The Kings Bay periscope

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00324


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Up Periscope Who said what about the Silent Service Page 9 Our Heritage WW II Vets and Cold Warriors chart course Page 5 Trunk or Treat Kings Bay children start Halloween early Page 4 Sub Vets Memorial Service Friday At WW II Submarine Vets Memorial Pavilion starting at 10 a.m. Submarine Veterans will participate in the United States Submarine Force World War II Memorial Service, at 10 a.m., Friday, Nov. 1 at the World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion, outside Trident Training Facility on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Capt. Stephen Gillespie, Deputy Commander and Chief of Sta, Submarine Group Ten, is the scheduled guest speaker for the Memorial Service. Other scheduled participants, subject to change, will be Capt. Ed Mayer, Commanding Ocer USS Florida (SSGN 728). He will present the preamble. Submarine Group 10 Command Master Chief Shaun Garvin will be master of ceremonies. Capt. Steve Hall, Deputy Commodore Fast attacks USS Virginia, USS Minnesota rst to integrate female ocerse fast attack submarines USS Virginia (SSN 774) and USS Minnesota (SSN 783) have been selected as the initial two Virginia-class submarines to integrate female ocers, announced Oct. 15. A total of six female ocers, two Supply Corps and four nuclear-trained, will report aboard no later than January 2015. Both submarines are homeported in Groton, Conn. Female ocers serving aboard Virginia-class submarines is the next natural step to more fully integrate women into the submarine force, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus said. ere are many extremely talented and capable women with a desire to succeed in this eld and the submarine force will be stronger because of their eorts. Our Navy has proven over the years that one of our greatest advantages is our diversity. is is an advantage we should capitalize on across all platforms, including submarines. Since the Navy ocially changed its policy prohibiting women from serving on submarines on April 29, 2010, the subma rine force has integrated 43 women onto six Ohio-class ballistic-missile (SSBN) and guided-missile submarines (SSGN). Further Virginia-class integration is being planned in the submarine force. My plan is to begin by integrating four Virginia-class attack submarines, with the second set of two units being integrated in Fiscal Year 2016, said Vice Adm. Michael Connor, commander, Submarine Forces. Since Virginia and Minnesota are both Atlantic Fleet submarines home ported in Groton, Conn., I intend to select two Pacic Fleet submarines home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii early next year. e female ocers will be assigned to the Virginia-class submarines for duty after completing the nuclear submarine training pipeline, which consists of nuclear power school, prototype training and the Submarine Ocer Basic Course. Submarines with women currently serving on board are USS Florida (SSGN 728), USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), homeported in Kings Bay, Ga., and USS Ohio (SSGN 726), USS Louisiana (SSBN 743), and USS Maine (SSBN 741), homeported in Bangor, Wash. Women assigned to SSNs Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Horror with a causeNSBs Seabees haunted house supports ball e Seabees of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were busy the early weeks of October, planning their annual haunted house. Nearly 50 of them worked together to bring a night of horror to military families and friends for the 14th consecutive year. At a cost of $3 per person, the funds from the haunted house are used to support the annual Seabees Ball. e Haunted House was so scary, 17-year-old Camden High School student Ashanti Je-Mapp said. ere was a joker and Jason hiding in the woods. Ive been to the Jacksonville Zoo haunted house, and this was far better. My money was definitely well spent. Operations Chief Steven Maldonado said they designed the haunted house for sheer terror, but safety remained a top priority. Some of the Seabees who helped build this years haunted house were rst-time participants. Others, like EO2 Michael Ivey, who has contributed

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is now providing annual inuenza vaccine to service members, retirees and families. e u vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, selected reserves and healthcare workers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for everyone age six months and up. Its the rst and most important step in protecting against u viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epidemics of inuenza occur every year in the United States, usually between October and April. Typically, epidemics cause thousands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the U.S. A vaccine to prevent inuenza has been available since the 1940s, yet some patients dont take the time to get the vaccine, even after the recent 2009 H1N1 global pandemic the rst such pandemic in more than 40 years. Inuenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shaking hands, sneezing or talking closely with another person. Typical u symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, congestion, cough, runny nose and diculty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the immunocompromised. H1N1 u virus has similar symp toms, sometimes also including vom iting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and children. NBHC Kings Bay oers two kinds of u vaccine. Flu mist, an intranasal vaccine that is squirted into the nose, can be given to healthy patients ages two to 49. e injectable vaccine, or u shot, is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with a chronic medical con dition such as emphysema. e shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during pregnancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective u antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immunization. At NBHC Kings Bay, patients can walk-in for u vaccine 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Flu vaccine walk-ins will be conducted from 7 to 11 a.m. only, on the last Friday of each month, to facilitate command training. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Societys Budget 4 Baby Class is Nov. 7. Learn what expenses you should plan for and how to make wise nancial decisions, where you can you nd the best prices on diapers and formula, and what baby furniture you will need. At the workshop, youll receive a Junior Sea Bag, which includes layette items like crib sheets, onesies and a baby blanket handmade by a Society volunteer. To register, call (912) 573-3928.RecruitMilitary will have a Veteran Job Fair 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 7 in Jacksonville at Everbank Field. For more information, visit www.prlog.org/12221360-jobfair-for-veterans-scheduled-for-jacksonvilleon-november-7.htmlVFW Post No. 8385 will host the annual Veterans Day Parade at 10 a.m., Nov. 11 in downtown Kingsland. At the conclusion of the parade, all are invited to the Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park for the 11 a.m. Spouse House pavilion dedication ceremony, followed by a southern fried catsh dinner at the Kingsland Depot Pavilion, 200 E. King Ave. in downtown Kingsland.e Camden Partnerships Inaugural Kings Bay/Camden Community Golf Classic begins with registration and brunch 10 to 11:30 a.m., ursday, Nov. 7 at Trident Lakes Golf Course on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Best Ball play begins at noon. All funds raised will benet the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation, St. Marys Submarine Museum and e Camden Partnership. For more information, contact Marty Klumpp at martyklumpp@tds. net or (912) 227-2148. In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Reward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter for college. e next drawing will be at the end of August. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded more than $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.The Habitat Ride to Build Poker Run, benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Camden County, will be Nov. 16. The ride begins and ends at VFW of Kingsland. Cost is $20 for rider and one passenger, one poker hand, cookout, music. For more information, contact Haylinder at (912) 552-4563.e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvillecelticfestival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Branch Health Clinic oers u shots NBHC Kings Bay Dont let eas drive your pet crazyFlea allergy dermatitis or sensitivity to fleas is a common issue in veterinary medicine. We call it the pants o allergy because the itching and subsequent hair-loss tends to start at the base of the tail and progresses down both back legs, making them look like they arent wearing their pants. It can be seasonal in some parts of the country, but here in Georgia it has the potential to be a yearround issue. Some dogs and cats are sensitive to the saliva of the ea, so when they are bitten it causes a local reaction. e reaction itches, causing the animal scratch and chew on his or herself. It is important to know that for a sensitive animal, one ea bite can be enough to cause the itching. Your pet may be suering from ea allergy dermatitis even if you dont see any eas. Once a pet starts chewing on his or herself, they can cause an infection of bacteria and/or yeast on the surface of the skin. is infection then adds to the itching, making it a vicious cycle of itching and chewing. is chewing and scratching is known as self-trauma, and it can lead to hair loss, redness, formation of papules little bumps on the skin and more. is itching and scratching can lead to hot spots, which are a worsening of the supercial skin infection. If you suspect that you pet may be sensitive to eas, call your veterinar ian. It is important to treat the skin infection and to take care of the eas. We typically recommend a good monthly ea preventive, as well as treating the home and possibly using a pill that kills eas for 24 hours. Feel free to contact the vet clinic her at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay with questions or to schedule an appointment for your pet, at 573-0755. Dont let eas drive your pet crazy! Four-Legged World By Capt. Lauren Seal, USA Kings Bay Veterinarian In an eort to establish positive access control measures at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, eective Nov. 4, National Crime Information Center background checks must be completed for all persons or groups that do not have access to NSB Kings Bay that will be attending special events on the base, to include weddings, receptions, birthday parties, retirements, change of commands, homecomings, sports and more. A uniformed service member or government employee with a valid Common Access Card, a military re tiree with a valid DoD identication credential, or an adult dependent of at least 16 years of age with a valid DoD identication credential is allowed to sponsor any vehicle occupants with out a NCIC background check. All vehicle occupants 16 years of age and older must have a valid non-expired identication card. A valid escort may escort up 10 guests. e escort must remain with his/her guest at all times. All guests list to be placed on the gates will be delivered to the SUBASE Physical Security Division, Bldg. 2026, for review, NCIC background check and approval before being posted on the gates. e guest list will include name of event, date, time, place and a point of contact to include a phone number. All guest lists must be received seven days in advance of the event. e point-of-contact is Cheryl Par ish at 573-9640 or Cheryl.parish@ navy.mil or Randy Sewell at 573-4402 or Randy.Sewell.ctr@navy.mil.Physical Security to begin checks Physical Security Division FFSC workshops FFSC will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. This interactive program intro duces the basic concepts of financial retirement planning, including the military retirement system and the new Thrift Savings Plan. Its 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 to register. The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplating marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 5734512. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 4, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is

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Adri Iranians rescued While operating in the northern waters of the Arabian Gulf, a small vessel capsized in a remote area leaving ve Iranian mariners stranded with no one to rescue them. is was the scenario these men faced prior to their chance discovery by the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Maui. Rescue did not come to their aid until this 110-foot Coast Guard cutter happened to come across the mariners whose lives were saved by the quick-thinking Coast Guard crew. e crew, who had trained intensely for such a situation, swiftly moved into action in the early morning hours of Oct. 11, while assigned to Combined Task Force 152. As the sun rose over the horizon, Petty Ocer 1st Class Kevin Sweetman spotted a faint orange object oating in the distance. Once Sweetman reported the object, Mauis crew altered course to investigate. As Maui approached the object, Sweetman was able to identify a man waving an orange ag. I waited a few seconds after realizing it was a man waving a ag, Sweetman said. I had to be positive on what I was seeing before passing the information to the bridge. Shortly after the bridge team was notied of the sighting, an announcement was heard around the ship. e crew of Maui stepped into action relying on everything they had learned to this point in their careers. It seemed like a blur, we knew what we had to do and without hesitation our training kicked in as if it was instinct, said Seaman CJ Garza. As Maui navigated closer to the person in the water, Sweetman was able to identify four more mariners lying in the raft. e crew rescued the ve Iranian mariners from the life raft within minutes after they arrived on scene. One of the survivors informed the Maui on-scene leader that their Iranian dhow had capsized and they had been adrift. With the ve Iranian mariners safely aboard, the crews focus shifted to providing medical treatment. Once all the survivors were provided initial rst aid they were given food, water, blankets and clothing. I am very proud of my crew for the judgment they used and actions they took throughout the situation, said Lt. Earl Potter, commanding ocer of Maui. I think we were extremely fortunate to nd these ve men. ey were all visibly weakened and suering from extreme exposure when we got them aboard. I dont know how much longer they would have lasted. Commander, Task Force 55 made initial arrangements for the mariners to be transferred to the Iranian Coast Guard ship Naji 7. at evening Maui contacted the Naji 7 to work out the details of the transfer of the mariners. It was quite a day, including working with the Iranians to conduct a nighttime small-boat transfer, Potter said. is case clearly demonstrates how exible the Coast Guard is and another way we add value in this region. From the moment we arrived to the moment we transferred them to the Iranian coast guard vessel, the ve mariners expressed their gratitude and relief that we were able to help them, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Mark Delacruz. e Bahrain-based cutter and crew are currently assigned to Patrol Forces Southwest Asia and actively participate with CTF-152. CTF-152 is one of three task forces operating under Combined Maritime Forces. e partnership with the task force denes the service in being nationally deployed and globally connected bringing military expertise and response capability anywhere Americas maritime interests extend. In the case of the rescue of these ve Iranians, the maritime interests extended to saving lives at sea. ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. There will be Ombudsman Basic Training for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 4 to 8. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service mem bers wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC An assistant professor at the University of Southern California funded by the Oce of Naval Research, is highlighted as one of this years Brilliant 10 young scientists and engineers Popular Science magazines October issue. e annual feature highlighted Dr. Andrea Armani, who-with support from ONR-could help the Navy save lives through new understandings of light and biology. With steady backing from ONR, including both the Young Investigator Award Program and recognition under the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Armani has invented a range of devices that allow her to explore the nano-world of viruses, bacteria and DNA and their interactions with the environment. One immediate application of her research is improving detection abilities of pathogens in dierent environments. Shes developing the capabilities that will be used in future conicts to keep Sailors and Marines out of harms way, said Dr. Timothy Bentley, program ocer in ONRs Warghter Performance Department. While biosensors like those created by Armani would give warghters increased protection against biological threats on the battleeld, her research also holds implications for communications, preventative healthcare and more. ONRs support allows me to pursue high-risk research that ultimately has benets in many areas, Armani said. When you have that kind of encourage ment, theres no end to what you can discov er, and the next break through could come when you least expect it. She recently developed a sensor to detect ultraviolet light that could help fend o diseases associated with excessive exposure. Given the simplicity of the detection mechanism, it has many potential applications, including water monitoring. Now Armani and ONR are embarking on a new project to study the way cells communicate after damage from a blast incident. e ndings could help scientists create biomarkers to better understand blast injuries and develop protective methods and therapies for traumatic brain injury, a problem faced by many military service members. But ONRs research investment in Armanis work is making an impact beyond what happens on the battleeld, Bentley said. Dr. Armani attracts some of the brightest young researchers to work in her lab and makes a lot of connections through her work, he said. is is invaluable as we build up our network of national and international scientists who carry our research from the military and into the world at large. e Department of the Navys Oce of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR researcher honoredof Submarine Squadron 20, and Capt. John Carter, Commander, Submarine Squadron 16, will read the list of boats on Eternal Patrol, the 52 U.S. submarines lost in World War II, as well as USS resher (SSN 593), USS Scorpion (SSN 589) and British submarines. Squadron 20 CMC Eddie Van Meter and Retired Master Chief Buddy Raquer will toll the bell. Squadron 16 CMC Mitch Burgin will sound the klaxon. Lt. Cmdr. Sean Farrell (Ret.) will place the wreath. Cmdr. Ted Fanning of Kings Bays Chapel will give the benedicition and invocation. NSB Kings Bay CMC Randy Huckaba will give the rememberance. CSC Kevin Calliste will present the POW/MIA Table. e ceremony will include music by the Navy Band Southeast and Volume One from Camden County High School. Fridays World War II Memorial Service will be followed at Trident Training Facility by a lunch, hosted by the TTF Chief Petty Ocers Association, and tours. About 230 Sub Vets and their family members are planning to attend. Each year we have the honor to host the World War II Submarine Memorial here at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba said. It is the pinnacle of all events we do here for the submarine force, because we pay homage to those who have paid the ultimate sacrice and paved the way for all future submariners. I can think of no better way to spend a week of tribute than to honor our veterans. Friday evening, a 6 p.m. steak dinner sponsored by Trident Ret Facility Chief Petty Ocer Association will be at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. e Order of the Eagles will host a Low Country Boil at the Eagles Club in St. Marys at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 2. Every year, submarine veterans from around the country travel to Camden County and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to catch up with old friends and shipmates. Sub Vets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 5 Diesel-powered submarines played a critical role in the U.S. Navys success during WWII. But the Allied victory over German U-boats in the Atlantic indicated that submarines designed primarily for surfaced operations had limited future eectiveness. Two issues confronted designers greater underwater speed and endurance. e rst issue, speed, was addressed in 1945 through hull shape experiments at the Navys David Taylor Model Basin. ese tests resulted in the teardrop hull design. First implemented on the experimental USS Albacore (SS-569), the teardrop design enabled unprecedented submerged speeds. e advent of nuclear power solved the undersea endurance problem, and truly revolutionized submarine design and naval warfare. In 1954, the Navy launched USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds rst nuclear-powered submarine. USS Skipjack (SSN-585) was the rst submarine to combine the endurance of nuclear propulsion and the high-speed teardrop hull design. Every American submarine built since 1958 incorporates these features. roughout the Cold War, U.S. military forces contained and deterred the Soviet Union and her allies from attacking the free world. e Submarine Force played a vital role, checking the Soviets in two ways. First, U.S. ballistic missile submarines deterred nuclear war by maintaining a survivable retaliatory strike capability against any nuclear attack on the U.S. Second, U.S. attack submarines monitored the rapidly expanding Soviet Navy while conducting in telligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. Dominance over the Soviet Navy was vital in preserving maritime superiority during the Cold War. During this time period, U.S. attack submarines monitored Soviet naval development and open ocean naval operations in the Mediterranean, Atlantic, and Pacic oceans. U.S. SSNs obtained vital information on Soviet naval capabilities and weaknesses while underscoring American determination to defend the nation and her allies from attack. While almost all Cold War operations remain classied, two recently declassied missions showcase Submarine Force capabilities. USS Guardsh (SSN-612) silently tracked a Soviet cruise missile (SSGN) submarine which was following U.S. aircraft carriers o Vietnam in the 1970s, ready to protect our ships should the SSGN launch its missiles. In 1978, in the Atlantic, USS Batsh (SSN-681) tracked a Soviet ballistic missile submarine sailing o the East Coast of the U.S., learning Soviet SSBN patrol areas and operating patterns Silent Service key player during Cold War The NavyIn the Cold WarSpecial report e USS Barb, a 1,525-ton Gato class submarine built at Groton, Connecticut, was commissioned in July 1942. at fall the submarine was sent to operate in European waters, taking part in the Morocco invasion in November. Four more war patrols in the rst half of 1943 took her to the Bay of Biscay, the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea but produced no damage to the enemy. In mid-1943 Barb went to the Pacic. at fall her sixth war patrol took her o China, where it damaged two enemy ships. Following a West Coast overhaul, Barb operated in the central and western Pacic during March and April 1944, sinking one ship and bombarding an enemy shore facility. After that, under Cmdr. Eugene B. Fluckey, Barbs skipper for the rest of the war, the submarines combat record became remarkably successful. Barbs eighth war patrol, o northern Japan in May through July, deprived the enemy of ve ships and saw the rst of many gunre actions that ultimately destroyed some 20 small vessels. On her ninth war patrol, operating with two other submarines between the Philippines and China in August and September 1944, Barb sank three more Japanese ships, among them the escort carrier Unyo. In addition, Barb rescued 14 Allied prisoners of war. e subs next two cruises, in the East China Sea during October 1944 through February 1945, were also made in close cooperation with other U.S. submarines. Barb sank two ships on its 10th patrol and four more on its 11th, with a partial credit for another. e 11th patrol was conducted in the Formosa Straits and East China Sea o the east coast of China, from Shanghai to Kam Kit. During this patrol, Barb, displaying the ultimate in skill and daring, penetrated Namkwan Harbor on the China coast and wrought havoc upon a convoy of some 30 enemy ships at anchor. Riding dangerously in shallow waters, Barb launched its torpedoes into the enemy group and then retired at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined, and rock-obstructed waters. In recognition of this outstanding patrol, Fluckey was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and Barb received the Presidential Unit Citation. e Presidential Unit Citation read as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese sur face forces in restricted waters of the Pacic. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the Barb relentlessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomi table fury despite unfavorable attack opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled su perbly, she held undeviatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of USS Barb, one of World War IIs submarine stars Eugene Bennett Fluckey was born in Washington, D.C., on 5 October 1913. Following four years at the U.S. Naval Academy, he graduated with the Class of 1935 and received a commission. Ensign Fluckeys rst assignments, as an ocer of the battleship Nevada and the destroyer McCormick, were followed in 1938 by instruction at the Submarine School, New London, located at Groton, Connecticut. In December of that year Lt. j.g. Fluckey was assigned to the submarine S-42. He served in USS Bonita in 1941 to 1942, during which time he was promoted to Lieutenant. From mid-1942 into early 1944, Fluckey received Naval Engineering instruction and attended Prospective Commanding Ocers School at New London, then went to the Pacic where he made a war patrol as Prospective Commanding Ocer of the submarine Barb, Promoted to Lt. Commander in May 1943 and Commander in March 1944, he assumed command of Barb in late April Fluckeys daring set Barbs pace

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Navy College information Fluckey hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerous ly, surfaced, in shallow wa ter, the Barb launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retiring at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed wa ters. Inexorable in combat, the Barb also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpedoing and sinking of a hostile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japanese Empire. Determined in carrying the ght to the enemy, the Barb has achieved an illus trious record of gallantry in action, reecting the high est credit upon her valiant ocers and men and upon the United States Naval Service. Another Mare Island overhaul gave Barb a larger deck gun and a rocket launcher. Returning to northern Japan in June 1945 for its 12th war patrol, both of these weapons were used to sink small craft and bombard shore facilities. Barbs torpedoes sank two more ships, a freighter and the escort Kaibokan No. 112, and some of its crew made raid ashore that destroyed a railroad train. Barb ended World War II among the dozen topscoring U.S. submarines in terms of ships sunk, and third in terms of tonnage. If a disputed credit for another ship is counted, Barb would have ranked rst in the latter category. After returning to the U.S. East Coast in September 1945, Barb was generally inactive until formally decommissioned in February 1947. e intensied Cold War brought Barb back into commission in December 1951, and it performed training service until midJanuary 1954. Barb then underwent conversion to the streamlined Guppy conguration and operated briey on trials and training from August until December 1954, when it was loaned to Italy and renamed Enrico Tazzoli. e submarine served actively with the Italian Navy until 1972 and was sold for scrapping in April 1975.Barb of the latter year. During ve war patrols Cmdr. Fluckeys initiative and agressiveness cost the enemy at least 16 ships, many small craft and facilities ashore, earning a Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses for himself, and Presidential Unit Citations and the Navy Unit Commendation for Barb. In August 1945 Cmdr. Fluckey became Prospective Commanding Ocer of the new submarine Dogsh, then under construction at Groton, Conn. However, this assignment ended after a few months and he began duty in Washington, D.C., rst in the Oce of the Secretary of the Navy, then at the War Plans Division and, beginning in late 1945, as Personal Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz. In June 1947 he again received a seagoing command, the modernized submarine Halfbeak. From 1949 to 1950 Fluckey served on the sta of Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet and from October 1950 to July 1953 was U.S. Naval Attache at Lisbon, Portugal. Command of Submarine Division 52 in 1953 to 1954 was followed, after his promotion to the rank of Captain, by command of the submarine tender Sperry and of Submarine Squadron Five. During the later 1950s Captain Fluckey was assigned to the Naval Academy, attended the National War College and served with the National Security Council. Selection for promotion to Rear Admiral in mid-1960 was followed by tours as Commander Amphibious Group Four, presidency of the Board of Inspection and Survey and a temporary assignment as Task Force Director of the Shipyards Appraisal Group. In June 1964 Rear Admiral Fluckey became Commander Submarine Force, Pacic, and in July 1966 he reported as Director of Naval Intelligence. Two years later he became Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Portugal. Fluckey retired from active duty at the beginning of August 1972. He died in 2007 at age 93. and providing early indications of any potential surprise attack on the U.S. As the Cold War progressed, the Soviet Navy expanded substantially in size and capability. Concerned about U.S. submarine superiority, the Soviet Union devoted considerable resources to improving the quality of their submarine force, which throughout the Cold War was much larger than the U.S. Submarine Force. By the 1980s, Soviet submarines had narrowed, but not eliminated, the submarine technology gap. e U.S. Navy counted on the superiority of its submarines and, above all, its submariners in the event of hostilities.Cold War Pearl Harbor veteran at rest A burial ceremony in honor of retired chief petty ocer and Pearl Harbor survivor Yuell Chandler was Oct. 10 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacic. e event in the historic Punchbowl Cemetery was attended by U.S. Navy Sailors, friends and family members of Chandler, who passed away on Oct. 2 at the age of 95. An overview of Yuell Chandlers life was provided by Pearl Harbor Survivors Liaison, Jim Taylor, who spoke about his experiences to those in attendance. Chandler was born April 28, 1918 in Richmond, Va, where he started o his military career by joining the U.S. Army in March 1939 and then later enlisting as a Seabee in the U.S. Navy where he retired as a chief petty ocer. Of the ceremonies I have participated in this was the rst one that I was actually participating in the burial of a fellow Seabee, said Navy Utilitiesman 2nd Class Jeremy Orndolf, assigned to Joint Base Honors and Ceremonies. It was an honor to be a part of this, knowing that we are saying farewell to one of our own. Chandler served in many battles during his service in the military including the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the Battle of Iwo Jima from February to March of 1945. While in the Navy he served in Vietnam during which he retired. He told the story of how he actually tripped over a box of grenades the Japanese had set for a trap, luckily none of them exploded, said Taylor. e family still has two of them he saved, of course they are diused and are harmless. According to Taylor, Chandler found himself in another dangerous incident during his time in Iwo Jima in which he found himself sleeping on top of a buried dud explosive under his bed. Following his time at war he became a helping hand to his shipmates. Chandler helped them obtain benets they were to receive and provided guidance to fellow Pearl Harbor survivors on medical care and equipment. He helped with all the paperwork which can be very dicult, obviously he cared for his shipmates, said Taylor. Chandler retired during the Vietnam War in October 1962 and later volunteered at the National Park Service and the Arizona Memorial Visitor Center. ere he not only visited the memorial but signed autographs and told his stories. e tourists loved hearing his stories, he was there at minimum three times a week, said Taylor. He served as a volunteer for over 28 years, leaving many wonderful memories for the visitors he talked to and even more importantly those of the National Park Service and the employees from Pacic Historic Parks. Aileen Utterbyke, CEO of Pacic Historic Parks, remarked about the many years Chandler spent volunteering. For Pacic Historic Parks, Yuell Bob Chandler was like family to us, said Utterbyke. He was very dedicated in what he did. His drive was to share his experiences with the visitors who came throughout the parks. At the end of the ceremony Chief Chandler received full military honors for his dedication and service including a rie salute by the Joint Base Honors and Ceremonial Guard and the playing of Taps by a Navy bugler. His family was presented with the national ensign during a ag presentation.

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Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp Registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 25 to 29, but is closed anksgiving. Camp is for kindergartener to 12-year-olds. SAC patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and IAs registration begins Nov. 4. Active duty with working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Nov. 12 and DoD Contractors and all others will start Nov. 18. Register 8 a.m. to noon, Monday to Friday. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/ pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provided. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend Movies at 1 p.m. for November are Monsters University Nov. 2 and 3, Epic Nov. 9 and 10, Hotel Transylvania Nov. 16 and 17, Despicable Me 2 Nov. 23 and 24 and Turbo Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. Movie sched ule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Winter Break 2013 at the Youth Center Camp runs Dec. 23 to Jan. 10, but is closed Christmas Day and New Years Day, for kindergarteners to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/ dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and IAs registration begins Dec. 2. Active duty with working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Dec. 9 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Dec. 16. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, except holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch andsnacks will be pro vided. No outside food allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. The Combined Federal Campaign season has started Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can support with your giving. e num bers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018.Wobble Gobble 5K Nov. 13 Just for kids Youth Camp signup to start e Wobble Gobble 5K Run is Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Sign-ups start at 6:30 a.m. with the race beginning at 7 a.m. Bring a canned food item for donation, which will benet Camden House. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Movie Under the Stars On Saturday, Nov. 9 at about 7 p.m. at Youth Center Ballfields, free admission with the feature presenta tion showing Despicable Me 2 (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and your own movie snacks. For more information, (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 5105400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos. Liberty call to this project for the last four years, was given the opportunity to design the layout in his last week at Kings Bay. My husband and I were stationed here right before the haunted house began, Iveys wife, Kaleigh, said. He immediately jumped right into it, and loved it ever since. Once completed, some patrons waited nearly 20 minutes in the crisp night air to experience the fright of the Seabees haunted house. ose who found the courage to go in did not leave disappointed. Screams could be heard in the distance, while adults and children ran from the house. Although the Seabees contributed hundreds of hours of labor to the haunted house, they said the project would not have been successful without the support of their spouses and children. Together, they were all able to contribute to the fun and fear of the Halloween season. e contribution of the Seabees will continue. In a few weeks, they will work with Morale, Welfare and Recreation to transform the haunted house into a laser tag arena for single, active duty members to enjoy. Haunted THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Usually in this space, I pose a question, like, What do you put on your hamburger? or Whats a good movie youve seen lately? With the Sub Vets in town, I decided to change up and see what submariners and others have said about themselves. Theres a good Web site, submarinesailor.com, that had some quotes to help me get started. The years listed are the years of military service, except in Churchills case, where the dates are when he served as prime minister.Winston Churchill Prime Minister Great Britain 1945-47, -55 Of all the branches of men in the forces there is none which shows more devotion and faces grimmer perils than the submariners. Adm. Charles Lockwood USN, 1912-47 I can assure you that they went down fighting and that their brothers who survived them took a grim toll of our savage enemy to avenge their deaths. Lt. James Michener USN, WW II Author, Tales of the South Pacific I saw the submariners, the way they stood aloof and silent, watching their pig boat with loving eyes. They are alone in the Navy... the submari ners! In the entire fleet they stand apart! Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz USN, 1905-66 We shall never forget that it was our submarines that held the lines against the enemy while our fleets replaced losses and repaired wounds. Cmdr. Howard Gilmore USN, 1920-43 Medal of Honor Take her down! (Wounded by machine gun fire and unable to go below, Gilmore gave the order sacrificing himself so his submarine could dive to safety.) Adm. Hyman Rickover USN, 1918-82 I believe it is the duty of each of us to act as if the fate of the world depended on him. Admittedly, one man by himself cannot do the job. However, one man can make a difference. Gen. Collin Powell USA, 1958-93 No one has done more to prevent conflict, no one has made a greater sacrifice for the cause for peace, than you, Americas proud missile submarine family. You stand tall among our heroes of the Cold War. Military Postal Service Agency ocials recommend that parcel post packages for service members overseas be mailed by Nov. 12 for delivery by the holidays. Ocials at MPSA, an extension of the U.S. Postal Service, have published a chart at http://hqdainet. army.mil/mpsa/xmas. htm that shows deadlines for various mailing options, broken down by the APO/FPO/DPO numbers of various destinations. USPS is oering a discount on its largest Priority Mail Flat Rate box at $14.85. e price includes a $2 per box discount for military mail being sent to APO/FPO/DPO destinations worldwide, ocials said. Priority Mail Flat Rate boxes are available free at local post oces, or can be ordered from USPS online. Postage, labels and customs forms also are available online.Holiday mail delivery deadlines announced THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Marines and Sailors with Black Sea Rotational Force 14 conducted training with Romanian soldiers from the 812th Mechanized Infantry Brigade in Bistrita, Romania, Oct. 7 to 12. Platinum Lynx kicked-o with an opening ceremony to begin the engagement and partnership between U.S. and Romanian forces. Marines, Sailors and Soldiers conducted mounted and dismounted patrols, a platoon live-re exercise, movementto-contact, and concluded with a closing ceremony. e Marines and sailors also got to experience culture in the surrounding area with a cultural day held on that Saturday. e partnership between these two forces tie-in with BSRF-14s mission of promoting regional stability and security, increasing military capacity and interoperability and maintaining partnerships with their counterparts in Eastern Europe. Romanian First Sergeant Florin Zanr, a squad leader with the 812th MIB, said that the opening ceremony was an introduction of both forces, and helped them get to know each other better. e opening ceremony is good because we have to respect the countries that we have to work alongside; we have to know each other, the techniques, tactics and procedures better, said Zanr. Cpl. Roderic Liggens, an infantryman with BSRF-14 and Washington, D.C. native, said that the opening ceremony was a presentation to welcome the Marines to Bistrita. It shows the news and other networks that [the Marines] are here [promoting] partnerships with other forces, said Liggens. After the opening ceremony, the Romanian soldiers showed the Marines their various vehicles and weapons systems. Marines and soldiers ended the day with rehearsals for the upcoming events. e Marines and soldiers began work ing together on mounted and dismounted patrols, and a quick reaction force, which consisted of setting up cordons inside the defense of operations, loading vehicles and patrolling, and patrolling on foot. Marines and Soldiers were able to adapt and overcome any challenges they encountered while training together in new terrain. In this training the dismounted patrol was better because in that area there is not a lot of space to maneuver, said Zanr. ere are a lot of slopes so it was better for the soldiers to come on foot. Liggens said that, overall, there were many positive outcomes with the mounted and dismounted patrols. ey were very good with communication with radios, said Liggens. When we were getting attacked they were able to gain enough distance so if an improvised explosive device [were to go o], it would only aect one vehicle compared to all of them. e following day the Marines and soldiers participated in a live-re exercise which consisted of buddy-rushing and movement-under-re. Liggens said that the platoon live-re proved to be a challenge because the Marines had to adapt to a new way of shooting. e range was awesome because of how they made it in line with the trenching, it gave Marines training with how to basically dive in the trench and shoot from it, said Liggens. We had to adapt because we are so used to shooting from the prone, and we couldnt do that so we had to get used to shooting in an unstable position. It also let them know that you can take a whole platoon and move them either simultaneously or at dierent times. e last training event of the week was movement-to-contact which started o with a mounted patrol, followed by Marines and soldiers walking up a hill where they had to work together to cordon o the surrounding area from IEDs. To complete the exercise, Marines and soldiers were ambushed and then had to nd a weapons casualty. Its to see how the [Marines] work, and for them to see how the Romanian forces work, said Zanr. Its all about the coop eration between these two nations, and af ter the training to be better on both ends. e training was benecial for both the Marines and Romanians. I think that it will benet us in the future, said Liggens. It builds a longer lasting relationship so well know how to work together, so now it wont be so difcult for them to understand the way we do things, and for us to understand the way that they do things. e week-long exercise was concluded with a closing ceremony. e Romanian forces expressed gratitude for the partnership and training evolutions conducted during the week. e Marines expressed their gratitude by oering gifts to some of the Romanian soldiers. e force of the explosion initially lifted the entire four-story structure, shearing the bases of the concrete support columns, each measuring fteen feet in circumference and reinforced by numerous oneand-three-quarter-inch steel rods. e airborne building then fell in upon itself. is was the scene as described in Eric Hammels e Root: e Marines in Beirut, August 1982-February 1984, the authoritative source on the 1983 Beirut bombing. is scene claimed the life of 220 Marines, 18 Sailors and 3 Soldiers, most killed as they slept in their racks. Of those who witnessed those nightmare events, two remain on active duty today. Non-commissioned ocers within Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa organized a Beirut bombing memorial Oct. 23 which remembered those who lost their lives or were impacted by the sad day in Americas history 30 years ago. Most of the organizers were not alive when it happened yet they felt a bond beyond the uniform. Sgt. Bryson M. Jones, one of the event organizers and Washington Court House, Ohio native, said the NCOs thought it was important to take a moment, remind their fellow Marines of why we are here, the Marine to the left and the right of us and honoring those that came before us. Although 30 years had passed, the Marines of MARFOREUR and MARFORAF, gathering to honor the memory of those Americans, have much in common with the Marines in Beirut. As the Marines of today witnessed the event played on the overhead projector, they were reminded that history is not just an abstract class in high school or a channel on television. e Marines in Beirut were on a peace keeping mission to restore order to Lebanon during a time of religious ghting between Christians and Muslims. An extremist from the ter rorist organization Islamic Jihad was on a suicide mis sion, driving a truck with as much as 21,000 pounds of explosives. e reported reason for the attack was the American presence in the country during the Lebanese Civil War. is story is an all too familiar story to the Marines at this years memorial, after 12 years of the Global War on Terrorism. ey know the high cost of ghting an enemy that hates you for simply having a presence in their country. ese Marines are living the lessons learned on that fateful morning as they support the deployment of Marines working with countries across Africa and Europe. e goal is to share these lessons to help bring and maintain stability to areas that are unstable, just as it was 30 years ago. e NCOs were keeping with a tradition as old as the Marine Corps itself, one that has been taught since the early days of basic training history must be remembered, honored and passed on. Memories such as the Halls of Montezuma to the events at Iwo Jima are still talked about today. Memories of more recent events such as the Beirut bombings or the battle of Fallujah must be honored. Corps remembers fallen in Beruit bombing e attack on the Marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, on Oct. 23, 1983 became a harbinger of what is known today as the war on terror, said Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos, during a ceremony in Jacksonville, N.C., to mark the 30th anniversary of the attacks. e terrorist truck bomb took the lives of 241 service members. e world we lived in and the future we knew of a secure environment changed forever that morning of Oct. 23, Amos said. e nation was not expecting this. It was a new kind of warfare. e threat of radical extremists being able to target military and civilian personnel with weapons of mass destruction for political, religious and personal gains was a new way to attack the West. It was a cowardly act on freedom. e early 1980s was a tumultuous time of conicting powers, Amos told the audience of Marines, as well as families and friends of those killed in the attack. [at era] indeed became the harbinger of more challenging times yet to come, the general said. Tensions were high across the world, the Cold War raged on, and radicalism surfaced as a new threat to stability in the Middle East. And, when conict ripped at the peaceful coexistence of Lebanon, the United States, France, Italy and Great Britain answered the call to assist, Amos said of the multinational peacekeeping force that went into Beirut. Amos described how Marines attempted to serve as peace keepers at a time when the country was deeply immersed in a civil war. ey stood watch and patrolled chaotic streets to provide a blanket of safety and security and comfort for the citizens of Lebanon. ey stood for freedom, he said, adding that the Marines knew their protection of the citizens came with a risk. On Oct. 23, 1983, terror struck. At 6:22 a.m., extremists drove an explosivesladen truck into the Marine barracks the likes of which had never been witnessed before. e massive explosion shook the ground of the entire Beirut International Airport along with the souls of all the Marines throughout the world, Amos said. Two-hundred and forty-one Marines and American soldiers and sailors [who] volunteered to make a difference died in the attack, he added. ey volunteered to serve their country to put the lives and freedoms of others before their own 241 of our nest, Amos said. We honor each of them today. Beginning with the attacks in Beirut, extremists have attempted to destroy what makes the United States great by attacking America at home and abroad, Amos pointed out. He recounted the 1996 Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia in which a truck detonated alongside a building that housed U.S. Air Force personnel, killing 19 and wounding 498. He also recalled the 1998 attacks on U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, in which 220 people were killed and more than 4,000 were wounded. Amos also spoke of the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, berthed in Yemen, which resulted in the deaths of 17 American sailors and injured 39others. On 9/11, Amos said, terrorists attacked America, in New York, the elds of Shanksville, Pa., and the Pentagon, killing nearly 3,000. We remember each of these well. We will never forgive, nor will we ever forget. In September 2012, he added, gunmen attacked the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, killing four people, including U.S. Ambassador J. Christo-World changed forever Marines train in Romania

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pher Stevens. Not only are these world-changing events, but they are very personal to all of us here today, Amos said. U.S. troops responded in countries such as Yemen, Somalia, Mali, Libya, Afghanistan and Iraq, he said. Today, our Marines remain forwarddeployed, Amos said. Marine expeditionary units are stationed around the globe the 26th, the 13th and the 31st Marines continue to train security forces and deny terrorists safe havens throughout all of Afghanistan. When Marines respond to crises, they remain strong, and ready to respond and answer the nations call, Amos said. Since the fateful day of the Beirut attacks, the Marines have stayed consistent in character and courage, and those traits have not wavered and never will, he said. Across the globe, extremists have attempted to plot against our freedom and our democracy. ey have tested our resolve as a nation. ose men who died 30 years ago would be proud to know that we have never relented, Amos told the audience members, who responded with cries of Oorah! We have never backed down, and we never will, he said.Amos USS Rentz conscates 1,000 kg. of cocaineLess than a week after arriving on station following a port visit in Panama, USS Rentz (FFG 46) and embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment and helicopter squadron disrupted a shipment of 1,000 kg. of cocaine o the coast of Colombia in coordination with the Colombian navy Oct. 9. Rentz worked closely with the Colombian navy operating in the region to detect and intercept the high-speed vessel suspected of smuggling narcotics in international waters. Once Rentz detected and conrmed the location of the suspect boat, the Colombian navy quickly intercepted the boat and discovered the illegal contraband. e drugs were taken back to Colombia. We are pleased by the overall success of the operation. From the intelligence received from Joint Interagency Task Force South to the quick response of our Colombian partners, Cmdr. Lance Lantier, commanding ofcer of USS Rentz said. e seizure is worth an estimated street value of $80 million. is disruption was a signicant event in preventing a substantial amount of drugs from being smuggled into the US and is a perfect example of the teamwork and joint operations we conduct everyday with our partner nations to support Operation Martillo counter transnational organized crime operations, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris said. Rentz is currently deployed to the 4th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Martillo which began in Jan. 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) targets illicit tracking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus, and is an international, interagency operation led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Since Operation Martillo started, 318,133 pounds of cocaine, 25,052 pounds of marijuana worth an estimated $40 billion have been conscated. e Navy awarded a $0.01 delivery order Oct. 22 for dismantling and recycling ex-USS Forrestal (AVT 59). e delivery order was made under an indenitedelivery, indenite-quantity contract to All Star Metals for the towing, dismantling and recycling of conventionally powered aircraft carriers stricken from the Naval Vessel Register. e price of the delivery order reects the net price proposed by All Star Metals, which considered the estimated proceeds from the sale of the scrap metal to be generated from dismantling. In May 2012, the Navy solicited proposals for the award of up to three contracts for the dismantling and recycling of inactive conventionally-powered aircraft carriers. All Star Metals is the rst of three successful oerors to receive its faForrestal sold for scap Tragedy struck in ight deck re e day was a typical one for the 5,000 ocers and enlisted men of the attack aircraft carrier USS Forrestal as the huge, 80,000-ton ship cut a wake through the calm waters of the Gulf of Tonkin. Overhead, the hot, THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 11

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cility security clearance, which is required prior to contract award. After the initial award of one carrier to each successful oeror, the Navy has the capability of scrapping additional conventionally-powered aircraft carriers over a veyear period under delivery orders competed between the three contractors. All Star Metals will now develop its nal tow plan for the Navys approval for the tow of ex-Forrestal from its current berth at the Navys inactive ship facility in Philadelphia to All Star Metals facility in Brownsville. e ship is expected to depart Philadelphia before the end of the year. Navy civilian personnel will be on site full time to monitor the contractors performance during dismantling of the ship. Forrestal was decommissioned Sept. 11, 1993, after more than 38 years of service. On June 16, 1999, the Navy announced the ship would be available for donation to an eligible organization for use as a museum or memorial. However, no viable applications were received and the vessel was removed from donation hold in December 2003 and redesignated for disposal. e rst of the supercarriers, Forrestal was launched Dec. 11, 1954, by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., and commissioned Sept. 29, 1955. Navy scientists and engineers, famous for building the future eet, looked back at their history while celebrating the 95th Anniversary of Dahlgren Naval base on Diversity Day Oct. 16. Naval weapons technology artifacts, including the rst gun tested at Dahlgren 95 years ago, bring history to life. e World War I era seven-inch 45 caliber tractor mounted artillery gun on display seemed to relish its role in igniting the commands history, as Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Commander Capt. Michael Smith spoke to personnel gathered on the parade eld. e game-changing technology developed here is truly amazing, said Smith. From the rst shot red over the Potomac River Test Range in 1918, to todays testing and development of the electromagnetic railgun and everything in between, we have used our scientic and engineering expertise to impact our nations defense at home and abroad. Volunteers from groups such as the National Society of Black Engineers and the Hispanic Association interacted with government civilians, contractors and military members as diverse jazz, rhythm and blues, and African-Puerto Rican (Bomba) bands played music in support of the events theme: Reecting the Past... Building the Future. Many of the NSWCDD scientists and engineers in attendance routinely take their technical expertise to sea aboard ships and into war zones to ensure U.S. warghters can ght, win and come home safely. Todays leaders in pulsed power and directed energy were also among those who listened intently while Smith and the commands new technical director, Dennis McLaughlin, recounted the history of the base now known as Naval Support Facility Dahlgren. roughout the decades, the Dahlgren Naval Laboratory has been a leader in naval weapons technology, said Smith. Looking back on the many achievements of the past helps us to plan for the scientic and engineering advancements that will propel the Navy into the future. Smith and McLaughlin reected on the impact of Dahlgrens diversity on the commands rich technological history. I have seen rst-hand the benets of hiring disabled veterans, said McLaughlin, who led the Navys Disabled Veteran Outreach eorts and later served as director of the Naval Sea Systems Command Wounded Warrior Program. I salute the Dahlgren Division human resource oce and Equal Employment Opportunity oce for your success in hiring wounded warriors and making sure they are assured of their value to the division and the greater Navy mission. We are indebted to men and women who came here from universities and labs all across the country bringing their diverse ideas and their fervor for advancing science, technology engineering and mathematics as well as operational support skills, said Smith. We are also grateful to the many members of the local community who invested their futures in supporting the Navy at NSWC Dahlgren. eir diversity of thought coupled with their diversity of cultures and backgrounds have been key to our mission success. roughout its history, Dahlgren scientists and engineers provided the Navys core technical capability for the integration of sensors, weapons, and their associated weapon and combat systems into surface ships and vehicles. What makes the warfare center here at Dahlgren particularly eective is our co-location with our sister commands, said Smith later in the day at another 95th Anniversary Celebration sponsored by the Dahlgren Heritage Foundation at the University of Mary WashingtonDahlgren Campus. By working together in partnership, we support the full spectrum of Navy defensive combat systems needs to counter the threats from ballistic missiles, to aircraft, to cruise missiles as well as providing strike capabilities and Naval Surface Fire Support, he said. NSWC Dahlgren works closely with Aegis Ballistic Missile and Naval Air and Missile Defense Commands to provide everything from initial requirements to delivered products. For example, the commands scientists and engineers train Sailors from the Aegis Training and Readiness Center on how to use those products. Analysis of what is going on in the world is part of what another sister command here at Dahlgren does, explained Smith. e Joint Warfare Analysis Center ensures optimal employment of our systems and leads to new requirements and new systems as the world changes. rough our collaborative eorts, we are providing innovative enhancements, analysis and designs that are making a dierence to ensure optimal support for our warfighters and the Fleet. e NSWCDD commander emphasized that it takes a diverse, multitalented workforce to meet the needs of todays warghters and provide innovation solutions for the demands facing our future Fleet. e commands ability to bring together the best and brightest professionals from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and cultures is critical to address todays challenges and ensure our readiness for the Navys future mission needs anywhere around the globe. Dahlgrens tech history celebrates diversity Forrestal tropical sun beat down from a clear sky. It was just about 10:50 a.m., July 29, 1967. e launch that was scheduled for a short time later was never made. Lt. Cmdr. Robert Bo Browning one of the pilots due for launch with many others, he was seated in the cockpit of his fueled and armed Skyhawk; the plane was spotted way aft, to port. Lt. Cmdr. John S. McCain III said later he heard a whooshy sound then a low-order explosion in front of him. Suddenly, two A-4s ahead of his plane were engulfed in aming JP-5. Jet fuel spewed from them. A bomb dropped to the deck and rolled about six feet and came to rest in a pool of burning fuel. e awful conagration, which was to leave 132 Forrestal crewmen dead, 62 more injured and two missing and presumed dead, had begun. As the searing ames, fed by the spreading JP-5, spread aft and began to eat at the aircraft spotted around the deck, Lt. Cmdr. Browning escaped from his plane. He ducked under the tails of two Skyhawks spotted alongside his and ran up the ight deck toward the island area. Twice, explosions knocked him o balance. But he made it. e re soon enveloped all the aircraft in its wake. It spread to the fantail, to decks below. Bombs and ammunition were touched o in the midst of early re-ghting eorts. Black, acrid smoke boiled into the sky. A chief petty ocer, armed only with a small re extinguisher, ran toward the bomb that had dropped to the ight deck. He was killed when it exploded as were members of reghting teams trying to wrestle re hoses into position. Shrapnel from the explosion was thrown a reported 400 feet. ere was a horrendous explosion that shook Angel Two Zero, said Lt. David Clement, pilot of a rescue helicopter from the carrier USS Oriskany (CV 34). It seemed as if the whole stern of the Forrestal had erupted. Suddenly there were rafts, fuel tanks, oxygen tanks, trop tanks and debris of every description oating in the water below. Clement and others would be rescuing Forrestal crewmen who jumped, fell or were knocked from the carrier no less than ve times within an hour. Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Bruce Mulligan, a 22-year-old VA-106 crewman, was all the way aft on the ight deck when he heard explosions. He turned, saw a reball coming at him and hit the deck. Somehow, he managed to get forward and was headed for a re hose when he was hit by shrapnel. He helped a friend with a broken leg get to sick bay, then returned to the ight deck. Back aft of the island, we started throwing missiles and rockets over the side, he recounted later. After that was done, I looked around for some of my buddies on the line crew and I could nd only one. So we decided to help them ght the re and got the re hoses back aft and went to ght the plane res. My buddy and I stayed back aft for I dont know how long. We got separated and some ocer said later to leave. With strength born of adversity, 130-pound Lt. Otis Kight singlehandedly carried a 250-pound bomb to the edge of the hangar deck and threw it over the side. Lt. j.g. Robert Cates, the carriers explosive ordnance demolition ofcer, recounted later how he had noticed that there was a 500-pound bomb and a 750-pound bomb in the middle of the ight deck . that were still smoking. ey hadnt detonated or anything; they were just setting there smoking. So I went up and defused them and had them jettisoned. Cates said one of his men, whom he named only as Black, volunteered to be lowered by line through a hole in the ight deck to defuse a live bomb that had dropped to the 03 level, even though the compartment was still on re and full of smoke. Black did the job. Later, Cates had himself lowered into the compartment to attach a line to the bomb so it could be jettisoned. We [Black and himself] started picking up everything we could nd that had explosives in it and started throwing them over the side., Cates said. Some squadron pilots came up to me as we went aft. I dont know who they were [and] helped me take a Sidewinder missile o a burning F-4. We just continued working our way aft and taking what ordnance we found o aircraft and throwing it over the side. At 11:47 A.M., Forrestal reported the ight deck re was under control. At 12:15, the ship sent word that the ight deck re was out. At 12:45, stubborn res remained on the 01 and 02 levels and in hangar bay three. At 1:48 p.m., Forrestal reported that the res in the 01, 02 and 03 levels still burned, but that all the ships machinery and steering equipment were operational. At 2:12 p.m., the after radio compartment was evacuated because of dense smoke and water. All res out on 01 level, port side, the ship reported. At 2:47 p.m. the compartment res continued but progress was being made. Forrestal was steaming toward a rendezvous with the hospital ship USS Repose (AH 16). At 3 p.m., the commander of Task Force 77 announced he was sending Forrestal to Subic Bay, Philippines, after the carrier rendezvoused with Repose. At 5:05, a muster of Forrestal crewmen both in the carrier and aboard other ships was begun. Fires were still burning in the ships carpenter shop and on the main deck. At 8:33 p.m., Forrestal reported that res on the 02 level were under control but that re ghting was greatly hampered because of smoke and heat. At 12:20 a.m., July 30, all the res were out. Forrestal crewmembers continued to clear smoke and cool hot steel on the 02 and 03 levels. It was time, now, to begin to assess the damage. ere were four gaping holes in the ight deck where bombs exploded, pushing armored steel down and under much like an oldfashioned hole in a beer can. Stock was taken of the aircraft. It leveled o to a report of 26 either destroyed or jettisoned and 31 more damaged to some extent. And it was time to arrive at a nal toll of dead and injured. For hours, the muster of Forrestal men continued; it was made terrically dicult because so many of the crew were scattered in other ships. Compiled and edited by John D. Burlage for Naval Aviation News, 1967 Fire 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 13 As U.S. and allied ground and air forces grew in strength on the Arabian Peninsula during August 1990, naval forces put up a strong shield to protect the countrys airelds and three critical gulf ports; al Jubayl and ad Dammam in Saudi Arabia and Mina Sulman in Bahrain. An attack on these ports by Saddams 700-plane air force, 165-vessel navy, or saboteurs could have been devastating to the allied buildup. On hand to counter air or surface vessel threats were cruisers equipped with the advanced Aegis battle management system, and carriers, battleships, destroyers, frigates, and other combatants operating a lethal array of aircraft, missiles, and guns. SEALs and Coast Guard and Navy port security/harbor defense units guarded the ports. By Sep. 1, the naval contingent in the region was formidable and included three U.S. carriers, one battleship, six cruisers, ve destroy ers, eight frigates, and numerous warships from other coalition navies. Other impor tant units, including Seabee construction battalions and hospital ships USNS Mercy (TAH-19) and USNS Comfort (TAH-20), staed by Naval Reserve doctors, nurses, and other medical support personnel, had arrived in the region or were en-route. One of the rst ground combat formations to reach Saudi Arabia was the 7th Marine Expeditionary Brigade. e units equipment and supplies were delivered by the ships of Maritime Prepositioning Squadron 2, anchored year-round at Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean for just such a contingency in the Persian Gulf. e arrival of another MEB enabled the formation of I Marine Expeditionary Force, under Marine Lt. Gen. Walter Boomer. ese Marines and the Soldiers of the Armys 82nd Airborne Division soon stood ready to defend Saudi Arabia. To provide these troops with armored muscle, eight special Fast Sealift Ships of the Military Sealift Command were dispatched from the United States with hundreds of Abrams main battle tanks and Bradley armored ghting vehicles on board. By early November 1990, the 173 ships involved in the sealift operation and the transport planes of the Military Airlift Command had deployed such strong forces to Saudi Arabia that fears for the defense of the country largely evaporated. While taking full advantage of the sea, naval forces of the UN coalition denied the Iraqis access to it. In August, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolutions that authorized coalition naval vessels to embargo Iraqi overseas trade, with armed force if necessary. e resolutions advocates hoped that the embargo would induce Saddam to withdraw his forces from Kuwait but at the least prevent him from importing tanks, guns, and planes. On Aug. 17, a Maritime Interception Force, established under Vice Adm. Henry H. Mauz Jr., commander U.S. Naval Forces, Central Command, began operating in the waters around Saudi Arabia. Eventually, warships from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom joined the eort. American P-3 Orion, British Nimrod, and French Atlantique patrol planes also took part in the operation. With the greatest resources in the area, the U.S. Navy was recognized as rst among equals and in that capacity coordinated periodic meetings to decide on matters such as patrol sectors and search procedures. Normally, the patrol planes would spot a merchantman and direct coalition surface units to her. Once contact was made, the commanding ocer of a warship would communicate with the master of the merchant vessel by radio and gather information about her identity, point of origin, destination, and cargo. Boarding parties that routinely included American Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, the latter members of Law Enforcement Detachments, were dispatched to suspicious ships to investigate their manifests and cargo. ose ships found carrying prohibited cargo were ordered to the ports of the coalitions Arab members for impoundment. If a master refused to stop for inspection, the allies used helicopters to drop armed teams onto the ship. ese men then secured the bridge and took control of the vessel. An example of one such operation was on Oct. 28, 1990, when the master of the Iraqi oil tanker Amuriyah would not speak by radio to the on-scene naval commander or stop his vessel for inspection. Even though an F-14 Tomcat and an F/A-18 Hornet from Independence made low passes over the ship and USS Reasoner (FFG-1063) and Australian guided missile frigate Darwin red warning shots across her bow, the vessels master still refused to heave to. Eventually, helicopters lowered Marines onto the ship and with the reinforcement of Navy SEALs, coastguardsmen, and British and American Sailors the allies took control. Saddam must have been testing the coalitions resolve, for the ship carried no prohibited cargo. She was allowed to proceed. e embargo patrol did not force the Iraqis to quit Kuwait, but it did prevent Saddam from acquiring more arms, ammunition and spare parts or sell oil to nance his war eort. e operation also strengthened the international coalition, because it showed the governments and peoples of many countries that UN military measures could be executed without heavy casualties or indiscriminate use of force. is consensus was valuable in the fall of 1990, when President George H.W. Bush decided to launch a campaign to oust the Iraqi army from Kuwait and restore the country to its people. General Schwarzkopf developed a four-phase air, land, and sea campaign plan that would require the deployment to the theater of 200,000 more American service men and women. Additional units included three additional carrier battle groups, another battleship, a Marine expeditionary force, a Marine expeditionary brigade, more than 400 Air Force planes and the Armys VII Corps. As these new forces headed for the Persian Gulf, Vice Adm. Stanley R. Arthur replaced Vice Adm. Mauz and took additional measures to prepare U.S. naval forces for war. He established Battle Force Zulu in the Persian Gulf and Battle Force Yankee in the Red Sea. Carrier air squadrons practiced operating with Air Force units, the amphibious components carried out landing exercises, and the eets battleships, destroyers, and frigates prepared for naval gunre support and antiaircraft operations. In the early morning hours of Jan. 17 1991, the UN coalition launched Operation Desert Storm. Tomahawk land attack missiles red by ships in the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf and later by a submarine in the Eastern Mediterranean, began hitting targets throughout Baghdad, the capital of Iraq. at day or soon afterward, attack, ghter, electronic countermeasures and other aircraft from carriers USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Saratoga (CV-60), USS America (CV-66), USS Ranger (CV61), USS Midway (CV-41), and USS eodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) struck other enemy sites in Iraq. In the next few weeks Navy cruise missiles and the bombs and missiles of Navy, Air Force and coalition aircraft destroyed leadership and communications sites, air defense radars, military depots, airelds, bridges, naval bases, and facilities connected with nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons throughout Iraq and Kuwait. S imultaneously, allied ghters established air superiority, shooting down almost all of the Iraqi MiGs and Mirages that rose into the sky to challenge them. e Navys two kills occurred on the rst day of the war when Lt. Cmdr. Mark I. Fox and Lt. Nick Mongillo, ying F/A-18 Hornets from the Red Sea-based carrier USS Saratoga, each destroyed a MiG-21 with Sidewinder and Sparrow air-to-air missiles. Next: Desert Storm frees KuwaitAir strikes, Tomahawks soen Saddam The NavyIn the Cold WarTenth in a series

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Up Periscope Who said what about the Silent Service Page 9 Our Heritage WW II Vets and Cold Warriors chart course Page 5 Trunk or Treat Kings Bay children start Halloween early Page 4 Sub Vets Memorial Service Friday At WW II Submarine Vets Memorial Pavilion starting at 10 a.m. Submarine Veterans will participate in the United States Submarine Force World War II Memorial Service, at 10 a.m., Friday, Nov. 1 at the World War II Submarine Veterans Memorial Pavilion, outside Trident Training Facility on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Capt. Stephen Gillespie, Deputy Commander and Chief of Sta, Subma rine Group Ten, is the scheduled guest speaker for the Memorial Service. Other scheduled participants, subject to change, will be Capt. Ed Mayer, Com manding Ocer USS Florida (SSGN 728). He will present the preamble. Submarine Group 10 Command Mas ter Chief Shaun Garvin will be master of ceremonies. Capt. Steve Hall, Deputy Commodore Fast attacks USS Virginia, USS Minnesota rst to integrate female ocerse fast attack submarines USS Vir ginia (SSN 774) and USS Minnesota (SSN 783) have been selected as the initial two Virginia-class submarines to integrate fe male ocers, announced Oct. 15. A total of six female ocers, two Sup ply Corps and four nuclear-trained, will report aboard no later than January 2015. Both submarines are homeported in Groton, Conn. Female ocers serving aboard Vir ginia-class submarines is the next natu ral step to more fully integrate women into the submarine force, Sec retary of the Navy Ray Mabus said. ere are many extremely talented and capable women with a desire to succeed in this eld and the submarine force will be stronger because of their eorts. Our Navy has proven over the years that one of our greatest advan tages is our diversity. is is an advantage we should capitalize on across all plat forms, including submarines. Since the Navy ocially changed its policy prohibiting women from serving on submarines on April 29, 2010, the subma rine force has integrated 43 women onto six Ohio-class ballistic-missile (SSBN) and guided-missile submarines (SSGN). Further Virginia-class integration is being planned in the submarine force. My plan is to begin by integrating four Virginia-class attack submarines, with the second set of two units being integrated in Fiscal Year 2016, said Vice Adm. Michael Connor, commander, Submarine Forces. Since Virginia and Minnesota are both Atlantic Fleet sub marines home ported in Groton, Conn., I intend to select two Pacic Fleet subma rines home ported in Pearl Harbor, Ha waii early next year. e female ocers will be assigned to the Virginia-class submarines for duty after completing the nuclear submarine training pipeline, which consists of nuclear power school, prototype training and the Submarine Ocer Basic Course. Submarines with women currently serving on board are USS Florida (SSGN 728), USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), homeported in Kings Bay, Ga., and USS Ohio (SSGN 726), USS Louisiana (SSBN 743), and USS Maine (SSBN 741), homeported in Ban gor, Wash. Women assigned to SSNs Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Horror with a causeNSBs Seabees haunted house supports ball e Seabees of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were busy the early weeks of October, planning their annual haunted house. Nearly 50 of them worked together to bring a night of horror to military families and friends for the 14th consecutive year. At a cost of $3 per per son, the funds from the haunted house are used to support the annual Sea bees Ball. e Haunted House was so scary, 17-year-old Camden High School stu dent Ashanti Je-Mapp said. ere was a joker and Jason hiding in the woods. Ive been to the Jacksonville Zoo haunted house, and this was far better. My money was def initely well spent. Operations Chief Steven Maldonado said they designed the haunted house for sheer terror, but safety remained a top priority. Some of the Seabees who helped build this years haunted house were rst-time participants. Others, like EO2 Michael Ivey, who has contributed

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is now providing annual inu enza vaccine to service members, retirees and families. e u vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, se lected reserves and healthcare work ers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for everyone age six months and up. Its the rst and most important step in protecting against u viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epi demics of inuenza occur every year in the United States, usually be tween October and April. Typically, epidemics cause thousands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the U.S. A vaccine to prevent inuenza has been available since the 1940s, yet some patients dont take the time to get the vaccine, even after the recent 2009 H1N1 global pandemic the rst such pandemic in more than 40 years. Inuenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shaking hands, sneezing or talking closely with another person. Typical u symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, conges tion, cough, runny nose and di culty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the im munocompromised. H1N1 u virus has similar symp toms, sometimes also including vom iting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and children. NBHC Kings Bay oers two kinds of u vaccine. Flu mist, an intranasal vaccine that is squirted into the nose, can be given to healthy patients ages two to 49. e injectable vaccine, or u shot, is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with a chronic medical con dition such as emphysema. e shot is safe for pregnant wom en at any time during pregnancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breast feeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective u antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immunization. At NBHC Kings Bay, patients can walk-in for u vaccine 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Flu vaccine walk-ins will be conducted from 7 to 11 a.m. only, on the last Friday of each month, to facilitate command training. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. e Navy-Marine Corps Relief Societys Bud get 4 Baby Class is Nov. 7. Learn what expenses you should plan for and how to make wise nancial decisions, where you can you nd the best prices on diapers and formula, and what baby furniture you will need. At the workshop, youll receive a Junior Sea Bag, which includes layette items like crib sheets, onesies and a baby blanket handmade by a Society volun teer. To register, call (912) 573-3928.RecruitMilitary will have a Veteran Job Fair 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 7 in Jacksonville at Everbank Field. For more infor mation, visit www.prlog.org/12221360-jobfair-for-veterans-scheduled-for-jacksonvilleon-november-7.htmlVFW Post No. 8385 will host the annual Vet erans Day Parade at 10 a.m., Nov. 11 in downtown Kingsland. At the conclusion of the pa rade, all are invited to the Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park for the 11 a.m. Spouse House pavilion dedication ceremony, followed by a southern fried catsh dinner at the Kingsland Depot Pavilion, 200 E. King Ave. in downtown Kingsland.e Camden Partnerships Inaugural Kings Bay/Camden Community Golf Classic begins with registration and brunch 10 to 11:30 a.m., ursday, Nov. 7 at Trident Lakes Golf Course on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Best Ball play begins at noon. All funds raised will benet the Dolphin Scholarship Founda tion, St. Marys Submarine Museum and e Camden Partnership. For more information, contact Marty Klumpp at martyklumpp@tds. net or (912) 227-2148. In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Re ward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter for college. e next draw ing will be at the end of August. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point av erage equivalent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grad ing period and must re-enter with each quali fying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount cou pons for NEX products and services. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded more than $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its gen erous vendor partners. There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.The Habitat Ride to Build Poker Run, benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Camden County, will be Nov. 16. The ride begins and ends at VFW of Kingsland. Cost is $20 for rider and one passenger, one poker hand, cook out, music. For more information, contact Haylinder at (912) 552-4563.e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvilleceltic festival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Branch Health Clinic oers u shots NBHC Kings Bay Dont let eas drive your pet crazyFlea allergy dermatitis or sen sitivity to fleas is a common issue in veterinary medicine. We call it the pants o allergy because the itching and subsequent hair-loss tends to start at the base of the tail and progresses down both back legs, making them look like they arent wearing their pants. It can be seasonal in some parts of the country, but here in Georgia it has the potential to be a yearround issue. Some dogs and cats are sensitive to the saliva of the ea, so when they are bitten it causes a local reac tion. e reaction itches, causing the animal scratch and chew on his or herself. It is important to know that for a sensitive animal, one ea bite can be enough to cause the itching. Your pet may be suering from ea allergy dermatitis even if you dont see any eas. Once a pet starts chewing on his or herself, they can cause an infection of bacteria and/or yeast on the surface of the skin. is infection then adds to the itching, making it a vicious cycle of itching and chewing. is chewing and scratching is known as self-trauma, and it can lead to hair loss, redness, formation of papules little bumps on the skin and more. is itching and scratching can lead to hot spots, which are a worsening of the super cial skin infection. If you suspect that you pet may be sensitive to eas, call your veterinar ian. It is important to treat the skin infection and to take care of the eas. We typically recommend a good monthly ea preventive, as well as treating the home and possibly us ing a pill that kills eas for 24 hours. Feel free to contact the vet clinic her at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay with questions or to schedule an appointment for your pet, at 573-0755. Dont let eas drive your pet crazy! Four-Legged World By Capt. Lauren Seal, USA Kings Bay Veterinarian In an eort to establish positive access control measures at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, eective Nov. 4, National Crime Information Center background checks must be completed for all persons or groups that do not have access to NSB Kings Bay that will be attending special events on the base, to include wed dings, receptions, birthday parties, retirements, change of commands, homecomings, sports and more. A uniformed service member or government employee with a valid Common Access Card, a military re tiree with a valid DoD identication credential, or an adult dependent of at least 16 years of age with a valid DoD identication credential is allowed to sponsor any vehicle occupants with out a NCIC background check. All vehicle occupants 16 years of age and older must have a valid non-expired identication card. A valid escort may escort up 10 guests. e escort must remain with his/her guest at all times. All guests list to be placed on the gates will be delivered to the SUBASE Physical Security Division, Bldg. 2026, for review, NCIC back ground check and approval before being posted on the gates. e guest list will include name of event, date, time, place and a point of contact to include a phone num ber. All guest lists must be received seven days in advance of the event. e point-of-contact is Cheryl Par ish at 573-9640 or Cheryl.parish@ navy.mil or Randy Sewell at 573-4402 or Randy.Sewell.ctr@navy.mil.Physical Security to begin checks Physical Security Division FFSC workshops FFSC will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or class room and guarantee a minimum of ve participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human re sources and social issues. Counsel ors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly as signed personnel and family mem bers of active duty personnel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tues days, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. This interactive program intro duces the basic concepts of finan cial retirement planning, including the military retirement system and the new Thrift Savings Plan. Its 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 7. Registration is required. Call 573-4513 to register. The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplating marriage. The work shop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of marriage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not avail able. For more information call 5734512. Are you frustrated with your chil dren? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to com plete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, chil dren dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 4, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is

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Adri Iranians rescued While operating in the northern waters of the Arabian Gulf, a small ves sel capsized in a remote area leaving ve Iranian mariners stranded with no one to rescue them. is was the scenario these men faced prior to their chance discovery by the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Maui. Rescue did not come to their aid until this 110-foot Coast Guard cutter hap pened to come across the mariners whose lives were saved by the quick-think ing Coast Guard crew. e crew, who had trained intensely for such a situation, swiftly moved into action in the early morning hours of Oct. 11, while assigned to Com bined Task Force 152. As the sun rose over the horizon, Petty Ocer 1st Class Kevin Sweetman spotted a faint orange object oating in the dis tance. Once Sweetman reported the object, Mauis crew altered course to investigate. As Maui approached the object, Sweetman was able to identify a man waving an orange ag. I waited a few seconds after realizing it was a man waving a ag, Sweetman said. I had to be positive on what I was seeing before passing the informa tion to the bridge. Shortly after the bridge team was notied of the sighting, an announcement was heard around the ship. e crew of Maui stepped into action rely ing on everything they had learned to this point in their careers. It seemed like a blur, we knew what we had to do and without hesitation our training kicked in as if it was instinct, said Sea man CJ Garza. As Maui navigated clos er to the person in the wa ter, Sweetman was able to identify four more mari ners lying in the raft. e crew rescued the ve Iranian mariners from the life raft within min utes after they arrived on scene. One of the survivors in formed the Maui on-scene leader that their Iranian dhow had capsized and they had been adrift. With the ve Iranian mariners safely aboard, the crews focus shifted to providing medical treat ment. Once all the survivors were provided initial rst aid they were given food, water, blankets and clothing. I am very proud of my crew for the judgment they used and actions they took throughout the situation, said Lt. Earl Potter, commanding ocer of Maui. I think we were ex tremely fortunate to nd these ve men. ey were all visibly weakened and suering from extreme ex posure when we got them aboard. I dont know how much longer they would have lasted. Commander, Task Force 55 made initial arrange ments for the mariners to be transferred to the Iranian Coast Guard ship Naji 7. at evening Maui con tacted the Naji 7 to work out the details of the trans fer of the mariners. It was quite a day, in cluding working with the Iranians to conduct a nighttime small-boat transfer, Potter said. is case clearly demonstrates how exible the Coast Guard is and another way we add value in this region. From the moment we arrived to the moment we transferred them to the Iranian coast guard vessel, the ve mariners expressed their gratitude and relief that we were able to help them, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Mark Delacruz. e Bahrain-based cut ter and crew are currently assigned to Patrol Forces Southwest Asia and ac tively participate with CTF-152. CTF-152 is one of three task forces operating un der Combined Maritime Forces. e partnership with the task force denes the service in being nation ally deployed and glob ally connected bringing military expertise and response capability any where Americas maritime interests extend. In the case of the rescue of these ve Iranians, the maritime interests extended to saving lives at sea. ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. There will be Ombudsman Basic Training for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 4 to 8. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service mem bers wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC An assistant professor at the University of Southern California funded by the Oce of Naval Research, is highlighted as one of this years Brilliant 10 young scientists and en gineers Popular Science magazines October issue. e annual feature highlighted Dr. Andrea Ar mani, who-with support from ONR-could help the Navy save lives through new understandings of light and biology. With steady backing from ONR, including both the Young Investiga tor Award Program and recognition under the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, Armani has invented a range of devices that allow her to explore the nano-world of viruses, bacteria and DNA and their interactions with the environment. One immediate application of her research is im proving detection abilities of pathogens in dierent environments. Shes developing the capabilities that will be used in future conicts to keep Sailors and Marines out of harms way, said Dr. Timothy Bentley, program ocer in ONRs Warghter Performance Department. While biosensors like those created by Armani would give warghters in creased protection against biological threats on the battleeld, her research also holds implications for communications, pre ventative healthcare and more. ONRs support allows me to pursue high-risk research that ultimately has benets in many areas, Armani said. When you have that kind of encour age ment, theres no end to what you can discov er, and the next break through could come when you least expect it. She recently developed a sensor to detect ultraviolet light that could help fend o diseases associated with excessive expo sure. Given the simplicity of the detection mechanism, it has many potential ap plications, including water monitoring. Now Armani and ONR are embarking on a new project to study the way cells communicate af ter damage from a blast incident. e ndings could help scientists create biomarkers to better understand blast injuries and develop protective methods and therapies for traumatic brain injury, a problem faced by many military service members. But ONRs research investment in Armanis work is making an impact beyond what happens on the battleeld, Bentley said. Dr. Armani attracts some of the brightest young researchers to work in her lab and makes a lot of connections through her work, he said. is is invaluable as we build up our network of national and international scientists who carry our research from the mili tary and into the world at large. e Department of the Navys Oce of Naval Research provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 coun tries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR researcher honoredof Submarine Squadron 20, and Capt. John Carter, Commander, Submarine Squadron 16, will read the list of boats on Eternal Patrol, the 52 U.S. subma rines lost in World War II, as well as USS resher (SSN 593), USS Scorpion (SSN 589) and British sub marines. Squadron 20 CMC Ed die Van Meter and Retired Master Chief Buddy Raquer will toll the bell. Squadron 16 CMC Mitch Burgin will sound the klaxon. Lt. Cmdr. Sean Far rell (Ret.) will place the wreath. Cmdr. Ted Fanning of Kings Bays Chapel will give the benedicition and invocation. NSB Kings Bay CMC Randy Huckaba will give the rememberance. CSC Kevin Calliste will present the POW/MIA Table. e ceremony will in clude music by the Navy Band Southeast and Vol ume One from Camden County High School. Fridays World War II Memorial Service will be followed at Trident Training Facility by a lunch, hosted by the TTF Chief Petty Ocers Association, and tours. About 230 Sub Vets and their family members are planning to attend. Each year we have the honor to host the World War II Submarine Memorial here at Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay, Kings Bay Command Mas ter Chief Randy Huckaba said. It is the pinnacle of all events we do here for the submarine force, because we pay homage to those who have paid the ultimate sacrice and paved the way for all future submariners. I can think of no better way to spend a week of tribute than to honor our veterans. Friday evening, a 6 p.m. steak dinner sponsored by Trident Ret Facility Chief Petty Ocer Association will be at the Kings Bay Goat Locker. e Order of the Eagles will host a Low Country Boil at the Eagles Club in St. Marys at 3 p.m., Satur day, Nov. 2. Every year, submarine veterans from around the country travel to Camden County and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to catch up with old friends and shipmates. Sub Vets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 5 Diesel-powered submarines played a critical role in the U.S. Navys success during WWII. But the Allied victory over German U-boats in the Atlan tic indicated that submarines designed primarily for surfaced operations had limited future eectiveness. Two issues confronted designers greater underwater speed and endurance. e rst issue, speed, was ad dressed in 1945 through hull shape experiments at the Na vys David Taylor Model Basin. ese tests resulted in the tear drop hull design. First implemented on the experimental USS Albacore (SS-569), the teardrop design enabled unprecedented submerged speeds. e advent of nuclear power solved the undersea endurance problem, and truly revolution ized submarine design and naval warfare. In 1954, the Navy launched USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds rst nuclear-powered submarine. USS Skipjack (SSN-585) was the rst submarine to combine the endurance of nuclear pro pulsion and the high-speed teardrop hull design. Every American submarine built since 1958 incorporates these features. roughout the Cold War, U.S. military forces contained and deterred the Soviet Union and her allies from attacking the free world. e Submarine Force played a vital role, checking the Soviets in two ways. First, U.S. ballistic missile sub marines deterred nuclear war by maintaining a survivable retalia tory strike capability against any nuclear attack on the U.S. Second, U.S. attack submarines monitored the rapidly expanding Soviet Navy while conducting in telligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. Dominance over the Soviet Navy was vital in preserving maritime superiority during the Cold War. During this time period, U.S. attack submarines monitored Soviet naval development and open ocean naval operations in the Mediterranean, Atlantic, and Pacic oceans. U.S. SSNs obtained vital information on Soviet naval capabilities and weaknesses while underscor ing American determination to defend the nation and her allies from attack. While almost all Cold War op erations remain classied, two recently declassied missions showcase Submarine Force capabilities. USS Guardsh (SSN-612) si lently tracked a Soviet cruise missile (SSGN) submarine which was following U.S. air craft carriers o Vietnam in the 1970s, ready to protect our ships should the SSGN launch its mis siles. In 1978, in the Atlantic, USS Batsh (SSN-681) tracked a Soviet ballistic missile submarine sailing o the East Coast of the U.S., learning Soviet SSBN patrol areas and operating patterns Silent Service key player during Cold War The NavyIn the Cold WarSpecial report e USS Barb, a 1,525-ton Gato class submarine built at Groton, Connecticut, was com missioned in July 1942. at fall the submarine was sent to operate in European wa ters, taking part in the Morocco invasion in November. Four more war patrols in the rst half of 1943 took her to the Bay of Biscay, the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea but pro duced no damage to the enemy. In mid-1943 Barb went to the Pacic. at fall her sixth war patrol took her o China, where it damaged two enemy ships. Fol lowing a West Coast overhaul, Barb operated in the central and western Pacic during March and April 1944, sinking one ship and bombarding an enemy shore facility. After that, under Cmdr. Eu gene B. Fluckey, Barbs skipper for the rest of the war, the sub marines combat record became remarkably successful. Barbs eighth war patrol, o northern Japan in May through July, deprived the enemy of ve ships and saw the rst of many gunre actions that ultimately destroyed some 20 small vessels. On her ninth war patrol, oper ating with two other submarines between the Philippines and China in August and Septem ber 1944, Barb sank three more Japanese ships, among them the escort carrier Unyo. In addition, Barb rescued 14 Allied prisoners of war. e subs next two cruises, in the East China Sea during Oc tober 1944 through February 1945, were also made in close cooperation with other U.S. submarines. Barb sank two ships on its 10th patrol and four more on its 11th, with a partial credit for another. e 11th patrol was conduct ed in the Formosa Straits and East China Sea o the east coast of China, from Shanghai to Kam Kit. During this patrol, Barb, dis playing the ultimate in skill and daring, penetrated Namkwan Harbor on the China coast and wrought havoc upon a convoy of some 30 enemy ships at anchor. Riding dangerously in shallow waters, Barb launched its tor pedoes into the enemy group and then retired at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heav ily mined, and rock-obstructed waters. In recognition of this out standing patrol, Fluckey was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and Barb re ceived the Presidential Unit Ci tation. e Presidential Unit Citation read as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese sur face forces in restricted waters of the Pacic. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the Barb relentlessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomi table fury despite unfavorable attack opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled su perbly, she held undeviatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of USS Barb, one of World War IIs submarine stars Eugene Bennett Fluckey was born in Wash ington, D.C., on 5 October 1913. Following four years at the U.S. Naval Academy, he graduated with the Class of 1935 and re ceived a commission. Ensign Fluckeys rst as signments, as an ocer of the battleship Nevada and the destroyer McCormick, were followed in 1938 by instruction at the Submarine School, New London, located at Groton, Connecticut. In December of that year Lt. j.g. Fluckey was assigned to the submarine S-42. He served in USS Bonita in 1941 to 1942, during which time he was promoted to Lieutenant. From mid-1942 into early 1944, Fluckey received Naval Engineering instruction and attended Prospective Com manding Ocers School at New London, then went to the Pacic where he made a war patrol as Prospective Commanding Ocer of the submarine Barb, Promoted to Lt. Commander in May 1943 and Commander in March 1944, he assumed command of Barb in late April Fluckeys daring set Barbs pace

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Navy College information Fluckey hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerous ly, surfaced, in shallow wa ter, the Barb launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retiring at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed wa ters. Inexorable in combat, the Barb also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpedoing and sinking of a hostile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japanese Empire. Determined in carrying the ght to the enemy, the Barb has achieved an illus trious record of gallantry in action, reecting the high est credit upon her valiant ocers and men and upon the United States Naval Service. Another Mare Island overhaul gave Barb a larg er deck gun and a rocket launcher. Returning to northern Japan in June 1945 for its 12th war patrol, both of these weapons were used to sink small craft and bombard shore facilities. Barbs torpedoes sank two more ships, a freighter and the escort Kaibokan No. 112, and some of its crew made raid ashore that destroyed a railroad train. Barb ended World War II among the dozen topscoring U.S. submarines in terms of ships sunk, and third in terms of tonnage. If a disputed credit for another ship is counted, Barb would have ranked rst in the latter category. After returning to the U.S. East Coast in Sep tember 1945, Barb was generally inactive until formally decommis sioned in February 1947. e intensied Cold War brought Barb back into commission in December 1951, and it performed training service until midJanuary 1954. Barb then underwent conversion to the streamlined Guppy conguration and oper ated briey on trials and training from August until December 1954, when it was loaned to Italy and re named Enrico Tazzoli. e submarine served actively with the Italian Navy until 1972 and was sold for scrapping in April 1975.Barb of the latter year. During ve war patrols Cmdr. Fluckeys initiative and agressiveness cost the enemy at least 16 ships, many small craft and facilities ashore, earning a Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses for himself, and Presiden tial Unit Citations and the Navy Unit Commendation for Barb. In August 1945 Cmdr. Fluckey became Prospective Commanding Ocer of the new submarine Dogsh, then under construction at Groton, Conn. However, this assignment ended after a few months and he began duty in Washington, D.C., rst in the Oce of the Secretary of the Navy, then at the War Plans Division and, beginning in late 1945, as Personal Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz. In June 1947 he again received a seagoing command, the modernized submarine Halfbeak. From 1949 to 1950 Fluckey served on the sta of Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet and from October 1950 to July 1953 was U.S. Naval Attache at Lisbon, Portugal. Command of Submarine Division 52 in 1953 to 1954 was followed, af ter his promotion to the rank of Captain, by command of the submarine tender Sperry and of Submarine Squad ron Five. During the later 1950s Captain Fluckey was assigned to the Naval Academy, attended the National War Col lege and served with the National Security Council. Selection for promotion to Rear Admiral in mid-1960 was followed by tours as Commander Amphibious Group Four, presidency of the Board of Inspection and Survey and a temporary assignment as Task Force Di rector of the Shipyards Appraisal Group. In June 1964 Rear Admiral Fluckey became Com mander Submarine Force, Pacic, and in July 1966 he reported as Director of Naval Intelligence. Two years later he became Chief of the Military Assistance Advi sory Group, Portugal. Fluckey retired from active duty at the beginning of August 1972. He died in 2007 at age 93. and providing early indi cations of any potential surprise attack on the U.S. As the Cold War progressed, the Soviet Navy expanded substantially in size and capability. Concerned about U.S. submarine superiority, the Soviet Union devoted considerable resources to improving the quality of their submarine force, which throughout the Cold War was much larger than the U.S. Submarine Force. By the 1980s, Soviet sub marines had narrowed, but not eliminated, the submarine technology gap. e U.S. Navy count ed on the superiority of its submarines and, above all, its submariners in the event of hostilities.Cold War Pearl Harbor veteran at rest A burial ceremony in honor of retired chief petty ocer and Pearl Harbor survivor Yuell Chandler was Oct. 10 at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacic. e event in the his toric Punchbowl Cemetery was attended by U.S. Navy Sailors, friends and family members of Chandler, who passed away on Oct. 2 at the age of 95. An overview of Yuell Chandlers life was provided by Pearl Harbor Survivors Liaison, Jim Taylor, who spoke about his experiences to those in attendance. Chandler was born April 28, 1918 in Rich mond, Va, where he started o his military career by joining the U.S. Army in March 1939 and then later enlisting as a Seabee in the U.S. Navy where he retired as a chief petty ocer. Of the ceremonies I have participated in this was the rst one that I was actually par ticipating in the burial of a fellow Seabee, said Navy Utilitiesman 2nd Class Jeremy Orndolf, assigned to Joint Base Honors and Ceremonies. It was an honor to be a part of this, know ing that we are saying farewell to one of our own. Chandler served in many battles during his service in the military including the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the Battle of Iwo Jima from February to March of 1945. While in the Navy he served in Vietnam dur ing which he retired. He told the story of how he actually tripped over a box of grenades the Japanese had set for a trap, luckily none of them exploded, said Taylor. e family still has two of them he saved, of course they are diused and are harmless. According to Taylor, Chandler found himself in another dangerous incident during his time in Iwo Jima in which he found himself sleeping on top of a buried dud explosive under his bed. Following his time at war he became a help ing hand to his ship mates. Chandler helped them obtain benets they were to receive and provided guidance to fellow Pearl Harbor sur vivors on medical care and equipment. He helped with all the paperwork which can be very dicult, ob viously he cared for his shipmates, said Taylor. Chandler retired dur ing the Vietnam War in October 1962 and later volunteered at the Na tional Park Service and the Arizona Memorial Visitor Center. ere he not only visited the memorial but signed autographs and told his stories. e tourists loved hearing his stories, he was there at minimum three times a week, said Taylor. He served as a volunteer for over 28 years, leaving many wonderful memories for the visitors he talked to and even more impor tantly those of the National Park Service and the employees from Pacic Historic Parks. Aileen Utterbyke, CEO of Pacic Historic Parks, remarked about the many years Chan dler spent volunteering. For Pacic Histor ic Parks, Yuell Bob Chandler was like fam ily to us, said Utterbyke. He was very dedicated in what he did. His drive was to share his experi ences with the visitors who came throughout the parks. At the end of the cer emony Chief Chandler received full military honors for his dedica tion and service includ ing a rie salute by the Joint Base Honors and Ceremonial Guard and the playing of Taps by a Navy bugler. His family was presented with the national ensign during a ag presentation.

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Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Fall Camp Registration at the Youth Center. Camp runs from Nov. 25 to 29, but is closed anksgiving. Camp is for kin dergartener to 12-year-olds. SAC patrons, single/dual mili tary, wounded/fallen warriors, and IAs registration begins Nov. 4. Active duty with working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Nov. 12 and DoD Contractors and all others will start Nov. 18. Register 8 a.m. to noon, Monday to Fri day. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/ pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certi cate must be available for conr mation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. No outside food allowed. Breakfast, lunch and snack will be provid ed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome chil dren of all abilities. Free Movies for the Kids Weekend Movies at 1 p.m. for November are Monsters University Nov. 2 and 3, Epic Nov. 9 and 10, Hotel Transylvania Nov. 16 and 17, Despicable Me 2 Nov. 23 and 24 and Turbo Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. Movie sched ule is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youth under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Winter Break 2013 at the Youth Center Camp runs Dec. 23 to Jan. 10, but is closed Christmas Day and New Years Day, for kindergarteners to 12 years old. SAC patrons, single/ dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and IAs registration begins Dec. 2. Active duty with working or student spouse and DoD employees, registration begins Dec. 9 and DoD contrac tors and all others will start on Dec. 16. Register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, except holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent LES/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must pro vide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch andsnacks will be pro vided. No outside food allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. The Combined Federal Campaign season has started Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can support with your giving. e num bers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018.Wobble Gobble 5K Nov. 13 Just for kids Youth Camp signup to start e Wobble Gobble 5K Run is Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex. Sign-ups start at 6:30 a.m. with the race beginning at 7 a.m. Bring a canned food item for donation, which will benet Camden House. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Movie Under the Stars On Saturday, Nov. 9 at about 7 p.m. at Youth Center Ballfields, free admission with the feature presenta tion showing Despicable Me 2 (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and your own movie snacks. For more information, (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 5105400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos. Liberty call to this project for the last four years, was given the opportunity to design the layout in his last week at Kings Bay. My husband and I were stationed here right before the haunted house began, Iveys wife, Kaleigh, said. He immediately jumped right into it, and loved it ever since. Once completed, some patrons waited nearly 20 minutes in the crisp night air to experience the fright of the Seabees haunted house. ose who found the courage to go in did not leave disappointed. Screams could be heard in the distance, while adults and children ran from the house. Although the Seabees contributed hundreds of hours of labor to the haunted house, they said the project would not have been successful without the support of their spous es and children. Together, they were all able to con tribute to the fun and fear of the Halloween season. e contribution of the Seabees will continue. In a few weeks, they will work with Morale, Welfare and Recreation to transform the haunted house into a laser tag arena for single, active duty members to enjoy. Haunted THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove Galley menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Usually in this space, I pose a question, like, What do you put on your hamburger? or Whats a good movie youve seen lately? With the Sub Vets in town, I decided to change up and see what submariners and others have said about themselves. Theres a good Web site, submarinesailor.com, that had some quotes to help me get started. The years listed are the years of military service, except in Churchills case, where the dates are when he served as prime minister.Winston Churchill Prime Minister Great Britain 1945-47, -55 Of all the branches of men in the forces there is none which shows more devotion and faces grimmer perils than the submariners. Adm. Charles Lockwood USN, 1912-47 I can assure you that they went down fighting and that their brothers who survived them took a grim toll of our sav age enemy to avenge their deaths. Lt. James Michener USN, WW II Author, Tales of the South Pacific I saw the submariners, the way they stood aloof and silent, watching their pig boat with loving eyes. They are alone in the Navy... the submari ners! In the entire fleet they stand apart! Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz USN, 1905-66 We shall never for get that it was our submarines that held the lines against the enemy while our fleets replaced losses and repaired wounds. Cmdr. Howard Gilmore USN, 1920-43 Medal of Honor Take her down! (Wounded by machine gun fire and unable to go below, Gilmore gave the order sacrificing himself so his submarine could dive to safety.) Adm. Hyman Rickover USN, 1918-82 I believe it is the duty of each of us to act as if the fate of the world depended on him. Admittedly, one man by himself cannot do the job. However, one man can make a difference. Gen. Collin Powell USA, 1958-93 No one has done more to prevent con flict, no one has made a greater sacrifice for the cause for peace, than you, Americas proud missile subma rine family. You stand tall among our heroes of the Cold War. Military Postal Service Agency ocials recom mend that parcel post packages for service members overseas be mailed by Nov. 12 for delivery by the holidays. Ocials at MPSA, an extension of the U.S. Post al Service, have published a chart at http://hqdainet. army.mil/mpsa/xmas. htm that shows deadlines for various mailing options, broken down by the APO/FPO/DPO numbers of various destinations. USPS is oering a dis count on its largest Prior ity Mail Flat Rate box at $14.85. e price includes a $2 per box discount for military mail being sent to APO/FPO/DPO destinations worldwide, ocials said. Priority Mail Flat Rate boxes are available free at local post oces, or can be ordered from USPS online. Postage, labels and customs forms also are available online.Holiday mail delivery deadlines announced THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Marines and Sailors with Black Sea Rotational Force 14 conducted training with Romanian soldiers from the 812th Mechanized Infantry Brigade in Bistrita, Romania, Oct. 7 to 12. Platinum Lynx kicked-o with an opening ceremony to begin the engage ment and partnership between U.S. and Romanian forces. Marines, Sailors and Soldiers conduct ed mounted and dismounted patrols, a platoon live-re exercise, movementto-contact, and concluded with a clos ing ceremony. e Marines and sailors also got to experience culture in the sur rounding area with a cultural day held on that Saturday. e partnership between these two forces tie-in with BSRF-14s mission of promoting regional stability and security, increasing military capacity and interop erability and maintaining partnerships with their counterparts in Eastern Europe. Romanian First Sergeant Florin Zanr, a squad leader with the 812th MIB, said that the opening ceremony was an intro duction of both forces, and helped them get to know each other better. e opening ceremony is good because we have to respect the countries that we have to work alongside; we have to know each other, the techniques, tac tics and procedures better, said Zanr. Cpl. Roderic Liggens, an infantryman with BSRF-14 and Washington, D.C. native, said that the opening ceremony was a presentation to welcome the Marines to Bistrita. It shows the news and other networks that [the Marines] are here [promoting] partnerships with other forces, said Lig gens. After the opening ceremony, the Ro manian soldiers showed the Marines their various vehicles and weapons sys tems. Marines and soldiers ended the day with rehearsals for the upcoming events. e Marines and soldiers began work ing together on mounted and dismounted patrols, and a quick reaction force, which consisted of setting up cordons inside the defense of operations, loading vehicles and patrolling, and patrolling on foot. Marines and Soldiers were able to adapt and overcome any challenges they encountered while training together in new terrain. In this training the dismounted patrol was better because in that area there is not a lot of space to maneuver, said Zanr. ere are a lot of slopes so it was bet ter for the soldiers to come on foot. Liggens said that, overall, there were many positive outcomes with the mount ed and dismounted patrols. ey were very good with communi cation with radios, said Liggens. When we were getting attacked they were able to gain enough distance so if an improvised explosive device [were to go o], it would only aect one vehicle compared to all of them. e following day the Marines and soldiers participated in a live-re exercise which consisted of buddy-rushing and movement-under-re. Liggens said that the platoon live-re proved to be a challenge because the Ma rines had to adapt to a new way of shoot ing. e range was awesome because of how they made it in line with the trench ing, it gave Marines training with how to basically dive in the trench and shoot from it, said Liggens. We had to adapt because we are so used to shooting from the prone, and we couldnt do that so we had to get used to shooting in an un stable position. It also let them know that you can take a whole platoon and move them either simultaneously or at dier ent times. e last training event of the week was movement-to-contact which started o with a mounted patrol, followed by Ma rines and soldiers walking up a hill where they had to work together to cordon o the surrounding area from IEDs. To com plete the exercise, Marines and soldiers were ambushed and then had to nd a weapons casualty. Its to see how the [Marines] work, and for them to see how the Romanian forces work, said Zanr. Its all about the coop eration between these two nations, and af ter the training to be better on both ends. e training was benecial for both the Marines and Romanians. I think that it will benet us in the future, said Liggens. It builds a longer lasting relationship so well know how to work together, so now it wont be so dif cult for them to understand the way we do things, and for us to understand the way that they do things. e week-long exercise was concluded with a closing ceremony. e Romanian forces expressed grati tude for the partnership and training evolutions conducted during the week. e Marines expressed their gratitude by oering gifts to some of the Romanian soldiers. e force of the explosion initially lifted the en tire four-story structure, shearing the bases of the concrete support columns, each measuring fteen feet in circumference and rein forced by numerous oneand-three-quarter-inch steel rods. e airborne building then fell in upon itself. is was the scene as described in Eric Hammels e Root: e Marines in Beirut, August 1982-February 1984, the authoritative source on the 1983 Beirut bombing. is scene claimed the life of 220 Marines, 18 Sailors and 3 Soldiers, most killed as they slept in their racks. Of those who witnessed those nightmare events, two remain on active duty today. Non-commis sioned ocers within Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa organized a Beirut bombing memo rial Oct. 23 which remembered those who lost their lives or were impacted by the sad day in Americas history 30 years ago. Most of the organiz ers were not alive when it happened yet they felt a bond beyond the uniform. Sgt. Bryson M. Jones, one of the event organiz ers and Washington Court House, Ohio native, said the NCOs thought it was important to take a mo ment, remind their fellow Marines of why we are here, the Marine to the left and the right of us and honoring those that came before us. Although 30 years had passed, the Marines of MARFOREUR and MAR FORAF, gathering to hon or the memory of those Americans, have much in common with the Marines in Beirut. As the Marines of to day witnessed the event played on the overhead projector, they were re minded that history is not just an abstract class in high school or a channel on television. e Marines in Beirut were on a peace keeping mission to restore order to Lebanon during a time of religious ghting between Christians and Muslims. An extremist from the ter rorist organization Islamic Jihad was on a suicide mis sion, driving a truck with as much as 21,000 pounds of explosives. e reported reason for the attack was the American presence in the country during the Lebanese Civil War. is story is an all too familiar story to the Marines at this years memo rial, after 12 years of the Global War on Terrorism. ey know the high cost of ghting an enemy that hates you for simply hav ing a presence in their country. ese Marines are liv ing the lessons learned on that fateful morning as they support the deployment of Marines working with countries across Af rica and Europe. e goal is to share these lessons to help bring and maintain stability to areas that are unstable, just as it was 30 years ago. e NCOs were keep ing with a tradition as old as the Marine Corps itself, one that has been taught since the early days of ba sic training history must be remembered, honored and passed on. Memories such as the Halls of Montezuma to the events at Iwo Jima are still talked about today. Memories of more re cent events such as the Beirut bombings or the battle of Fallujah must be honored. Corps remembers fallen in Beruit bombing e attack on the Marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, on Oct. 23, 1983 became a harbinger of what is known today as the war on terror, said Ma rine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos, during a ceremony in Jack sonville, N.C., to mark the 30th anni versary of the attacks. e terrorist truck bomb took the lives of 241 service members. e world we lived in and the fu ture we knew of a secure environment changed forever that morning of Oct. 23, Amos said. e nation was not expecting this. It was a new kind of warfare. e threat of radical extrem ists being able to target military and civilian personnel with weapons of mass destruction for political, reli gious and personal gains was a new way to attack the West. It was a cow ardly act on freedom. e early 1980s was a tumultuous time of conicting powers, Amos told the audience of Marines, as well as families and friends of those killed in the attack. [at era] indeed became the har binger of more challenging times yet to come, the general said. Tensions were high across the world, the Cold War raged on, and radicalism sur faced as a new threat to stability in the Middle East. And, when conict ripped at the peaceful coexistence of Lebanon, the United States, France, Italy and Great Britain answered the call to assist, Amos said of the multinational peacekeeping force that went into Beirut. Amos described how Marines at tempted to serve as peace keepers at a time when the country was deeply immersed in a civil war. ey stood watch and patrolled chaotic streets to provide a blanket of safety and security and comfort for the citizens of Lebanon. ey stood for freedom, he said, adding that the Marines knew their protection of the citizens came with a risk. On Oct. 23, 1983, terror struck. At 6:22 a.m., extremists drove an explosivesladen truck into the Marine barracks the likes of which had never been wit nessed before. e massive explosion shook the ground of the entire Beirut International Airport along with the souls of all the Marines throughout the world, Amos said. Two-hundred and forty-one Ma rines and American soldiers and sail ors [who] volunteered to make a dif ference died in the attack, he added. ey volunteered to serve their country to put the lives and free doms of others before their own 241 of our nest, Amos said. We honor each of them today. Beginning with the attacks in Bei rut, extremists have attempted to de stroy what makes the United States great by attacking America at home and abroad, Amos pointed out. He recounted the 1996 Khobar Tow ers bombing in Saudi Arabia in which a truck detonated alongside a build ing that housed U.S. Air Force person nel, killing 19 and wounding 498. He also recalled the 1998 attacks on U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, in which 220 people were killed and more than 4,000 were wounded. Amos also spoke of the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole, berthed in Yemen, which resulted in the deaths of 17 American sailors and injured 39oth ers. On 9/11, Amos said, terror ists attacked America, in New York, the elds of Shanksville, Pa., and the Pentagon, killing nearly 3,000. We remember each of these well. We will never forgive, nor will we ever forget. In September 2012, he added, gun men attacked the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, killing four people, including U.S. Ambassador J. 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pher Stevens. Not only are these world-changing events, but they are very personal to all of us here today, Amos said. U.S. troops responded in countries such as Yemen, Somalia, Mali, Libya, Af ghanistan and Iraq, he said. Today, our Marines remain forwarddeployed, Amos said. Marine expedi tionary units are stationed around the globe the 26th, the 13th and the 31st Marines continue to train security forces and deny terrorists safe havens through out all of Afghanistan. When Marines respond to crises, they remain strong, and ready to respond and answer the nations call, Amos said. Since the fateful day of the Beirut at tacks, the Marines have stayed consistent in character and courage, and those traits have not wavered and never will, he said. Across the globe, extremists have at tempted to plot against our freedom and our democracy. ey have tested our re solve as a nation. ose men who died 30 years ago would be proud to know that we have never relented, Amos told the audience members, who responded with cries of Oorah! We have never backed down, and we never will, he said.Amos USS Rentz conscates 1,000 kg. of cocaineLess than a week after arriving on station fol lowing a port visit in Pan ama, USS Rentz (FFG 46) and embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment and helicopter squadron disrupted a shipment of 1,000 kg. of cocaine o the coast of Colombia in coordination with the Colombian navy Oct. 9. Rentz worked closely with the Colombian navy operating in the region to detect and intercept the high-speed vessel suspected of smuggling narcotics in international waters. Once Rentz detected and conrmed the location of the suspect boat, the Colombian navy quickly intercepted the boat and discovered the illegal contraband. e drugs were taken back to Colombia. We are pleased by the overall success of the op eration. From the intelli gence received from Joint Interagency Task Force South to the quick re sponse of our Colombian partners, Cmdr. Lance Lantier, commanding of cer of USS Rentz said. e seizure is worth an estimated street value of $80 million. is disruption was a signicant event in pre venting a substantial amount of drugs from be ing smuggled into the US and is a perfect example of the teamwork and joint operations we conduct everyday with our partner nations to support Operation Martillo counter transnational organized crime operations, Com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, Rear Adm. Sin clair M. Harris said. Rentz is currently de ployed to the 4th Fleet area of operations in sup port of Operation Martillo which began in Jan. 2012. Operation Martillo (Spanish for hammer) targets illicit tracking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus, and is an international, interagency operation led by Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth, a component of U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM). Since Operation Martil lo started, 318,133 pounds of cocaine, 25,052 pounds of marijuana worth an es timated $40 billion have been conscated. e Navy awarded a $0.01 delivery order Oct. 22 for dismantling and re cycling ex-USS Forrestal (AVT 59). e delivery order was made under an indenitedelivery, indenite-quantity contract to All Star Metals for the towing, dis mantling and recycling of conventionally powered aircraft carriers stricken from the Naval Vessel Reg ister. e price of the delivery order reects the net price proposed by All Star Met als, which considered the estimated proceeds from the sale of the scrap metal to be generated from dis mantling. In May 2012, the Navy solicited proposals for the award of up to three con tracts for the dismantling and recycling of inactive conventionally-powered aircraft carriers. All Star Metals is the rst of three successful oerors to receive its fa Forrestal sold for scap Tragedy struck in ight deck re e day was a typical one for the 5,000 o cers and enlisted men of the attack aircraft carrier USS Forrestal as the huge, 80,000-ton ship cut a wake through the calm waters of the Gulf of Tonkin. Overhead, the hot, THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 11

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cility security clearance, which is required prior to contract award. After the initial award of one carrier to each successful oeror, the Navy has the capability of scrapping additional conventionally-powered aircraft carriers over a veyear period under delivery orders competed between the three contractors. All Star Metals will now develop its nal tow plan for the Navys approval for the tow of ex-Forrestal from its current berth at the Navys inactive ship facility in Philadelphia to All Star Metals facility in Brownsville. e ship is expected to depart Philadelphia before the end of the year. Navy civilian personnel will be on site full time to monitor the contractors performance during dis mantling of the ship. Forrestal was decommissioned Sept. 11, 1993, after more than 38 years of service. On June 16, 1999, the Navy announced the ship would be available for donation to an eligible organization for use as a museum or memorial. However, no viable appli cations were received and the vessel was removed from donation hold in De cember 2003 and redesignated for disposal. e rst of the super carriers, Forrestal was launched Dec. 11, 1954, by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., and commissioned Sept. 29, 1955. Navy scientists and en gineers, famous for building the future eet, looked back at their history while celebrating the 95th Anni versary of Dahlgren Naval base on Diversity Day Oct. 16. Naval weapons technology artifacts, including the rst gun tested at Dahl gren 95 years ago, bring history to life. e World War I era seven-inch 45 caliber trac tor mounted artillery gun on display seemed to rel ish its role in igniting the commands history, as Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Com mander Capt. Michael Smith spoke to personnel gathered on the parade eld. e game-changing technology developed here is truly amazing, said Smith. From the rst shot red over the Po tomac River Test Range in 1918, to todays testing and development of the electromagnetic railgun and everything in be tween, we have used our scientic and engineering expertise to impact our nations defense at home and abroad. Volunteers from groups such as the National Society of Black Engineers and the Hispanic Association interacted with government civilians, contractors and military members as diverse jazz, rhythm and blues, and African-Puerto Rican (Bomba) bands played music in support of the events theme: Re ecting the Past... Build ing the Future. Many of the NSWCDD scientists and engineers in attendance routinely take their technical expertise to sea aboard ships and into war zones to ensure U.S. warghters can ght, win and come home safely. Todays leaders in pulsed power and directed energy were also among those who listened intently while Smith and the commands new tech nical director, Dennis McLaughlin, recounted the history of the base now known as Naval Support Facility Dahlgren. roughout the decades, the Dahlgren Naval Laboratory has been a leader in naval weapons technology, said Smith. Looking back on the many achievements of the past helps us to plan for the scientic and en gineering advancements that will propel the Navy into the future. Smith and McLaughlin reected on the impact of Dahlgrens diversity on the commands rich tech nological history. I have seen rst-hand the benets of hiring disabled veterans, said McLaughlin, who led the Navys Disabled Veteran Outreach eorts and later served as director of the Naval Sea Systems Com mand Wounded Warrior Program. I salute the Dahlgren Division human resource oce and Equal Employment Opportunity oce for your success in hiring wounded warriors and making sure they are assured of their value to the division and the great er Navy mission. We are indebted to men and women who came here from universi ties and labs all across the country bringing their diverse ideas and their fer vor for advancing science, technology engineering and mathematics as well as operational support skills, said Smith. We are also grateful to the many members of the local community who invested their futures in supporting the Navy at NSWC Dahlgren. eir diversity of thought coupled with their diver sity of cultures and back grounds have been key to our mission success. roughout its history, Dahlgren scientists and engineers provided the Navys core technical ca pability for the integration of sensors, weapons, and their associated weapon and combat systems into surface ships and vehicles. What makes the war fare center here at Dahlgren particularly eective is our co-location with our sister commands, said Smith later in the day at another 95th Anniversary Celebration sponsored by the Dahlgren Heritage Foundation at the Univer sity of Mary WashingtonDahlgren Campus. By working together in partnership, we support the full spectrum of Navy defensive combat sys tems needs to counter the threats from ballistic mis siles, to aircraft, to cruise missiles as well as providing strike capabilities and Naval Surface Fire Support, he said. NSWC Dahlgren works closely with Aegis Bal listic Missile and Naval Air and Missile Defense Commands to provide everything from initial re quirements to delivered products. For example, the commands scientists and engineers train Sail ors from the Aegis Train ing and Readiness Center on how to use those prod ucts. Analysis of what is go ing on in the world is part of what another sister command here at Dahl gren does, explained Smith. e Joint Warfare Analysis Center ensures optimal employment of our systems and leads to new requirements and new systems as the world changes. rough our col laborative eorts, we are providing innovative en hancements, analysis and designs that are making a dierence to ensure opti mal support for our warf ighters and the Fleet. e NSWCDD commander emphasized that it takes a diverse, multitalented workforce to meet the needs of todays warghters and provide innovation solutions for the demands facing our future Fleet. e commands ability to bring together the best and brightest profession als from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and cul tures is critical to address todays challenges and ensure our readiness for the Navys future mission needs anywhere around the globe. Dahlgrens tech history celebrates diversity Forrestal tropical sun beat down from a clear sky. It was just about 10:50 a.m., July 29, 1967. e launch that was scheduled for a short time later was never made. Lt. Cmdr. Robert Bo Browning one of the pilots due for launch with many others, he was seated in the cockpit of his fueled and armed Sky hawk; the plane was spotted way aft, to port. Lt. Cmdr. John S. McCain III said later he heard a whooshy sound then a low-order explosion in front of him. Suddenly, two A-4s ahead of his plane were engulfed in aming JP-5. Jet fuel spewed from them. A bomb dropped to the deck and rolled about six feet and came to rest in a pool of burning fuel. e awful conagration, which was to leave 132 Forrestal crewmen dead, 62 more injured and two miss ing and presumed dead, had begun. As the searing ames, fed by the spreading JP-5, spread aft and began to eat at the aircraft spotted around the deck, Lt. Cmdr. Browning es caped from his plane. He ducked under the tails of two Skyhawks spotted alongside his and ran up the ight deck toward the island area. Twice, explosions knocked him o balance. But he made it. e re soon enveloped all the air craft in its wake. It spread to the fantail, to decks below. Bombs and ammunition were touched o in the midst of ear ly re-ghting eorts. Black, acrid smoke boiled into the sky. A chief petty ocer, armed only with a small re extinguisher, ran toward the bomb that had dropped to the ight deck. He was killed when it exploded as were members of reghting teams trying to wrestle re hoses into position. Shrapnel from the explosion was thrown a reported 400 feet. ere was a horrendous explosion that shook Angel Two Zero, said Lt. David Clement, pilot of a rescue helicopter from the carrier USS Oriskany (CV 34). It seemed as if the whole stern of the Forrestal had erupted. Suddenly there were rafts, fuel tanks, oxygen tanks, trop tanks and debris of every descrip tion oating in the water below. Clement and others would be rescuing Forrestal crewmen who jumped, fell or were knocked from the carrier no less than ve times within an hour. Aviation Electricians Mate 3rd Class Bruce Mulligan, a 22-year-old VA-106 crewman, was all the way aft on the ight deck when he heard ex plosions. He turned, saw a reball coming at him and hit the deck. Somehow, he managed to get forward and was headed for a re hose when he was hit by shrapnel. He helped a friend with a broken leg get to sick bay, then returned to the ight deck. Back aft of the island, we started throwing missiles and rockets over the side, he recounted later. After that was done, I looked around for some of my buddies on the line crew and I could nd only one. So we de cided to help them ght the re and got the re hoses back aft and went to ght the plane res. My buddy and I stayed back aft for I dont know how long. We got separated and some ocer said later to leave. With strength born of adversity, 130-pound Lt. Otis Kight singlehandedly carried a 250-pound bomb to the edge of the hangar deck and threw it over the side. Lt. j.g. Robert Cates, the carriers explosive ordnance demolition of cer, recounted later how he had noticed that there was a 500-pound bomb and a 750-pound bomb in the middle of the ight deck . that were still smoking. ey hadnt det onated or anything; they were just setting there smoking. So I went up and defused them and had them jet tisoned. Cates said one of his men, whom he named only as Black, volun teered to be lowered by line through a hole in the ight deck to defuse a live bomb that had dropped to the 03 level, even though the compart ment was still on re and full of smoke. Black did the job. Later, Cates had himself lowered into the compartment to attach a line to the bomb so it could be jet tisoned. We [Black and himself] started picking up everything we could nd that had explosives in it and started throwing them over the side., Cates said. Some squadron pilots came up to me as we went aft. I dont know who they were [and] helped me take a Sidewinder missile o a burning F-4. We just continued working our way aft and taking what ordnance we found o aircraft and throwing it over the side. At 11:47 A.M., Forrestal reported the ight deck re was under control. At 12:15, the ship sent word that the ight deck re was out. At 12:45, stubborn res remained on the 01 and 02 levels and in han gar bay three. At 1:48 p.m., Forrestal reported that the res in the 01, 02 and 03 lev els still burned, but that all the ships machinery and steering equipment were operational. At 2:12 p.m., the after radio compartment was evacuated because of dense smoke and water. All res out on 01 level, port side, the ship reported. At 2:47 p.m. the compartment res continued but progress was be ing made. Forrestal was steaming toward a rendezvous with the hospi tal ship USS Repose (AH 16). At 3 p.m., the commander of Task Force 77 announced he was sending Forrestal to Subic Bay, Philippines, after the carrier rendezvoused with Repose. At 5:05, a muster of Forrestal crew men both in the carrier and aboard other ships was begun. Fires were still burning in the ships carpenter shop and on the main deck. At 8:33 p.m., Forrestal reported that res on the 02 level were un der control but that re ghting was greatly hampered because of smoke and heat. At 12:20 a.m., July 30, all the res were out. Forrestal crewmembers continued to clear smoke and cool hot steel on the 02 and 03 levels. It was time, now, to begin to assess the damage. ere were four gaping holes in the ight deck where bombs exploded, pushing armored steel down and under much like an oldfashioned hole in a beer can. Stock was taken of the aircraft. It leveled o to a report of 26 either destroyed or jettisoned and 31 more damaged to some extent. And it was time to arrive at a nal toll of dead and injured. For hours, the muster of Forrestal men continued; it was made terrically dicult because so many of the crew were scattered in other ships. Compiled and edited by John D. Burlage for Naval Aviation News, 1967 Fire 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 31, 2013 13 As U.S. and allied ground and air forces grew in strength on the Arabian Peninsula during August 1990, naval forces put up a strong shield to protect the countrys airelds and three critical gulf ports; al Jubayl and ad Dammam in Saudi Arabia and Mina Sulman in Bahrain. An attack on these ports by Saddams 700-plane air force, 165-vessel navy, or saboteurs could have been devastating to the allied buildup. On hand to counter air or surface vessel threats were cruisers equipped with the advanced Aegis battle management sys tem, and carriers, battle ships, destroyers, frigates, and other combatants operating a lethal array of aircraft, missiles, and guns. SEALs and Coast Guard and Navy port se curity/harbor defense units guarded the ports. By Sep. 1, the naval con tingent in the region was formidable and included three U.S. carriers, one battleship, six cruisers, ve destroy ers, eight frigates, and numerous warships from other coalition navies. Other impor tant units, including Sea bee construction battal ions and hospital ships USNS Mercy (TAH-19) and USNS Comfort (TAH-20), staed by Naval Reserve doctors, nurses, and other medical support person nel, had arrived in the re gion or were en-route. One of the rst ground combat formations to reach Saudi Arabia was the 7th Marine Expeditionary Brigade. e units equip ment and supplies were delivered by the ships of Maritime Prepositioning Squadron 2, anchored year-round at Diego Gar cia in the Indian Ocean for just such a contingency in the Persian Gulf. e arrival of another MEB enabled the forma tion of I Marine Expeditionary Force, under Marine Lt. Gen. Walter Boomer. ese Marines and the Soldiers of the Armys 82nd Airborne Division soon stood ready to defend Saudi Arabia. To provide these troops with armored muscle, eight special Fast Sealift Ships of the Military Sea lift Command were dis patched from the United States with hundreds of Abrams main battle tanks and Bradley armored ghting vehicles on board. By early November 1990, the 173 ships involved in the sealift operation and the transport planes of the Military Airlift Command had deployed such strong forces to Saudi Arabia that fears for the defense of the country largely evaporat ed. While taking full advan tage of the sea, naval forc es of the UN coalition de nied the Iraqis access to it. In August, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolutions that authorized coalition naval vessels to embargo Iraqi overseas trade, with armed force if necessary. e resolutions ad vocates hoped that the embargo would induce Saddam to withdraw his forces from Kuwait but at the least prevent him from importing tanks, guns, and planes. On Aug. 17, a Maritime Interception Force, established under Vice Adm. Henry H. Mauz Jr., commander U.S. Naval Forces, Central Command, began operating in the waters around Saudi Arabia. Eventually, warships from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Den mark, France, Greece, It aly, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom joined the eort. American P-3 Orion, British Nimrod, and French Atlantique pa trol planes also took part in the operation. With the greatest resources in the area, the U.S. Navy was recognized as rst among equals and in that capacity coordinated pe riodic meetings to decide on matters such as patrol sectors and search proce dures. Normally, the patrol planes would spot a mer chantman and direct co alition surface units to her. Once contact was made, the commanding ocer of a warship would com municate with the master of the merchant vessel by radio and gather information about her identity, point of origin, destina tion, and cargo. Boarding parties that routinely included American Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, the latter members of Law Enforce ment Detachments, were dispatched to suspicious ships to investigate their manifests and cargo. ose ships found carry ing prohibited cargo were ordered to the ports of the coalitions Arab members for impoundment. If a master refused to stop for inspection, the allies used helicopters to drop armed teams onto the ship. ese men then secured the bridge and took control of the vessel. An example of one such operation was on Oct. 28, 1990, when the master of the Iraqi oil tanker Amuriyah would not speak by radio to the on-scene na val commander or stop his vessel for inspection. Even though an F-14 Tomcat and an F/A-18 Hornet from Indepen dence made low passes over the ship and USS Reasoner (FFG-1063) and Australian guided missile frigate Darwin red warn ing shots across her bow, the vessels master still refused to heave to. Eventu ally, helicopters lowered Marines onto the ship and with the reinforcement of Navy SEALs, coastguards men, and British and American Sailors the allies took control. Saddam must have been testing the coalitions re solve, for the ship carried no prohibited cargo. She was allowed to proceed. e embargo patrol did not force the Iraqis to quit Kuwait, but it did prevent Saddam from acquiring more arms, ammunition and spare parts or sell oil to nance his war eort. e operation also strengthened the international coalition, because it showed the governments and peoples of many countries that UN military measures could be ex ecuted without heavy ca sualties or indiscriminate use of force. is consensus was valuable in the fall of 1990, when President George H.W. Bush decided to launch a campaign to oust the Iraqi army from Ku wait and restore the coun try to its people. General Schwarzkopf developed a four-phase air, land, and sea campaign plan that would require the deploy ment to the theater of 200,000 more American service men and women. Additional units included three additional carrier battle groups, another bat tleship, a Marine expeditionary force, a Marine ex peditionary brigade, more than 400 Air Force planes and the Armys VII Corps. As these new forces headed for the Persian Gulf, Vice Adm. Stanley R. Arthur replaced Vice Adm. Mauz and took additional measures to prepare U.S. naval forces for war. He established Battle Force Zulu in the Persian Gulf and Battle Force Yankee in the Red Sea. Carrier air squadrons practiced oper ating with Air Force units, the amphibious components carried out landing exercises, and the eets battleships, destroyers, and frigates prepared for naval gunre support and antiaircraft operations. In the early morning hours of Jan. 17 1991, the UN coalition launched Operation Desert Storm. Tomahawk land attack missiles red by ships in the Red Sea and the Per sian Gulf and later by a submarine in the Eastern Mediterranean, began hitting targets throughout Baghdad, the capital of Iraq. at day or soon after ward, attack, ghter, elec tronic countermeasures and other aircraft from carriers USS John F. Ken nedy (CV-67), USS Sarato ga (CV-60), USS America (CV-66), USS Ranger (CV61), USS Midway (CV-41), and USS eodore Roos evelt (CVN-71) struck other enemy sites in Iraq. In the next few weeks Navy cruise missiles and the bombs and missiles of Navy, Air Force and coalition aircraft destroyed leadership and commu nications sites, air defense radars, military depots, airelds, bridges, naval bases, and facilities connected with nuclear, bio logical, or chemical weapons throughout Iraq and Kuwait. Simultaneously, allied ghters established air su periority, shooting down almost all of the Iraqi MiGs and Mirages that rose into the sky to challenge them. e Navys two kills oc curred on the rst day of the war when Lt. Cmdr. Mark I. Fox and Lt. Nick Mongillo, ying F/A-18 Hornets from the Red Sea-based carrier USS Saratoga, each destroyed a MiG-21 with Sidewind er and Sparrow air-to-air missiles. Next: Desert Storm frees KuwaitAir strikes, Tomahawks soen Saddam The NavyIn the Cold WarTenth in a series

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