The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00335


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Seahawk logo, lore showcased by sta at naval hospital e Seahawk was in ight all day the Friday before the Super Bowl, at Naval Hospital Bremer ton. Lea Keyes knew such a day would be forthcoming from the start of the season. Despite several anxious moments, she never gave up faith that her team, the Seattle Seahawks, would make it to the Super Bowl. Nor did a number of other NHB sta members, who gath ered for an impromptu photo opportunity on the last work day before the Super Bowl to col lectively show their team colors, spirit and support for the game Feb. 2, against the Denver Bron cos. It was really fun here to see how many people showed up this morning, said Keyes, medi cal support assistant for Fam ily Practice and Immunizations Clinic, who tastefully decorated her work area with Seattle Se ahawks memorabilia that she attests has been given approval by beneciaries checking in for their appointments. Our guests seem to enjoy the Seahawks display at the desk as they check in. I have not even had any other team fans indi cate that it was not a good idea! One of the reasons I decorate my back wall is for conversation starters, and it always seems to be a good point in common that encourages comment and dis cussion, Keyes said. e Seattle Seahawks logo design the eyes, beak and the neck of the Seahawk was originally introduced in 1975, and has incorporated elements from the Pacic Northwest in digenous Haida and Kwakiutl coastal nations. Along with the Haida eagle and Haida eye, the ercely-look ing Seahawk look also has been inuenced by several aspects of Egyptian mythology such as the falcon and eye of Horus. Although not an exact replica of any specic Haida or Kwakiutl style, the design has won over the fans who now proudly sport the logo and support their team. Oh yeah, our logo is denitely the best. It encapsulates all that makes the Puget Sound great, such as the art of the native cul ture, the fact we have eagles and Seahawks, and the blue, green, and grey that makes up the nat ural beauty, Keyes said. Up Periscope Outstanding individuals in Black History Page 9 NJROTC Future leaders visit Kings Bay EOD Pages 4, 5 Soccer MWR T-Ball, youth, adult soccer coming Page 11Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bays RV Park like home to New York couple Retirement comes as a very just reward to most hardworking Americans. Its a wonderful time to slow down, pick up hobbies, enjoy relationships and focus on liv ing life. ats exactly what Elaine and Phil Marasco have done. At the end of every fall, Elaine packs up the RV while Phil ensures every drop of water is out of the pipes in their Upstate New York home. ese snow birds migrate straight here to their favorite winter home, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Eagle Hammock RV Park. ey arrive and once water, sewer and electricity are connected, theyre almost home. eir winter hasnt really started until Elaine can connect back with her friends. So they head over to Navy-Ma rine Corps Relief Society. Elaine said she enjoys walk ing around the RV park for the rst time each winter and renewing acquantences.S nowbirds roosting at Eagle Hammock February marks focus on African American culture, accomplishmentse Navy joins our nation in celebrat ing the vibrant history and culture of Af rican-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month throughout the month of February. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include the entire month of February. is year, Navy commands are encour aged to celebrate and reect on the theme Civil Rights in America. African-American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service that permeates naval history through every major armed con ict since the Revolutionary War. During the Civil War, African-American Sailors fought on every kind of Union war ship, accounting for 10 to 24 percent of each ships crew, and included eight Med al of Honor recipients. During World War II, the Golden ir teen were an example of African-Amer icans breaking new ground in the Navy and in American society. In February 1944, 12 prior-enlisted black servicemen were commissioned as ensigns and a 13th was made a warrant ocer. ey were the rst group of black servicemen to complete ocer training in the Navy and led the way for future Afri can-Americans. Navy celebrates Black History Obama covers issuesTouches on ash points during State of Union addressWhile President Barack Obamas State of the Union speech Jan. 28 was dominated by domestic concerns, he also addressed national security concerns. Tonight, because of the ex traordinary troops and civilians who risk and lay down their lives to keep us free, the United States is more secure, Obama told members of the House and Senate and other government lead ers gathered in the House of Representatives chamber. e president touted his eorts to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. When he took oce in January 2009, he noted, 180,000 Americans were serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, the war in Iraq is over and the war in Afghanistan is entering its nal months. All of the troops are out of Iraq, and 60,000 Americans have been withdrawn from Afghanistan, with about 38,000 Americans still serving in the country. With Afghan forces now in the lead for their own security, our troops have moved to a support role, Obama said. Together with our allies, we will complete our mission there by the end of this year, and Americas longest war will nally be over. Next year, the United States will continue to support a uni ed Afghanistan, he said. If the Afghan government signs a security agreement that we have negotiated, a small force of Americans could re main in Afghanistan with NATO allies to carry out two narrow missions: training and assisting Afghan forces, and counterter rorism operations to pursue any remnants of al-Qaida, Obama said. For while our relationship with Afghanistan will change, one thing will not: our resolve that terrorists do not launch at tacks against our country. It is still a dangerous world, the president said. While we have put al-Qaidas NH Bremerton fans in Seahawk heaven

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 e Keep What Youve Earned campaign released its latest testimo nial video Jan. 29 as part of a series featuring Sailors personal stories about how alcohol incidents im pacted their careers, and the impor tance of drinking responsibly. e latest video features Person nel Specialist 2nd Class Kathryn Cummings from Naval Operational Support Center Norfolk. She shares how a personal hardship led to destructive drinking habits and exces sive alcohol use. Struggling with personal issues, Cummings thought that a night of heavy drinking would be just what she needed, but a night of binge drinking led to even more trouble this time with her career. In the newly released video, Cum mings says she thought she did ev erything right. She called a taxi and got home safe. However, her deci sion to binge drink still aected her career when she was late to work and received a t for duty screen ing. After failing her screening, Cum mings was referred to her command Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Pro gram and got the help she needed. She now has regular meetings with her command Drug and Alco hol Program Advisor, Chief Person nel Specialist Howard Dickerson, who said that Cummings is a stellar Sailor who strives to be an example to others. Responsible drinking is so im portant especially these days where everyone is competing to stay in (the Navy), said Cummings. She now spends her time working out, volunteering and hanging out with more responsible friends. According to the Center for Dis ease Control, binge drinking has become so common that more than half of alcohol consumption in the U.S. is in the form of binge drinking. We want Sailors to understand that we arent trying to stop them from drinking all together, but that if they choose to drink, we want them to do so responsibly, said Dorice Favorite, director of the Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Of ce. If a night of drinking aects your ability to show up for work and do your job, thats when we know there is a problem. Cummings testimonial is part of the Keep What Youve Earned video series. Each testimonial reminds Sailors of the importance of drink ing responsibly and keeping what youve earned. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA e winter months are rolling by. As the mercury dips, some fami lies, struggling to pay their heating bills, will turn on the kitchen stove burners and the oven in an eort to take the chill out of their home. What these families dont realize is how dangerous this practice can be. A gas oven or range top should never be used for heating. A re could start and poisonous carbon monoxide fumes could ll the home. Any fuel-burning heating equip ment, such as replaces, furnaces, water heaters, space or portable heaters, generators and chimneys can produce carbon monoxide. According to the National Fire Protection Association there is an increased risk of dying in a home re during the winter season. Decem ber, January and February are generally the deadliest months for re. Also, hundreds of people die each year from unintentional CO poison ing. Fire departments responded to an estimated 61,000 CO incidents in 2011, a 9 percent increase from 2013. is excludes incidents where a re was present. Close to 90 percent of CO inci dents occur in the home. Often called a silent killer, CO is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas cre ated when fuels, such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil and methane, burn incompletely. CO enters the body through breathing. CO poisoning can be confused with u symptoms, food poisoning and other illnesses. Some symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, light headedness or headaches. Everyone is at risk for CO poison ing, but infants, pregnant women and people with physical conditions that limit their ability to use oxy gen, such as emphysema, asthma or heart disease, can be more severely aected by low concentrations of CO than healthy adults. High levels of CO can be fatal for anyone, causing death within min utes. e goal of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department is to reduce the number of carbon monoxide incidents and discourage anyone from using the range or oven to heat their home. Install CO alarms inside your home to provide early warning of accumulating CO. Have your heat ing equipment inspected by a pro fessional every year before cold weather sets in. CO alarms are not substitutes for smoke alarms. Know the differ ence between the sound of smoke alarms and CO alarms. Test CO alarms at least once a month. If your CO alarm sounds, imme diately move to a fresh air location and call for help. Remain at the fresh air location until emergency personnel say it is okay. If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries or other trouble indicators. e Kings Bay Fire Department wants everyone to be warm and safe this winter. Make sure your home has carbon monoxide alarms. Heating safety Its a cold winter night. You decide to use a space heater, or perhaps light a re in the replace, to save on the heating bill. Comfortable from its warmth as bedtime approaches you think, What harm could it cause to leave it on overnight? ink again. While these heating devices may help you feel cozy and warm, they can become extremely dangerous if not used properly. Home heating equipment was in volved in an estimated 62,000 home res in 2005, according to the nonprot NFPA. e cost of these res is more than just property damage. e cost includes roughly 700 lives and roughly 1,500 injuries. Home heating res are largely pre ventable when you know the rules. e majority of heating re deaths is caused by space heaters. Most heating res are caused by creosote build-up in the chimney. To help keep our community safe and warm this season, the Kings Bay Fire Department recommends that you follow these guidelines: Space heaters need space. Keep all things that can burn, such as paper, bedding or furniture, at least 3 feet away from heating equip ment. Turn portable heaters o when you go to bed or leave the room. Plug power cords only into outlets with sucient capacity and never into an extension cord. Inspect for cracked, frayed or broken plugs or loose connections. Replace before using. Have your chimney inspected each year and cleaned if necessary. Use a sturdy replace screen. Allow ashes to cool before dis posing. Dispose of ashes in a metal container. Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For the best protection inter connect all smoke alarms through out the home when one sounds, they all sound. Test smoke alarms at least once a month. Install and maintain a carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside each sleeping area. With simple precautions, help the KBFD meet its goal of decreasing home-heating res this winter. For more information, contact the Fire Prevention Oce at 573-9999. Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cmr. Robert E. Wirth is scheduled to be re lieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as com manding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) at 10 a.m., Feb.14 at the Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Chapel. Wirth has been in command since September 2011, serving dur ing four strategic deterrent patrols.e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will host Cmr. Rich ard Dubnansky, commanding ocer of USS Tennessee (Gold), at its regular meeting and dinner, starting at 6 p.m., ursday, Feb. 13, at Magnolias in the Kings Bay Conference Cen ter on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Dub nansky will update attendees on USS Tennes see Golds recent activities and achievements and speak about the challenges he faces at the helm of a major command in our nuclear triad. e public is invited to attend along with the regular membership. All attendees must send advance dinner payment ($25 per person) to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. e deadline to receive reservations is Monday, Feb. 10. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e names of all attendees must be sent in order to coordi nate base access. Additional information can be found at http://kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Activities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: Feb.14, starting at 10 a.m., a 5K Sweetheart Run at the base Fitness Center. Point of contact is MM1 Joseph Stockton at (912) 573-3905 or joseph.stockton@navy.mil March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Clue. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.Wild West Express featuring sharpshooters and an Indian village will is Feb. 8. Trains de part from eatre by the Trax, 1000 Osborne St, St. Marys at 10 a.m., noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.stmarysrailroad.com or by calling (912) 200-5235.St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e eve nings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and enter tainment, is $35 per person. For parade par ticipation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional informa tion, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Kingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, mo torcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early reg istration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeor gia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852. Now hear this! Carbon monoxide a silent killer NSB Fire Department Dont let alcohol impact your career Naval Personnel Some Veterans with traumatic brain injury who are diagnosed with any of ve other ailments will have an easier path to receive additional disability pay under new regulations developed by the Department of Veterans Aairs. e new regulation, which takes eect in January, impacts some Vet erans living with TBI who also have Parkinsons disease, certain types of dementia, depression, unprovoked seizures or certain diseases of the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. We decide Veterans disability claims based on the best science available, said Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki. As scien tic knowledge advances, VA will expand its programs to ensure Vet erans receive the care and benets theyve earned and deserve. is regulation stems from a re port of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine (IOM) regarding the association between TBI and the ve diagnosable ill nesses. e IOM report, Gulf War and Health, Volume 7: Long-Term Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury, found sucient evidence to link moderate or severe levels of TBI with the ve ailments. e new regulations, printed in the Federal Register, say that if cer tain Veterans with service-connect ed TBI also have one of the ve ill nesses, then the second illness will also be considered as service con nected for the calculation of VA dis ability compensation. Eligibility for expanded benets will depend upon the severity of the TBI and the time between the injury causing the TBI and the onset of the second illness. However, Veterans can still le a claim to establish di rect service-connection for these ailments even if they do not meet the time and severity standards in the new regulation. VA extends brain injury coverage Veterans Administration

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core leadership on a path to defeat, the threat has evolved, as al-Qaida aliates and other extremists take root in dierent parts of the world, he said. e threat remains in Yemen, Somalia, Iraq and Mali, and the United States must work with allies to disrupt and disable the terror networks. In Syria, well support the opposi tion that rejects the agenda of terrorist networks, the president said. Here at home, well keep strengthening our de fenses, and combat new threats like cy berattacks. And as we reform our defense budget, we have to keep faith with our men and women in uniform, and invest in the capabilities they need to succeed in future missions. America must remain vigilant, the president said, and while the American military is the bedrock of security, it does not and cannot act alone. As commander in chief, I have used force when needed to protect the Ameri can people, and I will never hesitate to do so as long as I hold this oce, Obama said. But I will not send our troops into harms way unless its truly necessary, nor will I allow our sons and daughters to be mired in open-ended conicts. We must ght the battles that need to be fought, not those that terrorists prefer from us largescale deployments that drain our strength and may ultimately feed extremism. e United States will continue to aggressively pursue terrorist networks through more targeted eorts and by building the capacity of foreign partners, Obama said. e United States must move o a per manent war footing, the president em phasized. ats why Ive imposed prudent lim its on the use of drones, for we will not be safer if people abroad believe we strike within their countries without regard for the consequence, he said. ats why, working with this Congress, I will reform our surveillance programs, because the vital work of our intelligence community depends on public condence, here and abroad, that the privacy of ordinary peo ple is not being violated. e president also called on Congress to lift the remaining restrictions on de tainee transfers and allow the adminis tration to close the prison at Guantana mo Bay, Cuba. is is needed, Obama said, because we counter terrorism not just through in telligence and military action, but by re maining true to our constitutional ideals, and setting an example for the rest of the world. e president said the diplomatic power of the United States, backed by the threat of force, is why Syrias chemical weapons are being eliminated, and we will continue to work with the interna tional community to usher in the future the Syrian people deserve, a future free of dictatorship, terror and fear. American diplomacy has halted the progress of Irans nuclear program and rolled parts of that program back for the very rst time in a decade, the president said. e United Nations sanctions helped to make this opportunity possible, the president said. e president vowed to slash the back log of disability claims at the Veterans Af fairs Department and to continue eorts to help veterans returning to civilian life. Well keep working to help all our vet erans translate their skills and leadership into jobs here at home, he said. And we all continue to join forces to honor and support our remarkable military fami lies. ese 13 ocers not only made a contribution to the Navy during World War II, but to society as well. By the end of the war, 64 African-Americans had become ocers in the Navy. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African-Amer ican Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the rst black graduate of the Unit ed States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieu tenant commander. He passed away May 22, 2012 after a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian work force. Edna Young was the rst black woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the rst black woman to achieve the rank of chief petty ocer. Young joined the Navy after the passage of the Womens Armed Services Integration Act July 7, 1948. In December 1996, Adm. J. Paul Reason be came the rst black naval ocer to wear four stars and assumed command of the Atlantic Fleet, comprising nearly 200 war ships, 1,400 aircraft, and 122,000 service men and women based at 18 major shore facilities. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard is recognized for many rst accomplishments, including the rec ognition as the rst female United States Naval Academy graduate to be promoted to the rank of admiral, the rst black fe male to command a com batant ship, and the rst black female promoted to two-star and three-star admiral. She has also been conrmed by the Senate to serve as Vice Chief of Na val Operations, the ser vices No. 2 uniformed of cer. She will be the rst black and rst woman to hold the job and the rst female four-star admiral. ese outstanding ex amples of African-Amer ican Sailors are just a handful of those marking history with rsts and dis tinguishing the Navy as a force for freedom and equality. African-Americans continue to serve with dis tinction, now comprising more than 17 percent of our active duty Navy total force end-strength. UnionMonth THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 NJROTC Tours Navy photos By MC2 Ashley Hedrick

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 5

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At the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, experts in the emotional toll of disasters help the Defense Department, gov ernment agencies and rst responders worldwide understand how best to help communities struck by terrorist attacks, mass casualties and natural disasters. e center is part of the psychiatry department at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md. e USUHS serves the Army, Navy, Air Force and U.S. Public Health Service by educating health professionals for DOD and USPHS career service. e center was established essentially to ad dress concerns by the Department of Defense about psychological impacts and health conse quences that might result from the potential use of weapons of mass destruc tion during combat [and] acts of terrorism or hos tage events, Dr. Joshua C. Morganstein told American Forces Press Service during a recent interview. Morganstein, a commander in the Public Health Service, is an as sistant professor in the USUHS psychiatry depart ment and a scientist at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. ere was growing in terest by DOD in the general psychological impact and health consequences resulting from a broad cat egory of traumatic events, he said, including peacekeeping missions, operations other than war, and natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis. DOD also was interested in more common stressproducing events like physical assaults or boat, plane and car accidents for uniformed and civilian communities, he said. e center was estab lished in 1987 as part of the USUHS psychiatry de partment. Since its inception the center has been run by department chairman Dr. Robert Ursano, who Mor ganstein said is internation ally renowned in the eld of disaster psychiatry, which diers from general psychiatry in important ways. Traditional psychiatry is, for the most part, hos pital or clinic based, tak ing place in a traditional treatment setting and generally one on one to focus on problems that an individual has sought care for, Army Col. (Dr.) David M. Benedek told Ameri can Forces Press Service. Benedek is associate di rector for consultation and education at the center, and professor and deputy chairman of the USUHS psychiatry department. Disaster psychiatry is an eort to target the range of possible respons es to a disaster without people necessarily seek ing care, he said, adding that the population-based approach in disaster psy chiatry is to do things that help all people regardless of whether they have iden tied themselves as hav ing an illness or as needing mental health care. Benedek and Mor ganstein explained that a key element underlying disaster response is a set of principles that together are known as psychologi cal rst aid. ese ve early inter vention principles pro mote a sense of safety by helping people meet basic needs for food and shelter, promote connected ness by keeping families together, promote self-as surance by giving practi cal suggestions that help people help themselves, promote hope by directing people to government and other kinds of services, and promote calming by being friendly and compassionate even if people are being dicult. Examples of what not to do, according to the cen ters fact sheet, include not forcing people to share their stories, not giving simple reassurances such as Everything will be all right, not making prom ises that may not be kept, and not criticizing existing services or relief activities. Psychological rst aid, Morganstein said, is designed to encourage health-seeking and decrease the incidence of more severe psychiatric symptoms or emotions and distress behaviors in the wake of a disaster. After the terrorist at tacks on 9/11, the scien tist added, people really sought Dr. Ursano out to address the impact of that event and the nations need for disaster planning and preparedness for fu ture events. In 2003, the center, whose multidisciplinary team had expertise in disaster psychiatry, military medicine and psychiatry, social and organizational psychology, neuroscience, family violence, workplace preparedness and public education, established an Oce of Public Education and Preparedness. Before this, Mor ganstein said, Dr. Ursano and other senior leaders here at the center played a role during disasters [like the 1986 Chernobyl nucle ar accident in Ukraine, the 1988 Lockerbie, Scotland, Pan ight 103 jumbo jet crash, and the 9/11 ter rorist attacks in the United States]. ey provided ex pertise, consultation and spoke with people about the best evidence for man aging psychiatric aspects of a disaster scenario. But the center needed a better way than individual consultation to get its expert information out to more people aected by disasters and to those involved in disaster response, he said. An answer to this, and part of the new oces multipronged approach to education and outreach is producing and disseminating rapid-response fact sheets tailored to ongoing situations such as last years Navy Yard shoot ings. e fact sheets get in formation out there to [the DOD and military mental health leadership], potential patients or aected public, [health care pro viders] and other people who are in a position to provide leadership and guidance, Benedek said. e goal, Morganstein added, is to oer educa tional resources to a wide range of folks who might potentially benet from this information in re sponse to a disaster thats happening. During the Navy Yard event, the center got a re quest from the District of Columbias mental health department to consult with its leaders, and from the mental health team lead from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center that augmented Navy medicines SPRINT team response, Mor ganstein said. One of the personnel from our center, a Public Health ocer, was asked to participate in the onthe-ground behavioral health response, he said. en we had about a 12hour turnaround where, based on the information as it rapidly evolved, we decided on what would be relevant issues to the military, the D.C. government and rst responders. Fact sheets were tailored to issues unique to an active-shooter situation on a military installa tion in which many people were killed, the shooter was killed, and challenges likely would arise as the D.C. government and the Defense Department worked through managing a response to people on the base and in the lo cal community, he said. e fact sheets were de veloped, reviewed by center subject-matter experts and then disseminated to key leaders in DOD and the D.C. government, the services mental health leadership, and organizations such as the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the USPHS leadership and others. at was the rst 12 to 18 hours after the news broke of the shooting as we watched it unfold, Morganstein said. e centers consultive services and educational products such as fact sheets, written in language everyone can understand, help to ll a longstanding gap in medical education. Because disaster psy chiatry is not something that over the past several decades has gotten a lot of education, Morganstein said, it isnt built into the curricula of behavioral health or medical provid ers not even in DOD, and certainly not in the civilian sector. Receiving such disasterspecic information can be a paradigm shift for health providers, he add ed, because what were saying to a psychiatrist or a psychologist, for instance, is the therapy you spent years learning to give and the medicines you spent years learning to prescribe may not necessarily be the most important tool in your arsenal right now. Still, Benedek said, many training programs increasingly recognize the need, in mental health and across medical disci plines, for specic disaster training. Certainly, weve been advocating that in aca demic channels and have published on the need for the development of an ac ademic disaster curriculum, he said, adding that the USUHS psychiatry de partment oers a disaster fellowship for one or two students a year. e post-graduate train ing program is open to psychiatrists and some internists who ultimately receive a masters degree in public health and then participate in rotations with agencies committed to disaster response. As far as we know, its the only disaster fellow ship, Benedek added, but other residency pro grams are developing at least some training in this area for their psychiatric residents. In late March, for ex ample, by joint invitation from Sheppard Pratt Health System and the University of Maryland, Morganstein will present a half-day seminar on disas ter psychiatry for fourthyear residents from both institutions. Were interested in partnering more widely in this region to begin with, Morganstein said, and potentially creating an ed ucational curriculum for psychiatry residents and expanding that potentially even further. Agencies such as the Red Cross, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psy chological Association disseminate disaster information, Benedek said, but particularly in the last ve or six years, medical training programs have recognized the need to for curricula. One such organization is the National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, established in 2008 by Homeland Se curity Presidential Direc tive 21 as an academic center of excellence in di saster medicine and public health. e NCDMPH, also aliated with USUHS, initially developed a cur riculum for responding to childrens needs during disasters, Morganstein said, then partnered with the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress to develop a behavioral health curriculum toolkit called Curriculum Recommendations for Disaster Health Professionals: Disaster Behavioral Health, published this month. Benedek said the new center, the fellowship at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, and increasing interest in di saster-focused health cur ricula all are evidence that awareness of the need for such training is growing nationwide. e lengthy conicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have certainly brought to the surface the reality of the emotional consequences of traumatic exposures, he said. Certainly, at military and governmental levels theres an awareness that bad events exact a psycho logical toll, Benedek add ed, and theres a need for a response to those events and training to develop an appropriate and rational re sponse across populations. DoD pursuing study of disaster psychiatry Payments to service members for Personally Procured Moves, formerly known as Do-it-Your self or DITY moves, will be received sooner via Electronic Funds Trans fer to service members checking or savings ac counts, Naval Supply Sys tems Command ocials anounced Jan. 17. Right now, it takes about 7 to 10 days for a Sailor to receive a compensatory check for a PPM. EFTs process quick ly, and can get money to a Sailor in less than half the time, said Naval Supply Systems Command Commander Rear Adm. Jona than Yuen. e current business process is costly and time consuming. It makes nancial sense for the Navy and benets our Sailors wallets to move to EFTs, Yuen said. e Navy PPM check list is being updated to include instructions along with a form that allows service members to safely and securely provide their electronic funds payment information as part of the PPM process, said NAV SUP Household Goods Director Francis Piacine. Payment by EFT is cur rently voluntary and will remain so until April 1, when it becomes manda tory for all Navy members performing a full or partial PPM. e new capability was developed by NAVSUP in partnership with the Defense Finance and Ac counting Service. Sailors to get payments faster 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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(I) really looks forward to connecting with friends here, she said. Eagle Hammock RV park ranks highly with parks on other military bases. e concrete pads are nice and big. e laundry room is clean and new, with free machines. e community room is warm and inviting. e park sta plans social ac tivities and residents have access to a lake and trails. Its amenities like these that got Phil and Elaine coming here the year it opened in 2008. But its not why they think about Kings Bay all year long. Elaine couldnt explain enough the feeling she gets in helping helping military members through NMCRS. Being able to connect with them when they come in is so rewarding, she said. ey are always show grat itude. ey are so thankful. You always feel like thats something. at something is the reason their time in Kings bay makes their retirement not just relaxing but enrich ing. Elaine said she cherishes the community and the feeling volunteering gives the couple. Phil is happy to use his military organi zational skills at the golf course, but whats to do more. He wants to connect more excited volunteers with worthwhile needs on base. Are you interested in vol unteering? If so, contact the public aairs oce at (912) 573-4714.Eagle So, exactly what type of bird is the Seahawk? Its an osprey, a sizable bird of prey that is valued and respected much as the bald eagle is by the Na tive American tribes. In a number of coastal Native American nations throughout the greater Puget Sound region where ospreys are most com monly seen, the birds are revered for their guardian roles in traditional legends. It is said that seeing one is sometimes considered to be a warning of danger to come. Even the blue-green color scheme of the Seattle Seahawks is symbolically used in Haida culture. Ive been following the team since before 2006 and was super excited back then, Keyes said. ere is a big dierence though as weve decided to assertively pursue our goal, instead of play ing our hearts out and hope for the best. We are far more willing to make things happen through interceptions and turnovers this year. ats what will win the championship, in my opinion. ere were a few Denver Bronco fans who also showed up for the group photo opportunity. My husband has always been a Bronco fan, said Capt. Iris Boehnke, NHB director of Nursing Services. I can remem ber when we were dating we would go watch them when we were at Pen sacola and in Maryland. I support him supporting them and the game itself doesnt really hold my interest but Ill watch it for the commercials.Seahawk THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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Jackie Robinson is recognized for breaking base balls color barrier in 1947. And rightfully so. He is a civil rights icon, and today is the only player to have his number retired by every team. But before the color barrier was put in place, African-American Bud Fowler played with white teams in 21 states and ter ritories, starting with Lynn, Mass., of the International Association, in 1978. This pioneer was a pitcher, catcher and infielder, but not a lot more is really known about him. Today, hes somewhat forgotten. Then, last year Baseball Hall of Fame hometown Cooperstown, N.Y., named a street, Bud Fowler Way, in his honor. Special people for Black History MonthET3 Bethany Larson NSB Kings Bay Ida, Mich. Rosa Parks. She was brave for standing up . well, technically for sitting down. Alice Simmons Retired Navy Tallahassee, Fla. Harriet Tubman. She risked her life to give others the chance of freedom and they helped others, like a chain reaction. HM2 Siviquallie Richardson Branch Health Clinic Detroit George Washington Carver and the scientific work he did with peanuts and cotton. MT3 Cordaro Hilton-Washington USS Rhode Island Gold Indianapolis Nelson Mandella. He is the epitome of peace after all he went through. EM3 Alexander Wynn USS Florida Blue Calhoon, Ga. Harriet Tubman. She helped emancipate a lot of slaves. HM3 Charles Shelton Branch Health Clinic Oklahoma City, Okla. Clara Luper from Muskogee, Oklahoma, the mother of Oklahoma civil rights. The civil rights movement started in Oklahoma at Kats Cafe. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Players in this years Super Bowl set aside time before Sundays game to thank members of the U.S. military, particularly those who are deployed and stationed abroad, for their sacrices while de fending the nation. I want to tell all the troops over there in Af ghanistan how much we appreciate what theyre doing for our country to protect our country, said Denver Broncos quarter back Peyton Manning. We are praying for you. Manning and other players from the Denver Broncos and their Super Bowl rivals, the Seattle Seahawks expressed their gratitude for troops serv ing to protect their free doms during shout-outs this week. ank you all for all you do, Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker said. You are the reason we have the opportunity to play this game, so thank you. ank you for every Super Bowl players thankful for military THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like sug gestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 10 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb 11, 18 and 25. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. A five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 10 to 14. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783. A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recom mends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. The Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is appli cable to the 32 hour bi-annual training requirement. The indi viduals attending are appoint ed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4p.m., Feb. 19. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19. For more infor mation, call 573-4513. The target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 19. Registration recommended, call 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command repre sentatives. The goal of the work shop is to ensure that designat ed command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsi bilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is sched uled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 20. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. There will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Frb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital rela tionship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the fed eral employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. 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Morale, Welfare and Recre ations Intramural 7-vs.-7 Out door Soccer League begins Feb. 18, with a fee of $100 for active duty members and $150 for DoD members. e captains meeting is at 5 p.m., Wed., Feb. 12, inside the Fitness Complex classroom. For more information, call (912) 409-1611. Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. The driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Cupids Couples Challenge Its 9 to 11 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Fitness Complex Racquetball Court No. 6, in Buidling 1034. No registra tion required. With a partner, complete a series of exercises that will challenge your physi cal and collaborative skills as a couple. e challenge will take no longer than 15 minutes. Two convenient walk-in time slots are available. e winning couple will receive a gift certificate for dinner for two. Call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990 for more details. Kings Bay is going to Tampa for a hockey game, the Tampa Bay Lightning against the Boston Bruins leaving here at 1:45 p.m., Saturday, March 8. Charter bus transportation will be provided. Cost is $45 per per son, 18 years old and older, with a $40 special price for liberty single active duty. Pre-pay at ITT/OAC by Feb.14 COB. Bring money for food and souvenirs. For more information, call Navy Adventures Unleashed at (912) 573-8972. DIY and Dessert This new program is offered on at 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 10 in the Kings Bay Conference Center. Its a Pinterest Idea Swap plus more. Feed your crafty side and create a Valentine sugar scrub favor. Cost is $5. RSVP by Feb. 7 by Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call Outdoor soccer coming Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. mov ies are Turbo Feb. 15 and 16, The Smurfs 2 (Monday) Feb. 17, and Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Intramural Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 calling (912) 573-8999. Unleash your Inner Beast Navy Adventures Unleashed goes skiing in Gatlinburg, Tenn., the long weekend of Feb. 14 to 17. One Day Ski is $190, One Day Snowboarding is $210, Two Day Ski is $250 or Two Day Snowboarding is $280. A deposit of $75 is due on Jan. 15 with balance due on Feb. 7. Cost includes transportation, hotel, tram tickets, ski lift, rentals plus one lesson. Participants must bring own money for food and souvenirs. Trippers will leave Big EZ on Friday, Feb. 14 at 4 p.m. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebrand ing of Bldg.1039 is under way! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety dur ing renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refresh ments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be lim ited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with comput ers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos.MWR Region tutors students Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast participated in a student enrichment day and provided one-on-one tutoring with students at Mattie V. Rutherford Alter native Middle School in Jacksonville, Fla., recently. During the volunteer ef fort, Sailors tutored sixth, seventh and eighth-grade students in math and reading, and helped fac ulty members supervise a basketball game. It was the latest in a se ries of events conducted under an ocial partner ship between CNRSE and MVR. e partnership ben ets our students because they can build relation ships with adults who are successful and are mak ing good choices, said Sadie Milliner-Smith, the schools principal. Our goal is to create a safe environment that is conducive for learning. Many of our students come here with a lot of challenges, and we provide personal, social and academic strat egies that students can use to address those challeng es. e one-on-one tutor ing the Sailors provide to the students aords them an opportunity to connect with an adult in a dierent way than they might be able to with their teachers. As an alternative school, MVR currently enrolls 96 students who have made poor educational and social decisions many of which have been involved in disciplinary incidents at school, at home or in the community. Students are assigned to the school for a mini mum of 45 days with the goal of helping them de velop positive strategies to resolve conicts while providing a challenging academic setting. ose who accomplish these goals return to their primary school. As principal, MillinerSmith said she is committed to creating and maintaining an orderly, trusting and caring environment to assist students as they develop into both productive and respon sible citizens. According to Chief Quartermaster Joseph Ziro, lead coordinator for the CNRSE-MVR partner ship, the school oers a unique opportunity for Sailors to have a signicant impact on commu nity youth. I think we can really make a dierence here because it is an opportu nity to be a positive role model for some good kids that may have made some bad decisions, Ziro said. Having been here and interacted with many of them, I can tell you that their potential is unlim ited. Our goal is to try to help them realize that potential through some posi tive guidance and mentor ship. Tandra Wade, who teaches eighth-grade geometry, algebra and prealgebra, agreed with Ziro. I think the students can recognize the honor in the fact that these service members are taking time out of their busy day to be here, Wade said. Work ing with them can help them understand what it means to be accountable and will also instill the message that they too can be successful if they make the right decisions. One student was very appreciative for the opportunity to receive oneon-one tutoring. Tavian Randall, a stu dent in Wades eighthgrade geometry class, said he looks forward to similar events in the future. It really helped me to understand math, Tavian said. He truly explained how to do the work and answered all of my ques tions. I would like to see them come back every other week. Navy Counselor 1st Class Vladimir Arias-Mar tinez, who tutored Tavian during the visit, said the experience was mutually rewarding. Its a really gratifying experience to have the opportunity to come out and help these kids grow from an educational standpoint, Arias said. I support these kinds of volunteer outings whenever I can because, as members of the military, we have a chance to positively inuence the community. As a Sailor, thats an opportu nity that I dont think we should shy away from. e ongoing leaks of classied docu ments by former National Security Agency contractor Edward J. Snowden amount to the most massive and damaging theft of intelligence in our history, the director of national intelligence told Congress Jan. 29. James R. Clapper delivered the assess ment as he and other ocials from the intelligence and law enforcement com munities briefed the Senate Intelligence Committee on worldwide threats to the nation, from ongoing espionage and cy ber operations by an assertive Russia and a competitive China to more diversied threats posed by al-Qaida and other ter ror groups that have beneted from the Snowden disclosures about sources and methods, making them harder to track. Seven months after Snowden gave doc uments about the NSAs highly classied metadata and eavesdropping programs to several newspapers, the nations top intelligence ocer described the pro found damage that his disclosures have caused and continue to cause, which he said has left the nation less safe and its people less secure. As a result, weve lost critical foreign intelligence collection sources, including some shared with us by valued partners, he said. Terrorists and other adversaries of this country are going to school on U.S. intelligence sources, methods and tradecraft, and the insights they are gaining are making our job much, much harder. Snowden has been charged with espio nage and stealing government property, and he remains a fugitive from justice in Russia, where he has been granted tem porary asylum. Clapper would not say during the hearing whether he believes the Rus sian government has gained access to the Snowden trove, saying that question should be addressed in a classied set ting. While a range of threats including counterintelligence eorts by China and Russia to a more diuse and, therefore, harder to track al-Qaida were listed as leading security threats, concerns about the Snowden leaks overshadowed the hearing, with Clapper calling on the for mer contractor to return the classied documents and prevent more damage to national security. Army Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn, De fense Intelligence Agen cy director, character ized the disclosures as grave, with the conse quences likely to prove deadly to American forces someday. We will likely face the cost in human lives on to morrows battleeld or in some place where we will put our military forces, he said. Overall, Clapper said, the leaks and the allegations of abuse of intelligence that they generated, as well as furloughs, government shutdowns and salary freez es have taken a toll on those who have done their utmost to protect this country and do so in a lawful manner. In addi tion, he warned the diminished morale and resources of the intelligence com munity will have a corresponding eect on national security. e impact of the losses caused by the disclosures will be amplied by the sub stantial budget reductions were incur ring, he said. e stark consequences of this perfect storm are plainly evident. e intelligence community is going to have less capacity to protect our nation, and its allies, than weve had. e hearing also touched on risks to national security posed by the civil war in Syria, which Clapper said has become a huge magnet for extremists who are get ting training to go back to their countries and conduct more terrorist acts. e intelligence community estimates that more than 7,000 foreign ghters from 50 countries have gone to Syria since the start of the civil war, he said. One issue of concern to lawmakers was security for the Winter Olympics that open in Sochi, Russia, next week, given several recent suicide bombings in the region and the history of unrest in the Caucuses in general. National Counterterrorism Center Director Matthew G. Olsen said the United States remains very focused on the prob lem of terrorism in southern Russia, but he characterized an uptick in threats re lated to the games as what we expected, given where the Olympics are located. e Russian government, he said, un derstands the threats and has devoted substantial resources to security. e greater threat is to softer targets in the greater Sochi area and in the outskirts, he said, where there is a substantial poten tial for a terrorist attack.Leak damage massive

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13 A Navy chief, assigned to Center for Security Forces Detachment Chesapeake, was scheduled to undergo a bone marrow aspira tion procedure Jan. 28, in a seless act to reach out and save the life of some one in dire need. e C.W. Bill Young De partment of Defense Mar row Donor Program, also known as Salute to Life, was established in 1991. e program is designed to work exclusively with DoD personnel in man aging bone marrow and stem cell donations. e program has suc cessfully coordinated more than 6,000 dona tions. It also has more than 800-thousand people who have joined the registry through the program people who stand ready and willing to help save the life of someone in need. At some point in his career, Chief Boatswains Mate Michael R. Kelly underwent DNA testing to see if he would be a pos sible match for someone needing a bone marrow transplant. Last December, he was found to be a perfect match for a mid dle-aged male who suers from a condition known as multiple myeloma. Once I got the information, I really wanted to do this because the person [I am helping] is only one year older than my father and I know how I would feel if I were that persons son and so, I knew I want ed to do it, Kelly said. e American Cancer Society reports mul tiple myeloma is a cancer formed by malignant plas ma cells. ese malignant cells can crowd out nor mal blood-forming cells in the bone marrow and cause low red and white cell blood counts. A short age of red blood cells, known as anemia, causes a person to become pale, weak, and fatigued as well as cause increased bleeding and bruising. A shortage of white blood cells can diminish a persons immune system and impair a persons abil ity to ght o infection. When I told my wife, she was hesitant when she talked to the [coordina tor] because she was told I would be hurting, in a lot of pain, and that a lot of people [choose] not to do it..., but its for a good cause, said Kelly. ere are two procedures for donating bone marrow being the tradi tional and the peripheral blood stem cell pro cess. Due to the specic needs of the bone marrow recipient, Kelly will need to undergo the traditional procedure. In this procedure, the needed marrow is extract ed by using needles in serted through two small incisions. e needles penetrate the soft center of the patients hipbone where a large deposit of bone marrow is located in the human body. e entire process takes about an hour and a half. I mean an hour and a half to save someones life or possibly extend it a little bit longer, Kelly said, pointing out how a mini mal investment of ones time can save the life of someone else. Kelly went on to ex plain that after the proce dure, he will not be able to move a lot, he will have a great deal of stiness in his back, and would be on medication that promotes increased production of bone marrow for about two or three days. e program also keeps the personal information about donors and patients condential and as for Kelly, the only thing he knows about the person he is helping is the indi vidual is a middle-aged male suering multiple myeloma. e biggest fear is ret ribution because there are scandalous people. [People who would say], Hey, I just saved your life, you owe me XYZ amount of money... or theyll try to go after the family, explained Kelly on why condential ity is so important. Kelly shared that donors are required to wait a peri od of one year before they can request any contact with marrow recipients. If desired, the program coordinator will then con tact the recipient to deter mine whether he or she also desires contact. If so, a meeting is then arranged and if not, anonymity between the two is maintained. However, recipients, unlike donors, can request contact at any time though the same rule applies if the donor desires to keep his or her anonymity. Asked if there was any advice he would like to oers his fellow Sailors in the eet Kelly said, If you have the opportunity [to save a life], take it I mean if you can save someones life other than giving blood then you should. Look at your [own] family because it may be your mom or dad, you wife or your kids [who one day needs help]. e National Marrow Donor Program reports more than 12,000 people are diagnosed with diseas es that require an infusion of stem cells every year. More than half of those diagnosed are unable to nd a suitable donor match within their own family. erefore, those individuals must rely on the compassionate giving of a non-related donor, like Kelly, who is willing to step out and save a life. Chief acts beyond duty Two tankers who as young men could have squared o against each other on the East German border sat in the Russian Embassy in Brussels, Bel gium, Jan. 21 and talked about ways their two na tions could cooperate. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, met his Russian coun terpart, Gen. Valery V. Gerasimov, with an eye to improving the military-tomilitary relations between the two nations. Dempsey spoke of the shared military history of the two nations and proposed a ceremony to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the meet ing of the U.S. and Russian armies at Torgau, Germa ny, in April 1945. at meeting sealed the defeat of Nazi Germany. On political tracks, the U.S.-Russia relationship is a bit bumpy, but on the military track, Dempsey noted, there are ways these two powerful forces can cooperate. I always nd it encour aging when I can meet with my counterparts especially the most inuential militarily around the world, the chairman said following the meet ing. I was encouraged by his candor and his warmth in seeking to nd ways that we can continue to advance the issues where we agree and where we can contribute to re solving those on which we disagree. e two men also signed the 2014 Work Plan for the nations. It was the rst time the chiefs of defense signed such a document. We felt it important enough to come togeth er and do it ourselves, Dempsey said. e Work Plan calls for 67 activities in which military person nel from both countries will work together. ese are generally sta exercises, not maneuver exercises, although there are maneuver exer cises in all domains air, land, sea, the chairman said during an earlier interview. Maneuver exer cises tend to be small battalion level or below. Some areas of disagreement exist between the two militaries, and bal listic missile defense tops that list. Russia is opposed to ballistic missile defense for political and technical reasons. But Im encouraged, because were still talking about it, Dempsey said. e alternative would be we would all go our sepa rate ways and we would generate another form of an arms race on that par ticular issue, and nobody wants that. e points of disagree ment have never driven us to the point in our milto-mil contacts where we cant have the conversation, Dempsey added. e chairman said he believes there is still room for a better understanding not only about the techni cal capabilities related to missile defense, but also the threat and our inten tions vis--vis our allies and protecting ourselves. But the nations agree on Afghanistan. We agree that a stable Afghanistan and an Af ghanistan that is not a sanctuary for terrorism is in our common interests, the chairman said. ey are concerned that if the Afghan security forces dont continue to receive a certain amount of sup port, and if the environment in Afghanistan dete riorates to the point where the central government cant control, or at least inuence, events, they are concerned it will destabilize fairly quickly. [e Russians] are supportive of our continued presence there. e Russians asked a number of questions about U.S. retrograde ac tivities from Afghanistan, Dempsey said, to gauge how quickly events in Af ghanistan could change. In their view, he add ed, it does relate to the amount of structure that NATO continues to provide there. e Russians are look ing for a tipping point in Afghanistan, the general said. ey didnt share what they thought the tipping point is, he con tinued, but in their view, there clearly is one. Other areas of mutual interest include antipiracy and counterterrorism ef forts and Arctic issues. e two men also dis cussed security at the upcoming Sochi Winter Olympic Games. e Russian military is working in support of ci vilian security organizations, and Dempsey heard Gerasimovs assessment of the task. e Russian armed forces are bringing unique military capabilities to the eort, he said, including air defense, the maritime domain, chemical and biological defense, back up medical support for civilian authorities, management of the electronic spectrum and electronic warfare and the like. I reiterated the fact that we would favorably con sider requests from them, Dempsey said. In a statement released yesterday, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said U.S. com manders in the region are conducting prudent planning and preparations should support be required. Air and naval assets, including two Navy ships in the Black Sea, will be available if requested for all manner of contingen cies in support of and in consultation with the Russian government, Kir by said, noting that there is no such requirement at this time. No matter where the Olympics were being held this year, it would be a problem, Dempsey said, as international terrorists would seek to disrupt the games no matter where they were held. But having the games near Chechnya and Dagestan brings its own set of threats, he noted. Gerasimov has a handpicked, highly trained task force thats been in place for some time, Dempsey said. He believes they have in place the intelli gence apparatus, as well as the response apparatus, to deal with the threats as Dempsey meets Russians

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Retest nearly nishedThe retesting of nuclear intercontinental ballis tic missile launch offi cers is nearly complete, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said Jan. 17. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III ordered the retesting after discovering that some nuclear launch officers cheated on proficiency exams. A total of 34 crewmen at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., have been suspended from duty due to the allegations. By close of business yesterday, 472 officers finished the retesting, Warren said. Of those, 21 officers failed the exam. The pass rate was 95.6 percent, well within his torical averages. The 21 officers that failed will undergo retraining and then be retested. If they pass they will return to duty, Warren said. Another 27 officers who are on leave or who are on temporary duty have not been retested. Officials said they will be retested once they return to their bases. The 34 officers who were suspended pend ing the investigation into cheating will not be retest ed, Warren said. All told, 82 officers are not available for assign ment. It is having an impact, Warren said. But it is an impact the missileers have been able to schedule around. It has no impact on the operational readiness, no impact on the safety, no impact on the capabilities, it is just more work for the individual missileers in the short term. A day after ordering an independent review of the militarys nuclear force amid allegations of cheating on pro ciency exams by Air Force ocers over seeing the nations ballistic nuclear mis siles, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel Jan. 24 vowed to restore condence in the Air Forces nuclear mission. Whatever the factors historical, in stitutional, cultural the Department of Defense and the Air Force will do whatev er it takes to continue to ensure the safe ty, security, reliability and eectiveness of our nuclear enterprise, Hagel said at a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony for Deborah Lee James, the 23rd secretary of the Air Force. e service has suspended 34 launch ocers overseeing intercontinental bal listic missiles after an investigation im plicated them for cheating or failing to report cheating on exams. A Pentagon spokesman told reporters yesterday the allegations raise legiti mate concerns about the departments stewardship of one of our most sensitive and important missions, prompting Ha gel to call for an independent, broader examination of the strategic deterrence enterprise as it relates to personnel. At the ceremony, Hagel said he, James and Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Mark. A. Welsh III are deeply concerned about the overall health and professionalism and discipline of our strategic forces, and called the problems facing the new Air Force secretary daunting. But he credited James with a swift, decisive and thought ful response, to the matter after she visited missile bases around the country in recent days. Even so, he said, re storing condence in the nuclear mission will be a top priority. Hagel called James well suited to lead the Air Force as the na tion faces an increasingly uncertain secu rity environment. e rise of emerging powers, dan gerous rogue states, aliated terrorist organizations, and the proliferation of technology will mean more contested and complicated domains, from space to cyber to sea lanes, he said. James, who was ocially sworn in as secretary last month, pledged to leave this Air Force some years from now on a path toward greater capability and bet ter aordability for our taxpayers while always remembering and protecting the important people who underpin every thing we do. But she cautioned the service will continue to face dicult challenges and tradeos brought on by shrinking budgets. Hagel noted that James has spent the last 30 years serving on the sta of the House Armed Services Committee, at the Penta gon, where she served three secretaries of defense, as well as in the private sector. Her approach, he said, has been to understand the problems and opportu nities, listen carefully, and then act de cisively. is, he added, will make her a success leading the Air Force.Hagel: Restore condence they know them this year in Sochi. And, the Russian general is interested in American technology for countering impro vised explosive devices that the Russian military might be able to use, the chairman said. e United States would share technical in formation on the counter-IED eorts, he add ed, and if it is compatible with Russian equip ment, will look to provide that information to Russia in time for the games. e Russian military is holding a tank bi athlon next year, and the United States will observe with the eye on participating down stream, Dempsey said. e biathlon, he added, could have a Rus sian T-90 tank competing against a U.S. M-1 tank sometime in the future.Russia thing you guys have done for us, and continue to do for us to be able to be here to play this great game of football, said Russell Wilson, quarterback for the Seahawks. ank you guys so much for everything you do protecting our country. Hey, we appreciate all your hard work and your dedication, and your sacrice, Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman said. ank you for everything you do for our country and for us ghting for our freedom. We appreciate it. Golden Tate, a wide receiv er for the Seahawks, thanked troops for serving. is country wouldnt be anything without you guys serving and ghting for us ev ery single day for our freedom, Tate said. We appreciate it so much, and we hope you enjoy the show. For Seahawks wider receiver Doug Baldwin, the message came from a little closer to home. My family is a military fam ily, Baldwin said. We appreciate everything those guys do. Its very heartfelt for me. Both teams want military members to know they are not forgotten. To the men and women serving overseas come home safe, said Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch.Players

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Seahawk logo, lore showcased by sta at naval hospital e Seahawk was in ight all day the Friday before the Super Bowl, at Naval Hospital Bremerton. Lea Keyes knew such a day would be forthcoming from the start of the season. Despite several anxious moments, she never gave up faith that her team, the Seattle Seahawks, would make it to the Super Bowl. Nor did a number of other NHB sta members, who gathered for an impromptu photo opportunity on the last work day before the Super Bowl to collectively show their team colors, spirit and support for the game Feb. 2, against the Denver Broncos. It was really fun here to see how many people showed up this morning, said Keyes, medical support assistant for Family Practice and Immunizations Clinic, who tastefully decorated her work area with Seattle Seahawks memorabilia that she attests has been given approval by beneciaries checking in for their appointments. Our guests seem to enjoy the Seahawks display at the desk as they check in. I have not even had any other team fans indicate that it was not a good idea! One of the reasons I decorate my back wall is for conversation starters, and it always seems to be a good point in common that encourages comment and discussion, Keyes said. e Seattle Seahawks logo design the eyes, beak and the neck of the Seahawk was originally introduced in 1975, and has incorporated elements from the Pacic Northwest indigenous Haida and Kwakiutl coastal nations. Along with the Haida eagle and Haida eye, the ercely-looking Seahawk look also has been inuenced by several aspects of Egyptian mythology such as the falcon and eye of Horus. Although not an exact replica of any specic Haida or Kwakiutl style, the design has won over the fans who now proudly sport the logo and support their team. Oh yeah, our logo is denitely the best. It encapsulates all that makes the Puget Sound great, such as the art of the native culture, the fact we have eagles and Seahawks, and the blue, green, and grey that makes up the natural beauty, Keyes said. Up Periscope Outstanding individuals in Black History Page 9 NJROTC Future leaders visit Kings Bay EOD Pages 4, 5 Soccer MWR T-Ball, youth, adult soccer coming Page 11Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bays RV Park like home to New York couple Retirement comes as a very just reward to most hardworking Americans. Its a wonderful time to slow down, pick up hobbies, enjoy relationships and focus on liv ing life. ats exactly what Elaine and Phil Marasco have done. At the end of every fall, Elaine packs up the RV while Phil ensures every drop of water is out of the pipes in their Upstate New York home. ese snow birds migrate straight here to their favorite winter home, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Eagle Hammock RV Park. ey arrive and once water, sewer and electricity are connected, theyre almost home. eir winter hasnt really started until Elaine can connect back with her friends. So they head over to Navy-Ma rine Corps Relief Society. Elaine said she enjoys walk ing around the RV park for the rst time each winter and renewing acquantences.Snowbirds roosting at Eagle Hammock February marks focus on African American culture, accomplishmentse Navy joins our nation in celebrating the vibrant history and culture of African-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month throughout the month of February. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include the entire month of February. is year, Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate and reect on the theme Civil Rights in America. African-American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service that permeates naval history through every major armed conict since the Revolutionary War. During the Civil War, African-American Sailors fought on every kind of Union warship, accounting for 10 to 24 percent of each ships crew, and included eight Medal of Honor recipients. During World War II, the Golden irteen were an example of African-Americans breaking new ground in the Navy and in American society. In February 1944, 12 prior-enlisted black servicemen were commissioned as ensigns and a 13th was made a warrant ocer. ey were the rst group of black servicemen to complete ocer training in the Navy and led the way for future African-Americans. Navy celebrates Black History Obama covers issuesTouches on ash points during State of Union addressWhile President Barack Obamas State of the Union speech Jan. 28 was dominated by domestic concerns, he also addressed national security concerns. Tonight, because of the extraordinary troops and civilians who risk and lay down their lives to keep us free, the United States is more secure, Obama told members of the House and Senate and other government leaders gathered in the House of Representatives chamber. e president touted his eorts to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. When he took oce in January 2009, he noted, 180,000 Americans were serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, the war in Iraq is over and the war in Afghanistan is entering its nal months. All of the troops are out of Iraq, and 60,000 Americans have been withdrawn from Afghanistan, with about 38,000 Americans still serving in the country. With Afghan forces now in the lead for their own security, our troops have moved to a support role, Obama said. Together with our allies, we will complete our mission there by the end of this year, and Americas longest war will nally be over. Next year, the United States will continue to support a unied Afghanistan, he said. If the Afghan government signs a security agreement that we have negotiated, a small force of Americans could remain in Afghanistan with NATO allies to carry out two narrow missions: training and assisting Afghan forces, and counterterrorism operations to pursue any remnants of al-Qaida, Obama said. For while our relationship with Afghanistan will change, one thing will not: our resolve that terrorists do not launch attacks against our country. It is still a dangerous world, the president said. While we have put al-Qaidas NH Bremerton fans in Seahawk heaven

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 e Keep What Youve Earned campaign released its latest testimonial video Jan. 29 as part of a series featuring Sailors personal stories about how alcohol incidents impacted their careers, and the importance of drinking responsibly. e latest video features Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Kathryn Cummings from Naval Operational Support Center Norfolk. She shares how a personal hardship led to destructive drinking habits and excessive alcohol use. Struggling with personal issues, Cummings thought that a night of heavy drinking would be just what she needed, but a night of binge drinking led to even more trouble this time with her career. In the newly released video, Cummings says she thought she did everything right. She called a taxi and got home safe. However, her decision to binge drink still aected her career when she was late to work and received a t for duty screening. After failing her screening, Cum mings was referred to her command Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Pro gram and got the help she needed. She now has regular meetings with her command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor, Chief Personnel Specialist Howard Dickerson, who said that Cummings is a stellar Sailor who strives to be an example to others. Responsible drinking is so important especially these days where everyone is competing to stay in (the Navy), said Cummings. She now spends her time working out, volunteering and hanging out with more responsible friends. According to the Center for Disease Control, binge drinking has become so common that more than half of alcohol consumption in the U.S. is in the form of binge drinking. We want Sailors to understand that we arent trying to stop them from drinking all together, but that if they choose to drink, we want them to do so responsibly, said Dorice Favorite, director of the Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Ofce. If a night of drinking aects your ability to show up for work and do your job, thats when we know there is a problem. Cummings testimonial is part of the Keep What Youve Earned video series. Each testimonial reminds Sailors of the importance of drinking responsibly and keeping what youve earned. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA e winter months are rolling by. As the mercury dips, some families, struggling to pay their heating bills, will turn on the kitchen stove burners and the oven in an eort to take the chill out of their home. What these families dont realize is how dangerous this practice can be. A gas oven or range top should never be used for heating. A re could start and poisonous carbon monoxide fumes could ll the home. Any fuel-burning heating equipment, such as replaces, furnaces, water heaters, space or portable heaters, generators and chimneys can produce carbon monoxide. According to the National Fire Protection Association there is an increased risk of dying in a home re during the winter season. December, January and February are generally the deadliest months for re. Also, hundreds of people die each year from unintentional CO poisoning. Fire departments responded to an estimated 61,000 CO incidents in 2011, a 9 percent increase from 2013. is excludes incidents where a re was present. Close to 90 percent of CO incidents occur in the home. Often called a silent killer, CO is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas created when fuels, such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil and methane, burn incompletely. CO enters the body through breathing. CO poisoning can be confused with u symptoms, food poisoning and other illnesses. Some symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, light headedness or headaches. Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning, but infants, pregnant women and people with physical conditions that limit their ability to use oxygen, such as emphysema, asthma or heart disease, can be more severely aected by low concentrations of CO than healthy adults. High levels of CO can be fatal for anyone, causing death within minutes. e goal of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fire Department is to reduce the number of carbon monoxide incidents and discourage anyone from using the range or oven to heat their home. Install CO alarms inside your home to provide early warning of accumulating CO. Have your heating equipment inspected by a professional every year before cold weather sets in. CO alarms are not substitutes for smoke alarms. Know the difference between the sound of smoke alarms and CO alarms. Test CO alarms at least once a month. If your CO alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location and call for help. Remain at the fresh air location until emergency personnel say it is okay. If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries or other trouble indicators. e Kings Bay Fire Department wants everyone to be warm and safe this winter. Make sure your home has carbon monoxide alarms. Heating safety Its a cold winter night. You decide to use a space heater, or perhaps light a re in the replace, to save on the heating bill. Comfortable from its warmth as bedtime approaches you think, What harm could it cause to leave it on overnight? ink again. While these heating devices may help you feel cozy and warm, they can become extremely dangerous if not used properly. Home heating equipment was involved in an estimated 62,000 home res in 2005, according to the nonprot NFPA. e cost of these res is more than just property damage. e cost includes roughly 700 lives and roughly 1,500 injuries. Home heating res are largely preventable when you know the rules. e majority of heating re deaths is caused by space heaters. Most heating res are caused by creosote build-up in the chimney. To help keep our community safe and warm this season, the Kings Bay Fire Department recommends that you follow these guidelines: Space heaters need space. Keep all things that can burn, such as paper, bedding or furniture, at least 3 feet away from heating equipment. Turn portable heaters o when you go to bed or leave the room. Plug power cords only into outlets with sucient capacity and never into an extension cord. Inspect for cracked, frayed or broken plugs or loose connections. Replace before using. Have your chimney inspected each year and cleaned if necessary. Use a sturdy replace screen. Allow ashes to cool before disposing. Dispose of ashes in a metal container. Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For the best protection interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home when one sounds, they all sound. Test smoke alarms at least once a month. Install and maintain a carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside each sleeping area. With simple precautions, help the KBFD meet its goal of decreasing home-heating res this winter. For more information, contact the Fire Prevention Oce at 573-9999. Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cmr. Robert E. Wirth is scheduled to be re lieved by Cmdr. Craig M. Gummer as com manding ocer of USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Gold) at 10 a.m., Feb.14 at the Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Chapel. Wirth has been in command since September 2011, serving dur ing four strategic deterrent patrols.e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will host Cmr. Rich ard Dubnansky, commanding ocer of USS Tennessee (Gold), at its regular meeting and dinner, starting at 6 p.m., ursday, Feb. 13, at Magnolias in the Kings Bay Conference Cen ter on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Dub nansky will update attendees on USS Tennes see Golds recent activities and achievements and speak about the challenges he faces at the helm of a major command in our nuclear triad. e public is invited to attend along with the regular membership. All attendees must send advance dinner payment ($25 per person) to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. e deadline to receive reservations is Monday, Feb. 10. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e names of all attendees must be sent in order to coordi nate base access. Additional information can be found at http://kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Activities in conjunction with the 114th Sub marine Birthday Ball are the following activities for Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay: Feb.14, starting at 10 a.m., a 5K Sweetheart Run at the base Fitness Center. Point of contact is MM1 Joseph Stockton at (912) 573-3905 or joseph.stockton@navy.mil March 14 a Golf Tournament at Trident Lakes Golf Clue. Point of contact is MT1 Adam Schumacher at (912) 573-3380 or adam.j.schumacher@navy.mil April 26, from 5 p.m. to midnight, the Sub Ball at Jacksonville Hyatt Regency Hotel. Points of contact are ETC Michael Steinhauer at (912) 573-8137 or mitchell.steinhauer@navy.mil; ETC Aaron Run at (912) 573-1499 or aaron. run@navy.mil; or Lt. Kelvin Rivera at (912) 573-3374 or kelvin.rivera@navy.mil TRICARE military health plan service centers will end administrative walk-in services at Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay April 1. Bene ciaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone. e change will not aect any TRICARE medical benet or health care service. What it will do is allow is allow global savings throughout the Department of Defense because all TRICARE service centers are closing in all three branches. About half of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers. e rest involve billing-related questions. is type of customer service can be handled more e ciently by phone or online. TRICARE Web site has run tests to ensure the site and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. Beneciaries can get more information and sign up for updates at www.tricare.mil/tsc.Wild West Express featuring sharpshooters and an Indian village will is Feb. 8. Trains de part from eatre by the Trax, 1000 Osborne St, St. Marys at 10 a.m., noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.stmarysrailroad.com or by calling (912) 200-5235.St. Marys 2014 Mardi Gras Festival March 1, will have a 10 a.m. parade, a 7 a.m. Color Run, a 11 a.m. chili cook-o and a 1 p.m. pet parade. Stage events run until 5 p.m. e evenings Mardi Gras Ball, with dinner and entertainment, is $35 per person. For parade participation information contact Carol Lanham at (912) 552-3313 and for vendor/sponsor information contact Once Upon A Bookseller at (912) 882-7350. For any additional information, contact the St. Marys Welcome Center at www.visitstmarys.com or (912) 882-4000.Kingslands Runabout In e Royal District Car Show, a lavish display of cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors, is March 15. Early registration for $20 to be in the show is through March 7 and $25 after to day of the show. For more information, visit www.kingslandgeorgia.com/DocumentCenter/View/1852. Now hear this! Carbon monoxide a silent killer NSB Fire Department Dont let alcohol impact your career Naval Personnel Some Veterans with traumatic brain injury who are diagnosed with any of ve other ailments will have an easier path to receive additional disability pay under new regulations developed by the Department of Veterans Aairs. e new regulation, which takes eect in January, impacts some Veterans living with TBI who also have Parkinsons disease, certain types of dementia, depression, unprovoked seizures or certain diseases of the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. We decide Veterans disability claims based on the best science available, said Secretary of Veterans Aairs Eric K. Shinseki. As scientic knowledge advances, VA will expand its programs to ensure Veterans receive the care and benets theyve earned and deserve. is regulation stems from a report of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine (IOM) regarding the association between TBI and the ve diagnosable illnesses. e IOM report, Gulf War and Health, Volume 7: Long-Term Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury, found sucient evidence to link moderate or severe levels of TBI with the ve ailments. e new regulations, printed in the Federal Register, say that if certain Veterans with service-connected TBI also have one of the ve illnesses, then the second illness will also be considered as service connected for the calculation of VA disability compensation. Eligibility for expanded benets will depend upon the severity of the TBI and the time between the injury causing the TBI and the onset of the second illness. However, Veterans can still le a claim to establish direct service-connection for these ailments even if they do not meet the time and severity standards in the new regulation. VA extends brain injury coverage Veterans Administration

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core leadership on a path to defeat, the threat has evolved, as al-Qaida aliates and other extremists take root in dierent parts of the world, he said. e threat remains in Yemen, Somalia, Iraq and Mali, and the United States must work with allies to disrupt and disable the terror networks. In Syria, well support the opposition that rejects the agenda of terrorist networks, the president said. Here at home, well keep strengthening our defenses, and combat new threats like cyberattacks. And as we reform our defense budget, we have to keep faith with our men and women in uniform, and invest in the capabilities they need to succeed in future missions. America must remain vigilant, the president said, and while the American military is the bedrock of security, it does not and cannot act alone. As commander in chief, I have used force when needed to protect the Ameri can people, and I will never hesitate to do so as long as I hold this oce, Obama said. But I will not send our troops into harms way unless its truly necessary, nor will I allow our sons and daughters to be mired in open-ended conicts. We must ght the battles that need to be fought, not those that terrorists prefer from us largescale deployments that drain our strength and may ultimately feed extremism. e United States will continue to aggressively pursue terrorist networks through more targeted eorts and by building the capacity of foreign partners, Obama said. e United States must move o a permanent war footing, the president emphasized. ats why Ive imposed prudent limits on the use of drones, for we will not be safer if people abroad believe we strike within their countries without regard for the consequence, he said. ats why, working with this Congress, I will reform our surveillance programs, because the vital work of our intelligence community depends on public condence, here and abroad, that the privacy of ordinary people is not being violated. e president also called on Congress to lift the remaining restrictions on detainee transfers and allow the administration to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. is is needed, Obama said, because we counter terrorism not just through intelligence and military action, but by remaining true to our constitutional ideals, and setting an example for the rest of the world. e president said the diplomatic power of the United States, backed by the threat of force, is why Syrias chemical weapons are being eliminated, and we will continue to work with the international community to usher in the future the Syrian people deserve, a future free of dictatorship, terror and fear. American diplomacy has halted the progress of Irans nuclear program and rolled parts of that program back for the very rst time in a decade, the president said. e United Nations sanctions helped to make this opportunity possible, the president said. e president vowed to slash the backlog of disability claims at the Veterans Affairs Department and to continue eorts to help veterans returning to civilian life. Well keep working to help all our veterans translate their skills and leadership into jobs here at home, he said. And we all continue to join forces to honor and support our remarkable military families. ese 13 ocers not only made a contribution to the Navy during World War II, but to society as well. By the end of the war, 64 African-Americans had become ocers in the Navy. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African-American Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the rst black graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He passed away May 22, 2012 after a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian workforce. Edna Young was the rst black woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the rst black woman to achieve the rank of chief petty ocer. Young joined the Navy after the passage of the Womens Armed Services Integration Act July 7, 1948. In December 1996, Adm. J. Paul Reason became the rst black naval ocer to wear four stars and assumed command of the Atlantic Fleet, comprising nearly 200 warships, 1,400 aircraft, and 122,000 service men and women based at 18 major shore facilities. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard is recognized for many rst accomplishments, including the recognition as the rst female United States Naval Academy graduate to be promoted to the rank of admiral, the rst black female to command a combatant ship, and the rst black female promoted to two-star and three-star admiral. She has also been conrmed by the Senate to serve as Vice Chief of Naval Operations, the services No. 2 uniformed ofcer. She will be the rst black and rst woman to hold the job and the rst female four-star admiral. ese outstanding examples of African-American Sailors are just a handful of those marking history with rsts and distinguishing the Navy as a force for freedom and equality. African-Americans continue to serve with distinction, now comprising more than 17 percent of our active duty Navy total force end-strength. UnionMonth THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 NJROTC Tours Navy photos By MC2 Ashley Hedrick

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At the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, experts in the emotional toll of disasters help the Defense Department, government agencies and rst responders worldwide understand how best to help communities struck by terrorist attacks, mass casualties and natural disasters. e center is part of the psychiatry department at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md. e USUHS serves the Army, Navy, Air Force and U.S. Public Health Service by educating health professionals for DOD and USPHS career service. e center was established essentially to address concerns by the Department of Defense about psychological impacts and health consequences that might result from the potential use of weapons of mass destruction during combat [and] acts of terrorism or hostage events, Dr. Joshua C. Morganstein told American Forces Press Service during a recent interview. Morganstein, a commander in the Public Health Service, is an assistant professor in the USUHS psychiatry department and a scientist at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. ere was growing interest by DOD in the general psychological impact and health consequences resulting from a broad category of traumatic events, he said, including peacekeeping missions, operations other than war, and natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis. DOD also was interested in more common stressproducing events like physical assaults or boat, plane and car accidents for uniformed and civilian communities, he said. e center was established in 1987 as part of the USUHS psychiatry department. Since its inception the center has been run by department chairman Dr. Robert Ursano, who Mor ganstein said is internation ally renowned in the eld of disaster psychiatry, which diers from general psychiatry in important ways. Traditional psychiatry is, for the most part, hospital or clinic based, taking place in a traditional treatment setting and generally one on one to focus on problems that an individual has sought care for, Army Col. (Dr.) David M. Benedek told American Forces Press Service. Benedek is associate director for consultation and education at the center, and professor and deputy chairman of the USUHS psychiatry department. Disaster psychiatry is an eort to target the range of possible responses to a disaster without people necessarily seeking care, he said, adding that the population-based approach in disaster psychiatry is to do things that help all people regardless of whether they have identied themselves as having an illness or as needing mental health care. Benedek and Morganstein explained that a key element underlying disaster response is a set of principles that together are known as psychological rst aid. ese ve early intervention principles promote a sense of safety by helping people meet basic needs for food and shelter, promote connectedness by keeping families together, promote self-assurance by giving practical suggestions that help people help themselves, promote hope by directing people to government and other kinds of services, and promote calming by being friendly and compassionate even if people are being dicult. Examples of what not to do, according to the centers fact sheet, include not forcing people to share their stories, not giving simple reassurances such as Everything will be all right, not making promises that may not be kept, and not criticizing existing services or relief activities. Psychological rst aid, Morganstein said, is designed to encourage health-seeking and decrease the incidence of more severe psychiatric symptoms or emotions and distress behaviors in the wake of a disaster. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, the scientist added, people really sought Dr. Ursano out to address the impact of that event and the nations need for disaster planning and preparedness for future events. In 2003, the center, whose multidisciplinary team had expertise in disaster psychiatry, military medicine and psychiatry, social and organizational psychology, neuroscience, family violence, workplace preparedness and public education, established an Oce of Public Education and Preparedness. Before this, Morganstein said, Dr. Ursano and other senior leaders here at the center played a role during disasters [like the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine, the 1988 Lockerbie, Scotland, Pan ight 103 jumbo jet crash, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States]. ey provided expertise, consultation and spoke with people about the best evidence for managing psychiatric aspects of a disaster scenario. But the center needed a better way than individual consultation to get its expert information out to more people aected by disasters and to those involved in disaster response, he said. An answer to this, and part of the new oces multipronged approach to education and outreach is producing and disseminating rapid-response fact sheets tailored to ongoing situations such as last years Navy Yard shootings. e fact sheets get information out there to [the DOD and military mental health leadership], potential patients or aected public, [health care providers] and other people who are in a position to provide leadership and guidance, Benedek said. e goal, Morganstein added, is to oer educational resources to a wide range of folks who might potentially benet from this information in response to a disaster thats happening. During the Navy Yard event, the center got a request from the District of Columbias mental health department to consult with its leaders, and from the mental health team lead from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center that augmented Navy medicines SPRINT team response, Morganstein said. One of the personnel from our center, a Public Health ocer, was asked to participate in the onthe-ground behavioral health response, he said. en we had about a 12hour turnaround where, based on the information as it rapidly evolved, we decided on what would be relevant issues to the military, the D.C. government and rst responders. Fact sheets were tailored to issues unique to an active-shooter situation on a military installation in which many people were killed, the shooter was killed, and challenges likely would arise as the D.C. government and the Defense Department worked through managing a response to people on the base and in the local community, he said. e fact sheets were developed, reviewed by center subject-matter experts and then disseminated to key leaders in DOD and the D.C. government, the services mental health leadership, and organizations such as the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the USPHS leadership and others. at was the rst 12 to 18 hours after the news broke of the shooting as we watched it unfold, Morganstein said. e centers consultive services and educational products such as fact sheets, written in language everyone can understand, help to ll a longstanding gap in medical education. Because disaster psychiatry is not something that over the past several decades has gotten a lot of education, Morganstein said, it isnt built into the curricula of behavioral health or medical providers not even in DOD, and certainly not in the civilian sector. Receiving such disasterspecic information can be a paradigm shift for health providers, he added, because what were saying to a psychiatrist or a psychologist, for instance, is the therapy you spent years learning to give and the medicines you spent years learning to prescribe may not necessarily be the most important tool in your arsenal right now. S till, Benedek said, many training programs increasingly recognize the need, in mental health and across medical disciplines, for specic disaster training. Certainly, weve been advocating that in academic channels and have published on the need for the development of an academic disaster curriculum, he said, adding that the USUHS psychiatry department oers a disaster fellowship for one or two students a year. e post-graduate training program is open to psychiatrists and some internists who ultimately receive a masters degree in public health and then participate in rotations with agencies committed to disaster response. As far as we know, its the only disaster fellowship, Benedek added, but other residency programs are developing at least some training in this area for their psychiatric residents. In late March, for example, by joint invitation from Sheppard Pratt Health System and the University of Maryland, Morganstein will present a half-day seminar on disaster psychiatry for fourthyear residents from both institutions. Were interested in partnering more widely in this region to begin with, Morganstein said, and potentially creating an educational curriculum for psychiatry residents and expanding that potentially even further. Agencies such as the Red Cross, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association disseminate disaster information, Benedek said, but particularly in the last ve or six years, medical training programs have recognized the need to for curricula. One such organization is the National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, established in 2008 by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 21 as an academic center of excellence in disaster medicine and public health. e NCDMPH, also aliated with USUHS, initially developed a curriculum for responding to childrens needs during disasters, Morganstein said, then partnered with the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress to develop a behavioral health curriculum toolkit called Curriculum Recommendations for Disaster Health Professionals: Disaster Behavioral Health, published this month. Benedek said the new center, the fellowship at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, and increasing interest in disaster-focused health curricula all are evidence that awareness of the need for such training is growing nationwide. e lengthy conicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have certainly brought to the surface the reality of the emotional consequences of traumatic exposures, he said. Certainly, at military and governmental levels theres an awareness that bad events exact a psycho logical toll, Benedek add ed, and theres a need for a response to those events and training to develop an appropriate and rational re sponse across populations. DoD pursuing study of disaster psychiatry Payments to service members for Personally Procured Moves, formerly known as Do-it-Yourself or DITY moves, will be received sooner via Electronic Funds Transfer to service members checking or savings accounts, Naval Supply Systems Command ocials anounced Jan. 17. Right now, it takes about 7 to 10 days for a Sailor to receive a compensatory check for a PPM. EFTs process quickly, and can get money to a Sailor in less than half the time, said Naval Supply Systems Command Commander Rear Adm. Jonathan Yuen. e current business process is costly and time consuming. It makes nancial sense for the Navy and benets our Sailors wallets to move to EFTs, Yuen said. e Navy PPM checklist is being updated to include instructions along with a form that allows service members to safely and securely provide their electronic funds payment information as part of the PPM process, said NAVSUP Household Goods Director Francis Piacine. Payment by EFT is currently voluntary and will remain so until April 1, when it becomes mandatory for all Navy members performing a full or partial PPM. e new capability was developed by NAVSUP in partnership with the Defense Finance and Accounting Service. Sailors to get payments faster 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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(I) really looks forward to connecting with friends here, she said. Eagle Hammock RV park ranks highly with parks on other military bases. e concrete pads are nice and big. e laundry room is clean and new, with free machines. e community room is warm and inviting. e park sta plans social ac tivities and residents have access to a lake and trails. Its amenities like these that got Phil and Elaine coming here the year it opened in 2008. But its not why they think about Kings Bay all year long. Elaine couldnt explain enough the feeling she gets in helping helping military members through NMCRS. Being able to connect with them when they come in is so rewarding, she said. ey are always show grat itude. ey are so thankful. You always feel like thats something. at something is the reason their time in Kings bay makes their retirement not just relaxing but enrich ing. Elaine said she cherishes the community and the feeling volunteering gives the couple. Phil is happy to use his military organi zational skills at the golf course, but whats to do more. He wants to connect more excited volunteers with worthwhile needs on base. Are you interested in vol unteering? If so, contact the public aairs oce at (912) 573-4714.Eagle So, exactly what type of bird is the Seahawk? Its an osprey, a sizable bird of prey that is valued and respected much as the bald eagle is by the Native American tribes. In a number of coastal Native American nations throughout the greater Puget Sound region where ospreys are most com monly seen, the birds are revered for their guardian roles in traditional legends. It is said that seeing one is sometimes considered to be a warning of danger to come. Even the blue-green color scheme of the Seattle Seahawks is symbolically used in Haida culture. Ive been following the team since before 2006 and was super excited back then, Keyes said. ere is a big dierence though as weve decided to assertively pursue our goal, instead of playing our hearts out and hope for the best. We are far more willing to make things happen through interceptions and turnovers this year. ats what will win the championship, in my opinion. ere were a few Denver Bronco fans who also showed up for the group photo opportunity. My husband has always been a Bronco fan, said Capt. Iris Boehnke, NHB director of Nursing Services. I can remember when we were dating we would go watch them when we were at Pensacola and in Maryland. I support him supporting them and the game itself doesnt really hold my interest but Ill watch it for the commercials.Seahawk THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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Jackie Robinson is recognized for breaking baseballs color barrier in 1947. And rightfully so. He is a civil rights icon, and today is the only player to have his number retired by every team. But before the color barrier was put in place, African-American Bud Fowler played with white teams in 21 states and territories, starting with Lynn, Mass., of the International Association, in 1978. This pioneer was a pitcher, catcher and infielder, but not a lot more is really known about him. Today, hes somewhat forgotten. Then, last year Baseball Hall of Fame hometown Cooperstown, N.Y., named a street, Bud Fowler Way, in his honor. Special people for Black History MonthET3 Bethany Larson NSB Kings Bay Ida, Mich. Rosa Parks. She was brave for standing up . well, technically for sitting down. Alice Simmons Retired Navy Tallahassee, Fla. Harriet Tubman. She risked her life to give others the chance of freedom and they helped others, like a chain reaction. HM2 Siviquallie Richardson Branch Health Clinic Detroit George Washington Carver and the scientific work he did with peanuts and cotton. MT3 Cordaro Hilton-Washington USS Rhode Island Gold Indianapolis Nelson Mandella. He is the epitome of peace after all he went through. EM3 Alexander Wynn USS Florida Blue Calhoon, Ga. Harriet Tubman. She helped emancipate a lot of slaves. HM3 Charles Shelton Branch Health Clinic Oklahoma City, Okla. Clara Luper from Muskogee, Oklahoma, the mother of Oklahoma civil rights. The civil rights movement started in Oklahoma at Kats Cafe. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Players in this years Super Bowl set aside time before Sundays game to thank members of the U.S. military, particularly those who are deployed and stationed abroad, for their sacrices while defending the nation. I want to tell all the troops over there in Afghanistan how much we appreciate what theyre doing for our country to protect our country, said Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning. We are praying for you. Manning and other players from the Denver Broncos and their Super Bowl rivals, the Seattle Seahawks expressed their gratitude for troops serving to protect their freedoms during shout-outs this week. ank you all for all you do, Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker said. You are the reason we have the opportunity to play this game, so thank you. ank you for everySuper Bowl players thankful for military THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 10 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. A five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 10 to 14. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783. A job search workshop will be 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. The Advanced/Refresher training is for all individuals that are current Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates. This training is applicable to the 32 hour bi-annual training requirement. The individuals attending are appointed by their Command and will represent the Command in all assigned sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4p.m., Feb. 19. Registration is required by calling (912) 573-4512. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19. For more information, call 573-4513. The target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 19. Registration recommended, call 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship training to all command representatives. The goal of the workshop is to ensure that designated command personnel have the necessary education and training to successfully fulfill the role of command sponsor. It presents an overview of the benefits of sponsorship, a list of sponsor duties and responsibilities, and a timeline to assist in streamlining the sponsorship process. The workshop is scheduled on 1 to 2:30 p.m., Feb. 20. Registration is required as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 573-4513. Events, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. There will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Frb. 21 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life to improve their marital rela tionship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 24 to 28. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 5 to 7 p.m., Feb. 26. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops

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Morale, Welfare and Recreations Intramural 7-vs.-7 Outdoor Soccer League begins Feb. 18, with a fee of $100 for active duty members and $150 for DoD members. e captains meeting is at 5 p.m., Wed., Feb. 12, inside the Fitness Complex classroom. For more information, call (912) 409-1611. Spring Adventure Festival Driathlon It starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, March 22 at Etowah Park and ends at Lake D Fun. The driathlon includes orienteering, running, biking and paddling. Register at the Fitness Complex. Cost is $15 for each team of two and includes T-shirts. All twoperson teams must complete all events together and all bike types are welcome. Limited to 15 teams per wave. Call Navy Adventures Unleashed for more details at (912) 573-8972. Cupids Couples Challenge Its 9 to 11 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 12 at the Fitness Complex Racquetball Court No. 6, in Buidling 1034. No registration required. With a partner, complete a series of exercises that will challenge your physical and collaborative skills as a couple. e challenge will take no longer than 15 minutes. Two convenient walk-in time slots are available. e winning couple will receive a gift certificate for dinner for two. Call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990 for more details. Kings Bay is going to Tampa for a hockey game, the Tampa Bay Lightning against the Boston Bruins leaving here at 1:45 p.m., Saturday, March 8. Charter bus transportation will be provided. Cost is $45 per person, 18 years old and older, with a $40 special price for liberty single active duty. Pre-pay at ITT/OAC by Feb.14 COB. Bring money for food and souvenirs. For more information, call Navy Adventures Unleashed at (912) 573-8972. DIY and Dessert This new program is offered on at 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 10 in the Kings Bay Conference Center. Its a Pinterest Idea Swap plus more. Feed your crafty side and create a Valentine sugar scrub favor. Cost is $5. RSVP by Feb. 7 by Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings T-Ball, Soccer signups Liberty call Outdoor soccer coming Youth Spring Registration for Soccer and T-Ball is start ing. Smart Registration is 8 a.m. to weekdays, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 10 to Feb. 28 at Youth Center, plus 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 1. A $5 late fee will apply if openings are still available after March 1. The cost is $60 active duty and reservists and $65 retired military and DoD civilians. Age control date is Jan. 1, 2014 for all youth sports. For soccer, ages 4 to 18 and must still be in high school, must turn 4 prior to Jan 1, 2014 and must not turn 19 prior to Jan 1, 2014. T-Ball, ages 4 6, must turn 4 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 7 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. The Start Smart Sports Development Program is for ages 3 to 5. You must turn 3 prior to Jan. 1, 2014 and must not turn 6 prior to Jan. 1, 2014. Its free, with limited spots available. Start Smart is a six-week instructional program that helps parents work one-on-one with their chil dren, while teaching them the basics of sports throwing, catching, kicking and batting. The program helps prepare children for organized youth sports by using safe and fun equipment to teach them the basic motor skills needed to compete. For more details contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend The 1 p.m. movies are Turbo Feb. 15 and 16, The Smurfs 2 (Monday) Feb. 17, and Ghostbusters Feb. 22 and 23. Youth under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one else comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Just for kids Intramural Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 calling (912) 573-8999. Unleash your Inner Beast Navy Adventures Unleashed goes skiing in Gatlinburg, Tenn., the long weekend of Feb. 14 to 17. One Day Ski is $190, One Day Snowboarding is $210, Two Day Ski is $250 or Two Day Snowboarding is $280. A deposit of $75 is due on Jan. 15 with balance due on Feb. 7. Cost includes transportation, hotel, tram tickets, ski lift, rentals plus one lesson. Participants must bring own money for food and souvenirs. Trippers will leave Big EZ on Friday, Feb. 14 at 4 p.m. For more information, contact NAU at (912) 573-8972. Triplex is coming Its a new year and the renovation and rebranding of Bldg.1039 is under way! The first phase of the renovation started Jan. 13 inside the The Billiard Zone. For your safety dur ing renovations, MWR will place a temporary wall. You will still be able to get snacks and refresh ments from the counter area. Access to other areas of the facility will be lim ited to each entrance. The Liberty side, with comput ers and gaming, will only be accessible through the entrance by the Library. The Big EZ entrance will be the snack bar and Sports Zone entrance and the Conference Center can only be accessed through the main lobby entrance by the Magnolia sign. Ten Dollar Tuesday at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Its 5 to 9 p.m., Tuesday nights. $10 will get you shoes and all the bowling you can handle. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos.MWR Region tutors students Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast participated in a student enrichment day and provided one-on-one tutoring with students at Mattie V. Rutherford Alternative Middle School in Jacksonville, Fla., recently. During the volunteer effort, Sailors tutored sixth, seventh and eighth-grade students in math and reading, and helped faculty members supervise a basketball game. It was the latest in a series of events conducted under an ocial partnership between CNRSE and MVR. e partnership benets our students because they can build relationships with adults who are successful and are making good choices, said Sadie Milliner-Smith, the schools principal. Our goal is to create a safe environment that is conducive for learning. Many of our students come here with a lot of challenges, and we provide personal, social and academic strategies that students can use to address those challenges. e one-on-one tutoring the Sailors provide to the students aords them an opportunity to connect with an adult in a dierent way than they might be able to with their teachers. As an alternative school, MVR currently enrolls 96 students who have made poor educational and social decisions many of which have been involved in disciplinary incidents at school, at home or in the community. Students are assigned to the school for a minimum of 45 days with the goal of helping them develop positive strategies to resolve conicts while providing a challenging academic setting. ose who accomplish these goals return to their primary school. As principal, MillinerSmith said she is committed to creating and maintaining an orderly, trusting and caring environment to assist students as they develop into both productive and responsible citizens. According to Chief Quartermaster Joseph Ziro, lead coordinator for the CNRSE-MVR partnership, the school oers a unique opportunity for Sailors to have a signicant impact on community youth. I think we can really make a dierence here because it is an opportunity to be a positive role model for some good kids that may have made some bad decisions, Ziro said. Having been here and interacted with many of them, I can tell you that their potential is unlimited. Our goal is to try to help them realize that potential through some positive guidance and mentorship. Tandra Wade, who teaches eighth-grade geometry, algebra and prealgebra, agreed with Ziro. I think the students can recognize the honor in the fact that these service members are taking time out of their busy day to be here, Wade said. Working with them can help them understand what it means to be accountable and will also instill the message that they too can be successful if they make the right decisions. One student was very appreciative for the opportunity to receive oneon-one tutoring. Tavian Randall, a student in Wades eighthgrade geometry class, said he looks forward to similar events in the future. It really helped me to understand math, Tavian said. He truly explained how to do the work and answered all of my questions. I would like to see them come back every other week. Navy Counselor 1st Class Vladimir Arias-Martinez, who tutored Tavian during the visit, said the experience was mutually rewarding. Its a really gratifying experience to have the opportunity to come out and help these kids grow from an educational standpoint, Arias said. I support these kinds of volunteer outings whenever I can because, as members of the military, we have a chance to positively inuence the community. As a Sailor, thats an opportunity that I dont think we should shy away from. e ongoing leaks of classied documents by former National Security Agency contractor Edward J. Snowden amount to the most massive and damaging theft of intelligence in our history, the director of national intelligence told Congress Jan. 29. James R. Clapper delivered the assessment as he and other ocials from the intelligence and law enforcement communities briefed the Senate Intelligence Committee on worldwide threats to the nation, from ongoing espionage and cyber operations by an assertive Russia and a competitive China to more diversied threats posed by al-Qaida and other terror groups that have beneted from the Snowden disclosures about sources and methods, making them harder to track. Seven months after Snowden gave documents about the NSAs highly classied metadata and eavesdropping programs to several newspapers, the nations top intelligence ocer described the profound damage that his disclosures have caused and continue to cause, which he said has left the nation less safe and its people less secure. As a result, weve lost critical foreign intelligence collection sources, including some shared with us by valued partners, he said. Terrorists and other adversaries of this country are going to school on U.S. intelligence sources, methods and tradecraft, and the insights they are gaining are making our job much, much harder. Snowden has been charged with espionage and stealing government property, and he remains a fugitive from justice in Russia, where he has been granted temporary asylum. Clapper would not say during the hearing whether he believes the Russian government has gained access to the Snowden trove, saying that question should be addressed in a classied setting. While a range of threats including counterintelligence eorts by China and Russia to a more diuse and, therefore, harder to track al-Qaida were listed as leading security threats, concerns about the Snowden leaks overshadowed the hearing, with Clapper calling on the former contractor to return the classied documents and prevent more damage to national security. Army Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn, Defense Intelligence Agency director, characterized the disclosures as grave, with the consequences likely to prove deadly to American forces someday. We will likely face the cost in human lives on tomorrows battleeld or in some place where we will put our military forces, he said. Overall, Clapper said, the leaks and the allegations of abuse of intelligence that they generated, as well as furloughs, government shutdowns and salary freezes have taken a toll on those who have done their utmost to protect this country and do so in a lawful manner. In addition, he warned the diminished morale and resources of the intelligence community will have a corresponding eect on national security. e impact of the losses caused by the disclosures will be amplied by the substantial budget reductions were incurring, he said. e stark consequences of this perfect storm are plainly evident. e intelligence community is going to have less capacity to protect our nation, and its allies, than weve had. e hearing also touched on risks to national security posed by the civil war in Syria, which Clapper said has become a huge magnet for extremists who are getting training to go back to their countries and conduct more terrorist acts. e intelligence community estimates that more than 7,000 foreign ghters from 50 countries have gone to Syria since the start of the civil war, he said. One issue of concern to lawmakers was security for the Winter Olympics that open in Sochi, Russia, next week, given several recent suicide bombings in the region and the history of unrest in the Caucuses in general. National Counterterrorism Center Director Matthew G. Olsen said the United States remains very focused on the problem of terrorism in southern Russia, but he characterized an uptick in threats related to the games as what we expected, given where the Olympics are located. e Russian government, he said, understands the threats and has devoted substantial resources to security. e greater threat is to softer targets in the greater Sochi area and in the outskirts, he said, where there is a substantial potential for a terrorist attack.Leak damage massive

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13 A Navy chief, assigned to Center for Security Forces Detachment Chesapeake, was scheduled to undergo a bone marrow aspiration procedure Jan. 28, in a seless act to reach out and save the life of someone in dire need. e C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program, also known as Salute to Life, was established in 1991. e program is designed to work exclusively with DoD personnel in managing bone marrow and stem cell donations. e program has suc cessfully coordinated more than 6,000 dona tions. It also has more than 800-thousand people who have joined the registry through the program people who stand ready and willing to help save the life of someone in need. At some point in his career, Chief Boatswains Mate Michael R. Kelly underwent DNA testing to see if he would be a possible match for someone needing a bone marrow transplant. Last December, he was found to be a perfect match for a middle-aged male who suers from a condition known as multiple myeloma. Once I got the information, I really wanted to do this because the person [I am helping] is only one year older than my father and I know how I would feel if I were that persons son and so, I knew I wanted to do it, Kelly said. e American Cancer Society reports multiple myeloma is a cancer formed by malignant plasma cells. ese malignant cells can crowd out normal blood-forming cells in the bone marrow and cause low red and white cell blood counts. A shortage of red blood cells, known as anemia, causes a person to become pale, weak, and fatigued as well as cause increased bleeding and bruising. A shortage of white blood cells can diminish a persons immune system and impair a persons ability to ght o infection. When I told my wife, she was hesitant when she talked to the [coordinator] because she was told I would be hurting, in a lot of pain, and that a lot of people [choose] not to do it..., but its for a good cause, said Kelly. ere are two procedures for donating bone marrow being the traditional and the peripheral blood stem cell process. Due to the specic needs of the bone marrow recipient, Kelly will need to undergo the traditional procedure. In this procedure, the needed marrow is extracted by using needles inserted through two small incisions. e needles penetrate the soft center of the patients hipbone where a large deposit of bone marrow is located in the human body. e entire process takes about an hour and a half. I mean an hour and a half to save someones life or possibly extend it a little bit longer, Kelly said, pointing out how a minimal investment of ones time can save the life of someone else. Kelly went on to explain that after the procedure, he will not be able to move a lot, he will have a great deal of stiness in his back, and would be on medication that promotes increased production of bone marrow for about two or three days. e program also keeps the personal information about donors and patients condential and as for Kelly, the only thing he knows about the person he is helping is the individual is a middle-aged male suering multiple myeloma. e biggest fear is ret ribution because there are scandalous people. [People who would say], Hey, I just saved your life, you owe me XYZ amount of money... or theyll try to go after the family, explained Kelly on why condential ity is so important. Kelly shared that donors are required to wait a period of one year before they can request any contact with marrow recipients. If desired, the program coordinator will then contact the recipient to determine whether he or she also desires contact. If so, a meeting is then arranged and if not, anonymity between the two is maintained. However, recipients, unlike donors, can request contact at any time though the same rule applies if the donor desires to keep his or her anonymity. Asked if there was any advice he would like to oers his fellow Sailors in the eet Kelly said, If you have the opportunity [to save a life], take it I mean if you can save someones life other than giving blood then you should. Look at your [own] family because it may be your mom or dad, you wife or your kids [who one day needs help]. e National Marrow Donor Program reports more than 12,000 people are diagnosed with diseases that require an infusion of stem cells every year. More than half of those diagnosed are unable to nd a suitable donor match within their own family. erefore, those individuals must rely on the compassionate giving of a non-related donor, like Kelly, who is willing to step out and save a life. Chief acts beyond duty Two tankers who as young men could have squared o against each other on the East German border sat in the Russian Embassy in Brussels, Belgium, Jan. 21 and talked about ways their two nations could cooperate. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, met his Russian counterpart, Gen. Valery V. Gerasimov, with an eye to improving the military-tomilitary relations between the two nations. Dempsey spoke of the shared military history of the two nations and proposed a ceremony to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the meeting of the U.S. and Russian armies at Torgau, Germany, in April 1945. at meeting sealed the defeat of Nazi Germany. On political tracks, the U.S.-Russia relationship is a bit bumpy, but on the military track, Dempsey noted, there are ways these two powerful forces can cooperate. I always nd it encouraging when I can meet with my counterparts especially the most inuential militarily around the world, the chairman said following the meeting. I was encouraged by his candor and his warmth in seeking to nd ways that we can continue to advance the issues where we agree and where we can contribute to resolving those on which we disagree. e two men also signed the 2014 Work Plan for the nations. It was the rst time the chiefs of defense signed such a document. We felt it important enough to come together and do it ourselves, Dempsey said. e Work Plan calls for 67 activities in which military personnel from both countries will work together. ese are generally sta exercises, not maneuver exercises, although there are maneuver exercises in all domains air, land, sea, the chairman said during an earlier interview. Maneuver exercises tend to be small battalion level or below. Some areas of disagreement exist between the two militaries, and ballistic missile defense tops that list. Russia is opposed to ballistic missile defense for political and technical reasons. But Im encouraged, because were still talking about it, Dempsey said. e alternative would be we would all go our separate ways and we would generate another form of an arms race on that particular issue, and nobody wants that. e points of disagreement have never driven us to the point in our milto-mil contacts where we cant have the conversation, Dempsey added. e chairman said he believes there is still room for a better understanding not only about the technical capabilities related to missile defense, but also the threat and our intentions vis--vis our allies and protecting ourselves. But the nations agree on Afghanistan. We agree that a stable Afghanistan and an Afghanistan that is not a sanctuary for terrorism is in our common interests, the chairman said. ey are concerned that if the Afghan security forces dont continue to receive a certain amount of support, and if the environment in Afghanistan deteriorates to the point where the central government cant control, or at least inuence, events, they are concerned it will destabilize fairly quickly. [e Russians] are supportive of our continued presence there. e Russians asked a number of questions about U.S. retrograde activities from Afghanistan, Dempsey said, to gauge how quickly events in Afghanistan could change. In their view, he added, it does relate to the amount of structure that NATO continues to provide there. e Russians are looking for a tipping point in Afghanistan, the general said. ey didnt share what they thought the tipping point is, he continued, but in their view, there clearly is one. Other areas of mutual interest include antipiracy and counterterrorism efforts and Arctic issues. e two men also discussed security at the upcoming Sochi Winter Olympic Games. e Russian military is working in support of civilian security organizations, and Dempsey heard Gerasimovs assessment of the task. e Russian armed forces are bringing unique military capabilities to the eort, he said, including air defense, the maritime domain, chemical and biological defense, backup medical support for civilian authorities, management of the electronic spectrum and electronic warfare and the like. I reiterated the fact that we would favorably consider requests from them, Dempsey said. In a statement released yesterday, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said U.S. commanders in the region are conducting prudent planning and preparations should support be required. Air and naval assets, including two Navy ships in the Black Sea, will be available if requested for all manner of contingencies in support of and in consultation with the Russian government, Kirby said, noting that there is no such requirement at this time. No matter where the Olympics were being held this year, it would be a problem, Dempsey said, as international terrorists would seek to disrupt the games no matter where they were held. But having the games near Chechnya and Dagestan brings its own set of threats, he noted. Gerasimov has a handpicked, highly trained task force thats been in place for some time, Dempsey said. He believes they have in place the intelligence apparatus, as well as the response apparatus, to deal with the threats as Dempsey meets Russians

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Retest nearly nishedThe retesting of nuclear intercontinental ballis tic missile launch offi cers is nearly complete, Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren said Jan. 17. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III ordered the retesting after discovering that some nuclear launch officers cheated on proficiency exams. A total of 34 crewmen at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., have been suspended from duty due to the allegations. By close of business yesterday, 472 officers finished the retesting, Warren said. Of those, 21 officers failed the exam. The pass rate was 95.6 percent, well within his torical averages. The 21 officers that failed will undergo retraining and then be retested. If they pass they will return to duty, Warren said. Another 27 officers who are on leave or who are on temporary duty have not been retested. Officials said they will be retested once they return to their bases. The 34 officers who were suspended pend ing the investigation into cheating will not be retested, Warren said. All told, 82 officers are not available for assign ment. It is having an impact, Warren said. But it is an impact the missileers have been able to schedule around. It has no impact on the operational readiness, no impact on the safety, no impact on the capabilities, it is just more work for the individual missileers in the short term. A day after ordering an independent review of the militarys nuclear force amid allegations of cheating on prociency exams by Air Force ocers overseeing the nations ballistic nuclear missiles, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel Jan. 24 vowed to restore condence in the Air Forces nuclear mission. Whatever the factors historical, institutional, cultural the Department of Defense and the Air Force will do whatever it takes to continue to ensure the safety, security, reliability and eectiveness of our nuclear enterprise, Hagel said at a ceremonial swearing-in ceremony for Deborah Lee James, the 23rd secretary of the Air Force. e service has suspended 34 launch ocers overseeing intercontinental ballistic missiles after an investigation implicated them for cheating or failing to report cheating on exams. A Pentagon spokesman told reporters yesterday the allegations raise legitimate concerns about the departments stewardship of one of our most sensitive and important missions, prompting Hagel to call for an independent, broader examination of the strategic deterrence enterprise as it relates to personnel. At the ceremony, Hagel said he, James and Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Mark. A. Welsh III are deeply concerned about the overall health and professionalism and discipline of our strategic forces, and called the problems facing the new Air Force secretary daunting. But he credited James with a swift, decisive and thoughtful response, to the matter after she visited missile bases around the country in recent days. Even so, he said, restoring condence in the nuclear mission will be a top priority. Hagel called James well suited to lead the Air Force as the nation faces an increasingly uncertain security environment. e rise of emerging powers, dangerous rogue states, aliated terrorist organizations, and the proliferation of technology will mean more contested and complicated domains, from space to cyber to sea lanes, he said. James, who was ocially sworn in as secretary last month, pledged to leave this Air Force some years from now on a path toward greater capability and better aordability for our taxpayers while always remembering and protecting the important people who underpin everything we do. But she cautioned the service will continue to face dicult challenges and tradeos brought on by shrinking budgets. Hagel noted that James has spent the last 30 years serving on the sta of the House Armed Services Committee, at the Penta gon, where she served three secretaries of defense, as well as in the private sector. Her approach, he said, has been to understand the problems and opportunities, listen carefully, and then act decisively. is, he added, will make her a success leading the Air Force.Hagel: Restore condence they know them this year in Sochi. And, the Russian general is interested in American technology for countering improvised explosive devices that the Russian military might be able to use, the chairman said. e United States would share technical information on the counter-IED eorts, he added, and if it is compatible with Russian equipment, will look to provide that information to Russia in time for the games. e Russian military is holding a tank biathlon next year, and the United States will observe with the eye on participating downstream, Dempsey said. e biathlon, he added, could have a Russian T-90 tank competing against a U.S. M-1 tank sometime in the future.Russia thing you guys have done for us, and continue to do for us to be able to be here to play this great game of football, said Russell Wilson, quarterback for the Seahawks. ank you guys so much for everything you do protecting our country. Hey, we appreciate all your hard work and your dedication, and your sacrice, Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman said. ank you for everything you do for our country and for us ghting for our freedom. We appreciate it. Golden Tate, a wide receiver for the Seahawks, thanked troops for serving. is country wouldnt be anything without you guys serving and ghting for us every single day for our freedom, Tate said. We appreciate it so much, and we hope you enjoy the show. For Seahawks wider receiver Doug Baldwin, the message came from a little closer to home. My family is a military fam ily, Baldwin said. We appreciate everything those guys do. Its very heartfelt for me. Both teams want military members to know they are not forgotten. To the men and women serving overseas come home safe, said Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch.Players

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 6, 2014