The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00322


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DoD comptroller before House Armed Services Committeee lapse in appropriations that triggered the government shutdown is a tragedy, and a colossal waste of time the De partment of Defenses comptroller told the House Armed Ser vices Committee Oct. 10. Under Secretary of Defense Robert F. Hale described for law makers how the department has implemented the Pay Our Mili tary Act, which has mitigated some aspects of the shutdown. e act, passed September 30, took some days for DOD o cials to examine and implement. Hale described the steps the department took to prepare for the shutdown. On Sept. 25, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter issued a memo on shutdown triggered by the lapse in appropriations dening excepted activities. Under the law such activities are re lated to military operations and safety to life and protection to property. Once the lapse occurred we have no authority except to follow this guidance, Hale said. Under the guidance, active duty military personnel continued in their normal status. Com manders and managers identi ed DOD civilians who worked primarily on excepted activities. ese excepted civilians continued working after the lapse, Hale said. All others were placed on emergency no-notice furloughs. Reserve component person nel on inactive duty were al lowed to drill only if the drills were in support of excepted ac tivities such as readying for deployment to Afghanistan. All told around 400,000 DOD civilians were placed on fur lough. ey will be paid only if Con gress passes separate legisla tion, Hale said. Military per sonnel and excepted civilians continued to work and they are guaranteed to be paid. In [the] reserves they cant be paid until after the lapse ends. is was the situation before the Pay Our Military Act was implemented. Pavilion dedicated Vets DayKingsland Veterans Memorial Park ceremony Nov. 11 To honor the memory of the men and women who have served or are currently serv ing in the Armed Forces of the United States of America, VFW Post No. 8385 hosts the annual Veterans Day Parade Nov. 11 in downtown Kingsland. Parade line up starts at 9 a.m., with ste po at 10 a.m. At the con clusion of the parade, all are invited to the Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park for the 11 a.m. Spouse House pavilion dedication ceremony. is phase of the park was fund ed in part by a $5,000 grant and through Memorial Brick sales. We are requesting that all military spouses in attendance wear yellow and there will be a yellow ribbon cutting to signify the ocial dedication of the pavilion to show support and appreciation of all military spouses, said Trish Jared, King sland Downtown Development Authority executive director. Krista Callahan, member of the American Military Spouse Choir and wife of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Ocer Cmdr Ed Callahan, will sing the national anthem and help cut the yellow ribbon at the KVM Park Spouse House pa vilion dedication. e dedication ceremony will be followed by a southern fried catsh dinner at the Kingsland Depot Pavilion, 200 E. King Ave. in downtown Kingsland. Up Periscope Find outs whats best at Pirates Cove Galley Page 9 Cold War United States turns attention to Middle East Page 10 Prevention Kings Bay Fire Dept. spreads its message Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com In 1939, Navy diving bell brought 33 men up from bottom of ocean USS Squalus (SS 192), a 1,450-ton Sargo class subma rine, was built at the Ports mouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Commissioned in March 1939, Squalus was conducting test dives o the New Hamp shire coast not far from Ports mouth, at 8:40 a.m., May 23, 1939, New Hampshire. All in dications were that everything was ready for a safe dive. However, just after the sub marine submerged, the engine rooms began to ood. Somehow the main induction valve, a large opening that brought air to the engines while on the surface, had opened. Quickly, the submarines af ter compartments lled with water, drowning 26 men there, and Squalus settled to the bot tom, 243 feet deep. In the forward compart ments, sealed by watertight doors, 33 men remained alive. eir Commanding Ocer, Lt. Oliver F. Naquin, began sur vival planning. Since the water depth and temperature made ascent with the self-contained Momsen Lung very dangerous, he elected to wait for rescue from above. Within a few hours, other ships were searching for the missing Squalus, unfortunately in the wrong place. However, in the early afternoon a distant signal rocket was seen from a sister submarine, USS Sculpin (SS191). Communication via the sunken subs rescue bouy was soon established, and as soon broken when the bouys connecting line snapped. The amazing rescue of USS S qualus Hale calls shutdown tragedy, urges Congress to end

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is now providing annual inu enza vaccine to service members, retirees and families. e u vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, se lected reserves and healthcare work ers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for everyone age six months and up. Its the rst and most important step in protecting against u viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epi demics of inuenza occur every year in the United States, usually be tween October and April. Typically, epidemics cause thousands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the U.S. A vaccine to prevent inuenza has been available since the 1940s, yet some patients dont take the time to get the vaccine, even after the recent 2009 H1N1 global pandemic the rst such pandemic in more than 40 years. e u can be very dangerous, especially to the young and elderly, said Cmdr. Chad Roe, NBHC Kings Bay ocer in charge. Vaccination is the primary means of reducing seasonal u illness and its compli cations. Vaccine protects both the individual and the community as a whole, by reducing and preventing the spread of the disease. Inuenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shaking hands, sneezing or talking closely with another person. Typical u symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, conges tion, cough, runny nose and di culty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the im munocompromised. H1N1 u virus has similar symptoms, sometimes also including vomiting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and chil dren. NBHC Kings Bay oers two kinds of u vaccine. Flu mist, an intrana sal vaccine that is squirted into the nose, can be given to healthy pa tients ages two to 49. e injectable vaccine, or u shot, is given to preg nant moms, diabetic patients, asth matics and anyone with a chronic medical condition such as emphy sema. e shot is safe for pregnant wom en at any time during pregnancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breast feeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective u antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immunization. Potential side eects are usually mild. e u mist can cause mild congestion and a runny nose, but it cant grow in the lungs and cant cause pneumonia. e u shot can cause some redness and pain at the injection site, muscle ache and a low grade fever, but because the virus is completely inactivated, it cannot possibly cause inuenza. At NBHC Kings Bay, patients can walk-in for u vaccine 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Flu vaccine walk-ins will be conducted from 7 to 11 a.m. only, on the last Friday of each month, to facilitate command training. Other important immunizations include human papillomavirus, pneumococcal and the entire spec trum of childhood vaccines. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and historical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. It features 11 haunting venues with 11 stories told by cos tumed actors, including the infamous Goat Man. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 8827350. Also ongoing in St. Marys through Oct. 31 are the Haunted House in the Kings Bay Shopping Center Fridays and Saturdays, plus Oct. 17 and 31, and Hay Days. For more infor mation, call (912) 888-4000.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemora tive glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Wel come Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Re ward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter for college. e next draw ing will be at the end of August. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point av erage equivalent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grad ing period and must re-enter with each quali fying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount cou pons for NEX products and services. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded more than $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its gen erous vendor partners. There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.The Habitat Ride to Build Poker Run, benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Camden County, will be Nov. 16. The ride begins and ends at VFW of Kingsland. Cost is $20 for rider and one passenger, one poker hand, cook out, music. For more information, contact Haylinder at (912) 552-4563.e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvilleceltic festival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Branch Health Clinic oers u shots Branch Health Clinic KB Every single service member de ployed outside the United States de serves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syn dicated radio program, and its lis tening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were success fully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed out side the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling to gether, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e pur pose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fra ternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, mark ers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You Topics for General Military Train ing for Fiscal Year 14 were an nounced in NAVADMIN 264/13, Oct. 9. e announcement, usually released Oct. 1, was delayed due to the ongoing eort to streamline or elim inate administrative burdens on the eet, allowing more time to focus on mission readiness. In support of this eort, known as Reducing Adminis trative Distractions, a revision of the GMT instruction is nearing comple tion. rough RAD and other feed back, the Fleet has been pretty clear that they want us to give this a good hard look, said Vice Adm. Bill Mo ran, chief of naval personnel. We need to nd the right balance of re quired training and white space for our commanders. While each of the GMT subjects are important, Moran said his stas review of the instruction will ensure training requirements are validated, ineciencies are eliminated, and improvements are made to overall program eectiveness. e intent of the GMT instruction revision is to provide clear communication of re quirements and to establish an an nual review process for each topic. ere are two categories of GMT topics that must be completed in FY 14. Category One topics must be con ducted via face-to-face, instructorled training sessions provided at the command level. Senior leadership, command training teams, or col lateral duty training ocers/chief petty ocers will conduct Category One GMT. e FY 14 Category One GMT top ics are: Alcohol Abuse Prevention and Control; Equal Opportunity and Grievance Procedures; Hazing Policy and Prevention; Personal Finan cial Management; Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Aware ness; Sexual Harassment and Griev ance Procedures; Stress Manage ment; and Suicide Awareness and Prevention. ese are the opportunities for leadership to engage and have frank and deliberate discussions about command-delivered train ing, ensuring Sailors understand their roles and responsibilities, said Capt. John Newcomer, Command ing Ocer at the Center for Personal and Professional Development. e remaining required GMT top ics are Category Two topics that can be completed via Navy e-Learning or through face-to-face, commanddelivered training at the discretion of the unit commander. e Category Two GMT topics for FY 14 are: Anger Management; Antiterrorism/Force Protection; Combating Tracking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Domestic Violence Pre vention and Reporting; Drug Abuse Prevention and Control; Fraternization Awareness and Prevention; In formation Assurance; Operational Risk Management; Operational Se curity; Physical Readiness; Privacy and Personally Identiable Information Awareness; Records Manage ment; Sexual Health and Responsi bility; and Tobacco Use Prevention General training schedule released Education & Training

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POMA is an appropria tions act, Hale said. It guarantees pay and allow ances for those on active service. DOD can now pay ac tive duty military person nel on time and in full, even if the lapse contin ues beyond the active duty payday, he said. e act also allows pay and and benets for ex cepted civilians in full and on time, he said. It further provides pay and benets for civilians in other categories, and this allowed the depart ment to call back many civilians who most directly served the members of the armed forces, Hale said. Lawyers concluded the act did not allow a blanket re call. Department leaders conducted a review to identify the DOD civilians that fell within the acts purview. at review focused on the degree to which civil ians aided the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of members of the armed forces, Hale said. Excepted personnel fell into this category. e department recalled civilians who provide day-to-day support, like health care provid ers, family support, some repair and maintenance, commissary workers and payroll activities. Another group of civilians who provide longer term support were also recalled. ey include acquisi tion oversight, nancial management, logistics, and a number of others. Finally, a category of civilians was identied whose work is highly valu able and necessary but it provides less direct sup port to military members, Hale said. ese civilians were not covered by POMA, and some remain on furlough. ey include chief in formation ocer sta functions, public aairs ocers except internal communications personnel, legislative aairs, deputy chief management of cer, auditors, and related functions, as well as per sonnel providing support to non-DOD personnel. More than 95 percent of DOD civilians who were on furlough were recalled, and most were back to work by Oct. 7. Still, the lapse of appropriations is having serious adverse eects on DOD, Hale said. Despite our very best eorts, there are already some limited adverse ef fects on the war in Afghanistan, he said. While military opera tions are excepted, we no longer have authority to make the Commander Emergency Response Program payments. CERP funds are used to pay Afghans compensation for deaths or damage, or other events. ey are key to con tinuing a responsible drawdown in Afghanistan, Hale said. Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the Interna tional Security Assistance Force commander in Ka bul, has expressed his strong concerns on the situation. But we have not yet identied a legal way to make these payments dur ing a lapse of appropria tions, Hale said. Were trying our best. e lapse continues to erode reserve component training and readiness. Weekend drills have been halted. e National Guard has canceled around 100,000 drills in the rst week end; the reserves canceled around another 75,000 drills. Active duty personnel are also hit in training and readiness accounts. e lapse forces us to waste a good deal of the publics money, Hale said. About 400,000 DOD civilian personnel on fur lough did not work for four days. ats roughly $600 million in services that we lost in support of national security objectives. e department cur tailed training, will pay interest for late payments and pay increased trans portation costs.Hale and Cessation. In order to allow su cient time to complete the GMT program review, for mulate program change proposals, and implement the approved changes, completion of Category Two GMT topics is waived for FY 14 except for the fol lowing topics which must be completed: Antiter rorism/Force Protection; Combating Tracking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Information Assurance; Operational Security; and Records Management. Standardized training material for Category One and Category Two training is available for download from the Personal Devel opment GMT page on the Navy Knowledge Online Web page at www.nko. navy.mil. Training completion of Category One topics must be recorded in Fleet Train ing Management Planning System via learning event completion forms. Additionally, a GMT calendar for FY 14 is also available on the NKO GMT page, including rec ommended training delivery months to coincide with Navywide training themes. GMT questions should be addressed to Lyman Watts, GMT program manager at (757) 4920763, DSN: 492 or via e-mail to the Center for Personal and Professional Development at gmt.dis tribution@navy.mil. Additional information about GMT training requirements for FY 14 is detailed in NAVADMIN 264/13.Schedule Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) gathered for a remembrance ceremony Sept. 29 to honor the lives of two fallen pilots killed in a helicopter accident. On Sept. 22, an MH60S Seahawk helicopter, attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 6, crashed in the central Red Sea while operating with William P. Lawrence. e two pilots killed were Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, of Lompoc, Ca lif., and Chief Warrant Of cer 3 Jonathan S. Gibson, 32, of Aurora, Ore. During the ceremony Cmdr. Jana A. Vavasseur, commanding ocer of William P. Lawrence, ex pressed how their loss had aected everyone. Vavas seur said that even though many Sailors aboard may not have known Jones or Gibson personally, their loss still hurt because they were shipmates. After Vavasseur addressed the crew, mem bers from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 read the biogra phies of Jones and Gibson. Lt. Benjamin Box, a Navy chaplain assigned to Destroyer Squadron 23, read a letter written by eresa Jones, widow of Jones. In the letter, eresa ex plained what was on her mind and what she did the day three men in service dress blues knocked on her door. In her letter Mrs. Jones wrote: My boys, one of you lost your best friend and one of you never even had the chance to meet him. But, please know that your father loves you. Following the letter, Box said a few words and led the crew in a prayer for the lives of Jones and Gibson. Perhaps the best way we can honor the dead, is to go on living, to enjoy our loved ones, to value the small blessings that are often taken for granted and to appreciate our op portunity to serve a great and noble cause, said Box. On this solemn oc casion may we nd the in spiration to complete our mission with pride, dig nity and dedication. e ceremony concluded by the playing of Taps. William P. Lawrence de parted her homeport of San Diego Jan. 14 for her maiden deployment and is currently in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion eorts. Lawrence holds memorial Training eorts realistic e Coast Guard is re sponsible for maritime safety, security and stew ardship. Performing these responsibilities requires a high level of training for Coast Guard men and women. e training is es pecially intense for Coast Guard law enforcement missions such as gaining compliance of potentially dangerous vessels eeing from a violation of federal law. Coast Guard members learn how to pursue and neutralize eeing vessels in a course known as No compliant Vessel Pursuit or NCVP. e course, designed for boat drivers as well as boat crewmembers, teaches Coast Guard men and women how to approach a vessel that may be in vio lation of a federal law such as drug or migrant smuggling. In these scenarios, a vessel may not stop when directed to do so by the Coast Guard. e boats driven by pursuit course students, called over the horizonboats, will hail the noncompliant vessel with their blue light and a radio call or loudhailer. If the vessel does not stop, it will often oper ate in a wild or erratic fashion in an attempt to shake o the Coast Guard vessel in pursuit. It is this type of situation where the courses tactics come into practice. We teach them how to approach the vessel safely, to minimize the risk that is associated with an opera tion like this. We not only [teach them how] to stop the vessel but also [how] to engage and neutralize the person once the vessel is stopped, said Lt. Shan non Sca, the Advanced Course school chief. We have a number of dierent tactics, such as disabling re that we teach in order to gain control of the non compliant vessel. e courses training facility has 21 boats of dif ferent shapes, sizes and styles to act as noncompli ant vessels. ey refer to it as their dirt eet where the boats are set up with micro phones and cameras so the instructors can watch and critique the students as they run through their exercises. ey employ real-life role players to memorize scenarios and act or react according to how the students con duct themselves during a boarding. We want to make it more than just a boat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5 course. We have all of our law enforcement duties in one program and it makes the training more seamless. We teach from blue lights to handcus , said Senior Chief Petty O cer Seth Hunt, the NCVP school chief. Petty Ocer 1st Class Orlando Rivera was a student of the course and subsequently assigned to a unit where he has em ployed the tactics taught to him. Its fast going and hightempo, but they make sure you are well aware of what to do and what not to do, Rivera said. e rst day is classroom training on what to expect, the sec ond day they allow each coxswain to get behind the wheel and they start at a very slow pace. ey go through every step at a slow pace with safe speed and distance. en each day they add new stu. ey do it at night and in crease the speed and the aggressiveness of the tac tics. By the end of the week you are doing everything at full speed and at night. It really helps you get pre pared to go out in to the eld. Rivera explained that at the end of the day the course provides the ex perience and training needed for the, coxswain to make the nal deter mination as to whether the tactics are safe to em ploy. ere are other fac tors like weather, sea state, construction of the other boat that need to be con sidered. is course was recently moved to join the Coast Guard Maritime Law En forcement Academy in Charleston, S.C. MLEA is located at the Federal Law Enforement Training Center. With the move of the course, the MLEA now serves as a one-stop shop for all Coast Guard law en forcement training. e MLEA has four schoolhouses based there. e Basic School owns the boarding team mem ber, boarding ocer and boarding ocer practical courses. e Advanced School has ve courses: international boarding of cer, radiation detection level II, counter drug op erations, ports waterways and coastal security and an integrated cross-border maritime law enforcement operators course a joint eort course between the U.S. and Canada. e Maritime Enforcement Specialist A School qualies Coast Guard members in a security and law enforcement career rating. e last, and most recent, school to join is NCVP. It is a true to life based dynamic training, Sca said. is is the reason why the MLEA in Charles ton is so ideal. Rather than have bits and pieces (of law enforcement training) here and there, now it is all here in one place. Moving the NCVP course to the MLEA was not an easy endeavor, taking 10 years of careful planning. Sca described the pro cess keying in on the need to identify places for the boats to moor and launch from safely. Once that all came together, they real ized the most important aspect was what trainees would get out of the move. When a new mem ber comes into the Coast Guard and nds him or herself on a law enforce ment career track they come to the MLEA for boarding team member and boarding ocer train ing, he said. en if they end up at a unit with counter narcotics or hu man tracking they come back and take the NCVP course. When they come to Charleston, they get ex posure to all these areas. It has become a one-stop shopping for all law en forcement training. After weekend meetings in Kabul, Afghanistan, with Afghan President Ha mid Karzai, Secretary of State John Kerry said he and Karzai had resolved all but one of the major is sues critical to a bilateral security agreement between the two countries. And en route to London Oct. 13, Kerry consulted several times via phone with De fense Secretary Chuck Hagel about the meetings, ac cording to senior State Department ocials who spoke with reporters in a background brieng. Kerry and Karzai spoke during an Oct. 12 press conference at the presidential palace in Kabul, positive about the progress theyd made. I believe that in the last 24 hours, as we have worked hard at these is sues that really have been negotiated over now for more than 11 months, that we have resolved the major issues that [President Karzai] went through, Kerry said. Kerry said he and Kar zai have put ourselves in a position for an enduring [U.S.-Afghanistan] part nership going forward in the years ahead. In his remarks, Karzai had described his main issues as national sover eignty, prevention of civil ian casualties, and a clear denition of invasion by foreign forces. But both leaders ac knowledged that, on the outstanding issue of claiming U.S. jurisdiction for U.S. troops who are accused of committing crimes while deployed in Afghanistan, the decision about whether to allow this agreement in the bi lateral agreement will be left to the Loya Jirga, or council of Afghan elders, which Karzai has called to meet in November. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, had said in July after meeting with Karzai in Kabul that getting the security agree ment signed by October t in with his best military advice for putting in place the framework for the con tinuing U.S. and NATO ef fort in the country after Dec. 31, 2014, when the current NATO mandate expires. Last night Kerry said his delegation was pleased that the agreement reached could be submit ted to a Loya Jirga, where it will go through the appro priate political process, in cluding the issue of juris diction for U.S. troops who act outside the law while in Afghanistan post-2014. e question of jurisdic tion is an appropriate one for the president to submit to the Loya Jirga, and we have high condence that the people of Afghanistan will see the benets that ex ist in this agreement, the secretary said. But we need to say that if the issue of jurisdiction cannot be resolved, then unfortunately there cannot be a bilateral security agreement, Kerry added. So we hope that that will be resolved. And its up to the Afghan people, as it should be. e secretary explained that if an American who is part of any expedition ary force under agreement from the Afghan govern ment were to violate any law, the United States would prosecute to the full measure of that law and any perpetrator of any in cident or crime would be punished. ere is no immunity, he said, referring to what some call immunity for U.S. troops posted over seas. Let me make that clear: No immunity, Kerry added. And we have proven in many cases, unfortunately too many instances, that when somebody has violated the law, they have paid the price. ere are people in prison today in the United States of Amer ica who have paid that price. In terms of jurisdic tion, Kerry said, where the United States has forces serving in other parts of the world, including Japan, South Korea, Europe, Africa and elsewhere, they operate under the same standard. We completely respect that the [Afghan] presi dent should decide appropriately that this issue ought to be decided in his Loya Jirga, Kerry said. But, he added, if [the jurisdiction issue] isnt re solved, we cant send our forces in places because we dont subject United States citizens to that kind of uncertainty with respect to their rights and lives. e partial government shut down has not aected U.S. con tributions to the International Security Assistance Force in Af ghanistan or other NATO mis sions, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen told reporters in Brussels Oct. 10. So far we havent seen any negative impact on U.S. contribu tions to NATO-led operations, Rasmussen said, noting that U.S. military members have been exempted from the shutdown. Speaking at his monthly news conference, the secretary general also dismissed reported allega tions by Afghan President Hamid Karzai that NATO hasnt done enough in Afghanistan. anks to the immense eorts and the solemn sacrices of the troops and civilians from ISAF contributing nations, Afghanistan has come a long way in the past decade, Rasmussen said. e changes have been remarkable, and our investment in lives and resources has been unprecedented. Nobody can deny that. And this eort should be respected. Rasmussen said he is struck by the Afghan peo ples recognition of NATOs contribution. We have sacriced much in blood and treasure to assist the Afghan people, and whenever I meet Afghans, they express appreciation for that, he said. While working to ensure the sovereignty of the Afghan state, NATO and other troop-contributing nations in Afghanistan have helped build a strong Afghan National Security Force that now numbers about 350,000, Rasmussen said. We have seen the resilience and the growing professionalism of Afghan forces, he said. And I am condent that the Afghan security forces will be able to take full responsibility by the end of 2014 as planned. Meanwhile, Afghanistan is preparing to hold elec tions next year that will be fully led and managed by the Afghans. Six months before the polls, preparations are more advanced than for any other elections in Af ghanistans modern history, Rasmussen said. e registration of candidates was recently com pleted, with a multi-ethnic lineup of presidential tickets, he said. In addition, women are actively par ticipating as voters, election workers and candidates with at least one woman vying for oce in every provincial council. Rasmussen emphasized the importance of transparent, inclusive and credible elections, with the results acceptable to the Afghan people so the political process provides the certainty and predict ability that both Afghans and the international community expect. He welcomed Great Britains oer to host the 2014 NATO Summit at a turning point for the alliance as it prepares to complete the longest and largest opera tion in its history. is will be a critical opportunity to take stock of our ongoing work, including in Afghanistan, and to look to the future, he said. e summit will also ensure that we continue to build on the lessons that we have learned, to strengthen the alliance and keep it ready to deal with modern security challenges, Rasmussen said. It will rearm the vital transatlantic bond on which NATO was founded, he added. And it will further enhance our partnerships, which are key to our future success in a world where risks cross bor ders and we are all interconnected.Rasmussen: Progress in Afghanistan remarkableKerry, Karzai work on security agreement Training

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 21 and 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social is sues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless other wise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for ac tive duty females who have been sexually as saulted as adults. is group will oer ac tive duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmo sphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil e tug Penacook (YT6) spent the afternoon and evening dragging a grap nel around the sinking site, nally hooking what all hands hoped was Squalus. Meanwhile, a team of divers from Washington, D.C, their leader, Lt. Cmdr. Charles B. Momsen and the submarine rescue ship Falcon (ARS-2) were hur rying northward toward Portsmouth. Falcon carried more div ers and a McCann Rescue Chamber, a large diving bell specially designed for just such an emergency. Falcon moored over the Penacooks contact on the morning of May 24. Divers soon conrmed that the contact was in deed the Squalus. During the afternoon and early evening, the rescue cham ber made three relatively smooth round trips to the sunken submarine, bringing up 25 men. Only one more trip would nish the rescue of all those known to be alive. Shortly before 8 p.m., crewed by Chief Torpedomans Mate John Mi halowski and Chief Metal smith James H. McDonald, the rescue chamber picked up the last eight Squalus survivors, including Lt. Naquin, and began its ascent. While still 160 feet deep, its guiding cable jammed and the chamber had to return to the Squalus. Over the next four hours, as problem followed prob lem, and divers labored heroically to eect repairs, the chamber was in im minent danger of disaster, risking the lives of its 10 occupants. However, with careful handling, it surfaced safely shortly after midnight on May 25. During that day, divers and the rescue chamber crew made more dicult trips down to the Squalus, determining that no more crewmen remained alive on board. e historic rescue mis sion, the rst such undertak ing in history, and one con ducted at a time in which the technologies of underwater object location, communications and deep-water div ing were in their infancies, was a success. e salvage of Squalus, which began immediately after the end of the rescue of her survivors, was a pro longed and very dicult operation. Hampered by water depths of 240 ft., which led to constant bouts with ni trogen narcosis, Navy div ers labored to prepare the sunken submarine for recovery. eir work was so risky that four of the divers were subsequently awarded the Medal of Honor. Mother Ship for the salvage was the submarine rescue ship USS Falcon (ASR-2). Ot was aided by the tugs Wandank (AT-26) and Penacook (YT-6) and Squalus sister submarine, USS Sculpin (SS-191). A rst eort to raise Squalus ended in neardisaster on July 13, 1939, when the salvors lost con trol of the lifting pontoons. e submarine burst to the surface bow rst, then sank, requiring repair of damaged equipment, clearance of a clutter of lines and hoses and the laborious re-rigging of the lifting gear. On Aug. 12, a second lift attempt succeeded in bringing Squalus some 70 feet o the sea oor. e tugs then towed her into shallower water, where equipment was reposi tioned for another lift, to about 100 feet below the surface, which took place on Aug. 17. Towed further inshore, Squalus was prepared for another lift, which ended with the submarine again rising out of control and sinking back to the bot tom, with a heavy list to port. Work continued, inter rupted by bad weather, into September, as the Second World War began in Europe. Finally, and not without further problems, on Sept. 13, 1939, Squalus was brought to the surface and towed to the Ports mouth Navy Yard, where work began to return her to service. Decommissioned, repaired and renamed Sail sh, she was recommis sioned in May 1940. Following initial opera tions in the Atlantic, Sailsh was tranferred to the Pacic in early 1941, and subsequently went to op erate in Asiatic waters. With the outbreak of war with Japan in Decem ber 1941, Sailsh made three war patrols from the Philippines and Java, then shifted its base to Australia, from which it made Squalus

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e Night Glow Golf Tourna ment is Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each per son golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie Under the Stars in October Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presenta tion Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and movie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movies call, (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Kick-Off is coming Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, ched darwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www. facebook.com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Movies for Oc tober are Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Movie Under the Stars scheduled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie list ing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Combined Federal Campaign season has started Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can sup port with your giving. The numbers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018. Officials needed The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Monster University plays Just for kids Night Glow Golf set Oct. 25 Liberty call Navy College information four more patrols from March 1942 into January 1943. After an overhaul, Sailsh went to Pearl Harbor, from which it operated for the rest of its combat career. From May 1943 into De cember 1944, it conducted a further ve war patrols. During the 12 patrols, Sailsh sank seven Japanese ships, including the escort carrier Chuyo, totalling more 40,000 tons and was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. In January 1945, Sailsh returned to the Atlantic, where it performed training duties during the remainder of World War II. Sailsh was decommis sioned in October 1945 and assigned to be ex pended as a target. How ever, it was not used for that purpose and was sold for scrapping in June 1948.Squalus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho I love our galley, and Ive always loved Navy chow. I feel fortunate every time I get some. I recently dined at Pirates Cove when the Messlords visited and for the Navy Birthday. Everyone there treats me great, like I was their good, old daddy. I went there last week to find the secret thoughts of the people who work there as far as what they thought was the best thing on their menu. After all, who would know better than those preparing the food? Heres what they said. CS1 Dewey Bartholomeus Pirates Cove Galley Sedro Woolley, Wash. I like the burgers and the chicken. CS3 Robert Gibson Pirates Cove Galley Arroyo Grande, Calif. Chicken, all the kinds we make. We make about 40 different kinds. CS3 Tyren Kelly Pirates Cove Galley Lakeland, Ga. Spaghetti, with my secret recipe garliccheese bread. CS2 Antonio Archuleta Pirates Cove Galley New Castle, Pa. Any of our homemade soups . Italian Wedding, gumbo, clam chowder. Theres a bunch of them. CS2 Cevon Dumas Pirates Cove Galley Aurora, Ill. The Chicken Parmesan. Everybody is crazy about it. MM2 Chris Bishop Pirates Cove Galley Fleming Island, Fla. The Chicken Parmesan is pretty good, and the ribs are really good. Women train for infantry e rst female Marines to ever attend infantry training with the Infantry Training Battalion, School of Infantry-East, at Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, N.C., completed the rst week of training Sept. 28. Fifteen female Marines began the training follow ing graduation from boot camp at Marine Corps Re cruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., as part of ongoing re search on the incorporation of women into com bat-related jobs. e research is a result of the lifting of the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Assignment Restriction earlier this year, which required all services to implement a plan to com pletely integrate women into combat positions by 2016. e 15 female students were among 119 recent graduates from recruit THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 e Middle East continued to command attention during the 1980s as various radical terror ist groups and the Libyan gov ernment preyed on American citizens and U.S. interests in the region. In December 1984, radical Shiite Muslims hijacked a Ku waiti airliner and killed two American passengers. e following June, other terrorists in the Hezbol lah organization seized an American pas senger plane and ruthlessly murdered Navy Petty Of cer Robert D. Stethem, who died with great courage and dig nity. In October 1985, four ter rorists seized the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro, killed wheelchair bound Leon Klinghofer, an American citizen, and threw his body into the sea. e perpetrators of this grisly murder were captured shortly afterward when F-14s from USS Saratoga (CV-60) intercepted an airliner bearing the men and forced the plane to land at a U.S. base in Sicily, where they were turned over to Italian authorities. Col. Muammar Qadda trum peted Libyas support for these and other anti-American out rages. Determined not to stand idly by in the face of these provocations, President Ronald Reagan ordered the 27,000-man Battle Force Zulu, composed of air craft carriers USS Coral Sea, USS America (CV-66), and USS Saratoga, twenty-three other warships, and 250 aircraft into waters north of Libya. When U.S. ships and aircraft crossed Qaddas line of death on 24 March 1986, the Libyans red shore-based surface-to-air missiles at the planes and sent three fast missile attack craft toward the eet. During the next two days, American air-launched missiles and bombs knocked out the missile site on shore, sank two of the vessels, and damaged the third. Apparently, Qadda was not chastened by the experience, because in early April U.S. and British intelligence organiza tions intercepted communica tions that proved Libyan agents had exploded a bomb in the La Belle Discotheque in West Ber lin, Germany, killing two Ameri cans and injuring many more. e President ordered execu tion of El Dorado Canyon, a onetime Navy-Air Force strike on military and terrorist-associated targets in Libya to punish Qad da for his actions. e French and Spanish gov ernments did not allow U.S. military aircraft to y over their countries. As a result, the Unit ed Kingdombased U.S. Air Force units had to follow a course over the Atlantic and Mediter ranean that required four in-ight refuelings to reach Libya and four more to return to Great Britain. In contrast, the Sixth Fleet deployed the Coral Sea and Amer ica carrier battle groups within easy striking range of the Libyan coast. In the early morning hours of April 15, 1986, in a surprise at tack, Navy and Air Force combat aircraft crossed the Libyan coast, quickly neutralized the enemy air defenses, and dropped their ordnance on aircraft on the ground, barracks, and other military targets near Tripoli and Benghazi. All but one Air Force plane and its two crewmen, who were killed, returned to base. e operations against Libya during 1986 clearly demonstrat ed that Qaddas rogue behavior could have serious consequenc es for him and his country. ey also showed once again that the U.S. government could employ naval power to achieve shortterm political objectives without putting troops on shore or going to war. e Navy had little respite from crises in the Middle East during the turbulent 1980s. In 1987, Iran, led by the virulently anti-American government of Ayatollah Khomeni, and at war for seven years with nearby Iraq, employed surface-to-surface missiles, fast attack vessels, and mines to curtail oil trac in the Persian Gulf. e Iranians hoped to cut o this source of revenue for its enemy Iraq by attacking the oil tankers owned by Kuwait, a country from which the Iraqis got nancial support. Since the economic well being of the world depended on the ready availability of Persian Gulf oil, President Ronald Reagan agreed to a Kuwaiti request that their tankers be allowed to y the American ag and thus receive the protection of the U.S. Navy. By the end of the year, there were 13 American cruisers, destroyers, frigates, and minesweepers steaming in the gulf and escorting U.S.-agged Ku waiti tankers. Close at hand east of the Strait of Hormuz were an aircraft carrier, battleship USS Missouri, and their escorts. Dangers abounded in the volatile Persian Gulf. At night on May 17, 1987, for instance, an Iraqi F-1 Mirage mistakenly launched two Exocet air-to-sur face missiles against USS Stark (FFG-31), killing thirty-seven Sailors and coming close to sinking the frigate. e surviv ing crewmen, however, applied training they had received in damage control to save the ship. A few months later, Bridgeton, one of the re-agged tankers, struck a sea mine laid by the Ira nians. U.S. Army AH-6 Sea Bat heli copters, operating from the deck of USS Jarrett (FFG-33), a guided missile frigate, discovered the Iranian vessel Iran Ajr putting mines in the water one night. U.S. naval forces captured and then sank her. Iranian-inicted damage to another re-agged tanker and to American frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988 sparked more U.S. retaliation. On the 18th, warships, Navy carrier aircraft, and Marine he licopters destroyed two Iranian platforms in the gulf and sank or severely damaged three Iranian naval vessels. In contrast to these positive actions, on July 3, guided missile cruiser USS Vincennes (CG-49) mistakenly shot down an Irani an airliner, killing all aboard the plane. Finally, Iran, recognizing the futility of the anti-shipping cam paign and exhausted after eight years of war, soon agreed to a cease-re with Iraq. e Navys operations dur ing the so-called Tanker War not only kept the oil owing to a thirsty global economy but persuaded Americas friends in the region that the United States could be counted on to oppose aggression. e importance of this perception would be clear a few years later. e U.S. Navys dominance of the waters around the Arabian Peninsula and its capacity for bringing naval power to bear against the enemy ashore were vital to the UN coalitions victory over Saddam Husseins armed forces in the Persian Gulf War. When Iraqi forces stormed into Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990, warships of the U.S. Middle East Force were in the Persian Gulf defending U.S. interests, as they had been since 1949. In short order, the USS In dependence (CVN-69) carrier battle group changed course in the Indian Ocean and headed toward the gulf. Eisenhower and her escorts deployed from the Eastern Med iterranean through the Suez Canal and into the Red Sea. Within ve days, the air wings of both carriers were in range to attack advancing Iraqi armored ve hicles and supply convoys, had Saddam decided to invade Sau di Arabia, As these forces steamed in harms way, President George H.W. Bush began forging an in ternational coalition to oppose the Iraqi aggression and in Op eration Desert Shield ordered the deployment of powerful American forces to the troubled region. As detailed in Operation Plan 1002, on Aug. 7 three carrier bat tle groups, a battleship surface action group, a marine expeditionary force, and various Army and Air Force units began de ploying into the region. is was the operational theater of the U.S. Central Command, headed by Army General Norman H. Schwarzkopf Jr. e Air Force Military Airlift Command carried most Ameri can soldiers, marines, airmen, and coast guardsmen to Saudi Arabia. Sailors deployed to the region in their ships. e Navys Military Sealift Command trans ported almost everything else needed by the American armed forces to ght a war half way around the globe. is included their tanks, armored ghting vehicles, artillery pieces, fuel, ammunition, supplies, and a mountain of other essential ma terial. Protecting the planes and ships that began streaming from U.S. airelds and ports across the Atlantic and Pacic, through the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean, and into the theater were the warships of the U.S. Navy and its allies. For politi cal reasons, some countries like Germany could not take part in the Persian Gulf eort. But, German naval vessels operating in the Eastern Mediterranean in keeping with their NATO re sponsibilities helped guard the Military Sealift Commands un armed merchantmen as they steamed along the coasts of Lib ya and other potentially hostile nations. Next: Middle East buildup to ground and air war against IraqTerrorists targeted, Iraq takes Kuwait The NavyIn the Cold WarNinth in a series

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11 National Guard personnel are feeling the eects of the government shut down and leaders are wor ried about the readiness of the component, Air Force Gen. Joseph Lengyel, the vice chief of the National Guard Bureau said Oct. 11. e Pay Our Military Act has mitigated some of the eects of the partial gov ernment shutdown for the Guard, but there are still concerns, the general said. e act does not allow for drill training periods, unless the drill is in sup port of an excepted activ ity such as preparing for an overseas deployment, he said. Most October drills are canceled, impacting near ly 400,000 National Guard members, Lengyel said. ese drill periods are critical to maintaining the training and preparedness of our citizen soldiers and airmen nearly 85 per cent of our force. For individual Guards men canceling drills means a loss of pay. For units it means degrading the readiness needed to respond to homeland and overseas missions. Not all units are impact ed. Units preparing for deployment are not af fected by the government shutdown, Lengyel said. e National Guard is now the best-trained and best-equipped force in our history. We are indis pensable to both domestic and overseas operations. It would be extremely un fortunate to this nation if our readiness is allowed to atrophy. e shutdown is de laying some training de ployments, the general said, but it will not aect Guardsmens ability to de ploy for actual, real-world missions. e National Guard re sponds to emergencies within the United States. Recent activities included providing assistance to local authorities during ooding in Colorado, aiding in ght ing wildres in the West and preparing for storms in the East. Guardsmen and civil ians who work for the Guard remain on call despite the shutdown. During the lapse of appropriations, DOD ci vilians who support the military in support of the preservation of life and protection of property were allowed to continue working, Lengyel said. When Tropical Storm Karen threatened the Gulf Coast, the Guard worked with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to authorize the recall of up to 2,200 additional National Guard military technicians to as sist with disaster response actions. e initial shutdown furlough impacted more than 40,000 dual-status military technicians. ese men and women are civilian employees during the week and drilling Guardsmen. Chief of Naval Op erations Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke to 150 mil itary spouses during the Naval Ocers Spouses Club Welcome Coee at the Joint Base AnacostiaBolling Club Oct. 7. e annual NOSC event welcomes new members and spouses who have recently moved to the DC area. This year the NOSC wel comed several spouses of for eign at taches from Canada, France, Mexico, Sweden and the United Kingdom, among other nations. Admiral Greenert, along with his wife Dar leen, have been incredible supporters of the Naval Ocers Spouses Club of DC and we are pleased they could join us today. said Corey Chernesky, President of the NOSC DC. I need to talk to people who can get stu done, said Greenert. is organi zation always steps up and takes care of things. No matter what the situation, the spouses club pulls together to communicate between families and commands, said Greenert. Greenert took the op portunity to talk budget impacts on readiness and family programs as well as take questions from the attendees. Topping the list of is sues discussed was the return of many DoD civilian employees brought back to work after a decision made by the Secretary of Defense over the week end, based on the Pay Our Military Act. Greenert described the process in which some Civilians were brought back and others were still furloughed. Navy civilians are critical to the Navy mission, said Greenert. e military cant do what they do without our military civilians. Greenert went on to dis cuss other eects of the government shutdown, as well as sequestration if imposed during scal year 2014. Despite budget cuts, Greenert emphasized that service members that are deployed and getting ready to deploy, will have fuel, parts and pay. In FY14, tuition assis tance, compensation, pay, entitlements, retirement process stays as it is now, he said. Greenert also stressed that the G.I. Bill is safe because it is a separate law that is not aected by Department of Defense funding, or lack thereof. Generally speaking it doesnt cost a lot of money to fund family readiness programs, said Greenert when asked about the status of family programs. e payback is pretty big, if ever people needed ser vices like counseling, its now. I dont look to the family readiness programs to save money. Greenert did point out that entitlements, such as the future of commissary operations and retirement structures are being ex amined by congressional panels. However, changes to the retirement system would not aect Sailors serving now, he said. No matter how the panel runs the numbers, they have to examine how much money these changes would really save, said Greenert. Youve got to survey the people who are just starting out and those who are in the military now and see what they say about it. When asked about man ning and promotions, Greenert pointed out that the Navy mans equipment dierent than how the other services equip their manning. e Navy must align its overall manning to the number of ships in the eet rather than building ships to the number of Sailors. We have to keep per sonnel at a certain level. Weve been struggling to get the manning at the proper levels in the right specialties, but now we are a balanced force. said Greenert. Promotions will continue at pace. He went on to say that no force shaping programs are planned. When asked about fu ture deployment lengths in the light of the AsiaPacic rebalance, Greenert said the result should be positive for Sailors and their families. He also went on to em phasize Sailors and Families are capable of handling deployments well, as long as the deployments are predictable. In the end what will make the dierence will be the Sailors, the Sailors spouses, and spouse clubs like yourself. Well pull through this, well do it the best we can, and well show them what weve got, said Greenert. Spouses briefed about budget New Hydra program aims to make it easier, faster and cheaper to de ploy crucial capabilities worldwide Todays Naval forces rely primarily on highly capable multifunctional manned platforms, such as ships and submarines. Even the most ad vanced vessel, however, can only be in one place at a time, making the ability to respond increasingly de pendent on being ready at the right place at the right time. With the number of U.S. Navy vessels continuing to shrink due to planned force reductions and s cal constraints, Naval assets are in creasingly stretched thin trying to cover vast regions of interest around the globe. To maintain advantage over ad versaries, U.S. Naval forces need a way to project key capabilities in multiple locations at once, without the time and expense of building new vessels to deliver those capabilities. e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has initiated the Hydra program to help address these challenges. Named for the multi-headed creature from Greek mythology, Hydra aims to develop a distributed undersea network of unmanned payloads and platforms to complement manned vessels. e system would integrate ex isting and emerging technologies in new ways to create an alternate means of delivering various capabilities above, on and below the oceans surface. e goal is to create a force mul tiplier that enables rapid, scalable and cost-eective deployment of as sets close to the point of use. e climate of budget austerity runs up against an uncertain security environment that includes natural disasters, piracy, ungoverned states and the proliferation of sophisticat ed defense technologies, said Scott Littleeld, DARPA program manager. An unmanned technology infra structure staged below the oceans surface could relieve some of that resource strain and expand military capabilities in this increasingly chal lenging space. DARPA seeks ideas and technical proposals for how to best develop and implement the Hydra system. e agency hosted a Proposers Day on Aug. 5 at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Labora tory in Baltimore, Md. Key to the eort is the develop ment of modular payloads that would provide key capabilities, in cluding Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and Mine Counter-Measures. Each payload module would plug into a standardized enclosure that would securely transport, house and launch various payloads, while sustaining payload functionality for weeks to months. e Hydra system would emphasize scalability, rapid reconguration and maximization of payload. Ships, submarines or airplanes could deliver the Hydra system to littoral ocean zones (shallow inter national waters near shorelines). Hydras communications suite would work synergistically with manned platforms, increasing their eectiveness. It would also enable remote control from over-the-horizon signicantly increasing opera tional reach. Additionally, Hydra would enable other new capabilities not currently performed by manned platforms, such as forward-deployed airborne ISR with expendable platforms or recharging hubs for ISR-capable un dersea vehicles. By separating capabilities from the platforms that deliver them, Hy dra would enable naval forces to de liver those capabilities much faster and more cost-eectively wherever needed, Littleeld said. It is envisioned to work across air, underwa ter and surface operations, enabling all three to perform their missions better. Hydra program multiplies forces Funding shis schedule Due to a lapse in fed eral funding, all statu tory and administrative selection boards scheduled for October are being rescheduled, Navy leaders said Oct. 11. Capt. Chris Halton, assistant commander for Career Progression, NPC, said boards are comprised of Sailors from around the world. Since Navy Person nel Command has no travel funding, no one is able to be a voting member of a board or work as an assistant re corder. NPC does not vote on any board and the board recommendations are made by Fleet sailors, said Halton. An updated scal year 2015 board schedule will be posted on the NPC website once all of the details are worked out. National Guard faced with shutdown Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel commend ed U.S. troops Oct. 6 for the capture of one of the worlds most sought after terrorists. U.S. military person nel conducted targeted operations in Libya and Somalia to bring international terrorists to justice, he said. Abu Anas al Libi was designated as a global ter rorist by Executive Order, was a subject of the U.S. Rewards for Justice Program, and is on the U.N. al-Qaida sanctions list., Hagel said. He was also indicted for his alleged role in the 1998 U.S. em bassy bombings in Africa, and other plots to conduct attacks against U.S. inter ests.Terrorist captured in Africa

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13 Recruit sheds weightFor most recruits, the hardest part of boot camp is boot camp, but for one new Marine who gradu ated Sept. 20, 2013, it was the hefty two-year challenge just to get here. To become a Marine, 20-year-old Pvt. Chris topher Stephens from Phenix City, Ala., had a lot to lose more than 175 pounds to be exact. Stephens carried 359 pounds on his 5-foot-7inch frame during his se nior year at Smiths Station High School in Smiths Station, Ala. He knew he could be doing something better with his life. e military was always in the back of his mind, but he knew his weight would prevent him from joining. Stephens grew up in a very military-friendly family. His brother and both of his grandfathers were Ma rines. e three years in the Marine Corps Junior ROTC program during high school increased his interest to enlist. I wasnt really going anywhere else with my life, and I didnt do the best in high school, Ste phens said. I either knew I had to lose weight and join the Marine Corps or I may not have a good fu ture at all. Stephens mother, Dar rie Stephens, said after local children continually teased her son about his weight and told him he would never be able to be come a Marine, he began to change. She noticed how serious he was about joining and how he was dedicated to proving it to those who doubted him. Afraid of being denied, Stephens waited to speak to a recruiter until he be gan losing weight. He started a liquid protein diet and dramatically cut his calorie intake. When Stephens walked in the recruiters oce, he weighed 275 pounds, 84 pounds less than what he weighed his senior year. Stephens told the re cruiter he understood the amount of work it would take to ship to boot camp, but he wanted to show his dedication. e recruiter explained the Marine Corps has strict height and weight standards for those who want to join, and Stephens needed to lose an addi tional 80 pounds before he would even consider enlisting him. en, the recruiter showed him the door. Eighteen months later, Stephens returned to the recruiting oce weighing 195 pounds. He was ready to enlist. He spent four months in the Delayed Entry Pro gram, working with his re cruiter every Tuesday and Saturday to get in better shape. roughout that time he was able to get his weight down to 180 pounds, four pounds under his maximum shipping weight and literally half the man he was in high school. Stephens is by far the most dedicated poolee I have ever worked with, said Sta Sgt. Byron Ba con, the recruiter who worked with Stephens ev ery week in Montgomery, Ala. Bacon said that when Stephens joined the De layed Entry Program he was running 1.5 miles in approximately 15 minutes, and doing zero pullups and 58 crunches. Four months later, when Stephens shipped to boot camp, he had cut his run time by three minutes and improved to six pullups and 75 crunches. On Parris Island, Stephens trained in Platoon 2073, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Bat talion. During this time he endured hikes, intensive physical training and the Crucible, boot camps 54hour nal test. He said there were times when he thought it was too challenging to be able to nish, but he knew he didnt come all this way to give up. Sta Sgt. Jonathan Sy pole, Stephens senior drill instructor, described him as a motivated re cruit who has made it clear that he can accomplish any goals he sets for himself. Even with the praise from his family and friends, Stephens cant believe how far he has come. He went from weighing 359 pounds in high school to 160 pounds as a United States Marine. I feel like this is all a dream, Stephens said. I never thought I would have made it coming from my heaviest weight to where I am now. Stephens said he under stands that what he has gone through was chal lenging, but he wants to assure those in similar cir cumstances its worth it. I hope I maybe inspire at least one or two people to do what they want to do even if they have to lose a lot of weight, Stephens said. Its not impossible. If you really want it, you can do it. training. Forty-eight of the wom en met the initial physical requirements for the course, but only 19 vol unteered to join Infan try Training Battalion, or ITB. Four later opted out of the training, instead choosing to attend Marine Combat Training, a course required for all Marines, regardless of occupational-specialty. All Marines attending the infantry training are expected to meet the same physical standard, known as the ITB standard, dur ing scored events re gardless of gender. e standards of the battalion have not changed; they are the same standards outlined by the Marine Corps prior to the start of the current research. e remaining 15 students chose to go above and beyond what is required of female Ma rines by attending the in fantry course. Upon completion of the course, the female Ma rines will not be awarded the 0311 infantry job des ignator and will proceed to their previously select ed occupational specialty training. I asked them why they are doing this, Sta Sgt. Kevin Hayden, a combat instructor with delta com pany at ITB said. eir answer to me was that they wanted a challenge. I think all Marines come to the Marine Corps for a challenge, and this was a way for them to put in a little more eort and do something that most peo ple wouldnt volunteer for. e students spent the rst week completing rigorous physical screenings to include the physical tness test, the combat tness test, the high in tensity tactical training as sessment and a 5-kilome ter hike. Hayden said he and his fellow combat instructors arent treating any of the Marines dierently. ese are Marines, Hayden said. No matter what, theyre going to be treated the same as every other Marine. One female Marine did not meet the physical t ness test minimum score and chose to drop from the current cycle to work on her strength before attempting the training again with the next cycle. One female Marine did not meet the combat t ness test minimum score and chose to opt out of the training entirely. One male Marine also dropped from the training for failing the physical t ness test. Since the female students are attending the training on a voluntary basis, they are permitted to drop on request at any point during the training with no penalty. In order to accommodate female students into Infantry Training Battal ion, a few adjustments had to be made includ ing dedicating an existing squad bay for the exclu sive billeting of female students and bringing over three female combat instructors from Marine Combat Training, or MCT, to serve as gender advisors to the ITB sta and to pro vide positive leadership to the female students par ticipating in the research study. e female instruc tors went through one training cycle with ITB to familiarize themselves with the instruction be fore assuming their roles during this iteration. e rst half of the in fantry course roughly mir rors the 29-day training cycle all non-infantry Ma rines complete at MCT. e second half, how ever, delves into more spe cic infantry skills.is is the part of infantry train ing where instructors say many of the Marines begin to struggle. e instructors said in juries are one of the main reasons students drop from training. It is rigorous training for the body, but they have youth on their side, so a lot of them can put up with it, 1st Sgt. Shawn Hebert, rst sergeant of delta company, Infantry Training Bat talion, said. All of these young Marines are pretty strong mentally, but phys ically our minds want to go forever, but our bodies end up failing us. Among other collection requirements, the ques tion of whether female Marines are able to withstand the physical rigors of entry level infantrytraining is a key data point behind the research at ITB. e Marine Corps plans to continue to send fe male Marines through the course for the next year, or until they have gathered data from 250 to 300 fe male students. is is denitely histor ic for the Marine Corps, Hebert said. e Marines are going to do great things ... I feel privileged to be here at the Infantry Training Battalion. Infantry

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AIR, SURF A CE A ND SUBM A RINE A SA LUTE TO OUR NA VY AN D ALL WHO HA VE SERVED FE A TURING NA VY BIRTHD A YMA RINE S BIRTHD A Y VETER A N S DA Y AND MILIT A RY FA MILY APPRECI A TION MONTH PUBLI S HED BY

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3 On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to inter cept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certificate of the navy. To understand the momentous sig nificance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the author ity of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their rela tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolution ary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a cen tral government for the colonies, cre ated a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held supe riority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies' trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized pri vateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the out set of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neu tral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance pos sible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southern ers agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would do so in the south ern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consid er the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protec tion of their coasts and harbors. Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equip ping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was "the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress received intelligence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its mem bers were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They rec ommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until 13 October, when another for tuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup ply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluc tant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The com mittee's proposal, now appearing emi nently reasonable to the reluctant mem bers, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the pur chasing, outfitting, manning, and oper ations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navy's conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed ves sels of various types. The navy's squad rons and cruisers seized enemy sup plies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked dip lomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tra dition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cel ebrate each year in October.~ history.navy.mil Establishment of the Navy, October 13, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Navy. "Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for intercepting such transports as may be laden with warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies, and for such other purposes as the Congress shall direct. That a Committee of three be appointed to pre pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same before the Congress, and to contract with proper persons to fit out the vessel. Resolved, that another vessel be fitted out for the same purposes, and that the said committee report their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti mate of the expence."Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13 October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966): 442. Establishment of the Department of the Navy, April 30, 1798This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval mat ters were under the cognizance of the War Department. AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the depart ment of the navy. SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war, as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary, shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take pos session of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this depart ment, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War. SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regula tions, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a fur ther compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments. SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive depart ment, to be denominated the department of war,'' as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.Approved, April 30, 1798. Air, Surface and Submarine: A salute to our Navy and all who have served is a spe cial advertising section produced by the Military Publications department of The Florida TimesUnion. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper, and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn Hirschman. Material, information and photo graphs used in this section was provided by Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise credited.

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Resolution of the Continental Congress establishing the Marine Corps November 10, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Marine Corps. "Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlist ed into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commis sioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be dis tinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the con tinental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of." Reestablishment of the Marine Corps July 11, 1798An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, fortyeight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distri bution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay and subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, and four rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth, aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieu tenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and musicians, conformably to the act, intituled "An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself, to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof, may be for the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster, sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music, respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments, which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed vessels of the United States, respectively, as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid, shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be estab lished by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States." Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of ser vice, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his discretion, shall direct. Approved, July 11, 1798.During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that two Battalions of Marines be raised for ser vice as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopt ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned offi cer in the Continental Marines and is cel ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded. In the next decade, however, increasing con flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called QuasiWar with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first sol diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores. Today, there are more than 200,000 activeduty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning Always Faithful in Latin.~ history.com Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5

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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 World War I known at the time as The Great War offi cially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hos tilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the elev enth month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of the war to end all wars. Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two min utes before the armistice end ing World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the fol lowing words: "To us in America, the reflec tions of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the countrys service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations" The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business begin ning at 11:00 a.m. The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words: Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the ces sation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful rela tions with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to per petuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives con curring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation call ing upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable plac es, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holidaya day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veter ans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nations histo ry; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service orga nizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legis lation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veter ans of all wars. Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common pur pose. Toward this end, I am des ignating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary plan ning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agen cies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible." President Eisenhower signing HR7786, changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne Richards, Arthur J. Connell, John T. Nation, Edward Rees, Richard L. Trombla, Howard W. Watts On that same day, President Eisenhower sent a letter to the Honorable Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs (VA), designating him as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee. In 1958, the White House advised VA's General Counsel that the 1954 designation of the VA Administrator as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee applied to all sub sequent VA Administrators. Since March 1989 when VA was elevated to a cabinet level department, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has served as the committee's chairman. The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by cel ebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreation al and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service orga nizations and the American people. Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The res toration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the histori cal significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacri fice for the common good.~ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7 Veterans Day, 1954 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION 3071Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351) that the eleventh of November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day. In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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8 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. A heartfelt thank you to all advertisers who have taken part in this special Salute to our Navy and all who have served! Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide unending support." This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a monthlong celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacri fices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families President Proclaims November as Military Family Month Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families Why Appreciate Military Families? Throughout the month of November, military families serving around the world are honored through a variety of observances and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu tions they make every day in support of the military and our nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and support ed by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange Service, Defense Commissary Agency, and others. Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts are teaming up to recognize military families through special events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business and sporting events; and special recognitions during community activities throughout the month of November.~ military.com 10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRCThe VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their tran sition process from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a successful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weapons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficiency to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their successful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspection of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to exe cute safely and efficiently in prepara tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy ment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Proud Warriors MQ-4C Triton

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 A six-plane detachment of F/A-18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a fiveplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, the aircraft from VFC-12 and contractor adver sary aircraft, represent a real istic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capa bilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deploy ment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC-12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adver sary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other avia tion units. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their warfighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A-18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after avia tion duty assignments. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily task ing from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres ent a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint mis sions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as tow ing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-air frame testing to certify the reli ability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the con crete test chamber are 18 inch es thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was con structed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid-1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the control room behind two inches of bullet proof glass, test cell opera tors put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical air craft are each powered by two of these engines. The test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine performance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple num and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly test cells around. We have testing capa bility for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution

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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Station Mayport Established since 1942, Naval Station Mayport has grown to become the third largest fleet concentration in the United States. The unique operational compo sition of the naval installation includes a harbor capable of accommodat ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway capable of handling any aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory. NS Mayport is home to more than 83 tenant commands, including 16 naval ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4 helicopter squadrons and Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. The mission of Naval Station Mayport is to enhance and sustain the opera tional readiness of its tenant commands and provide unparalleled support to its families. The vision of the command is to be recognized as the leader of shore installations in the Navy and a model facility that employs a premier work force always seeking to provide the fin est service to the fleet, family and com munity. Over the past year, the base has worked towards its mission by under taking vast energy conservation mea sures, completing a state of the art fit ness center to enhance the physical readiness of Sailors and implementing housing improvements to enrich the quality of life. NS Mayport improvements have saved the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while still providing the fleet with premium services. These improvements not only positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors, but those soon to arrive with USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport is also currently adding three patrol coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal arrived in October, followed shortly by USS Tornado and USS Zephyr. The base has provided support for 532 Navy ship movements, including 16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast guard ship movements and 110 foreign and commercial visiting ships. NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19 Darkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-a-day. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they prepare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the coun ter-narcotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marksmen aboard who are authorized to fire disabling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to com ply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a suspected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, authority over the helicopter is trans ferred to the regional Coast Guard com mander, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard precision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforcement members who have been selected for the precision marks manship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can read ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we cap tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to configure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive training before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth perception. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, air speed, and other critical flight param eters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instru ment panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these mis sions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coordinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin fly ing these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when necessary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accom plished. HSL-60 Jaguars use nighttime force against drug runners

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20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 With minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor inge nuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for surface Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated navi gation team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships navigation teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive simulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simula tion. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills nec essary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hardware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equipment and inno vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, headsets, and reformat existing computers to com plete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of underway times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in navigation and ship han dling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experience the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent train ing class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course simulates relative motion, which means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly changing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the MSN simulation was exponentially better than read ing it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the sys tem with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient form of navigation team training Budget cuts have reduced Department of Navy spending across the board. Ship deployments have been cancelled and aircraft flying hours have been reduced. This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has turned to innovative ways to continue the fleets important mission. 4th Fleets current missions include security cooperation activities, con tingency operations, and the domi nant mission of maritime security operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes this through Counter Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission. The illegal transportation of illicit cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions as the greatest means these organiza tions make money and influence and destabilize the region. 4th Fleet and partner nations in the region monitor detect and intercept narcotics being smuggled via the water ways between the Americas. Defending the homeland by preventing narcotics from entering American schools and neighborhoods is an important mission that 4th Fleet must now accomplish with fewer ships, aircraft, and other assets. In the current fiscal environ ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova tive, cost effective solutions that can address the capability gaps caused by budget cuts. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet said. To continue sustained operations 4th Fleet has employed a combination of resources from the past with new tech nologies to continue the mission. In March of this year 4th Fleet host ed a capabilities demonstration of the Naval Air Warfare Centers MZ-3A Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized blimps during WWII in the South Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. Harris discussed the benefits blimps can bring to the C-TOC mission. Transnational criminal organiza tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics, low observable and high speed vessels, masked communication signatures and sophisticated coordination to smug gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year. One way to enhance detection efforts against illicit trafficking within our area of operations is to utilize long-endur ance platforms with the ability to use a multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) technologies, like this blimp have the potential to meet these operational needs, Harris said. In May Harris traveled to Key West for a very successful demonstration of the TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon) and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel Swift. The tethered Aerostat provides an aerodynamically stable, reliable and cost effective, unmanned aerial plat form for surveillance, monitoring and detection. The standard system config uration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly and safely. The Puma UAV delivers flexibil ity, endurance and a payload capability unmatched in its vehicle class. With a wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight, hand-launched UAV provides aerial observation at line-of-sight ranges up to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov ered in very restricted areas using verti cal descent Auto Land and is currently undergoing sea landing trials. On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters for a capabilities demon stration prior to a scheduled deploy ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America, another vehicle from the past 4th Fleet wants to use for future opera tions. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a variety of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The equip ment on board this DC-3 allows it not only to survey coastal areas, but also detect surface and underwater contacts essential for the C-TOC mission. It is important for 4th Fleet to find creative ways to continue the C-TOC mission with fewer assets. In 2012, 318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti mated street value of $25.5 billion were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Harris said. Developing, testing and deploying low cost innovative ideas and technol ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue operations now and in the near future. The Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission is of vital importance to our nation, as well as our partners in the region. The effect of crime and corruption that this ille gal activity has brought threatens the stability of emerging countries like Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem, but a problem for all of the Americas, Harris said. 4th Fleet AORs close proximity to the U.S. makes the Fleets mission that more important. Illegal materials enter ing the U.S. are a direct threat to the homeland. The violence that drug traf ficking creates has impacted our part ner nations in the hemisphere. It is important that 4th Fleet contin ues to explore innovative ways to do more with less. Budget concerns are a problem that is not going away any time soon, and neither is the attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari time forces in cooperative maritime security operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. 4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21 East Coast Ohio-class submarine home port continues to thrive What began as an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now home to the most powerful vessels ever created for the U.S. Navy and the world. Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is the largest employer in Camden County with more than 8,000 service members and civilian employees and an estimat ed annual payroll of $500 million. The goods and service the Kings Bay mili tary bring into Camden County is esti mated at $697 million. Kings Bay is the home port to six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and two Ohio-Class guided missile sub marines. The Navys move to Kings Bay began when treaty negotiations between the United States and Spain called for the withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16 from its operational base in Rota, Spain by 1979. Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials looked at more than 60 sites along the East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as the future refit site for the squadron. In addition to the land already owned by the Army, the Navy acquired other sur rounding properties for a total of 16,900 acres to create the new support base. It also transformed a sleepy com munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of about 50,000. It changed Camden County forev er, said David Rainer during a 2005 interview. It was a defining period for everyone. Rainer, a Camden County Commissioner, was the superintendent of Camden County schools in 1978. During a visit to the base in 2005, for mer president Jimmy Carter jokingly said it was hard not to have an influence in Kings Bays selection during his ten ure as president. However, the former governor and submariner noted, Kings Bay was selected on its own merits. Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility employee and mayor of Kingsland, said the base was among the most important events to occur in Camden County his tory. I dont know if [Carter] did anything in office that was more significant to Camden County, Smith said in 2005. He was in office at the time of the bases inception. It helped bring a lot of change, not only to Camden County, but surrounding counties. The first group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and civilian employees, raised the national ensign and changed the sign to read Naval Submarine Support Base Kings Bay near what was to become Stimson Gate. With the transition complete, the commanding officer of the support base and his crew set out to transform the terminal into an operational naval base. Initial construction began to prepare for the arrival of the squadron and the submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS33). According to base archives and newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil lion cubic yards of material from the St. Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland Sound and Kings Bay in preparation for the incoming fleet. Congress also approved funding for many projects such as the development of 250 fam ily housing units, the first base admin istration building (now public works), security building, and a new fire sta tion. When I first arrived at Kings Bay to take command in 1979, it was only a few trailers and a pine forest, said retired Capt. Richard Currier, who was the second commanding officer of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that year. Making do was our biggest chal lenge as was incorporating change. I had a workforce of 350 personnel when I started. When I left, there was close to 1,000 people working on the base. Following an extensive one-year environmental impact study in October 1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east coast site for the new Ohio-class sub marines. The Navy then called for the construction of three new commands. Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic were built to support the mas sive new boats. Trident Training Facility is the largest building in Camden County, with more than 500,000 square feet of classrooms and office space. Trident Refit Facilitys dry dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemisphere. The announcement spurred the larg est peacetime construction project ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3 billion, 11-year construction project also fueled a population explosion in Camden County that still persists today. Other milestones achieved dur A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year

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22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 ing the first years were the publication of the first Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in April 1980. When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years, said Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later worked for the base administration. The admin building was still being built, Trident Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10 was non-existent. Since then he said, construction of new buildings changed the face of the base. The biggest impression I received from my initial arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design of the base, because everything was within walking distance, Alexander said. The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15, 1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150 Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to 10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000. Kings Bay continues to evolve. Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729) were converted to guided missile submarines and shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732) arrived from the West Coast. In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing 140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to the base. Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. The Times-Union contributed to this story. 35 YEARS

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 23 First qualified female sub officers receive Dolphins Three Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in sub marines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during sepa rate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Officer of the Deck and Engineering Officer of the Watch, perform damage con trol functions, and demon strate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew officer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par ticipated in a ceremony pre sided by Cmdr. Christopher Nash, commanding officer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young officers earned the right to lead the next gen eration of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations tech nical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualified submari ner onboard the ballistic mis sile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the sub marine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew officers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeffer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Officer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. The Commanding officer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four fine officers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. They are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submari ners that have gone before us as qualified in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line officers and seven supply officers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each complet ed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective subma rines. Qualifying is a huge accom plishment for any submariner, and it feels no different for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to finally be a member of this elite commu nity. Im particularly grateful to my crew, officers and enlisted, for supporting me and hold ing me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualified sub marine officer. Cowan said qualification in submarines is more of a per sonal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of subma rine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at every thing that I have done and what this qualification means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowl edge and the instinct to per form safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its mis sions. Ultimately, it is a monu mental mark of the confidence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line officers under instruc tion graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and under went naval nuclear prototype training. Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

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24 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013



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DoD comptroller before House Armed Services Committeee lapse in appropriations that triggered the government shutdown is a tragedy, and a colossal waste of time the Department of Defenses comptroller told the House Armed Services Committee Oct. 10. Under Secretary of Defense Robert F. Hale described for lawmakers how the department has implemented the Pay Our Military Act, which has mitigated some aspects of the shutdown. e act, passed September 30, took some days for DOD ocials to examine and implement. Hale described the steps the department took to prepare for the shutdown. On Sept. 25, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter issued a memo on shutdown triggered by the lapse in appropriations dening excepted activities. Under the law such activities are related to military operations and safety to life and protection to property. Once the lapse occurred we have no authority except to follow this guidance, Hale said. Under the guidance, active duty military personnel continued in their normal status. Commanders and managers identied DOD civilians who worked primarily on excepted activities. ese excepted civilians continued working after the lapse, Hale said. All others were placed on emergency no-notice furloughs. Reserve component personnel on inactive duty were allowed to drill only if the drills were in support of excepted activities such as readying for deployment to Afghanistan. All told around 400,000 DOD civilians were placed on furlough. ey will be paid only if Congress passes separate legislation, Hale said. Military personnel and excepted civilians continued to work and they are guaranteed to be paid. In [the] reserves they cant be paid until after the lapse ends. is was the situation before the Pay Our Military Act was implemented. Pavilion dedicated Vets DayKingsland Veterans Memorial Park ceremony Nov. 11 To honor the memory of the men and women who have served or are currently serving in the Armed Forces of the United States of America, VFW Post No. 8385 hosts the annual Veterans Day Parade Nov. 11 in downtown Kingsland. Parade line up starts at 9 a.m., with ste po at 10 a.m. At the conclusion of the parade, all are invited to the Kingsland Veterans Memorial Park for the 11 a.m. Spouse House pavilion dedication ceremony. is phase of the park was fund ed in part by a $5,000 grant and through Memorial Brick sales. We are requesting that all military spouses in attendance wear yellow and there will be a yellow ribbon cutting to signify the ocial dedication of the pavilion to show support and appreciation of all military spouses, said Trish Jared, Kingsland Downtown Development Authority executive director. Krista Callahan, member of the American Military Spouse Choir and wife of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Executive Ocer Cmdr Ed Callahan, will sing the national anthem and help cut the yellow ribbon at the KVM Park Spouse House pavilion dedication. e dedication ceremony will be followed by a southern fried catsh dinner at the Kingsland Depot Pavilion, 200 E. King Ave. in downtown Kingsland. Up Periscope Find outs whats best at Pirates Cove Galley Page 9 Cold War United States turns attention to Middle East Page 10 Prevention Kings Bay Fire Dept. spreads its message Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com In 1939, Navy diving bell brought 33 men up from bottom of ocean USS Squalus (SS 192), a 1,450-ton Sargo class submarine, was built at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Commissioned in March 1939, Squalus was conducting test dives o the New Hampshire coast not far from Portsmouth, at 8:40 a.m., May 23, 1939, New Hampshire. All indications were that everything was ready for a safe dive. However, just after the submarine submerged, the engine rooms began to ood. Somehow the main induction valve, a large opening that brought air to the engines while on the surface, had opened. Quickly, the submarines after compartments lled with water, drowning 26 men there, and Squalus settled to the bottom, 243 feet deep. In the forward compartments, sealed by watertight doors, 33 men remained alive. eir Commanding Ocer, Lt. Oliver F. Naquin, began survival planning. Since the water depth and temperature made ascent with the self-contained Momsen Lung very dangerous, he elected to wait for rescue from above. Within a few hours, other ships were searching for the missing Squalus, unfortunately in the wrong place. However, in the early afternoon a distant signal rocket was seen from a sister submarine, USS Sculpin (SS191). Communication via the sunken subs rescue bouy was soon established, and as soon broken when the bouys connecting line snapped. The amazing rescue of USS S qualus Hale calls shutdown tragedy, urges Congress to end

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is now providing annual inuenza vaccine to service members, retirees and families. e u vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, selected reserves and healthcare workers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for everyone age six months and up. Its the rst and most important step in protecting against u viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epidemics of inuenza occur every year in the United States, usually between October and April. Typically, epidemics cause thousands to tens of thousands of deaths and about 200,000 hospitalizations each year in the U.S. A vaccine to prevent inuenza has been available since the 1940s, yet some patients dont take the time to get the vaccine, even after the recent 2009 H1N1 global pandemic the rst such pandemic in more than 40 years. e u can be very dangerous, especially to the young and elderly, said Cmdr. Chad Roe, NBHC Kings Bay ocer in charge. Vaccination is the primary means of reducing seasonal u illness and its complications. Vaccine protects both the individual and the community as a whole, by reducing and preventing the spread of the disease. Inuenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shaking hands, sneezing or talking closely with another person. Typical u symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, congestion, cough, runny nose and diculty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia, especially in the elderly and the immunocompromised. H1N1 u virus has similar symptoms, sometimes also including vomiting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and children. NBHC Kings Bay oers two kinds of u vaccine. Flu mist, an intranasal vaccine that is squirted into the nose, can be given to healthy patients ages two to 49. e injectable vaccine, or u shot, is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with a chronic medical condition such as emphysema. e shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during pregnancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective u antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immunization. Potential side eects are usually mild. e u mist can cause mild congestion and a runny nose, but it cant grow in the lungs and cant cause pneumonia. e u shot can cause some redness and pain at the injection site, muscle ache and a low grade fever, but because the virus is completely inactivated, it cannot possibly cause inuenza. At NBHC Kings Bay, patients can walk-in for u vaccine 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. Flu vaccine walk-ins will be conducted from 7 to 11 a.m. only, on the last Friday of each month, to facilitate command training. Other important immunizations include human papillomavirus, pneumococcal and the entire spectrum of childhood vaccines. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and historical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. It features 11 haunting venues with 11 stories told by costumed actors, including the infamous Goat Man. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 8827350. Also ongoing in St. Marys through Oct. 31 are the Haunted House in the Kings Bay Shopping Center Fridays and Saturdays, plus Oct. 17 and 31, and Hay Days. For more information, call (912) 888-4000.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemorative glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Welcome Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Reward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter for college. e next drawing will be at the end of August. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded more than $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. There is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.The Habitat Ride to Build Poker Run, benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Camden County, will be Nov. 16. The ride begins and ends at VFW of Kingsland. Cost is $20 for rider and one passenger, one poker hand, cookout, music. For more information, contact Haylinder at (912) 552-4563.e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvillecelticfestival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Branch Health Clinic oers u shots Branch Health Clinic KB Every single service member deployed outside the United States deserves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syndicated radio program, and its listening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were successfully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed outside the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling together, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e purpose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fraternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, markers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You Topics for General Military Training for Fiscal Year 14 were announced in NAVADMIN 264/13, Oct. 9. e announcement, usually released Oct. 1, was delayed due to the ongoing eort to streamline or eliminate administrative burdens on the eet, allowing more time to focus on mission readiness. In support of this eort, known as Reducing Administrative Distractions, a revision of the GMT instruction is nearing completion. rough RAD and other feedback, the Fleet has been pretty clear that they want us to give this a good hard look, said Vice Adm. Bill Moran, chief of naval personnel. We need to nd the right balance of required training and white space for our commanders. While each of the GMT subjects are important, Moran said his stas review of the instruction will ensure training requirements are validated, ineciencies are eliminated, and improvements are made to overall program eectiveness. e intent of the GMT instruction revision is to provide clear communication of requirements and to establish an annual review process for each topic. ere are two categories of GMT topics that must be completed in FY 14. Category One topics must be conducted via face-to-face, instructorled training sessions provided at the command level. Senior leadership, command training teams, or collateral duty training ocers/chief petty ocers will conduct Category One GMT. e FY 14 Category One GMT topics are: Alcohol Abuse Prevention and Control; Equal Opportunity and Grievance Procedures; Hazing Policy and Prevention; Personal Financial Management; Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Awareness; Sexual Harassment and Grievance Procedures; Stress Management; and Suicide Awareness and Prevention. ese are the opportunities for leadership to engage and have frank and deliberate discussions about command-delivered training, ensuring Sailors understand their roles and responsibilities, said Capt. John Newcomer, Commanding Ocer at the Center for Personal and Professional Development. e remaining required GMT topics are Category Two topics that can be completed via Navy e-Learning or through face-to-face, commanddelivered training at the discretion of the unit commander. e Category Two GMT topics for FY 14 are: Anger Management; Antiterrorism/Force Protection; Combating Tracking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Domestic Violence Prevention and Reporting; Drug Abuse Prevention and Control; Fraternization Awareness and Prevention; Information Assurance; Operational Risk Management; Operational Security; Physical Readiness; Privacy and Personally Identiable Information Awareness; Records Management; Sexual Health and Responsibility; and Tobacco Use Prevention General training schedule released Education & Training

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POMA is an appropriations act, Hale said. It guarantees pay and allowances for those on active service. DOD can now pay active duty military personnel on time and in full, even if the lapse continues beyond the active duty payday, he said. e act also allows pay and and benets for excepted civilians in full and on time, he said. It further provides pay and benets for civilians in other categories, and this allowed the department to call back many civilians who most directly served the members of the armed forces, Hale said. Lawyers concluded the act did not allow a blanket recall. Department leaders conducted a review to identify the DOD civilians that fell within the acts purview. at review focused on the degree to which civilians aided the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of members of the armed forces, Hale said. Excepted personnel fell into this category. e department recalled civilians who provide day-to-day support, like health care providers, family support, some repair and maintenance, commissary workers and payroll activities. Another group of civilians who provide longer term support were also recalled. ey include acquisition oversight, nancial management, logistics, and a number of others. Finally, a category of civilians was identied whose work is highly valuable and necessary but it provides less direct support to military members, Hale said. ese civilians were not covered by POMA, and some remain on furlough. ey include chief information ocer sta functions, public aairs ocers except internal communications personnel, legislative aairs, deputy chief management ofcer, auditors, and related functions, as well as personnel providing support to non-DOD personnel. More than 95 percent of DOD civilians who were on furlough were recalled, and most were back to work by Oct. 7. Still, the lapse of appropriations is having serious adverse eects on DOD, Hale said. Despite our very best eorts, there are already some limited adverse effects on the war in Afghanistan, he said. While military operations are excepted, we no longer have authority to make the Commander Emergency Response Program payments. CERP funds are used to pay Afghans compensation for deaths or damage, or other events. ey are key to continuing a responsible drawdown in Afghanistan, Hale said. Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the International Security Assistance Force commander in Kabul, has expressed his strong concerns on the situation. But we have not yet identied a legal way to make these payments during a lapse of appropriations, Hale said. Were trying our best. e lapse continues to erode reserve component training and readiness. Weekend drills have been halted. e National Guard has canceled around 100,000 drills in the rst weekend; the reserves canceled around another 75,000 drills. Active duty personnel are also hit in training and readiness accounts. e lapse forces us to waste a good deal of the publics money, Hale said. About 400,000 DOD civilian personnel on furlough did not work for four days. ats roughly $600 million in services that we lost in support of national security objectives. e department curtailed training, will pay interest for late payments and pay increased transportation costs.Hale and Cessation. In order to allow sucient time to complete the GMT program review, formulate program change proposals, and implement the approved changes, completion of Category Two GMT topics is waived for FY 14 except for the following topics which must be completed: Antiterrorism/Force Protection; Combating Tracking in Persons; Counterintelligence Awareness and Reporting; Information Assurance; Operational Security; and Records Management. Standardized training material for Category One and Category Two training is available for download from the Personal Development GMT page on the Navy Knowledge Online Web page at www.nko. navy.mil. Training completion of Category One topics must be recorded in Fleet Training Management Planning System via learning event completion forms. Additionally, a GMT calendar for FY 14 is also available on the NKO GMT page, including recommended training delivery months to coincide with Navywide training themes. GMT questions should be addressed to Lyman Watts, GMT program manager at (757) 4920763, DSN: 492 or via e-mail to the Center for Personal and Professional Development at gmt.distribution@navy.mil. Additional information about GMT training requirements for FY 14 is detailed in NAVADMIN 264/13.Schedule Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) gathered for a remembrance ceremony Sept. 29 to honor the lives of two fallen pilots killed in a helicopter accident. On Sept. 22, an MH60S Seahawk helicopter, attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 6, crashed in the central Red Sea while operating with William P. Lawrence. e two pilots killed were Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, of Lompoc, Calif., and Chief Warrant Ofcer 3 Jonathan S. Gibson, 32, of Aurora, Ore. During the ceremony Cmdr. Jana A. Vavasseur, commanding ocer of William P. Lawrence, expressed how their loss had aected everyone. Vavasseur said that even though many Sailors aboard may not have known Jones or Gibson personally, their loss still hurt because they were shipmates. After Vavasseur addressed the crew, members from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 read the biographies of Jones and Gibson. Lt. Benjamin Box, a Navy chaplain assigned to Destroyer Squadron 23, read a letter written by eresa Jones, widow of Jones. In the letter, eresa explained what was on her mind and what she did the day three men in service dress blues knocked on her door. In her letter Mrs. Jones wrote: My boys, one of you lost your best friend and one of you never even had the chance to meet him. But, please know that your father loves you. Following the letter, Box said a few words and led the crew in a prayer for the lives of Jones and Gibson. Perhaps the best way we can honor the dead, is to go on living, to enjoy our loved ones, to value the small blessings that are often taken for granted and to appreciate our opportunity to serve a great and noble cause, said Box. On this solemn occasion may we nd the inspiration to complete our mission with pride, dignity and dedication. e ceremony concluded by the playing of Taps. William P. Lawrence departed her homeport of San Diego Jan. 14 for her maiden deployment and is currently in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation eorts. Lawrence holds memorial Training eorts realistic e Coast Guard is responsible for maritime safety, security and stewardship. Performing these responsibilities requires a high level of training for Coast Guard men and women. e training is especially intense for Coast Guard law enforcement missions such as gaining compliance of potentially dangerous vessels eeing from a violation of federal law. Coast Guard members learn how to pursue and neutralize eeing vessels in a course known as Nocompliant Vessel Pursuit or NCVP. e course, designed for boat drivers as well as boat crewmembers, teaches Coast Guard men and women how to approach a vessel that may be in violation of a federal law such as drug or migrant smuggling. In these scenarios, a vessel may not stop when directed to do so by the Coast Guard. e boats driven by pursuit course students, called over the horizonboats, will hail the noncompliant vessel with their blue light and a radio call or loudhailer. If the vessel does not stop, it will often operate in a wild or erratic fashion in an attempt to shake o the Coast Guard vessel in pursuit. It is this type of situation where the courses tactics come into practice. We teach them how to approach the vessel safely, to minimize the risk that is associated with an operation like this. We not only [teach them how] to stop the vessel but also [how] to engage and neutralize the person once the vessel is stopped, said Lt. Shannon Sca, the Advanced Course school chief. We have a number of dierent tactics, such as disabling re that we teach in order to gain control of the noncompliant vessel. e courses training facility has 21 boats of different shapes, sizes and styles to act as noncompliant vessels. ey refer to it as their dirt eet where the boats are set up with microphones and cameras so the instructors can watch and critique the students as they run through their exercises. ey employ real-life role players to memorize scenarios and act or react according to how the students conduct themselves during a boarding. We want to make it more than just a boat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5 course. We have all of our law enforcement duties in one program and it makes the training more seamless. We teach from blue lights to handcus , said Senior Chief Petty Ocer Seth Hunt, the NCVP school chief. Petty Ocer 1st Class Orlando Rivera was a student of the course and subsequently assigned to a unit where he has employed the tactics taught to him. Its fast going and hightempo, but they make sure you are well aware of what to do and what not to do, Rivera said. e rst day is classroom training on what to expect, the second day they allow each coxswain to get behind the wheel and they start at a very slow pace. ey go through every step at a slow pace with safe speed and distance. en each day they add new stu. ey do it at night and increase the speed and the aggressiveness of the tactics. By the end of the week you are doing everything at full speed and at night. It really helps you get prepared to go out in to the eld. Rivera explained that at the end of the day the course provides the experience and training needed for the, coxswain to make the nal determination as to whether the tactics are safe to employ. ere are other factors like weather, sea state, construction of the other boat that need to be considered. is course was recently moved to join the Coast Guard Maritime Law Enforcement Academy in Charleston, S.C. MLEA is located at the Federal Law Enforement Training Center. With the move of the course, the MLEA now serves as a one-stop shop for all Coast Guard law enforcement training. e MLEA has four schoolhouses based there. e Basic School owns the boarding team member, boarding ocer and boarding ocer practical courses. e Advanced School has ve courses: international boarding ofcer, radiation detection level II, counter drug operations, ports waterways and coastal security and an integrated cross-border maritime law enforcement operators course a joint eort course between the U.S. and Canada. e Maritime Enforcement Specialist A School qualies Coast Guard members in a security and law enforcement career rating. e last, and most recent, school to join is NCVP. It is a true to life based dynamic training, Sca said. is is the reason why the MLEA in Charleston is so ideal. Rather than have bits and pieces (of law enforcement training) here and there, now it is all here in one place. Moving the NCVP course to the MLEA was not an easy endeavor, taking 10 years of careful planning. Sca described the process keying in on the need to identify places for the boats to moor and launch from safely. Once that all came together, they realized the most important aspect was what trainees would get out of the move. When a new member comes into the Coast Guard and nds him or herself on a law enforcement career track they come to the MLEA for boarding team member and boarding ocer training, he said. en if they end up at a unit with counter narcotics or human tracking they come back and take the NCVP course. When they come to Charleston, they get exposure to all these areas. It has become a one-stop shopping for all law enforcement training. After weekend meetings in Kabul, Afghanistan, with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, Secretary of State John Kerry said he and Karzai had resolved all but one of the major issues critical to a bilateral security agreement between the two countries. And en route to London Oct. 13, Kerry consulted several times via phone with De fense Secretary Chuck Hagel about the meetings, according to senior State Department ocials who spoke with reporters in a background brieng. Kerry and Karzai spoke during an Oct. 12 press conference at the presidential palace in Kabul, positive about the progress theyd made. I believe that in the last 24 hours, as we have worked hard at these issues that really have been negotiated over now for more than 11 months, that we have resolved the major issues that [President Karzai] went through, Kerry said. Kerry said he and Karzai have put ourselves in a position for an enduring [U.S.-Afghanistan] partnership going forward in the years ahead. In his remarks, Karzai had described his main issues as national sovereignty, prevention of civilian casualties, and a clear denition of invasion by foreign forces. But both leaders acknowledged that, on the outstanding issue of claiming U.S. jurisdiction for U.S. troops who are accused of committing crimes while deployed in Afghanistan, the decision about whether to allow this agreement in the bilateral agreement will be left to the Loya Jirga, or council of Afghan elders, which Karzai has called to meet in November. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, had said in July after meeting with Karzai in Kabul that getting the security agreement signed by October t in with his best military advice for putting in place the framework for the continuing U.S. and NATO effort in the country after Dec. 31, 2014, when the current NATO mandate expires. Last night Kerry said his delegation was pleased that the agreement reached could be submitted to a Loya Jirga, where it will go through the appropriate political process, including the issue of jurisdiction for U.S. troops who act outside the law while in Afghanistan post-2014. e question of jurisdic tion is an appropriate one for the president to submit to the Loya Jirga, and we have high condence that the people of Afghanistan will see the benets that ex ist in this agreement, the secretary said. But we need to say that if the issue of jurisdiction cannot be resolved, then unfortunately there cannot be a bilateral security agreement, Kerry added. So we hope that that will be resolved. And its up to the Afghan people, as it should be. e secretary explained that if an American who is part of any expeditionary force under agreement from the Afghan government were to violate any law, the United States would prosecute to the full measure of that law and any perpetrator of any incident or crime would be punished. ere is no immunity, he said, referring to what some call immunity for U.S. troops posted overseas. Let me make that clear: No immunity, Kerry added. And we have proven in many cases, unfortunately too many instances, that when somebody has violated the law, they have paid the price. ere are people in prison today in the United States of America who have paid that price. In terms of jurisdiction, Kerry said, where the United States has forces serving in other parts of the world, including Japan, South Korea, Europe, Africa and elsewhere, they operate under the same standard. We completely respect that the [Afghan] president should decide appropriately that this issue ought to be decided in his Loya Jirga, Kerry said. But, he added, if [the jurisdiction issue] isnt resolved, we cant send our forces in places because we dont subject United States citizens to that kind of uncertainty with respect to their rights and lives. e partial government shut down has not aected U.S. con tributions to the International Security Assistance Force in Af ghanistan or other NATO mis sions, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen told reporters in Brussels Oct. 10. So far we havent seen any negative impact on U.S. contribu tions to NATO-led operations, Rasmussen said, noting that U.S. military members have been exempted from the shutdown. Speaking at his monthly news conference, the secretary general also dismissed reported allega tions by Afghan President Hamid Karzai that NATO hasnt done enough in Afghanistan. anks to the immense eorts and the solemn sacrices of the troops and civilians from ISAF contributing nations, Afghanistan has come a long way in the past decade, Rasmussen said. e changes have been remarkable, and our investment in lives and resources has been unprecedented. Nobody can deny that. And this eort should be respected. Rasmussen said he is struck by the Afghan peo ples recognition of NATOs contribution. We have sacriced much in blood and treasure to assist the Afghan people, and whenever I meet Afghans, they express appreciation for that, he said. While working to ensure the sovereignty of the Afghan state, NATO and other troop-contributing nations in Afghanistan have helped build a strong Afghan National Security Force that now numbers about 350,000, Rasmussen said. We have seen the resilience and the growing professionalism of Afghan forces, he said. And I am condent that the Afghan security forces will be able to take full responsibility by the end of 2014 as planned. Meanwhile, Afghanistan is preparing to hold elec tions next year that will be fully led and managed by the Afghans. Six months before the polls, preparations are more advanced than for any other elections in Af ghanistans modern history, Rasmussen said. e registration of candidates was recently com pleted, with a multi-ethnic lineup of presidential tickets, he said. In addition, women are actively par ticipating as voters, election workers and candidates with at least one woman vying for oce in every provincial council. Rasmussen emphasized the importance of transparent, inclusive and credible elections, with the results acceptable to the Afghan people so the political process provides the certainty and predict ability that both Afghans and the international community expect. He welcomed Great Britains oer to host the 2014 NATO Summit at a turning point for the alliance as it prepares to complete the longest and largest opera tion in its history. is will be a critical opportunity to take stock of our ongoing work, including in Afghanistan, and to look to the future, he said. e summit will also ensure that we continue to build on the lessons that we have learned, to strengthen the alliance and keep it ready to deal with modern security challenges, Rasmussen said. It will rearm the vital transatlantic bond on which NATO was founded, he added. And it will further enhance our partnerships, which are key to our future success in a world where risks cross bor ders and we are all interconnected.Rasmussen: Progress in Afghanistan remarkableKerry, Karzai work on security agreement Training

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 21 and 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social is sues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for active duty females who have been sexually assaulted as adults. is group will oer active duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmosphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil e tug Penacook (YT6) spent the afternoon and evening dragging a grap nel around the sinking site, nally hooking what all hands hoped was Squalus. Meanwhile, a team of divers from Washington, D.C, their leader, Lt. Cmdr. Charles B. Momsen and the submarine rescue ship Falcon (ARS-2) were hurrying northward toward Portsmouth. Falcon carried more divers and a McCann Rescue Chamber, a large diving bell specially designed for just such an emergency. Falcon moored over the Penacooks contact on the morning of May 24. Divers soon conrmed that the contact was indeed the Squalus. During the afternoon and early evening, the rescue chamber made three relatively smooth round trips to the sunken submarine, bringing up 25 men. Only one more trip would nish the rescue of all those known to be alive. Shortly before 8 p.m., crewed by Chief Torpedomans Mate John Mihalowski and Chief Metal smith James H. McDonald, the rescue chamber picked up the last eight Squalus survivors, including Lt. Naquin, and began its ascent. While still 160 feet deep, its guiding cable jammed and the chamber had to return to the Squalus. Over the next four hours, as problem followed problem, and divers labored heroically to eect repairs, the chamber was in imminent danger of disaster, risking the lives of its 10 occupants. However, with careful handling, it surfaced safely shortly after midnight on May 25. During that day, divers and the rescue chamber crew made more dicult trips down to the Squalus, determining that no more crewmen remained alive on board. e historic rescue mis sion, the rst such undertak ing in history, and one con ducted at a time in which the technologies of underwater object location, communications and deep-water div ing were in their infancies, was a success. e salvage of Squalus, which began immediately after the end of the rescue of her survivors, was a prolonged and very dicult operation. Hampered by water depths of 240 ft., which led to constant bouts with nitrogen narcosis, Navy divers labored to prepare the sunken submarine for recovery. eir work was so risky that four of the divers were subsequently awarded the Medal of Honor. Mother Ship for the salvage was the submarine rescue ship USS Falcon (ASR-2). Ot was aided by the tugs Wandank (AT-26) and Penacook (YT-6) and Squalus sister submarine, USS Sculpin (SS-191). A rst eort to raise Squalus ended in neardisaster on July 13, 1939, when the salvors lost control of the lifting pontoons. e submarine burst to the surface bow rst, then sank, requiring repair of damaged equipment, clearance of a clutter of lines and hoses and the laborious re-rigging of the lifting gear. On Aug. 12, a second lift attempt succeeded in bringing Squalus some 70 feet o the sea oor. e tugs then towed her into shallower water, where equipment was repositioned for another lift, to about 100 feet below the surface, which took place on Aug. 17. Towed further inshore, Squalus was prepared for another lift, which ended with the submarine again rising out of control and sinking back to the bottom, with a heavy list to port. Work continued, interrupted by bad weather, into September, as the Second World War began in Europe. Finally, and not without further problems, on Sept. 13, 1939, Squalus was brought to the surface and towed to the Portsmouth Navy Yard, where work began to return her to service. Decommissioned, repaired and renamed Sailsh, she was recommissioned in May 1940. Following initial operations in the Atlantic, Sailsh was tranferred to the Pacic in early 1941, and subsequently went to operate in Asiatic waters. With the outbreak of war with Japan in December 1941, Sailsh made three war patrols from the Philippines and Java, then shifted its base to Australia, from which it made Squalus

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e Night Glow Golf Tournament is Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each person golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie Under the Stars in October Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presentation Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and movie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movies call, (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Kick-Off is coming Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, cheddarwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promos. (912) 510-5400. www. facebook.com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Movies for October are Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Movie Under the Stars scheduled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie listing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Combined Federal Campaign season has started Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can support with your giving. The numbers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018. Officials needed The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Monster University plays Just for kids Night Glow Golf set Oct. 25 Liberty call Navy College information four more patrols from March 1942 into January 1943. After an overhaul, Sailsh went to Pearl Harbor, from which it operated for the rest of its combat career. From May 1943 into December 1944, it conducted a further ve war patrols. During the 12 patrols, Sailsh sank seven Japanese ships, including the escort carrier Chuyo, totalling more 40,000 tons and was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. In January 1945, Sailsh returned to the Atlantic, where it performed training duties during the remainder of World War II. Sailsh was decommissioned in October 1945 and assigned to be expended as a target. However, it was not used for that purpose and was sold for scrapping in June 1948.Squalus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho I love our galley, and Ive always loved Navy chow. I feel fortunate every time I get some. I recently dined at Pirates Cove when the Messlords visited and for the Navy Birthday. Everyone there treats me great, like I was their good, old daddy. I went there last week to find the secret thoughts of the people who work there as far as what they thought was the best thing on their menu. After all, who would know better than those preparing the food? Heres what they said. CS1 Dewey Bartholomeus Pirates Cove Galley Sedro Woolley, Wash. I like the burgers and the chicken. CS3 Robert Gibson Pirates Cove Galley Arroyo Grande, Calif. Chicken, all the kinds we make. We make about 40 different kinds. CS3 Tyren Kelly Pirates Cove Galley Lakeland, Ga. Spaghetti, with my secret recipe garliccheese bread. CS2 Antonio Archuleta Pirates Cove Galley New Castle, Pa. Any of our homemade soups . Italian Wedding, gumbo, clam chowder. Theres a bunch of them. CS2 Cevon Dumas Pirates Cove Galley Aurora, Ill. The Chicken Parmesan. Everybody is crazy about it. MM2 Chris Bishop Pirates Cove Galley Fleming Island, Fla. The Chicken Parmesan is pretty good, and the ribs are really good. Women train for infantry e rst female Marines to ever attend infantry training with the Infantry Training Battalion, School of Infantry-East, at Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, N.C., completed the rst week of training Sept. 28. Fifteen female Marines began the training following graduation from boot camp at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., as part of ongoing research on the incorporation of women into combat-related jobs. e research is a result of the lifting of the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Assignment Restriction earlier this year, which required all services to implement a plan to completely integrate women into combat positions by 2016. e 15 female students were among 119 recent graduates from recruit THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 e Middle East continued to command attention during the 1980s as various radical terrorist groups and the Libyan government preyed on American citizens and U.S. interests in the region. In December 1984, radical Shiite Muslims hijacked a Kuwaiti airliner and killed two American passengers. e following June, other terrorists in the Hezbollah organization seized an American passenger plane and ruthlessly murdered Navy Petty Ofcer Robert D. Stethem, who died with great courage and dignity. In October 1985, four terrorists seized the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro, killed wheelchair bound Leon Klinghofer, an American citizen, and threw his body into the sea. e perpetrators of this grisly murder were captured shortly afterward when F-14s from USS Saratoga (CV-60) intercepted an airliner bearing the men and forced the plane to land at a U.S. base in Sicily, where they were turned over to Italian authorities. Col. Muammar Qadda trumpeted Libyas support for these and other anti-American outrages. Determined not to stand idly by in the face of these provocations, President Ronald Reagan ordered the 27,000-man Battle Force Zulu, composed of aircraft carriers USS Coral Sea, USS America (CV-66), and USS Saratoga, twenty-three other warships, and 250 aircraft into waters north of Libya. When U.S. ships and aircraft crossed Qaddas line of death on 24 March 1986, the Libyans red shore-based surface-to-air missiles at the planes and sent three fast missile attack craft toward the eet. During the next two days, American air-launched missiles and bombs knocked out the missile site on shore, sank two of the vessels, and damaged the third. Apparently, Qadda was not chastened by the experience, because in early April U.S. and British intelligence organizations intercepted communications that proved Libyan agents had exploded a bomb in the La Belle Discotheque in West Berlin, Germany, killing two Americans and injuring many more. e President ordered execution of El Dorado Canyon, a onetime Navy-Air Force strike on military and terrorist-associated targets in Libya to punish Qadda for his actions. e French and Spanish governments did not allow U.S. military aircraft to y over their countries. As a result, the United Kingdombased U.S. Air Force units had to follow a course over the Atlantic and Mediterranean that required four in-ight refuelings to reach Libya and four more to return to Great Britain. In contrast, the Sixth Fleet deployed the Coral Sea and America carrier battle groups within easy striking range of the Libyan coast. In the early morning hours of April 15, 1986, in a surprise attack, Navy and Air Force combat aircraft crossed the Libyan coast, quickly neutralized the enemy air defenses, and dropped their ordnance on aircraft on the ground, barracks, and other military targets near Tripoli and Benghazi. All but one Air Force plane and its two crewmen, who were killed, returned to base. e operations against Libya during 1986 clearly demonstrated that Qaddas rogue behavior could have serious consequences for him and his country. ey also showed once again that the U.S. government could employ naval power to achieve shortterm political objectives without putting troops on shore or going to war. e Navy had little respite from crises in the Middle East during the turbulent 1980s. In 1987, Iran, led by the virulently anti-American government of Ayatollah Khomeni, and at war for seven years with nearby Iraq, employed surface-to-surface missiles, fast attack vessels, and mines to curtail oil trac in the Persian Gulf. e Iranians hoped to cut o this source of revenue for its enemy Iraq by attacking the oil tankers owned by Kuwait, a country from which the Iraqis got nancial support. Since the economic well being of the world depended on the ready availability of Persian Gulf oil, President Ronald Reagan agreed to a Kuwaiti request that their tankers be allowed to y the American ag and thus receive the protection of the U.S. Navy. By the end of the year, there were 13 American cruisers, destroyers, frigates, and minesweepers steaming in the gulf and escorting U.S.-agged Kuwaiti tankers. Close at hand east of the Strait of Hormuz were an aircraft carrier, battleship USS Missouri, and their escorts. Dangers abounded in the volatile Persian Gulf. At night on May 17, 1987, for instance, an Iraqi F-1 Mirage mistakenly launched two Exocet air-to-surface missiles against USS Stark (FFG-31), killing thirty-seven Sailors and coming close to sinking the frigate. e surviving crewmen, however, applied training they had received in damage control to save the ship. A few months later, Bridgeton, one of the re-agged tankers, struck a sea mine laid by the Iranians. U.S. Army AH-6 Sea Bat helicopters, operating from the deck of USS Jarrett (FFG-33), a guided missile frigate, discovered the Iranian vessel Iran Ajr putting mines in the water one night. U.S. naval forces captured and then sank her. Iranian-inicted damage to another re-agged tanker and to American frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988 sparked more U.S. retaliation. On the 18th, warships, Navy carrier aircraft, and Marine helicopters destroyed two Iranian platforms in the gulf and sank or severely damaged three Iranian naval vessels. In contrast to these positive actions, on July 3, guided missile cruiser USS Vincennes (CG-49) mistakenly shot down an Iranian airliner, killing all aboard the plane. Finally, Iran, recognizing the futility of the anti-shipping campaign and exhausted after eight years of war, soon agreed to a cease-re with Iraq. e Navys operations during the so-called Tanker War not only kept the oil owing to a thirsty global economy but persuaded Americas friends in the region that the United States could be counted on to oppose aggression. e importance of this perception would be clear a few years later. e U.S. Navys dominance of the waters around the Arabian Peninsula and its capacity for bringing naval power to bear against the enemy ashore were vital to the UN coalitions victory over Saddam Husseins armed forces in the Persian Gulf War. When Iraqi forces stormed into Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990, warships of the U.S. Middle East Force were in the Persian Gulf defending U.S. interests, as they had been since 1949. In short order, the USS Independence (CVN-69) carrier battle group changed course in the Indian Ocean and headed toward the gulf. Eisenhower and her escorts deployed from the Eastern Mediterranean through the Suez Canal and into the Red Sea. Within ve days, the air wings of both carriers were in range to attack advancing Iraqi armored vehicles and supply convoys, had Saddam decided to invade Saudi Arabia, As these forces steamed in harms way, President George H.W. Bush began forging an international coalition to oppose the Iraqi aggression and in Operation Desert Shield ordered the deployment of powerful American forces to the troubled region. As detailed in Operation Plan 1002, on Aug. 7 three carrier battle groups, a battleship surface action group, a marine expeditionary force, and various Army and Air Force units began deploying into the region. is was the operational theater of the U.S. Central Command, headed by Army General Norman H. Schwarzkopf Jr. e Air Force Military Airlift Command carried most American soldiers, marines, airmen, and coast guardsmen to Saudi Arabia. Sailors deployed to the region in their ships. e Navys Military Sealift Command transported almost everything else needed by the American armed forces to ght a war half way around the globe. is included their tanks, armored ghting vehicles, artillery pieces, fuel, ammunition, supplies, and a mountain of other essential material. Protecting the planes and ships that began streaming from U.S. airelds and ports across the Atlantic and Pacic, through the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean, and into the theater were the warships of the U.S. Navy and its allies. For political reasons, some countries like Germany could not take part in the Persian Gulf eort. But, German naval vessels operating in the Eastern Mediterranean in keeping with their NATO responsibilities helped guard the Military Sealift Commands unarmed merchantmen as they steamed along the coasts of Libya and other potentially hostile nations. Next: Middle East buildup to ground and air war against IraqTerrorists targeted, Iraq takes Kuwait The NavyIn the Cold WarNinth in a series

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11 National Guard personnel are feeling the eects of the government shutdown and leaders are worried about the readiness of the component, Air Force Gen. Joseph Lengyel, the vice chief of the National Guard Bureau said Oct. 11. e Pay Our Military Act has mitigated some of the eects of the partial government shutdown for the Guard, but there are still concerns, the general said. e act does not allow for drill training periods, unless the drill is in support of an excepted activity such as preparing for an overseas deployment, he said. Most October drills are canceled, impacting nearly 400,000 National Guard members, Lengyel said. ese drill periods are critical to maintaining the training and preparedness of our citizen soldiers and airmen nearly 85 percent of our force. For individual Guardsmen canceling drills means a loss of pay. For units it means degrading the readiness needed to respond to homeland and overseas missions. Not all units are impacted. Units preparing for deployment are not affected by the government shutdown, Lengyel said. e National Guard is now the best-trained and best-equipped force in our history. We are indispensable to both domestic and overseas operations. It would be extremely unfortunate to this nation if our readiness is allowed to atrophy. e shutdown is delaying some training deployments, the general said, but it will not aect Guardsmens ability to deploy for actual, real-world missions. e National Guard re sponds to emergencies within the United States. Recent activities included providing assistance to local authorities during ooding in Colorado, aiding in ght ing wildres in the West and preparing for storms in the East. Guardsmen and civil ians who work for the Guard remain on call despite the shutdown. During the lapse of appropriations, DOD ci vilians who support the military in support of the preservation of life and protection of property were allowed to continue working, Lengyel said. When Tropical Storm Karen threatened the Gulf Coast, the Guard worked with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to authorize the recall of up to 2,200 additional National Guard military technicians to assist with disaster response actions. e initial shutdown furlough impacted more than 40,000 dual-status military technicians. ese men and women are civilian employees during the week and drilling Guardsmen. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke to 150 military spouses during the Naval Ocers Spouses Club Welcome Coee at the Joint Base AnacostiaBolling Club Oct. 7. e annual NOSC event welcomes new members and spouses who have recently moved to the DC area. This year the NOSC wel comed several spouses of foreign attaches from Canada, France, Mexico, Sweden and the United Kingdom, among other nations. Admiral Greenert, along with his wife Darleen, have been incredible supporters of the Naval Ocers Spouses Club of DC and we are pleased they could join us today. said Corey Chernesky, President of the NOSC DC. I need to talk to people who can get stu done, said Greenert. is organization always steps up and takes care of things. No matter what the situation, the spouses club pulls together to communicate between families and commands, said Greenert. Greenert took the opportunity to talk budget impacts on readiness and family programs as well as take questions from the attendees. Topping the list of issues discussed was the return of many DoD civilian employees brought back to work after a decision made by the Secretary of Defense over the weekend, based on the Pay Our Military Act. Greenert described the process in which some Civilians were brought back and others were still furloughed. Navy civilians are critical to the Navy mission, said Greenert. e military cant do what they do without our military civilians. Greenert went on to discuss other eects of the government shutdown, as well as sequestration if imposed during scal year 2014. Despite budget cuts, Greenert emphasized that service members that are deployed and getting ready to deploy, will have fuel, parts and pay. In FY14, tuition assistance, compensation, pay, entitlements, retirement process stays as it is now, he said. Greenert also stressed that the G.I. Bill is safe because it is a separate law that is not aected by Department of Defense funding, or lack thereof. Generally speaking it doesnt cost a lot of money to fund family readiness programs, said Greenert when asked about the status of family programs. e payback is pretty big, if ever people needed services like counseling, its now. I dont look to the family readiness programs to save money. Greenert did point out that entitlements, such as the future of commissary operations and retirement structures are being examined by congressional panels. However, changes to the retirement system would not aect Sailors serving now, he said. No matter how the panel runs the numbers, they have to examine how much money these changes would really save, said Greenert. Youve got to survey the people who are just starting out and those who are in the military now and see what they say about it. When asked about manning and promotions, Greenert pointed out that the Navy mans equipment dierent than how the other services equip their manning. e Navy must align its overall manning to the number of ships in the eet rather than building ships to the number of Sailors. We have to keep personnel at a certain level. Weve been struggling to get the manning at the proper levels in the right specialties, but now we are a balanced force. said Greenert. Promotions will continue at pace. He went on to say that no force shaping programs are planned. When asked about future deployment lengths in the light of the AsiaPacic rebalance, Greenert said the result should be positive for Sailors and their families. He also went on to emphasize Sailors and Families are capable of handling deployments well, as long as the deployments are predictable. In the end what will make the dierence will be the Sailors, the Sailors spouses, and spouse clubs like yourself. Well pull through this, well do it the best we can, and well show them what weve got, said Greenert. Spouses briefed about budget New Hydra program aims to make it easier, faster and cheaper to deploy crucial capabilities worldwide Todays Naval forces rely primarily on highly capable multifunctional manned platforms, such as ships and submarines. Even the most advanced vessel, however, can only be in one place at a time, making the ability to respond increasingly dependent on being ready at the right place at the right time. With the number of U.S. Navy vessels continuing to shrink due to planned force reductions and scal constraints, Naval assets are increasingly stretched thin trying to cover vast regions of interest around the globe. To maintain advantage over adversaries, U.S. Naval forces need a way to project key capabilities in multiple locations at once, without the time and expense of building new vessels to deliver those capabilities. e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has initiated the Hydra program to help address these challenges. Named for the multi-headed creature from Greek mythology, Hydra aims to develop a distributed undersea network of unmanned payloads and platforms to complement manned vessels. e system would integrate existing and emerging technologies in new ways to create an alternate means of delivering various capabilities above, on and below the oceans surface. e goal is to create a force multiplier that enables rapid, scalable and cost-eective deployment of assets close to the point of use. e climate of budget austerity runs up against an uncertain security environment that includes natural disasters, piracy, ungoverned states and the proliferation of sophisticated defense technologies, said Scott Littleeld, DARPA program manager. An unmanned technology infrastructure staged below the oceans surface could relieve some of that resource strain and expand military capabilities in this increasingly challenging space. DARPA seeks ideas and technical proposals for how to best develop and implement the Hydra system. e agency hosted a Proposers Day on Aug. 5 at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Baltimore, Md. Key to the eort is the development of modular payloads that would provide key capabilities, including Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and Mine Counter-Measures. Each payload module would plug into a standardized enclosure that would securely transport, house and launch various payloads, while sustaining payload functionality for weeks to months. e Hydra system would emphasize scalability, rapid reconguration and maximization of payload. Ships, submarines or airplanes could deliver the Hydra system to littoral ocean zones (shallow international waters near shorelines). Hydras communications suite would work synergistically with manned platforms, increasing their eectiveness. It would also enable remote control from over-the-horizon signicantly increasing operational reach. Additionally, Hydra would enable other new capabilities not currently performed by manned platforms, such as forward-deployed airborne ISR with expendable platforms or recharging hubs for ISR-capable undersea vehicles. By separating capabilities from the platforms that deliver them, Hydra would enable naval forces to deliver those capabilities much faster and more cost-eectively wherever needed, Littleeld said. It is envisioned to work across air, underwater and surface operations, enabling all three to perform their missions better. Hydra program multiplies forces Funding shis schedule Due to a lapse in federal funding, all statutory and administrative selection boards scheduled for October are being rescheduled, Navy leaders said Oct. 11. Capt. Chris Halton, assistant commander for Career Progression, NPC, said boards are comprised of Sailors from around the world. Since Navy Personnel Command has no travel funding, no one is able to be a voting member of a board or work as an assistant recorder. NPC does not vote on any board and the board recommendations are made by Fleet sailors, said Halton. An updated scal year 2015 board schedule will be posted on the NPC website once all of the details are worked out. National Guard faced with shutdown Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel commended U.S. troops Oct. 6 for the capture of one of the worlds most sought after terrorists. U.S. military personnel conducted targeted operations in Libya and Somalia to bring international terrorists to justice, he said. Abu Anas al Libi was designated as a global terrorist by Executive Order, was a subject of the U.S. Rewards for Justice Program, and is on the U.N. al-Qaida sanctions list., Hagel said. He was also indicted for his alleged role in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, and other plots to conduct attacks against U.S. interests.Terrorist captured in Africa

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13 Recruit sheds weightFor most recruits, the hardest part of boot camp is boot camp, but for one new Marine who graduated Sept. 20, 2013, it was the hefty two-year challenge just to get here. To become a Marine, 20-year-old Pvt. Christopher Stephens from Phenix City, Ala., had a lot to lose more than 175 pounds to be exact. Stephens carried 359 pounds on his 5-foot-7inch frame during his senior year at Smiths Station High School in Smiths Station, Ala. He knew he could be doing something better with his life. e military was always in the back of his mind, but he knew his weight would prevent him from joining. Stephens grew up in a very military-friendly family. His brother and both of his grandfathers were Marines. e three years in the Marine Corps Junior ROTC program during high school increased his interest to enlist. I wasnt really going anywhere else with my life, and I didnt do the best in high school, Stephens said. I either knew I had to lose weight and join the Marine Corps or I may not have a good future at all. Stephens mother, Darrie Stephens, said after local children continually teased her son about his weight and told him he would never be able to become a Marine, he began to change. She noticed how serious he was about joining and how he was dedicated to proving it to those who doubted him. Afraid of being denied, Stephens waited to speak to a recruiter until he began losing weight. He started a liquid protein diet and dramatically cut his calorie intake. When Stephens walked in the recruiters oce, he weighed 275 pounds, 84 pounds less than what he weighed his senior year. Stephens told the recruiter he understood the amount of work it would take to ship to boot camp, but he wanted to show his dedication. e recruiter explained the Marine Corps has strict height and weight standards for those who want to join, and Stephens needed to lose an additional 80 pounds before he would even consider enlisting him. en, the recruiter showed him the door. Eighteen months later, Stephens returned to the recruiting oce weighing 195 pounds. He was ready to enlist. He spent four months in the Delayed Entry Program, working with his recruiter every Tuesday and Saturday to get in better shape. roughout that time he was able to get his weight down to 180 pounds, four pounds under his maximum shipping weight and literally half the man he was in high school. Stephens is by far the most dedicated poolee I have ever worked with, said Sta Sgt. Byron Bacon, the recruiter who worked with Stephens every week in Montgomery, Ala. Bacon said that when Stephens joined the Delayed Entry Program he was running 1.5 miles in approximately 15 minutes, and doing zero pullups and 58 crunches. Four months later, when Stephens shipped to boot camp, he had cut his run time by three minutes and improved to six pullups and 75 crunches. On Parris Island, Stephens trained in Platoon 2073, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. During this time he endured hikes, intensive physical training and the Crucible, boot camps 54hour nal test. He said there were times when he thought it was too challenging to be able to nish, but he knew he didnt come all this way to give up. Sta Sgt. Jonathan Sypole, Stephens senior drill instructor, described him as a motivated recruit who has made it clear that he can accomplish any goals he sets for himself. Even with the praise from his family and friends, Stephens cant believe how far he has come. He went from weighing 359 pounds in high school to 160 pounds as a United States Marine. I feel like this is all a dream, Stephens said. I never thought I would have made it coming from my heaviest weight to where I am now. Stephens said he understands that what he has gone through was challenging, but he wants to assure those in similar circumstances its worth it. I hope I maybe inspire at least one or two people to do what they want to do even if they have to lose a lot of weight, Stephens said. Its not impossible. If you really want it, you can do it. training. Forty-eight of the women met the initial physical requirements for the course, but only 19 volunteered to join Infantry Training Battalion, or ITB. Four later opted out of the training, instead choosing to attend Marine Combat Training, a course required for all Marines, regardless of occupational-specialty. All Marines attending the infantry training are expected to meet the same physical standard, known as the ITB standard, during scored events regardless of gender. e standards of the battalion have not changed; they are the same standards outlined by the Marine Corps prior to the start of the current research. e remaining 15 students chose to go above and beyond what is required of female Marines by attending the infantry course. Upon completion of the course, the female Marines will not be awarded the 0311 infantry job designator and will proceed to their previously selected occupational specialty training. I asked them why they are doing this, Sta Sgt. Kevin Hayden, a combat instructor with delta company at ITB said. eir answer to me was that they wanted a challenge. I think all Marines come to the Marine Corps for a challenge, and this was a way for them to put in a little more eort and do something that most people wouldnt volunteer for. e students spent the rst week completing rigorous physical screenings to include the physical tness test, the combat tness test, the high intensity tactical training assessment and a 5-kilometer hike. Hayden said he and his fellow combat instructors arent treating any of the Marines dierently. ese are Marines, Hayden said. No matter what, theyre going to be treated the same as every other Marine. One female Marine did not meet the physical tness test minimum score and chose to drop from the current cycle to work on her strength before attempting the training again with the next cycle. One female Marine did not meet the combat tness test minimum score and chose to opt out of the training entirely. One male Marine also dropped from the training for failing the physical tness test. Since the female students are attending the training on a voluntary basis, they are permitted to drop on request at any point during the training with no penalty. In order to accommodate female students into Infantry Training Battalion, a few adjustments had to be made including dedicating an existing squad bay for the exclusive billeting of female students and bringing over three female combat instructors from Marine Combat Training, or MCT, to serve as gender advisors to the ITB sta and to provide positive leadership to the female students participating in the research study. e female instructors went through one training cycle with ITB to familiarize themselves with the instruction before assuming their roles during this iteration. e rst half of the infantry course roughly mirrors the 29-day training cycle all non-infantry Marines complete at MCT. e second half, however, delves into more specic infantry skills.is is the part of infantry training where instructors say many of the Marines begin to struggle. e instructors said injuries are one of the main reasons students drop from training. It is rigorous training for the body, but they have youth on their side, so a lot of them can put up with it, 1st Sgt. Shawn Hebert, rst sergeant of delta company, Infantry Training Battalion, said. All of these young Marines are pretty strong mentally, but physically our minds want to go forever, but our bodies end up failing us. Among other collection requirements, the question of whether female Marines are able to withstand the physical rigors of entry level infantrytraining is a key data point behind the research at ITB. e Marine Corps plans to continue to send female Marines through the course for the next year, or until they have gathered data from 250 to 300 female students. is is denitely historic for the Marine Corps, Hebert said. e Marines are going to do great things ... I feel privileged to be here at the Infantry Training Battalion. Infantry

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AIR, SURF A CE A ND SUBM A RINE A SA LUTE TO OUR NA VY AN D ALL WHO HA VE SERVED FEA TURING NA VY BIRTHD AYMA RINE S BIRTHD AY VETER ANS DAY AND MILIT A RY FA MILY APPRECI A TION MONTH PUBLI S HED BY

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3 On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to inter cept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certificate of the navy. To understand the momentous sig nificance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their rela tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolution ary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a cen tral government for the colonies, cre ated a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held superiority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies' trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized pri vateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the out set of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance pos sible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would do so in the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protec tion of their coasts and harbors. Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equip ping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was "the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress received intelligence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They rec ommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until 13 October, when another for tuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup ply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The committee's proposal, now appearing emi nently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the pur chasing, outfitting, manning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navy's conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed ves sels of various types. The navy's squadrons and cruisers seized enemy sup plies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked dip lomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we celebrate each year in October.~ history.navy.mil Establishment of the Navy, October 13, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Navy. "Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for intercepting such transports as may be laden with warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies, and for such other purposes as the Congress shall direct. That a Committee of three be appointed to pre pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same before the Congress, and to contract with proper persons to fit out the vessel. Resolved, that another vessel be fitted out for the same purposes, and that the said committee report their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti mate of the expence."Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13 October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966): 442. Establishment of the Department of the Navy, April 30, 1798This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval matters were under the cognizance of the War Department. AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the department of the navy. SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war, as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary, shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take possession of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this department, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War. SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regulations, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a further compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments. SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive department, to be denominated the department of war,'' as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.Approved, April 30, 1798. Air, Surface and Submarine: A salute to our Navy and all who have served is a spe cial advertising section produced by the Military Publications department of The Florida TimesUnion. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper, and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn Hirschman. Material, information and photo graphs used in this section was provided by Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise credited.

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Resolution of the Continental Congress establishing the Marine Corps November 10, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Marine Corps. "Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commis sioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be distinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of." Reestablishment of the Marine Corps July 11, 1798An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, fortyeight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distribution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay and subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, and four rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth, aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieutenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and musicians, conformably to the act, intituled "An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself, to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof, may be for the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster, sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music, respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments, which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed vessels of the United States, respectively, as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid, shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be established by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States." Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of service, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his discretion, shall direct. Approved, July 11, 1798.During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that two Battalions of Marines be raised for ser vice as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopt ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned offi cer in the Continental Marines and is cel ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded. In the next decade, however, increasing con flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called QuasiWar with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first sol diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores. Today, there are more than 200,000 activeduty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning Always Faithful in Latin.~ history.com Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5

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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 World War I known at the time as The Great War officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hos tilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of the war to end all wars. Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two min utes before the armistice end ing World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the fol lowing words: "To us in America, the reflec tions of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the countrys service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations" The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business begin ning at 11:00 a.m. The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words: Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful rela tions with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to per petuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives con curring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation call ing upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holidaya day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veter ans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nations histo ry; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service orga nizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common pur pose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary plan ning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agen cies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible." President Eisenhower signing HR7786, changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne Richards, Arthur J. Connell, John T. Nation, Edward Rees, Richard L. Trombla, Howard W. Watts On that same day, President Eisenhower sent a letter to the Honorable Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs (VA), designating him as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee. In 1958, the White House advised VA's General Counsel that the 1954 designation of the VA Administrator as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee applied to all sub sequent VA Administrators. Since March 1989 when VA was elevated to a cabinet level department, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has served as the committee's chairman. The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by cel ebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreation al and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service organizations and the American people. Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the histori cal significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacri fice for the common good.~ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7 Veterans Day, 1954 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION 3071Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351) that the eleventh of November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day. In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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8 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. A heartfelt thank you to all advertisers who have taken part in this special Salute to our Navy and all who have served! Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide unending support." This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a monthlong celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacrifices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families President Proclaims November as Military Family Month Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families Why Appreciate Military Families? Throughout the month of November, military families serving around the world are honored through a variety of observances and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu tions they make every day in support of the military and our nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and supported by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange Service, Defense Commissary Agency, and others. Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts are teaming up to recognize military families through special events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business and sporting events; and special recognitions during community activities throughout the month of November.~ military.com 10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRCThe VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their transition process from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a successful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weapons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficiency to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their successful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspection of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to execute safely and efficiently in prepara tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy ment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Proud Warriors MQ-4C Triton

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 A six-plane detachment of F/A-18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a fiveplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, the aircraft from VFC-12 and contractor adver sary aircraft, represent a real istic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capabilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deploy ment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC-12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adversary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other avia tion units. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their warfighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A-18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after avia tion duty assignments. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily task ing from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres ent a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint mis sions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as towing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-air frame testing to certify the reliability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the con crete test chamber are 18 inches thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was con structed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid-1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the control room behind two inches of bullet proof glass, test cell opera tors put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical air craft are each powered by two of these engines. The test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine performance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple num and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly test cells around. We have testing capability for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution

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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Station Mayport Established since 1942, Naval Station Mayport has grown to become the third largest fleet concentration in the United States. The unique operational compo sition of the naval installation includes a harbor capable of accommodat ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway capable of handling any aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory. NS Mayport is home to more than 83 tenant commands, including 16 naval ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4 helicopter squadrons and Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. The mission of Naval Station Mayport is to enhance and sustain the opera tional readiness of its tenant commands and provide unparalleled support to its families. The vision of the command is to be recognized as the leader of shore installations in the Navy and a model facility that employs a premier work force always seeking to provide the fin est service to the fleet, family and community. Over the past year, the base has worked towards its mission by under taking vast energy conservation mea sures, completing a state of the art fit ness center to enhance the physical readiness of Sailors and implementing housing improvements to enrich the quality of life. NS Mayport improvements have saved the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while still providing the fleet with premium services. These improvements not only positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors, but those soon to arrive with USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport is also currently adding three patrol coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal arrived in October, followed shortly by USS Tornado and USS Zephyr. The base has provided support for 532 Navy ship movements, including 16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast guard ship movements and 110 foreign and commercial visiting ships. NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19 Darkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-a-day. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they prepare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the counter-narcotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marksmen aboard who are authorized to fire disabling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to comply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a suspected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, authority over the helicopter is trans ferred to the regional Coast Guard commander, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard precision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforcement members who have been selected for the precision marks manship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can read ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we cap tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to configure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive training before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth perception. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, airspeed, and other critical flight param eters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instru ment panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these missions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coordinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin flying these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when necessary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accomplished. HSL-60 Jaguars use nighttime force against drug runners

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20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 With minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor inge nuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for surface Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated navi gation team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships navigation teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive simulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simulation. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills necessary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hardware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equipment and inno vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, headsets, and reformat existing computers to com plete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of underway times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in navigation and ship han dling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experience the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent training class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course simulates relative motion, which means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly changing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the MSN simulation was exponentially better than reading it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the system with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient form of navigation team training Budget cuts have reduced Department of Navy spending across the board. Ship deployments have been cancelled and aircraft flying hours have been reduced. This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has turned to innovative ways to continue the fleets important mission. 4th Fleets current missions include security cooperation activities, con tingency operations, and the domi nant mission of maritime security operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes this through Counter Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission. The illegal transportation of illicit cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions as the greatest means these organiza tions make money and influence and destabilize the region. 4th Fleet and partner nations in the region monitor detect and intercept narcotics being smuggled via the waterways between the Americas. Defending the homeland by preventing narcotics from entering American schools and neighborhoods is an important mission that 4th Fleet must now accomplish with fewer ships, aircraft, and other assets. In the current fiscal environ ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova tive, cost effective solutions that can address the capability gaps caused by budget cuts. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet said. To continue sustained operations 4th Fleet has employed a combination of resources from the past with new technologies to continue the mission. In March of this year 4th Fleet host ed a capabilities demonstration of the Naval Air Warfare Centers MZ-3A Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized blimps during WWII in the South Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. Harris discussed the benefits blimps can bring to the C-TOC mission. Transnational criminal organiza tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics, low observable and high speed vessels, masked communication signatures and sophisticated coordination to smug gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year. One way to enhance detection efforts against illicit trafficking within our area of operations is to utilize long-endur ance platforms with the ability to use a multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) technologies, like this blimp have the potential to meet these operational needs, Harris said. In May Harris traveled to Key West for a very successful demonstration of the TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon) and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel Swift. The tethered Aerostat provides an aerodynamically stable, reliable and cost effective, unmanned aerial plat form for surveillance, monitoring and detection. The standard system configuration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly and safely. The Puma UAV delivers flexibil ity, endurance and a payload capability unmatched in its vehicle class. With a wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight, hand-launched UAV provides aerial observation at line-of-sight ranges up to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov ered in very restricted areas using vertical descent Auto Land and is currently undergoing sea landing trials. On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters for a capabilities demonstration prior to a scheduled deploy ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America, another vehicle from the past 4th Fleet wants to use for future operations. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a variety of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The equipment on board this DC-3 allows it not only to survey coastal areas, but also detect surface and underwater contacts essential for the C-TOC mission. It is important for 4th Fleet to find creative ways to continue the C-TOC mission with fewer assets. In 2012, 318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti mated street value of $25.5 billion were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Harris said. Developing, testing and deploying low cost innovative ideas and technol ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue operations now and in the near future. The Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission is of vital importance to our nation, as well as our partners in the region. The effect of crime and corruption that this ille gal activity has brought threatens the stability of emerging countries like Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem, but a problem for all of the Americas, Harris said. 4th Fleet AORs close proximity to the U.S. makes the Fleets mission that more important. Illegal materials entering the U.S. are a direct threat to the homeland. The violence that drug traf ficking creates has impacted our part ner nations in the hemisphere. It is important that 4th Fleet contin ues to explore innovative ways to do more with less. Budget concerns are a problem that is not going away any time soon, and neither is the attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari time forces in cooperative maritime security operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. 4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21 East Coast Ohio-class submarine home port continues to thrive What began as an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now home to the most powerful vessels ever created for the U.S. Navy and the world. Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is the largest employer in Camden County with more than 8,000 service members and civilian employees and an estimated annual payroll of $500 million. The goods and service the Kings Bay mili tary bring into Camden County is esti mated at $697 million. Kings Bay is the home port to six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and two Ohio-Class guided missile submarines. The Navys move to Kings Bay began when treaty negotiations between the United States and Spain called for the withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16 from its operational base in Rota, Spain by 1979. Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials looked at more than 60 sites along the East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as the future refit site for the squadron. In addition to the land already owned by the Army, the Navy acquired other surrounding properties for a total of 16,900 acres to create the new support base. It also transformed a sleepy com munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of about 50,000. It changed Camden County forev er, said David Rainer during a 2005 interview. It was a defining period for everyone. Rainer, a Camden County Commissioner, was the superintendent of Camden County schools in 1978. During a visit to the base in 2005, former president Jimmy Carter jokingly said it was hard not to have an influence in Kings Bays selection during his tenure as president. However, the former governor and submariner noted, Kings Bay was selected on its own merits. Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility employee and mayor of Kingsland, said the base was among the most important events to occur in Camden County history. I dont know if [Carter] did anything in office that was more significant to Camden County, Smith said in 2005. He was in office at the time of the bases inception. It helped bring a lot of change, not only to Camden County, but surrounding counties. The first group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and civilian employees, raised the national ensign and changed the sign to read Naval Submarine Support Base Kings Bay near what was to become Stimson Gate. With the transition complete, the commanding officer of the support base and his crew set out to transform the terminal into an operational naval base. Initial construction began to prepare for the arrival of the squadron and the submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS33). According to base archives and newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil lion cubic yards of material from the St. Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland Sound and Kings Bay in preparation for the incoming fleet. Congress also approved funding for many projects such as the development of 250 fam ily housing units, the first base administration building (now public works), security building, and a new fire sta tion. When I first arrived at Kings Bay to take command in 1979, it was only a few trailers and a pine forest, said retired Capt. Richard Currier, who was the second commanding officer of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that year. Making do was our biggest challenge as was incorporating change. I had a workforce of 350 personnel when I started. When I left, there was close to 1,000 people working on the base. Following an extensive one-year environmental impact study in October 1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east coast site for the new Ohio-class sub marines. The Navy then called for the construction of three new commands. Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic were built to support the massive new boats. Trident Training Facility is the largest building in Camden County, with more than 500,000 square feet of classrooms and office space. Trident Refit Facilitys dry dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemisphere. The announcement spurred the larg est peacetime construction project ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3 billion, 11-year construction project also fueled a population explosion in Camden County that still persists today. Other milestones achieved dur A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year

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22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 ing the first years were the publication of the first Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in April 1980. When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years, said Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later worked for the base administration. The admin building was still being built, Trident Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10 was non-existent. Since then he said, construction of new buildings changed the face of the base. The biggest impression I received from my initial arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design of the base, because everything was within walking distance, Alexander said. The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15, 1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150 Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to 10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000. Kings Bay continues to evolve. Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729) were converted to guided missile submarines and shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732) arrived from the West Coast. In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing 140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to the base. Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. The Times-Union contributed to this story. 35 YEARS

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 23 First qualified female sub officers receive Dolphins Three Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in sub marines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during sepa rate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Officer of the Deck and Engineering Officer of the Watch, perform damage con trol functions, and demon strate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew officer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par ticipated in a ceremony pre sided by Cmdr. Christopher Nash, commanding officer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young officers earned the right to lead the next gen eration of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations technical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualified submari ner onboard the ballistic mis sile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the sub marine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew officers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeffer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Officer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. The Commanding officer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four fine officers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. They are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submari ners that have gone before us as qualified in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line officers and seven supply officers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each complet ed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective submarines. Qualifying is a huge accomplishment for any submariner, and it feels no different for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to finally be a member of this elite commu nity. Im particularly grateful to my crew, officers and enlisted, for supporting me and hold ing me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualified sub marine officer. Cowan said qualification in submarines is more of a per sonal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of subma rine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at every thing that I have done and what this qualification means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowledge and the instinct to per form safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its mis sions. Ultimately, it is a monu mental mark of the confidence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line officers under instruc tion graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and under went naval nuclear prototype training. Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

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24 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013