she claims is the Best of the Best! Do you think you have what it takes to beat her? If you do not wish to compete, please stop by and try out all of the recipes! We need you to be the judge! To enter the cook-off, please email jennis@bbc grp.com no later than February 26th. For more details, please call 904-372-4702.-Photo by MCSN Kameren Guy HodnettSailors conduct a fresh water wash down to the MH-60R Seahawk assigned to the Grandmasters of Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HMS) 46 detachment 4 aboard the guided-missile frigate USS Halyburton. See Rescue, Page 10 See Uniform, Page 12 See Exercise, Page 11

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Command Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Jerome Cayangyang Roman Catholic Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m. Holy Day of Obligation (call chapel for schedule) Confessions: before & after mass or upon request CCD, RCIA & Adult Ed: Sunday 10:30 a.m. Baptisms 3rd Sunday of month 10:30 a.m. Catholic Youth Group 2nd & 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m-1 p.m. Protestant Worship Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:15 a.m. Choir: Wednesday 7 p.m. Baptism: For information, contact your chaplain Womens Bible Study Wednesday 9:30 a.m. Protestant Youth Group 1st Friday Youth Quak Trip 6:30 p.m. 2nd & 4th Friday at Chapel 5-8:30 p.m. PWOC 2nd Saturday 9:30 a.m. PMOC 3rd Saturday Prayer Breakfast 9 a.m. MOPS 1st & 3rd Thursday, 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 270-5212. Naval Station Mayport Capt. Wesley McCall .......................................................................................... Commanding Officer Cmdr. Patrick Pickard ............................................................................................... Executive Officer CMDCM Robert L. White ............................................................................... Command Master Chief Naval Station Mayport Editorial Staff MCC William Townsend ...................................................................................... Public Affairs Officer GSM3 Hillary Hicks ............................................................................ Assistant Public Affairs Officer Paige Gnann ............................................................................................................................... Editor The Mirror is distributed without charge throughout Mayports Navy community, including the Naval Station, onand off-base Navy housing areas, and ships, squadrons and staffs homeported at NS Mayport. Copies are also available at the Naval Stations Public Affairs Office, Building 1, and The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202. The deadline for all submissions is Thursday at 4 p.m., one week prior to publication. News and articles should be submitted to the Public Affairs Office, or mailed to: The Mirror P.O. Box 280032 Naval Station Mayport, FL 32228-0032 Commercial: (904) 270-7817 Ext. 1012 DSN: 270-7817 Ext. 1012 Commercial FAX (904) 270-5329 DSN FAX: 270-5329 Email: mayportmirror@comcast.net CO Actionline: 270-5589 or 1-800-270-6307 This DoD newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Mirror are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Navy, under exclusive written contract with Naval Station Mayport, Fla. The appear ance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy or The Florida Times-Union, of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Public Affairs Office. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher. Inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to: THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A THE NS MA YPO RT FLORID A Shipmates, Naval Station Mayport has a strong history of environmental stewardship thanks to the hard working folks that comprise our Environmental team. Im proud to announce that the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Jacksonville will recognize their efforts next month during a ceremony where they will be presented the 2014 Environmental Excellence Award. This award highlights Naval Station Mayports partnership with our local community and affirms our proactive approach towards environ mental compliance, sustainability, protection and conservation of our natural resources. BZ to Cheryl Mitchell and her entire team! I would like to congratulate MWRs Pelicans Roost RV Park, which was recently voted 2013s #1 RV Park by the Special Military Active Retired Travel Club (SMART). SMART is a recreational vehicle social club for active, retired, and honorably discharged military veterans and their spouses. Pelicans Roost has long been recognized as one of the best facilities in the Navy. SMART presented a plaque to the MWR staff last Thursday that will be proudly displayed at the RV Park clubhouse for years to come. Great job! On Friday, I helped celebrate the 20th anniversary of MWRs Child Development Center (CDC) Rainbow Center and presented longevity awards to many of the childcare providers work ing there. The continuity of excellent care is comforting and has been main tained due to their devotion to Mayport, our Sailors and their families. These men and women are entrusted with our Sailors most precious possessions. It is one of the most important jobs here at Mayport and without their service and continued trust; we simply couldnt get our jobs done here or at sea. Thank you for caring for our future. On Monday, I signed a proclama tion in support of Military Saves Week onboard Naval Station Mayport. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encour age service members to make respon sible financial decisions and to devel op personal strategies to build wealth and reduce debt. The Fleet and Family Support Center, along with the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society, offer classes to service members, retirees and their spouses to teach good financial habits. I strongly recommend every Sailor take advantage of these classes to ensure their future financial security and well being. I want to invite everyone to the Base Chapel today at 1300 to listen to the Edward Waters Concert Choir in cel ebration of African American/Black History Month. I have heard amazing things about the choir and Im looking forward to the program organized by our Multicultural Committee. Our Oasis Galley is also serving a special meal from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in recognition of African American/ Black History month. Construction on the Massey Avenue Corridor Improvement project began Monday. The West bound portion of the roadway will remain closed to traf fic while they work on improvements on that side of the road. The parking lot behind the Water Treatment Plant and in front of the Delta/Echo piers on Massey will be closed until the April timeframe. This project will impact traffic flow for several months and I must reiterate that drivers should be patient and watch out for pedestrians crossing the road during this time. Final plans are being made for this years Force Protection and AntiTerrorism exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (February 18-28.) Everyone should expect increased security mea sures during this time, which may impact base access and cause delays at our gates. You may also see increased military activity during the exercise. Some of the training events that may take place include active shooter drills, waterfront threats, and unauthorized personnel trying to gain to our installation and tenant commands. If you have not already done so, please register for the AtHoc wide area alert network that notifies you in the event of emergencies, changes in force protection conditions and other real life and exercise related events. Please continue sending your sugges tions to the COs suggestion box or email them to wesley.mccall@navy.mil. Capt. Wesley McCall NS Mayport Commanding Officer CAPTAINSCORNERAre you interested in having your child attend a Duval magnet school for the 2014-2015 school year using your military prefer ence? Did you know the eli gibility for military dependent students has changed? Do you understand the new eligibility rules for military dependent stu dents? If you answered Yes to the first question and No to one of the other questions, you might consider attending the Parent Program on School Choice, Thursday, Feb. 13th, 6:00 PM at the USO on Mayport Road. Topics will include bility rules and process, Scholarships, and Student Transfers (Special Assignments). Each of the choice options has its own spe cial deadline and appli cation process. You are encouraged to attend this event if you are consid ering a Choice Option in this district. Magnet Applications Magnet applications for the 2014-2015 school year must be received or post marked by the February 28, 2014 deadline to be processed in the magnet lottery. If you meet the deadline and the eligibil ity rules listed below, you WILL receive your first choice of school. If you do submit a late appli cation, it will be filed according to the date it is received. If there is space in the school requested or if space becomes avail able later in the summer, notification will be sent. New Magnet Eligibility Rules Students seeking a transfer as a military dependent student must meet the following crite ria: a full-time active duty member of the uniformed service of the United States, including National Guard and Reserve on active duty orders; and, dent in kindergarten through 12th grade who resides in the household of the active-duty mem ber; and, from one duty station to another duty station. A student is eligible for a period of 12 months after a school assignment is impacted by the trans fer. Or, a student is eligible for one month before a deployment and up to six months after return to the home station after a deployment. The option to transfer as a transitioning military dependent student may be exercised only one time per change of duty station. Special Transfer Option Applications A special transfer option application is required for most nonmagnet choice programs. The exceptions include Charter Schools and High School Acceleration Programs. You may sub mit a Special Transfer Option application to the School Choice Office on or before May 16, 2014. A Military Transfer Request Form must be completed and attached to any other required application. If you wish to learn more and have the oppor tunity to ask questions, join us to learn on Feb. 13th at 6:00 PM at the USO, 2560 Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach, FL 32233. The program facilitator will be an expert from Duval Schools School Choice Office, Anthony Copeland. He will go over the deadlines for the 2014-2015 school year and how to access and fill out the applications, including required mili tary documentation. Judy Cromartie is the School Liaison Officer for NS Mayport. If you have questions about this arti cle or concerns about an educational issue impact ing your child, she can be reached via email at judith.cromartie@navy. mil or by phone at (904) 270-6289 X1305 [office] or (904) 993-5860 [cell]. Or you can schedule a meet ing with her in her office in Building One. Duval Schools Magnet Applications Due Feb. 28Judy Cromartie School Liaison Officer KnowingTHE ROPESI really dont mean to be a bummer, but I just googled Saint Valentine and learned that, not only was he not the patron saint of lovers, February 14th marks the date that he was imprisoned, tor tured and beheaded in Rome in 269 A.D. Real romantic, huh? Apparently, the Feast of St. Valentine (a.k.a. Valentines Day) was not intended to celebrate romantic love until some crusty old fourteenth century English histo rians began propagat ing the legend that Saint Valentine was martyred because he was caught secretly marrying perse cuted Christians behind Emperor Claudius back. So, as much as we want to point the fin ger at Hallmark, Brachs, Whitmans Samplers, The Melting Pot, FTD and the rest of the blood-suck ing consumer industry, apparently they are not to blame for inventing Valentines Day. Regardless, theres cer tainly nothing wrong with reserving one day a year to recognize love, right? As a little kid, Valentines Day was a fun affair filled with construc tion paper hearts, lace doilies, cards imprinted with Ziggy, and red heart lollipops with white edi ble paint. In high school, the mere chance of getting a $1 Valentine carnation from a secret admirer was thrilling. Just in case, my best friend and I always sent each other a secret carnation, which was smart, considering our dating track records. It wasnt until my senior year that I received a Valentine flower from an actual boy, but unfortunately, it was from a kid nicknamed Goober. Mercifully, I was final ly able to experience Valentines Day bliss after meeting my Navy husband. There is noth ing quite like the feel ing of true love, and in the early years, we spent hours picking out cards for each other, covering every square millimeter with hand written words professing how doggone happy we were to have found our soul mates. And we meant every sappy word of it. Still do. However, after 20 years of marriage, the manda tory traditions of this manufactured holiday can seem like the torture endured by St. Valentine back in Rome. I know, I know, buying a card and planning a romantic eve ning with a loved one shouldnt be compared to being stoned and behead-Valentines Is Little Bit Torture, Little Bit SweetLisa Smith Molinari Military Spouse Columnist The Meat&PotatoesOF LIFEed. But when youve got the afternoon carpool, the minivan is caked with black snow, you have to get a stool sample for the vet, and the water heat er is on the fritz again; Valentines Day can seem more like a day in hell. Unfortunately, mid dle aged couples get so bogged down with the relentless demands of life teen angst, mort gage payments, slowing metabolisms, routine oil changes, lost retain ers, low water pressure, stray chin hairs extra neous holidays become just another item on our already unmanageable To Do lists. These days, despite our best intentions, we do a lousy job of taking a day out to celebrate love on Valentines Day. My husband hurriedly runs into the 7-11 to grab any old card on his way home from work. Before getting out of the car, he finds a pen between the seats and scribbles a generic sentiment such as Love ya bunches, Honey! XOXO in large writing to take up space. He finds me in the kitchen, frantically trying to feed the kids and dog, while folding the laundry and helping our daughter study for her Chemistry test. We exchange a quick kiss and our hastily scrib bled cards inside enve lopes with still-wet glue. He rushes to change out of his military uniform, and I spritz on perfume to hide the scent of frozen tater tots. We dole out the requi site bedtime threats to the kids, climb into our dirty minivan, and fight the traffic to make our reser vation. At the restaurant, we make our best effort at romance, ordering wine, canoodling and shar ing dessert. But thanks to middle-aged fluctuations in blood sugar, we start yawning before the clock strikes nine. I dont think that this hurry-up-and-beromantic-before-I-fallasleep routine is what the Pope had in mind when he crowned poor St. Valentine the patron saint of love, but its the best we can muster on a weeknight. Besides, even the most tortured sched ule should include a little time for tenderness. Get more wit and observations from Lisa at her blog, The Meat and Potatoes of Life, www. themeatandpotatoesofli fe.com 2 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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The Greater Beaches Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3270 will celebrate its 75th anniversary, helping veterans and their causes, at noon on Feb. 15 at Post Headquarters, 915 8 th Ave South in Jacksonville Beach. It is the citys old est continuous veterans organization since 1939, The Post will open its cer emonies outside the Post headquarters with Post Commander Jim Durnal welcoming all to this aus picious occasion. It will be followed by BMCM (SW) Ret Jones reciting the very inspiring A Toast to the Flag, lead ing to the raising of Old Glory with a gun salute by the Beaches Honor Guard. Following this, guests will reassemble within the Post to hear our programs keynote speaker, VFW Florida Commander Chester Pyatt. Refreshments will be available and veteran guests will have special priced cocktails available after the ceremony. Commemorative mugs and pins will be available for your convenience. The VFW traces its roots back to 1898 when veterans of the Spanish American War of 1898 and the Philippine Insurrection of 1899 founded local organiza tions to secure rights and benefits for their members who returned wounded and sick. There were no medical care or pensions, and they were left to care for themselves. These veterans band ed together and formed what has became known as Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. Since that time the orga nization, along with its auxiliaries, have grown to around 2,000,000 mem bers. The VFW has been instrumental in estab lishing the Veterans Administration; creat ing the GI Bill for the 20th century; develop ing a National Cemetery system, among other achievements benefiting all of Americas heroes. If you are eligible through wartime over seas service, please bring your DD 214 and join these Band of Brothers who support your service needs. Jack Berry VFW Post 3270 Letter To The EditorMake Energy Conservation A Habit On BaseBy Anne DavisDeputy Commander, Navy Instal lations CommandEnergy conserva tion is important to me and critical to our Navy. Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) is initiating this blog and using medi ums like BRITEs (the Navys Shore Energy Conservation mascot) social media sites (www. facebook.com/navybrite and www.twitter.com/ navybrite) to get the word out and influence the Navys energy consump tion culture. I want you to play a role in conserving energy in our Navy. Get your story out or partici pate in our conversation by liking Navy BRITE on Facebook or following him on Twitter today. Energy is the single largest cost for our instal lations. Energy bills con sume about 28% of our annual shore budget. The Navy is embarked on an aggressive approach to shore energy man agement to meet the aggressive energy con servation goals set by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). When our energy rates or consumption increases, we are forced to cut back elsewhere. Ultimately, there are only two places we can go to get the funding for these must pay bills operations and training. SECNAV said it best. When energy costs go up, you fly less, you steam less, Marines go to the field less. Or, if the bill gets big enough, you have to start taking it out of platforms. The Navy must reduce our energy costs to free up scarce budget dollars to support train ing and fleet operations. Energy consumption reduction is a strategic imperative! SECNAV set goals for the Navy Shore Energy Program to reduce our shore energy by 50% by 2020, while providing reli able energy for Navy critical assets. These targets require the reduction of shore energy consump tion by 50% and require production of at least 50% of shore based energy requirements from alter native sources. Working with our Naval Facilities Engineering Command partners, I intend for us to meet this goal. Initial results of our energy conservation pro gram are impressive. The Navy has reduced shore energy consumption by 19% since 2003 and cur rently produces or con sumes 23% of shore energy from renewable sources. In addition, nontactical vehicle (NTV) petroleum consumption is down more than 20% since 2005. These sav ings are equal to 83,000 flight hours for an F/A-18 Hornet or 3,000 days at sea for a DDG 51 destroyer. I am further encour aged by the energy con servation best practices that are taking place at bases across the Navy shore enterprise. Below are a couple of highlights Night Audits: Naval Support Activity (NSA) Mid-South Public Works Department conducted a night audit of base build ings that resulted in ener gy awareness and sav ings programs that could total more than $100K in savings over the fiscal year. The audits purpose was three-fold: over night energy awareness, Building Energy Monitor (BEM) accountability, and decreased energy usage. The night audits were instrumental in bringing energy awareness to the forefront of ten ant commands and our CNIC team. Some initia tives that came about as a result of the night time audits are: de-lamping the water tower-saved $1,000 over the fiscal year, instal lation of timers on lights and equipment: removing underutilized refrigera tors. These savings may seem small, but if everyone followed this practice across the shore enter prise, the savings would add up quickly. NSA Mid-South saved 8.8% in energy from FY12 to FY13. Bravo Zulu! Reduce Excess Footprint: Through aggressive consolida tion efforts and work with a Space Allocation Committee, NAS Key West identified more than 52,000 square feet of excess space. To date, 25000 square feet was vacated and power removed, with the other 25,000 square feet expect ed to be cleared by the end of FY14. This dives titure will result in an esti mated minimum saving of $150,000 to $200,000 in annual electric costs beginning this fiscal year. Less is more! While there are a lot of great things going on in our shore energy pro gram, we need to do a lot more. The Navys energy conservation effort is both a challenge and an oppor tunity. The workplace accounts for most of the energy use at our Navy installations and it offers a unique opportunity for people to make a signifi cant impact on conserva tion by putting into prac tice some of the following energy saving actions: puters, monitors and noncomputing equipment when not in use when possible use task lighting appropriate clothing side of the paper Energy-efficiency tech niques as mentioned above remain the cheap est and quickest way to save energy. They should be pursued aggressively on a daily basis. Workers must take time to review their routines to conserve energy in our buildings; its what the occupants do when theyre at work mat ters. Every dollar saved on energy is a dollar that can be spent on operations and training. I look forward to con tinuing this conversation on energy throughout the year and if you have a best energy conservation prac tice please share it with us at energy@cnichq.org. Thanks for all you do for the shore enterprise. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 Simpson Sailors Connect With Malta CultureBy Ensign Jamar MilesUSS Simpson PAOThe guided missile frig ate USS Simpson (FFG56) recently conducted a port visit in Valletta, Malta during its deployment in the US 6th Fleet area of operation. The visit was designed to continue Naval Forces Europe-Africas efforts to strengthen mari time partnerships with European nations in order to enhance regional sta bility. During the course of the visit, Simpson and her crew participated in a variety of events with the Maltese including ship tours, a community rela tions volunteer project and going head-to-head in a friendly soccer game against the Armed Forces of Malta. Simpson is grateful to have had this time to experience the rich his tory and culture of Malta, said Cmdr. Christopher Follin, Simpsons commanding officer. This port visit was a perfect opportunity to strengthen -Photos by PS1(SW/FMF) Anthony J PetryElectronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Jonathan Salas shakes hands with a Maltese Armed Forcesmember during a day of VBSS train ing. See Simpson, Page 5 Lt. Sarah Sparks Air Training Officer of the embarked HSM 46 Det 8 gives a tour of Simpsons helicopter hangars and the aircraft on board. Ensign Andrew Hahn leads a tour of Simpsons pilot house. Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) (SW) Eric Aguirre leads a tour of Simpsons engineering central control station for Maltese visitors. Seaman Andre Jackson paints at the community relations project. GSM2 (SW) Courtney Hougabook painting at the community relations project.

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THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 our partnership with Malta as we collectively work to improve safety and security in the Mediterranean. The first day of the visit was filled with activity starting with tours on the ship for local associations. Visitors were given a unique look into how each of Simpsons departments con tributes to its operation at sea. The Maltese were very pleased to have such an inti mate view of a U.S. Navy ves sel and her Sailors, said Lt.j.g. Andrew Mauney, Simpsons Auxiliaries Officer. The second day allowed Simpsons crew to share tac tics and techniques in medi cal, damage control, Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), and sea-based aviation employ ment. Members from the Armed Forces of Malta, as well as Simpson Sailors, felt that the exchange allowed for greater professional understanding in each of the demonstrated skill sets. It is great to exchange stan dard operating procedures whilst making new friends that operate out at sea, said a Maltese Sailor that participated in the training. Members of the Maltese Special Detachment Enhanced Boarding Team showcased their skills in maritime interdiction operations as they boarded Simpson. The display high lighted the use of both forces tactics and equipment. I found it exciting to com pare tactics with the Maltese, said Ensign Andrew Hahn of Simpsons Visit Board Search and Seizure team. Damage control demonstra tions included processes for detection of fire and other haz ards while at sea. Simpsons Damage Control Assistant, Lt.j.g. Marco Arroyo, walked Maltese Sailors through the ships repair lockers to familiar ize them with the tools used to counter fire, flooding and toxic gas. The training culminated in a crash and salvage drill which simulated the required response for a helicopter crash on the flight deck. I was very impressed with the how well the Maltese Sailors performed, said Arroyo. Maltese Medics were given training in expeditionary medi cine and were able to test their capabilities to rapidly treat combat wounds in conflict sce narios or incidents out at sea. It was very interesting to have a chance to compare critical life saving techniques, while indentifying the differ ences between Western and European medical practices, said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mathew Robichaux. While the tours were being conducted on board the ship, more than two dozen members of Simpsons crew, along with volunteers from the American Embassy in Malta, participated in a community relations volun teer project. The Sailors tackled the challenge of painting a local shelter for victims of domes tic abuse. The project was a huge success and left a positive impression on the community. Participants were able to lend a helping hand by refreshing the interior appearance of the shelter. Due to the lack of staff resources, it would have taken months to complete what was finished in a day, said one Maltese shelter volunteer. Following the community relations project, Simpson Sailors saw action on the soccer field as they took on members of the Armed Forces of Malta in a friendly competition. Both teams welcomed the chance to showcase teamwork and sports manship in the host countrys favorite past time. The final event of the day was a reception hosted on board the ship. The afternoon wel comed several Maltese digni taries as well as the American Ambassador to Malta and sev eral members of the U.S. mili tary attach. The guest of honor was the American Ambassador of Malta Gina Abercrombie Winstanley. Members of Simpsons wardroom, crew and their distinguished guests shared a memorable afternoon over gourmet food prepared by the ships culinary specialists. I was very impressed and honored to be in attendance of such a remarkable event and in the presence of so many esteemed guests, said Gunners Mate 1st (SW) Enrique Cruz, Simpsons Sailor of the Year. Simpson deployed to the 6th Fleet area in September of 2013 and will continue its mission until their scheduled return to home port.From Page 4Simpson Simpsons mascot the Falcon at the reception hosted on board. Yoeman 2nd Class (SW) James Callis plays against members of the Armed Forces of Malta soccer team. Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley, the American Ambassador of Malta, enjoys the great food pre pared by Simpsons culinary specialists at a special reception held on Simpson. Cmdr. Christopher Follin, commanding officer of USS Simpsonand Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley cut the cake at the reception held on the ship.

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Williamson Signs Military Saves ProclamationBy MC1 (SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of Military Saves Week on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intend ed to encourage service members to make respon sible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The procla mation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial situations. Personal financial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Williamson said. Its very difficult for Sailors and families who are expe riencing financial dif ficulties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage everyone to assess their financial situ ation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have finan cial advisors and resourc es available through the Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military fami lies to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggres sive in promoting auto matic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. The campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and fam ily life coordinator. If a Sailor has a certain financial goal, whether its set ting up an emergency cash fund, getting out of debt or saving for retire ment, Military Saves can help them develop those goals and take action. The program focuses on helping service mem bers achieve their finan cial goals by providing savings advice, financial tools and resources, and motivation. According to Lucius, the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circum stances. Deployments and fre quent moves can be big financial strains on mili tary households and good financial planning for both events is essential for success, Lucius said. FFSC personal financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive financial planning work sheet to illustrate their current financial situation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good finan cial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal finan cial readiness of our ser vice members and their families directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stabil ity within a military fam ily, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop financial skills. The Military Youth Saves program is specifically designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Williamson, raising awareness about Military Saves and promoting effective financial plan ning and decision mak ing is the responsibility of all leaders throughout the region, not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I think its impor tant for leaders at all lev els of the chain of com mand to spread aware ness about the Military Saves program and the resources available to our Sailors, Williamson said. While we look to observe Military Saves Week later on this month, responsible financial planning is a year-round effort and there is always somewhere to turn for Sailors in need of assist ance. I encourage leaders throughout the region to make sure that message is heard. Service members or dependents that would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organi zations who would like to find out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more information is available at http://www.militarysaves. org/ -Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation recognizing Military Saves Week in front of members of the Commander, Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness Program. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to build wealth and reduce debt. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. 6 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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Workshops, Classes Offered To Sailors, FamiliesFrom FFSCThe following class es and activities are offered by the Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) and are free of charge. Pre-registration is required and childcare is not available. For more information about the classes or to register call 270-6600, ext. 1701. FFSC is located in Building One on Massey Avenue. Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 19, 8 a.m.-noon, FAP Key Personnel Training Bldg. 1, Room 1124 Feb. 20, 9-11 a.m., Victim Advocate Refresher Training Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 20, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Parents and children together meet to share parenting concerns, ideas, and fun! The group invites professionals to address specific areas of concern such as nutri tion, toilet training, etc. We even take field trips several times a year to local parks, museums and playgrounds. This group is designed for moms new to the area or moms who want their child to interact with other chil dren their childs age. Tottle Tyme Childrens Playgroup meets every Thursday from 9:00am to 12:00pm at the USO. All children age four and below are invited to attend. Feb. 24-28, 7:30 a.m.4:30 p.m., TAP Retiree Workshop, Bldg. 1, Room 1616 Feb. 24, 6-7 p.m., IA Family Connection Group, USO Feb. 24, 1-3 p.m., Part 2: Targeting Your Resume, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 24, 2-3 p.m., Financial Leadership Seminar, Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 24, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Anger Management FFSC Room 702 What does anger do for you? Communicate for you? Keep people at a safe distance from you? Keep you in charge? For many people, anger serves many uses, but all too often, it is at a high cost, anger can effect ones relationship, career and friendship. If you would like to break out of the get angry/get even syndrome, come to this class. Participants learn how anger and judgment are related, about irra tional beliefs and faulty self-talk, what E + R = O means, and the roles of stress and forgiveness in anger. Managing your anger group is recom mended as well. Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Active Parenting Bldg. 1 Room 702 Feb. 25, 1-3 p.m., Thrift Savings Plan Bldg. 1, Room 1004 Feb. 25, 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Stress Management Wellness Center Stress is a normal part of everyones life. It can be energizing and a fac tor in motivating us. But too much stress, without relief, can have debili tating effects. This pro gram is designed to pro vide participants with an understanding of what stress is and how it affects them. The class also helps participants begin to look at their own lives and development way to cope with stress and make life style changes. Feb. 26, 11 a.m.-noon, Saving and Investing Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 26, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Part 1: Organizing Your Job Search & Networking, FFSC Room 719 Feb. 27, 9 a.m.-noon, Tottle Tyme Playgroup USO Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Banking and Financial Services Bldg. 1, Room 104 Feb. 27, 9-11 a.m., Relationship Communication FFSC Room 719 Come learn new tech niques which will help you build on the strengths of your relationship and learn to identify barriers to effective communication. Mayport Team Ready To Help You Save-Photos by Paige GnannAbove, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer, Capt. Wesley McCall and Executive Officer, Cmdr. Pat Pickard, kneel ing, are joined by members of Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society and Navy Federal Credit Union and pledging to help service members learn how to save dur ing Military Saves Week. All the organizations have classes and personel ready to help Sailors and their families learn about good spending habits.Right, McCall signs a proclamation for Military Saves Week on Feb. 10. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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Hu City Honors Battle VeteransBy Lt.j.g. Colin RyanUSS Hu CityThe United States Navy honors its military past by naming the Ticonderoga Class Cruisers after important battles from the annals of American history. Namesake wor thy battles were cho sen from every era of American military his tory starting with Bunker Hill, the seminal battle of the Revolutionary War. However, only the Golden Dragon crew of USS Hu City has the honor of carrying the leg acy of the Vietnam War. This unique situation has given the ship an oppor tunity to enjoy something that few other ships have the opportunity to do: enjoy a relationship with veterans who fought in the namesake battle. USS Hu City strength ened this relationship even further by holding its annual Battle of Hu Memorial Ceremony at the NS Mayport Chapel on Feb. 2. Before approximately 150 Marines from Battle of Hu, their fami lies, and many Sailors of his own ship, Capt. Dan Uhls, Hu Citys com manding officer, paid homage to all those who have served our country, especially those who died at Hu, during Tet in 1968. We have come here for a memorial, not a cel ebration, he stated, then added the values dem onstrated the Marines at Hu served as a model for his own Sailors need ed during back-to-back deployments into the Arabian Gulf. Following Capt. Uhls, Nicholas Warr, a promi nent Vietnam War histo rian and a Junior Officer who fought at Hu, addressed the audience. In an emotional speech, he recognized several of his fellow Marines who showed exceptional cour age during the battle; sev eral of these individuals stood to be recognized, while others were not able to do so since they paid the ultimate sacrifice in Southeast Asia nearly a half-century ago. Following the speeches, a Hu veteran and Hu City Sailor present ed a wreath of flowers in memoriam of those who fought and died in the effort to bring freedom to Vietnam. Meanwhile, the hymn Eternal Father played in the background while five bell strikes and Taps recognized those who have died while serv ing in the four branches of the United States Armed Forces and also in rec ognition of the allies that fought along side the vet erans. To further commemo rate fallen comrades, vet erans were invited to sign a placard with the names of those with whom they fought who did not sur vive the battle. The Battle of Hu was an excep tionally bloody struggle, one in which, Capt. Uhls pointed out, 70 percent of all participating Marines earned a Purple Heart. Before the ceremony, Hu veterans had ample time to interact with the Sailors of the ship named after the battle in which they fought. On Friday night there was a meetand-greet at Bogeys, and on Saturday many enjoyed a round of golf while others attended a picnic and had the oppor tunity to tour the ship. The weekend also gave veterans an oppor tunity to reunite with each other. Lt.j.g. Devan Gurecki was the organizer Cpl. (Ret.) Jonathan Slater, left, and Chief Hospital Corpsman(SW/AW) Robert Murray of USS Hu City, carry a wreath during a wreath laying ceremony in honor of the Battle of Hu City during a Memorial Ceremony on NS Mayport. The ship honors the two U.S. Army bat talions, and three understrength U.S. Marine Corps battalions who defeated 10 battalions of the People's Army of Vietnam and the Viet Cong during the Battle of Hue City. -Photos by MC2 Damian BergStaff Sgt. (Ret.) John Mother Mullan writes down the names of his friends that were killed in action during the Battle of Hue City while attending the Hue City Memorial Ceremony on Naval Station Mayport. USS Hue City (CG 66) honors the two U.S. Army battalions, and three understrength U.S. Marine Corps battalions who defeated 10 battalions of the People's Army of Vietnam and the Viet Cong during the Battle of Hue City.of the events, herself the daughter of a Marine who fought at Hu. My dad thought he wouldnt recognize many people there, she claimed, but he was very surprised by the network of veterans that he knew and fought alongside decades ago! USS Hu City and the veterans of the Battle of Hu have nurtured a strong bond since the ships commissioning. This bond has given ser vice members past and present greater insight into why and how they sacrifice so much for greater ideals. History has given USS Hu City the chance to connect to those whose name she honors by hold ing a Hu Memorial in every non-deployed year since 1992. Hu City pays tribute to the past, ensures security in the present, and promises freedom in the future. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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During the SC-CS14 exercise, installation per sonnel and the surround ing communities may see an increase in delay at installation entry control points. Local area residents may also see increased military activity, and pos sible traffic/pedestrian congestion, associated with the exercise. Some of the training events that will be tak ing place are waterfront threats, personnel try ing to gain unauthorized access to installations, among others. Personnel should reg ister for the AtHoc wide area alert network if they have not already done so in order to be aware of force protection conditions and other emer gency, environmental, or exercise related impacts on the area. Instructions for add ing and updating contact information to the Wide Area Alert Notification WAAN using the AtHoc self service client are: AtHoc Self service client (Purple Globe) Icon in the desktop toolbar at the bottom of the computer screen vice from the pop-up menu info tab and update your last name, first name and display name, then save. Do not enter PIN infor mation. tab and enter your contact information in the appro priate fields. Staggered entry and exit times for personnel working on installations should be considered in order to limit traffic at entry control points. Personnel should also familiarize themselves with their command or tenant command antiterrorism plan to better know what to expect dur ing the exercise.From Page 1ExerciseUS, French Navies Conclude Combined OpsFrom Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs CSG) and French Navy five weeks of combined carrier strike group operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet began conducting inte in the Gulf of Oman and have operated together in the northern Arabian Sea and the Arabian Gulf to enhance regional mari time security and stability. Ships participating in the combined opera tions included USS Harry guided-missile cruisers and USS San Jacinto (CG destroyers USS Bulkeley included French aircraft and replenishment oiler array of operations together with the Charles de Gaulle strike group, Sweeney, commander, flight operations from Charles de Gaulle as well as carrier landing quali fications on both aircraft carriers. an F/A-18 pilot assigned Strike Fighter Squadron who had the opportuni ty to land on Charles de Gaulle. Charles DeGaulle was a terrific experience, said able how similar it was to ly professional and the transition was seamless. ing officer, said it was a unique experience being able to execute flight operations with jets and pilots from the French carrier. ducting actual missions together in this region brought our two fight ing units closer together, aviation cultures are very similar, so the mutual real-world missions were executed using familiar tactics, but with a unique mix of platforms. Carrier from Charles de Gaulle, Super Etendards landed and launched effortlessly good team and I look for ward to the next oppor tunity to operate with our trusted French allies. Sweeney said operajust the aircraft carriers. copter deck landing quali fications on our smaller ships. We executed board ing exercises, live-fire gunnery exercises, air defense exercises and combat search and res cue training all types of missions we could be called upon to do at any moment. We even executed what we call a had the Forbin providing actual air defense con Gettysburg providing the same defense for Charles de Gaulle. Sweeney highlighted that the combined opera tions not only improved interoperability between the French and U.S. navies, but they also pro vided reassurance to regional partners. designed to enhance our levels of cooperation and interoperability, he though, it helps promote long-term regional sta bility and through our continuous presence, we build trust and con fidence throughout the region. CSG chief of staff, echoed the significance of conducting the combined operations in the region. these cooperative rela tionships both contrib ute to safeguarding the global economy, said Combes. Personnel from most of the U.S. and French ships also had the opportunity to visit other ships to meet with counterparts and learn how they do their jobs on their respective ships. -French navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Bruno GaudryThe aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and the guided missile destroyer USS Gettysburg (DDG 64), left, sail in formation with the aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91) and destroyer FS Forbin (D 620), right, Harry S. Truman, part of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group, is conducting operations with ships assigned to French Task Force 473 to enhance levels of cooperation and interoperability, enhance mutual maritime capabilities and promote long-term regional stability in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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warfare insignia will available for purchase in NEXCOM and Navy Exchange Uniform Centers and the Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center this June. To ensure proper control and authenticity of the new NSF metal badges, the fourth scroll (line 4) of the badge will be engraved with a four digit number by Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support (DLA-TS). Metal badges are authorized to be worn on all uniforms. Embroidered badges are autho rized to be worn on the Navy Working Uniform (NWU Type I, II, and III) only. Deadline for the mandatory wear of the new NSF badge and patches is Oct. 1. Fleet feedback directly impacts uniform changes. Sailors may send a letter with uniform policy change recommendations through their chain of command to the Uniform Board. Recommendations should reflect Navy-wide application with an eye towards standardization and uniform policy reduction. Endorsements of uniform change proposals are required by each echelon.From Page 1UniformAuto Skills Center February Special: 10% off alignment and deluxe oil change for the price of a regular oil changes (most vehicles). 270-5392 Beachside Bingo Wednesdays: Lunchtime Bingo Every Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Beachside Bingo. Two $500 payouts every week. Buy two, get one free. Still only $13.00 per pack. 2707204 Feb. 14: Bingo Valentines Special. 6:30 p.m. at Beachside Bingo. There will be double payouts on all hard cards, free desserts, extra $1000 Sweetheart Game, plus, when you bring your sig nificant other, they will receive a free paper pack. 270-7204 Castaways Lounge Every Weekday: Castaways After Work, At Ease: Stop into Castaways every Monday-Friday from 4-6 p.m. for our great nightly specials! Enjoy Margarita Monday, Tuesdays Pint Glass Night, Around-theWorld Wednesday, BOGO Thursday and Five Dollar Friday! Plus, Last Buck Bottles on the 14th and last day of every month! 2707205 Every Thursday: Trivia on Tap. 6 p.m. at Castaways. Test your general trivia knowledge! the winning team of four takes home awesome prizes! 270-7205 Focsle Lounge CPO Club Every Tuesday: All Khaki Wings and Trivia Night. 3-7 p.m. every Tuesday at Focsle CPO Club with 40-cent wings, drink specials and allyou-can-drink soft drinks for $1. Trivia begins at 5:30 p.m. All Khakis welcome (Chief Petty Officers, Officers and their guests). 270-5431 Chicken Wednesdays. Every Wednesday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Focsle Lounge. Enjoy a twopiece fried chicken plate with two sides for only $7.00. 270-5431 ITT Disney Jr Live: Pirates and Princesses. Tickets are now on sale for Disney Jrs Pirates and Princesses on March 8, 2014 at the Times Union Moran Center. Tickets $15 each; available only at ITT on base. 270-5145 The following activi ties target single or unac companied Sailors. For more information, call 270-7788/89 or stop by the Mayport Liberty Center and pick up the monthly activity calendar with a complete listing of all upcoming Liberty events. Feb. 15: Mall Trip: Town Center. Van departs Liberty Center at 1 p.m. Sign up by Feb. 14, trans portation only. Feb. 16: Paintball. Van Departs 9 a.m. at Liberty Center. Transportation only; you pay for the paint. Sign up by Feb. 14. Feb. 17: Snag Golf. 4 p.m. at Liberty Center. Learn the basics, hone your skills, or have fun. Feb. 19: Billiards Tournament. 6 p.m. at Liberty Center. Feb. 21: Movie Trip. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $5. Feb. 22: Monster Jam. Van departs 5 p.m. Cost $35 active duty, $42 all oth ers; Sign up deadline Feb. 20. Space is limited. Feb. 23: Disc Golf. Van Departs 11 a.m. at Liberty Center. Equipment pro vided. Feb. 24: Lets Go Fishing! 3 p.m. Free for active duty, $10 for guests; sign up by Feb. 21. Space is limited. Feb. 25: Help Feed the Homeless. Van departs 3:15 p.m. Sign up deadline Feb. 24. Feb. 14: Youth Spring Baseball & Soccer Registration Opens. Open to military, DOD and civilians chil dren ages 7-14 (soc cer) and 4-12 (baseball). Registration can be done at the Youth Center Mon.Fri. 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Registration deadline is Mar. 17. For more infor mation, please call (904) 270-5018 or email the Youth Sports Coordinator at victor.e.miller@navy. mil. Intramural Sports Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Soccer Begins. Season Ends April 17. 270-5451 Feb. 18: Mens Captains Cup Softball Meeting. 11 a.m. at the Fitness Center. 270-5451 Mayport Bowling Center Friday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Friday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Saturday Nights: Xtreme Bowling. 8-11 p.m. every Saturday at Mayport Bowling Center. $10 include 2 hours of black light bowling, shoe rental, Sunday Nights: Bowling Family Fun Night. 4-7 p.m. at Mayport Bowling Center. Cost is $10 per person and includes your choice of a lb hamburger or a hotdog with fries and a soda, All-You-Can Bowl with shoes Windy Harbor Golf Club Wednesdays: Military Appreciation Day every Wednesday at Windy Harbor Golf Club.18 Holes and a Cart Only $15. Offer open to DOD, active duty, retired, and mili tary dependents (Must provide proper ID) 12 THE MIRROR NS MAYPORT, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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