The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00321


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Event to benet Dolphin Scholars, museum, Partnershipe Camden Partnerships inaugural Kings Bay Camden Community Golf Classic will be ursday, Nov. 7, at Trident Lakes Golf Club on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Proceeds from the tournament will benet The work of the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation, which awards college scholarships to the sons and daughters of U.S. submariners The St. Marys Submarine Museum, which boasts 4,700-square-feet of display area, with models, photos, plaques, a submarine library and a file on each United States Submarine command And, The Camden Partnership, which works with local, regional, state and federal governments, regional cham bers, development authorities, and other interested parties to ensure the long-term viabil ity and sustainability of mili tary missions at Kings Bay and for quality growth and contin ued economic development in Camden County. e tournament will be a Best Ball, casual event tailored to hackers and strikers alike. e day begins with registration and brunch from 10 to 11:30 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at noon. An awards ceremony and reception cap o the event. e cost to participate is $75 per player, or $240 per four some. Early Bird registration, at $60 per person or $200 per four some, is available until Oct. 14. Fee includes brunch, cart, green fees, and awards recep tion. Mulligans will be available at a cost of $10 each. Prizes will be awarded for rst-, secondand third-place foursomes, closest to the pin and longest drive. Lilliston Ford is providing a chance to win a new car with the a hole-in-one. Providing scholarships to the children of our submariners, preserving the unique naval her itage of the Kings Bay area and supporting advocacy on behalf of all of the military in Camden County are worthy causes, and a great ex cuse to spend a day on the golf course, Up Periscope What would you do if not for what youre doing? Page 9 College Fair Kings Bay bus trip goes to national event Oct. 12 Page 2 Birthday The Navy turns 238 on Sunday, Oct. 13 Page 9 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Support Center has change of command Rubbed, sauced ribs, loaded burgers, sweet and spicey chicken delight dinersTantalizing Gorilla Ribs. Mouth-watering Hodad Burgers. Scrumptious blackened chicken with fruit salsa and candied sweet potatoes. ese culinary sensations thrilled hungry service members at Pirates Cove Galley Oct. 3 when Messlords returned to Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay. Guest chefs were Sarah Simington, Ho dads Michael Hardin and Brian Duy, who have shown their culinary prowess on the Food Networks Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives as well as Spike TVs Bar Rescue. Sailors Melissa Pierre, Ewah Victor, An thony Powell and Soren Jessen were pres ent and enjoyed the feast. ey all agreed the dishes were savory and exceeded their expec tations. Jessen, of USS Alaska, enjoys cooking and was pleased and satised with the black ened chicken dish prepared by chef Sarah Simington. Its a dish thats sweet and spic ey, mixing a creative burst of avors. e sweet potato mash was amazing with the touch of cinnamon, and it went well with the fruit salsa. e choices of fruit were great and all fresh, Jessen said. ETSN Dwayne Wake field of USS Tennes see Gold Crew enjoyed all of it. at was so good, he said. Everything had so much avor. I went back for seconds. Hardin presented his Hodad Burgers, Cmdr. Chuck Cohn relieves Cmdr. Greg McRae Naval Submarine Support Center held a change-of-com mand ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Oct. 3. Cmdr. Chuck Cohn relieved Cmdr. Greg McRae as the com manding ocer of the Kings Bay-based command during the time-honored ceremony. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, was the guest speaker for the event, and commended McRae for his superior leadership. You consistently provided me valuable judgment and expert advice, and have earned the full trust and condence of all Kings Bay area major command ers and commanding of cers, Tofalo said. From supply and engineering assistance, to operational, medical and even spiritual support, NSSC Kings Bay constantly rises to the chal lenges placed in front of it. e outstanding professionals at NSSC are always getting the toughest of tasks, and every time they rise to the occasion. Suc cess like that is no accident; it starts at the top with the commandCamden Partnerships Golf inaugural Classic Nov. 7 Federal workers returnDefense Department furloughed civilians recalled by Hagel Defense Secretary Chuck Ha gel announced Saturday, Oct. 5, that he was recalling most of the Defense Department civilians who were placed on furlough as a result of the government shutdown which began Oct. 1. Today, I am announcing that most DOD civilians placed on emergency furlough dur ing the government shutdown will be asked to return to work begin ning next week, he said. Immediately after President [Barack] Obama signed the Pay Our Military Act into law, I direct ed DODs acting general counsel to determine whether we could reduce the number of civilian personnel furloughed due to the shutdown, Hagel said. Secretary of the Navy Ray Ma bus was pleased by the decision. We are grateful for todays deci sion about our civilian workforce. I know this has been dicult on you and your families. We are still working through the details, but we will bring back as many of our civilians as we can under the new CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 18e Combined Federal Campaigns Golf Tournament at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Lakes Golf Course will begin with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start Oct. 18. Open to all hands, the4person Captains Choice format tourney has a $35 entree fee, which includes lunch, greens fees, cart, and prizes. Call (912) 5738475 for reservations.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 e Jacksonville National College Fair will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center in Jacksonville. Sponsored by the National Asso ciation for College Admission Coun seling and hosted by the Southern Association for College Admission Counseling, this event is free and open to the public. Complete information about this national college fair can be found online by searching Jacksonville Na tional College Fair. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child and Youth Education Program, with funding from the Governors Oce for Children and Families, has chartered a bus to take two dozen high schoolers, each ac companied by a parent or guardian, to this college fair. Active duty and retiree dependents will be oered preferential seating, but all students and parents interested in this trip are advised to contact the school liaison ocer at (912) 573-8986 or kingsbayslo@navy.mil. ere is no cost for this trip. e bus will depart the Kings Bay Youth Center at 7 a.m. with plans to return at 1 p.m. Students who wish to attend the 2013 National College Fair are advised to pre-register for the event at www.gotomyncf.com. e Youth Center does not require special base access. After entering the Jackson Gate, located just past Crooked River Elementary School on Charlie Smith Highway/Georgia Spur 40, make a right turn onto USS Wahoo Avenue. e main parking lot for the Youth Center is at the end of the street on the right. e fair allows students and par ents to meet one-on-one with ad mission representatives from a wide range of national and international, public and private, two-year and four-year colleges and universities. Participants will learn about admis sion requirements, nancial aid, course oerings and campus envi ronment, as well as other informa tion pertinent to the college-selec tion process. At the fairs counseling center, students and parents can discuss their individual needs with college experts. e resources and opportunities that the National College Fairs pro vide for students and their families are invaluable, said Greg Ferguson, NACAC Director of National College Fairs Programs and Services, and admission professionals have been delighted by the caliber of students attending our programs. Now in its 41st year, the National College Fair program annually helps more than 675,000 students and families nationwide explore their options for higher education, making Every single service member de ployed outside the United States de serves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syn dicated radio program, and its lis tening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were success fully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed out side the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling to gether, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e pur pose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fra ternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, mark ers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Army Lt. Col. Jonathon A Shine will be the guest speaker at the Oct. 15 meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association monthy dinner, at start ing at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Dinner is $20. RSVP with Capt. Oreen Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 7292389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net by Oct. 11.e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and his torical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 882-7350.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemora tive glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Wel come Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Re ward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards for college. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which en titles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvilleceltic festival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You Bus trip planned for college fairWhen a woman hears the words breast cancer, the world narrows dra matically. ough not the leading cause of death in women, it is one that can aect her quality of life and her relationships with family and community. Treatments include removing both breasts (mastec tomy) with immediate reconstruc tion, simple biopsy or lumpec tomy (just removing the aected breast tissue). According to the American Cancer Society and CDC, this year more than 200,000 people will be diagnosed with breast cancer, but only 40,000 will die from breast cancer. One percent, or approx imtely 1,000, of breast cancers diagnosed will be men. In the last ve years, the death rate has decreased even as the rate of diagnosis has remained steady, due in large part to the tremendous eort made over the last decade encouraging women to have annual mammograms. I am a strong advocate of breast self exam/awareness and mammography. Despite the controversy over when, who and how often mammograms are done, women continue to vote with their breasts and have one annually. Since cancer has been in your breast at least ve to seven years before it can be identied on a mammogram, a monthly BSE can be life saving. Some cancers are found on mam mograms as tiny grains of salt or sand. Termed ductal carcinoma in situ and often called precancerous, this form of cancer has a greater than 95 percent cure rate and may be treated with simple surgery and radiation. While the majority of breast cancers start in the ducts of the breasts, some begin in the breast lobulesthe glands that produce milk. Lobular cancer is very dif cult to detect with traditional mammography as it is less likely than other forms of breast cancer to cause a rm breast lump. Because of this, lobular cancer often appears as a thickening of the tissue, a new area of fullness, swelling or change in the texture of the skin, such as a dimpling or peau dorange, that suddenly appears. I hope you understand why many consider BSE an important component of a healthy routine. Treatment for most breast cancer is surgery, possible x-ray treat ment and hormone or chemother apy. Advances in technology have allowed operations that require less axilla lymph nodes, medical oncology to further identify tumor components and treatments. No longer is everyone getting toxic medications. Some may take a hormone blocking medication for ve to seven years while others have chemotherapy that is less physically taxing. Even radiation has changed to create a more tar geted therapy with less disruption to underlying body parts such as the heart and lungs. It used to be a celebration when breast cancer patients reached the ve-year mark. While we know that some breast cancers can reoccur within two years, we are now looking to the 10-, 15or 20year mark. So what do we do? Lets celebrate the research and technology which have allowed women and men diagnosed with breast cancer to live longer, with less problems and side eects. Lets continue to advocate for annual mammograms and monthly BSE. Lets grow closer to our families that have supported us and the community that has fought for us. Lets continue to be the best we can possibly be and achieve that dream of a cure. Its something Im passionate about as a survivor of my mothers breast cancer. Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten is Breast Care Coordinator at the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Breast Care Center Breast Care By Nikki Levinson-LustgartenNaval Hospital JacksonvilleMammogram, self-exam important said Rear Adm. Chuck Beers (USN Ret.), former com mander of Submarine Group 10, chairman of the Dol phin Scholarship Foundation and honorary chair of the Golf Classic. Marty Klumpp, event chairman and member of e Camden Partnership board of directors, said civilians, veterans and active duty military members are encour aged to join the Partnership for a fun day on the course. Mix it up by registering as a single player and getting to know an amazing group of people you havent met before, he said. Or, register your team of heavy hitters and go for the gold. Register for the Classic at www.KingsBayCamden CommunityGolfClassic or contact Marty Klumpp at martyklumpp@tds.net or (912) 227-2148 for additional information.Camden

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On Sept. 16, the Mili tary Ocers Assocation of America and Syracuse Universitys Institute for Veterans and Military Families launched e Military Spouse Employ ment Survey. is anonymous survey provides a platform for all military spouses to share their challenges of employment while on active duty. Its results will enable MOAA and the IVMF to better understand military spouse unemployment and underemployment. e survey, which is vol untary, will take approxi mately 30 minutes to complete and will be available through Oct. 16. To access the survey and for additional information go to www.moaa.org/milspousesurvey. It will focus on the em ployment pattern of all military spouses, especially related to their longterm career trajectories. All active duty, National Guard and Reserve, veter an, and surviving spouses who are 18 years and older are encouraged to participate by sharing their sto ries, experiences and les sons learned. MOAA has been a leader in identifying and addressing issues related to spouse employment and this eort will allow us to further our work in this area, MOAA president Vice Adm. Norb Ryan said. We believe the data from this survey will shed light upon challenges spouses face with their employment goals so we can better address their is sues. To encourage as much participation as possible, share the MilSpouseSur vey with other military spouse communities. Survey results will be released in the spring of 2014.Military spouse survey oeredScorby takes command of EURAFSWAguidance. And we will continue to press to bring back all our civilian family as soon as possible e Defense Depart ment, Hagel said, consulted closely with the De partment of Justice, which expressed its view that the law does not permit a blan ket recall of all civilians. However, DOD and DOJ attorneys concluded that the law does allow the Department of Defense to eliminate furloughs for employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of ser vice members, Hagel said. Consequently, I am now directing the military departments and other DOD components to move expeditiously to identify all employees whose activities fall under these categories, he said. Hagel said he expects the military departments to be able to signicantly reduce, but not eliminate, civilian furloughs under this process. e defense secretary said the depart ment has tried to exempt as many DOD civilian per sonnel as possible. All Navy Department employees were to return to work with the exception of the employees in the categories listed below: Chief Information Officer functions, not previously excepted from furlough based on the Contingency Plan Guidance for Continuation of Essential Operations in the Absence of Available Appropriations of September 2013. Deputy Chief Management Officer functions not previously excepted. Should not be any below the Secretariat/Echelon I level. Legislative Aairs and Public Aairs functions not previously excepted or required in support of internal communications to members of the active service. Auditor and relat ed functions, includ ing Inspector General, not previously excepted. Employees supporting Financial Improvement Audit Readiness activi ties are excepted and can report to work. Work done in support of non-DoD activities and Agencies (except the U.S. Coast Guard) not previ ously excepted. Foreign Military Sales employ ees are excepted and can report to work. Employees in those cate gories were to receive calls from their supervisors ex plaining the situation. Secretary of the Navy Public Aairs and the Navy Oce of Information con tributed to this news story. Workers it one of the most vis ible college recruitment tools in the country. In addition to the Na tional College Fairs program, NACAC also holds Performing and Visual Arts College Fairs. ese fairs are during the fall and are designed to serve students with particular interest in the ne arts. NACAC sponsors National College Fairs and Performing and Visual Arts College fairs in 78 lo cations across the country. For a complete schedule, visit www.nationalcollegefairs.org. Fair Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia held a change of command cer emony at Naval Support Activity Naples in the Ca podichino district, Oct. 4. Rear Adm. John Scorby relieved Rear Adm. Antho ny Gaiani as the Regions commander. I couldnt be more proud than to have this opportunity to lead and serve with the outstanding team here, said Scorby. To the men and women of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, its my privilege to take com mand here today. I look forward to building on the amazing successes of Rear Adm. Gaiani. Scorby, a 1981 graduate of the State University of New York at Cortland, was commissioned an Ensign after completing Aviation Ocer Candidate School in March 1983. Scorby holds a Master of Science in nancial management from the Naval Postgraduate School, a Master of Arts in nation al security and strategic studies from the College of Command and Sta, U.S. Naval War College, and a Master of Arts in national resource strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Gaiani has commanded Navy Region EURAF SWA since August 2010. Under his leadership, he has managed an annual budget of more than $400 million during fiscally chal lenging times; leading environmental stew ardship projects that have resulted in signicantly improved resource management, while actively engaging families, government of cials and community leaders and strengthening key relationships in the Navys critically important Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia operating environ ment. It has been an honor and a privilege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, of Navy Region Europe, Af rica, Southwest Asia, said Gaiani. For the past three years, we have worked to gether to eectively provide world-class shore service and support for our maritime strategy, for four Combatant Commanders and forces both ashore and at sea in some of the most challenging ar eas of the world. I am very proud of what we have ac complished as a team. Gaiani was awarded the Distinguished Ser vice Medal during the ceremony, for his excep tional leadership and for 30 years faithful military service. Gaiani will retire from Naval service. Scorby will oversee a workforce of more than 4,000 host nation em ployees, U.S. employees and military members re sponsible for providing ef cient and eective shore service support to U.S. and allied forces in the Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia area of responsibility. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 come to Pirates Cove Galley while Duy created his fall-o-the-bone ribs. Musi cian John Taglieri was part of the group and enter tained with his guitar and songs. Galley Supervisor CS1 James Bryant said he was grateful that the chefs took the time from their res taurants to give back the military service men and women of Kings Bay. e cooks at the galley had the chance to cook alongside the chefs, while learning their recipes and techniques. CS2 Gad Horton was happy for the experience. ey really know what they are talking about, he said. I hope to work with them again the future. Duy said he was approached to be part of the Messlords group and was happy to take part, just as Hardin and Simington are. Were all in here 100 percent, he said. Were not here to be on TV. is is not being lmed or anything. All we want to do is come out and stoke these guys up. Because to me theyre like my kids. Messlords returned to the galley as part of the Navy Entertainment CNIC program. It was their sec ond visit here. Mess Lords travel 300 days of the year to places as far as Bahrain and Okinawa. From the Sailors to the cooks, the return of the Messlords pleased the palates of all. Messlords Messlords From Page 1 photos Bill Wesselhoff and MC2 Cory Rose

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 5 ing ocer. A native of Dalton, Ga., McRae will be heading to his next assignment at Commander, Submarine Squadron Six in Norfolk, Va. McRae extended appreciation to his sta and said there were two main reasons why his time as the commanding ocer at NSSC was the most gratifying of his career. Command is exciting for a number of reasons, but for me there were two that I found particularly enjoyable, he said. e rst was the autono my of command the second, and most enjoyable part of the job, was the ability to positively inuence people and make a dierence in their lives. Emphasizing the importance of personnel at NSSC, McRae likened his sta to being part of a football team and individually recognized each de partment for its eorts. I would argue that if Kings Bay is indeed a team, then NSSC is the of fensive line ... oensive lineman labor in the trenches and each individ ual contributes mightily to the success of the team, he said. Everyone inside the team understands their signicance and their importance, but to the outside observer, they are invisible. So today, Id like to briey rec ognize my oensive lineman so you can appreciate their contribution to this teams success. Cohn, who hails from Houston, was most recently the Deputy Com mander for Readiness at Commander, Submarine Squadron 16. As a part of Team Kings Bay while as CSS16, Cohn said, I personally witnessed the outstanding eort and seless dedication of the members of the NSSC team. Your eorts were and will continue to be critical to the successful operations of our nations strategic forces, and for that I say job well done. Naval Submarine Support Center Kings Bay Change of Command 03 Oct. 13 Change from Page 1

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A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 7, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social is sues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless other wise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 15. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 15, 22 and 29. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 16 and 17. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for ac tive duty females who have been sexually as saulted as adults. is group will oer ac tive duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmo sphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil When someone enlists in the Marine Corps, whether they do four years or 20, they are often found developing skills and traits they carry with them for the rest of their lives; no matter what they decide to do following their time in service. Carlos Guerra, photographer on Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, Calif., and former Marine Corps mortarman of ve years, is the epitome of this common characteristic. Guerra enlisted in the Marine Corps in 2001, the same year he graduated high school and devel oped a passion for photography. I wanted to know how cameras worked, so I took a camera mechanics class my senior year (in high school), Guerra said. He further explained he immediately developed a passion for the craft; how ever, he was set on becom ing a Marine. e former infantryman spent more than two years of his en listment deployed. Ive deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Africa, Israel and more, Guerra explained. I brought my camera to every deployment. Former mortarman now aims camera Two earn Stockdale Award Cmdr. Richard N. Massie and Cmdr. Leif E. Mollo are the 2013 recipients of the Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale Leadership Award, according to NAVAD MIN 252/13 released Sept. 26. e award was established in honor of Vice Adm. Stockdale whose distin guished naval career symbolized the highest standards of excellence in both personal conduct and leadership. It is presented annually to two commis sioned ocers on active duty in the grade of commander or below who are serv ing in command of a single unit and who serve as examples of excellence in leader ship and conspicuous contribution to the improvement of leadership in the Navy. Massie, commanding ocer of the USS Maine (SSBN 741 Gold) is the Pacic Fleet winner and Mollo, commanding ocer of SEAL Team FOUR is the Fleet Forces Command winner. e two men were nominated by their peers and were chosen from among nine nalists to receive the award. Massie was nominated by six of his fellow SSBN commanders for his commitment to excellence and highly successful integra tion of women into the submarine force. It is clear that his personal initiative and performance has infused his crew with a sense of honor and commitment that embodies the essence of the warghting spirit , wrote Cmdr. Tiger Pitt man, commanding ocer of USS Penn sylvania (SSBN 735 -Gold), about Massie. His clear expectations of dignity and respect foster a command culture that encourages teamwork and cohesiveness among all crew members. Mollo was nominated by fellow SEAL, Cmdr. J. Lasky, commanding ocer of SEAL Team TEN, for the leadership he provided through a time of change and adversity at two SEAL teams. Mollo was commanding ocer of SEAL Team EIGHT when its mission was changed from operations in Afghanistan to operations in Africa. He led the Team to become the vanguard of Admiral McRavens vision for the Global Special Operations Forces Network, wrote Lasky. Mollo was then hand-selected to assume command of SEAL Team FOUR following the death of the previous commanding ocer two months in to the Teams eightmonth combat tour in Afghanistan. Within weeks, through his ability to achieve excellence and balance, and to keep people focused on the mission, the Team built needed resiliency into the Af ghan Local Police Program, drove Afghan Special Operations Forces into the lead, and laid the foundation for transition, wrote Lasky. Massie and Mollo are scheduled to receive their awards from Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert at a ceremony later this fall. Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale, for whom the Stockdale Award is named, ar ticulated ve roles for a leader moralist, jurist, teacher, steward and philosopher. A Naval Academy graduate and pilot, Stockdale ejected from his A-4E Skyhawk over North Vietnam in September 1965 and was held prisoner and frequently tortured until February 1973. He received the Medal of Honor in 1976 and served as president of the Naval War College from October 1977 until August 1979. He died in 2005 and is buried at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, Oct, 12. Trident Lakes is presenting another great ad venture for you and your child to do together. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with lunch served at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of parent & child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and lots of fun. For the younger crowd a 9-hole course is set up with cost of only $20. is is open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each person golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie Under the Stars in October Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presenta tion Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and movie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Kick-Off is coming Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, ched darwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book with them before Sept. 30 and receive $50 o your room rental by mention ing Magnolias 50 o. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Monsters University Oct. 12 and 1, Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Mov ies for October are Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Mov ie Under the Stars sched uled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie listing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Camden Kids are out of school The Big EZ Movie Zone will be showing a Kids Matinee Movie at 1 p.m. on these special days: Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11 and Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. For more information, call The Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Combined Federal Campaign season has start ed Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can support with your giving. The numbers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018. Officials needed The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Monster University plays Just for kids Parent & Child golf Oct. 12 Liberty call THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 7

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During down-time on deployments, when he wasnt executing mis sions or training exercises, Guerra was honing his photography skills. I eventually became the un-ocial platoon photographer, Guerra ex plained. I took portrait shots of all of my fellow Marines. Guerra, who has albums full of photos from deploy ments, said his passion for photography and abilities greatly increased during his time in the Corps. e Edinburg, Texas, native honorably got out of the Marines as a ser geant to attend Brooks Institute of Photography in California. He recieved a degree in photography and worked at two photo studios before checking into MCLB Barstow. Guerra, specically looking for military photography jobs, applied as soon as an opening be came available in Barstow. Carlos (Guerra) was very qualied for the job, explained Robert Jackson, ocer in charge of the public aairs section on base. All of his answers to my questions were knowl edgeable and his photos were very impressive.Camera 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho What would you be doing if you werent doing what you are doing? That was the question I asked last week to service members at the Pirates Cove Galley. I know youre all dying to know my answer. Arent you? Well, if I wasnt here being editor of The Kings Bay Periscope, Id probably be on the sports desk of some paper someplace warm. But I really dont want to move, either, so maybe Id stay home and write The Great American Novel. Heres what others said.Lance Cpl. Adam Haseley Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Broadview Heights, Ohio Id probably be going to college for music. CS1 Adam Dalton Pirates Cove Galley Las Vegas Id either be on a cruise ship cooking or a chef in Las Vegas, where Im from. ETSA Anthony Ferraiolo USS Tennessee Gold Effort, Pa. Id be a computer pro gramer. Thats what Im planning on doing when I get out of the Navy. MT1 Andrew Wear Trident Training Facility Roodhouse, Ill. Id probably be in (dirt bike) motorcross. I do it part time now. YN3 Darrian Murray USS Georgia Gold Jacksonville, Fla. Id basically be an entertainer, a singer and dancer. MMC Jay Faulkner Trident Training Facility Ciero, Texas I make holsters, so Id be making holsters. On Friday, Oct. 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continen tal Congress voted to t out two sailing vessels, armed with 10 car riage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of 80, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to intercept transports car rying munitions and stores to the British army in America. is was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certicate of the navy. To understand the momentous signicance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Con gress, we need to review the strate gic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans rst took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their relationship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the Brit ish North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open re bellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolutionary govern ments put in their places. e Continental Congress had as sumed some of the responsibilities of a central government for the colo nies, created a Continental Army, is sued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held superiority at sea, from which they threatened to stop up the colonies trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small eets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams of Massachusetts. For Navys 238th birthday Oct. 13 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 9

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In his rst two-year term as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey hasnt blinked when facing chal lenges that would make some men quit the Iraq withdrawal, the Afghan surge, the sexual assault epidemic, green-on-blue killings in Af ghani stan, seques tration, Beng hazi, the Arab Spring, the Syrian War, a colder relationship with the Rus sians. And it goes on day after day after day. e chairman began his second two-year term to day. But he, and his wife Deanie, will make it through the second twoyear term. He is in South Korea discussing the 31-year-old communist dictator that rules North Korea. And meanwhile the challenges elsewhere will pile up the arguments over the East and South China Sea, trying to cajole allies to see the wisdom of your ways. Some challenges he will expect, but other will crop up and he will have to deal with them along with all the things he has to do. And now the money that was there when he rst took oce is gone. In fact, instead of nding just $487 billion in savings in the defense budget, he needs to nd an additional $500 billion, forcing a $1 trillion cut to defense. And add that to the fact that the U.S. govern ment just closed. When he started his rst term as chairman he issued four priorities. e rst was to achieve the national objectives that the military forces had Iraq and Afghani stan, deterrence in the Persian Gulf and so on. Second was to build Joint Force 2020 which was a look to the future to build the capabilities we will need in the future and not just today. e other two priorities dealt with the profession of arms. It occurred to me that after 10 years we needed to take a look at the values to which we claim to live to determine whether the personnel policies, training, deployment, all of that was contributing to our sense of professionalism or whether we had some points of friction, he said during an interview in Seoul. His nal priority was keeping faith with the mil itary family. Dempsey is an Armor ocer by trade, and an English professor by heart and he is choosy about his words. I chose family not fam ilies, because its not just spouses and children; its about veterans and its about the many, many young men and women who will transition out of the military under my watch, he said. ese priorities will re main the same, he told re porters traveling with him. But what Ive learned over the past two years is where I have to establish some initiatives, some milestones, some pro grams and processes to achieve progress in those areas over the time re maining to me. He notes it is a much dierent budgetary and scal environment than when he started. In fact, its twice as bad. It was $487 billion when I started, and now its a trillion-dollar challenge, Dempsey said. Expectations about levels of support, the pace of training the pace of deployments are all going to change in the next couple of years, and I have to make sure the force adapts to that. Were going to transition 100,000-plus out of the military, and I have to make sure those young men and women are ready for that change, Dempsey said. I have to slow the growth of pay and health care, I dont have to re duce it, I have to slow the growth [and] make it sus tainable. And Ive got to reshape the force both in size and capability, and weve got [to] renew our sense of professionalism because it is through that, that well get through this incredible uncertainty,. Dempsey is most wor ried about uncertainty in the force and what that is doing to the military fam ily. Now, we are far more adaptable than we are given credit for, he said. eres this notion of the cumbersome military bu reaucracy. Some is true, but there is also under neath the Pentagon an incredible group of young men and women leaders who change as they need to change to address the challenges as they nd them. And they will con tinue to do that. e United States and South Korea agreed to es tablish a bilateral strategy for tailored deterrence against North Korean nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said during a press conference in Seoul, South Korea, Oct. 2. Hagel and his counterpart, South Korean Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin, spoke to reporters after the 45th Security Consultative Meeting in the South Ko rean Ministry of Defense building this morning. e annual meeting brings together military and foreign aairs ocials from the two nations to discuss alliance, peninsular, regional and global issues. e tailored deterrence agreement will create a strategic, policy-level framework within the alli -U.S., Korea agree on deterence planDempsey gives hints on future priorities Seabees work in jungle Deep in the Northern Training Area 17,500 acres of dense jungle oc cupied by poisonous spi ders and three species of venomous snakes 63 Seabees with Naval Mo bile Construction Bat talion 3 woke to barking Marine Corps instructors Sept. 22, motivating them through the nal stage of their eight-day training at the Jungle Warfare Train ing Center. e 3.8-mile jungle en durance course cemented each block of prior practi cal instruction by splitting the group into 12-person squads to see which team could defeat the courses 31 obstacles in the short est time. ey did a really great job, said Cpl. Dustin Da vis, an instructor at the JWTC, Camp Gonsalves, Marine Corps Installa tions Pacic. e endur ance course requires a lot of ground work, tons of running and communication. ey worked togeth er well and none of them got heated, which was impressive. ey all kept a level head. During the previous sev en days, students learned combat tactics, rst aid, jungle survival, rappelling, overcoming booby traps and land navigation. All 63 Seabees slept in tents through turbulent rain and stiing humidity, further strengthening the group as a team. Being in the elements the whole time gave me some real perspective on how our forefathers fought during past wars, said Petty Ocer 3rd Class Cale Vandertuin, a hospi tal corpsman with NMCB 3. ats all I could think about. I curled up with my legs crossed and ate my meals in the rain for only a few days they did it for months in real combat. It made me very appreciative of their service. Applying these lessons directly impacted how well the teams performed. With each person representing a pressure point, victory equated to no one breaking under the jungle stress. When challenges bore down, the team shared the weight. e stretcher hauling was the most dicult, said Petty Ocer 3rd Class Jorge Reyes, a religious program specialist with NMCB 3. It tested all of our patience because each step was teamwork when one moved, we all moved. During the obstacle, squads built improvised stretchers using uniform tops, sticks and belts. e teams strapped a member on the makeshift stretche USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group observed its 40th anniversary of the rst U.S. Navy aircraft carrier and carrier air wing oper ating from Japan, Oct. 5. In 1973, aircraft carrier USS Midway (CV 41) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 arrived in Japan with missions to stabilize the security and international peace of the region. I think the movement of USS Midway as the forward deployed car rier and Carrier Air Wing 5 as a forward deployed air wing to Yokosuka and Atsugi respectively was a watershed moment of the U.S., said Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, commander, Battle Force 7th Fleet. It was a peace-time for ward deployment in a for eign country. If you look at the history of U.S. deploy ments at that time, they had generally been associated with wartime maneu vers and operations. is was recognition that for ward deployed forces have a presence factor, which is to say the value of the forces is as much the fact that they are present than the idea that they bring a specic warghting capability. Our presence has a deterring eect on adver saries and our presence has an assuring eect on our allies and partners. Between 1973 and 1991, CVW-5 and Midway made several deployments throughout the Western Pacic, South China Sea, Indian Ocean and North ern Pacic to deter the So viet threat in those areas. e most prominent deployments occurred in 1984, when CVW-5 completed 111 continuous days on guard in the North Arabian Sea, standing watch in the Strait of Hormuz to ensure the sus tained ow of critical oil to our partners in Japan and Western Europe. August of 1991 marked the rst time Midway departed Yokosuka en route to Pearl Harbor for an air wing swap with aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV 62). Independence and CVW-5 returned to the Arabian Gulf in 1992 to participate in Operation Southern Watch. USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) ocially relieved Inde pendence as the regional aircraft carrier August 1998. History was made ten years later as Kitty Hawk was relieved by nuclearpowered Nimitz-class air craft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). e decision to have a nuclear powered aircraft carrier forward deployed to Yokosuka was a mutual agreement between the U.S. and Japan. With the carrier for ward deployed, it also serves as an important reminder to our partners in the region that we sup port them and that our presence is forward. It shows that we care about our treaties, our alliances in support of our regional partners, said Capt. Greg Fenton, commanding oGroup marks 40 in Japan 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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ance for deterring specic threats, Hagel said, and help us work together more seamlessly to maxi mize the eects of our de terrence. Kim noted both sides have agreed on the need for a more future-orient ed and comprehensive strategic alliance. In a joint communiqu issued after the meeting, Hagel and Kim condemned North Koreas December 2012 long-range missile launch and its February 2013 nuclear test, and urged North Korea to abandon all nuclear weapons and ex isting nuclear programs in a complete, veriable and irreversible manner and to cease its nuclear pro grams immediately, including its nuclear activities at Yongbyon, uranium enrich ment and construction of a light water reactor. In his remarks, Hagel also emphasized North Koreas stockpiles of chemical weapons. ere should be no doubt that any North Korean use of chemical weap ons would be completely unacceptable, he said. e communiqu reaf rmed U.S. commitment to provide and strengthen deterrence for South Ko rea using the full range of military capabilities, including the U.S. nuclear umbrella, conventional strike, and missile defense capabilities. It also provides for a comprehensive countermissile strategy to, Kim said, detect, defend, deter and destroy threats from the North Korean arsenal. e agreement states South Korea will continue to build reliable interoper able response capabilities and to develop the Korean Air and Missile Defense system and that both sides will further interoperability of the alliances command and control system. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, also at tended discussions. Other senior U.S. military leaders were present as well, including Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, who leads U.S. Pacic Command, and the outgoing and incoming commanders of U.S. Forc es Korea, United Nations Command and Republic of Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command, Army Gen. James D. urman and Army Gen. Curtis Mike Scaparrotti. eir South Korean counterparts also attended. months, he and a few oth ers had been agitating in Congress for the establish ment of an American eet. ey argued that a eet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders and make it pos sible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resis tance possible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a eet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would that of the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as nal and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest eet the world had seen. e most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each col ony to t out armed ves sels for the protection of their coasts and harbors. en, on Oct. 3, Rhode Islands delegates laid be fore Congress a bold reso lution for the building and equipping of an American eet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the oor for debate, Sam uel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Even pro-navy members found the proposal too vague. It lacked specif ics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet un willing to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on Oct. 5, Congress received intelli gence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress imme diately appointed a com mittee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. ey recommended rst that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the muni tions ships; next they out lined a plan for the equip ping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until Oct. 13, when another fortuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he re ported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise o Massachusetts to inter cept enemy supply ships. e commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the rst step of tting out warships under Con tinental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. e committees pro posal, now appearing em inently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. e Continental Navy grew into an impor tant force. Within a few days, Con gress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a eet. is committee directed the purchasing, outtting, manning, and operations of the rst ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regula tions to govern the Conti nental Navys conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fty armed vessels of various types. e navys squadrons and cruisers seized enemy supplies and carried cor respondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. ey took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some o the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked diplomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. e Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cele brate each year in October. BirthdayPlan er and carried it through neck-high muddy water and ravines that pinned them on top of each other, while dodging the very real aspects of a living jungle. e snakes were no joke, said Reyes. e (Marine) instructors would see them, shout them out and help us, but we still got a guy on our backs relying on us to keep him safe. Big spiders the size of my hand there was nothing simulated during this training. It was amazing, and the instruc tors were the real deal. e JWTC is the only U.S. Department of Defense jungle training facility in existence. e Marines provide expert instruction that builds upon small-unit leadership, im parting a tactical mind-set and condence. e training environment is realistic and matches that found across the Pacic region, helping sustain NMCB 3s over all readiness as the only forward-deployed Pacic construction battalion ready to provide conven tional combat, counter insurgency and irregular warfare capabilities. anks, in part, to the Marine Corps-led JWTC training, NMCB 3 is able to perform critical construction projects in remote island areas such as Timor-Leste, Tonga, Cambodia and the Republic of the Philippines. NMCB 3 detachments are also conducting op erations in Atsugi, Yoko suka and Okinawa, Japan; Chinhae, Republic of Ko rea and China Lake, Calif. NMCB 3 is part of the Naval Construction Force, a vital component of the U.S. maritime strategy that provides deployable bat talions capable of provid ing disaster preparation and recovery support, hu manitarian assistance and combat operations support.Seabees THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 President Ronald Rea gan was elected presi dent in 1980, partly on his pledge to restore Ameri cas military superiority. In addition to strength ening the nations strate gic retaliatory arm with advanced B-1B bombers, deploying Pershing II theater missiles to Europe, and producing sophisticated Abrams main battle tanks and Bradley armored ghting vehicles, his administration dramatically increased the size and capability of the U.S. Navy. In 1981 USS Ohio (SSBN-726), the largest submarine ever built and the rst of her class, was commissioned. e ship carried 24 Trident I nucle ar missiles, each one capa ble of hitting targets 4,000 miles distant. Stepped up was construction of the 90,000-ton, nuclear-powered Nimitz-class carriers, Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarines, and the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers equipped with the revolutionary Aegis antiair war fare system. Also joining the eet during the 1980s were Tomahawk land attack, Harpoon antiship, and high-speed, anti-radiation missiles; improved ver sions of the F-14 Tomcat ghter, A-6 Intruder at tack, and EA-6B Prowler electronic countermeasures aircraft; and the new F/A-18 Hornet strike ghter. e venerable battleships USS Iowa (BB-61), USS New Jersey (BB-62), USS Missouri (BB-63), and USS Wisconsin (BB-64) once again put to sea with their awesome 16-inch guns and new Tomahawk surface-to-surface missile batteries. With these advanced instruments of sea power, naval leaders concluded that if it came to war with the USSR, the Navy should follow a new strategy-a Maritime Strategy. Adm. omas B. Hayward and his successor as Chief of Naval Opera tions, Adm. James D. Wat kins, argued that the Navy should exploit its inherent exibility and mobility by hitting the enemy when and where he was most vulnerable. Rather than passively trying to guard Americas sea lines of communication to Europe, the eet should mount oensive operations in northern Europe and the Far East and force the Soviet Union to ght a disadvantageous two-front war. Watkins and John Lehman, an outspoken, forceful, and media-wise Secretary of the Navy, persuaded Congress and many citizens that the Maritime Strategy was the right approach, and that the nation needed a ship Navy to carry it out. By 1990, the Navy had not reached the 600-ship number, but did operate the most powerful eet on earth with 15 carrier battle groups, four battleship surface action groups, 100 attack submarines, and scores more cruisers, destroyers, frigates, amphibious ships, and auxiliaries. Along with the new and improved ships, aircraft, and weapons came addi tional resources to recruit, Middle East, Caribbean hot in 1980s The NavyIn the Cold WarEighth in a series cer of George Washington. e size of the Pacic Ocean is a very important factor. It causes the neces sity for us to be in this vi cinity, said Capt. Michael Boyle, CVW-5 commander. Were living with our host nation, so not only are we closer to where we might be needed, but were making friends and building a relationship. George Washington and her embarked air wing CVW-5 shifted colors for their rst underway together in 2009. During the underway period, they par ticipated in a Talisman Saber exercise with the Aus tralians followed by a port call to Manila, Philippines. Im passionate about our commitment here. is 40 years represents 40 years of support to our principal allies, in north east of Asia, Japan and Republic of Korea, said Montgomery. is is 40 years of maritime com mitment to the region. What we may have re cently, strategically rebal anced some level of eort, there has been a strong 40 year commitment from the United States Navy. Its been anchored here in Yokosuka and Astugi. Whether it is continued support of presence and deterrence in the West ern Pacic, humanitar ian assistance or a new threat that has yet to be determined, the George Washington Strike Group is ready for the next chal lenge. George Washington, its embarked air wing CVW5, and escort ships pro vide a combat-ready force that protects the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its partners and allies in the Indo-Asia-Pacic region. Group

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 13 In late September, Hur ricane Ingrid prompted a eet of 179 Mexican shrimp boats to request shelter in the port of Brownsville until it was safe to return to Mexican waters. Coast Guard and Cus toms and Border Protec tion crews boarded each of the vessels, taking ac count of crew numbers and any pollution concerns that could adversely eect the port. e opportunity to do this was a unique challenge but at the core at what the Coast Guard pro vides safety of life at sea for all mariners. said Lt. Joshua Sagers, commanding ocer of Coast Guard Station South Padre Island. Normally, conscated lanchas, shing nets and dead sh populate empty parking spots of Coast Guard Station South Padre Island, Texas. On Sept. 17, the stations parking lot was unusually free of these tell-tale tro phies. It was also oddly quiet. No crewmembers milled about, no sound at all except for the lapping of the waves on the shore and the occasional bird chirp. It was not usual for one of the busiest stations in Texas. Inside the station was a completely dierent story. It was a beehive of activity. Crewmembers bustled around, moving from one meeting to another, up dating information on white boards and prepar ing for another potentially long day, their faces a mix of purpose, prideand ex haustion. Coast Guard and Cus toms and Border Protec tion crews boarded each of vessels, taking account of crew numbers and any pollution concerns that could adversely eect the port. is process took approximately 18 hours. On Sept. 17, approximately half of the 179 shrimp crews had decided to return home and the same boat crews that had processed them upon their arrival were now tapped to escort them out. Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos is rec ommending to the Secretary of the Navy that two commanding generals be relieved of their duties as a result of the September 2012 insurgent attack on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Upon Amos request, the com mander of U.S. Central Com mand, Army Gen. Lloyd J. Aus tin, III, conducted a thorough investigation into the incident and both agreed that Maj. Gen. Charles M. Gurganus and Maj. Gen. Gregg A. Sturdevant did not take the necessary steps to ensure force protection, result ing in the Sept. 14 to 15, attack. e attack, which had been planned by insurgents since 2011, took the lives of Lt. Col. Christo pher Raible and Sgt. Bradley At well and resulted in the injury of eight others and the destruction of six AV-8B Harrier jets, costing roughly $24 million each. Gurganus, the commanding general of Regional Command Southwest and I Marine Expe ditionary Force (Forward), and Sturdevant, the commanding general of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, were both operating in a coalition environment, with the Bastion Aireld under the command of British forces. e command and control structure was later considered sub-optimal by Austin, and this greatly inhibited Gurganus ability to create a unied and inte grated defense for the BastionLeather-Shorabak Complex. In addition, Regional Com mand Southwest experienced signicant drawdowns under Gurganus command. Numbers there were reduced from 17,000 to 7,400 over a period of six months. Gurganus request for additional forces were turned down. Yet Gurganus area of respon sibility spanned roughly 36,000 square miles and included 196 combat out posts and forward operating bases within 19 dis tricts. However, Amos not ed that the drawdown of forces was no excuse for the lack of security for the base as well as the underesti mation of outside enemy forces. Whether it be 17,000 or 7,400, the commander still has the inherent responsibility to provide force protection for his or her forces, Amos said. Its in our doctrine; its in our Marine Corps Warghting publication So, regardless of where you are in a drawdown, youre required to balance protection versus force projection. Amos noted that Gurganus and Sturdevant neglected to ful ly prepare for the various types of threats they might face in Helmand and Nimroz province. e clear focus of the eort and their intelligence drove them to believe the threat was internal, Amos said. ey fo cused their eorts primarily on those areas, not so much on the area of the intrusion from the outside in. But on Sept. 14, the 15 insur gents who attacked the aireld came from outside the perim eter a perimeter the U.S. CENTCOM investigation later showed painfully vulnerable. In his remarks, Amos noted that he does not expect his com manders to always make perfect decisions, especially when in a combat zone. However, Amos pointed out that the attack on Camp Bastion was an example of a complete lack of judgment on the part of both generals. Amos wrote in the memoran dum for the investigation, e fog of war, the uncertain risks of combat, and the actions of a determined foe do not relieve a commander of the responsibil ity for decisions that a reason able, prudent commander of the same grade and experience would have made under similar circumstances. Although Gurganus and Stur devant have both had long and successful careers, Amos asked both to retire. Additionally, the lieutenant general promotion for Gurganus, awaiting senate approval, will be rescinded. is is the hardest decision Ive had to make as comman dant of the Marine Corps, Amos said. Im not asking you to feel sorry for me, but Mark Gurga nus and Greg Sturdevant were close personal friends of mine. I served with them for decades. eyre extraordinary Marine ocers who have served their country with distinction and honor for many years. But com mandership is a sacred respon sibility and the standard for general ocers is necessarily high. In their duty to protect our forces these two generals did not meet that standard. Hurricane disrupts shing retain, and train the pro fessional Sailors who were so essential to modern operations. As it had throughout its 200-year history, the U.S. Navy responded to a number of international crises during the 1980s. e decade began with Col. Muammar Qadda, the mercurial and bellig erent leader of Libya, announcing that the territorial waters of his nation extend ed far out into the interna tional waters of the Medi terranean. He announced that if any U.S. ships or aircraft proceeded south of 32.30 north latitude, a de marcation he labeled the line of death, his forces would attack them. To back up his outra geous claim, on 19 August 1981 Qadda dispatched two Soviet-built SU-22 Fit ter ground attack planes toward the American eet. First contact with the single-seat, single-engine jets was made by Cmdr. Henry M. Hank Kleemann and his backseater, Lt. David J. Venlet, who were ying a combat air patrol in their F-14 Tomcat ghter. On their wing was the F-14 of Lt. Lawrence M. Muczynski and Lt. (jg) James P. Anderson. e Libyans were chal lenging one of the most lethal combat aircraft then in service. e F-14s were equipped with a radar that could detect another plane 200 miles away and could track as many as twenty-four targets at the same time. e Tomcats were armed with short-range AIM-9L Sidewinder heatseeking missiles and me dium-range AIM-7F Spar row radar-guided missiles. e two missile types had taken a huge toll of Communist aircraft in Southeast Asia. Venlet and a carrierbased E-2C Hawkeye early warning plane picked up the approaching bogeys, or unidentied contacts, about 80 miles from the F14s and approaching fast. e Libyans increased their speed to 550 knots. Fearing that the contacts might have hostile intent, the two F-14s got into a loose deuce formation that had served naval aviators well in Korea and Vietnam. Muczynski moved his ghter, with the call sign of Fast Eagle 107, 4,000 feet above and slightly for ward of Kleemann in Fast Eagle 102. Whenever the Americans changed the direction of their ight, Libyan ground controllers directed the Fitters to do the same. e Americans upped their speed to 550 knots and soon made visual contact with the Fitters. In a standard eyeball/ shooter intercept tactic, Kleeman kept his jet ying straight toward the Fitters as Muczynski maneuvered his aircraft to get to the six or vulnerable rear of the fast-approaching jets. As Kleeman changed course to y parallel with the Libyans, one of the Fitters suddenly red an Atoll heat-seaking mis sile at him at a distance of 1,000 feet. e Libyan missed, but Kleeman did not. He worked his ght er behind the Fitter, now clearly a bandit, and de stroyed the plane with one Sidewinder missile. Meanwhile Muczynski had outmaneuvered his opponent and launched a Sidewinder that tore the second Fitter apart in a bright explosion. Both Libyans managed to eject from their aming aircraft and parachute safely to the sea for later rescue. In this rst American air-to-air victory since the Vietnam War, the Navy dramatical ly underscored President Reagans determination to meet Qaddas challenge head-on. e Middle East continued to draw U.S. attention in 1982, when President Reagan ordered the Sixth Fleet to deploy U.S. Marines into Lebanon as part of a multinational peacekeeping force whose mis sion was to separate the Israeli army and its chief foe, the Palestine Libera tion Organization. e U.S. eet then over saw the evacuation by sea of the PLO. As Ameri can marines increasingly came under re from hos tile militia groups in Leba non, U.S. cruisers and de stroyers provided gunre support. Matters came to a head on 23 October 1983, when a militiaman bent on mar tyrdom crashed a truck packed with 2,000 pounds of high explosive into the Marine barracks in Beirut, killing 241 marines and other Americans. e situation worsened that December, when Syri an antiaircraft re downed two Sixth Fleet aircraft, resulting in the death of one naval aviator and the capture of Lt. Robert O. Goodman. For the rst time since the Vietnam War, battleship New Jer sey red her 16-inch guns in combat, bombarding hostile militia positions ashore. Finally, deciding early in the new year that the Unit ed States has nothing to gain by retaining forces in the war-torn country, the President ordered their withdrawal. Meanwhile, another crisis had developed in the Caribbean when Marxists on the island of Grenada seized control of the gov ernment. With evidence that the Cuban Communists intended to develop a mili tary presence in Grenada and fearful for the safety of American students there, Reagan directed that American forces led by Vice Adm. Joseph Metcalf III occupy the island. On 25 October, in Operation Urgent Fury, Navy SEALs secured Government House in the capital of St.Georges while Marine helicopters operating from amphibious assault ship USS Guam (LPH-9) landed troops at Pearls Airport and later in the day at Grand Mal Bay. Simultaneously, Army paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division dropped onto an unnished airstrip at Point Salinas. Aircraft and ships of the Independence task group ensured that there would be no external interfer ence with the operation. By the 27th, American forces had overcome spir ited resistance by some 1,000 Cuban and Grena dan Marxist troops, res cued the American students, and liberated the island. e operation cost the lives of 18 Americans and revealed communications and other deciencies, but resulted in elimination of the Cuban presence and restoration of democratic government on the island. Next: e Persian Gulf and back to LibyaRelief recommended in wake of camp attack Cold War Navy College information

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Event to benet Dolphin Scholars, museum, Partnershipe Camden Partnerships inaugural Kings Bay Camden Community Golf Classic will be ursday, Nov. 7, at Trident Lakes Golf Club on board Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Proceeds from the tournament will benet The work of the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation, which awards college scholarships to the sons and daughters of U.S. submariners The St. Marys Submarine Museum, which boasts 4,700-square-feet of display area, with models, photos, plaques, a submarine library and a file on each United States Submarine command And, The Camden Partnership, which works with local, regional, state and federal governments, regional cham bers, development authorities, and other interested parties to ensure the long-term viabil ity and sustainability of mili tary missions at Kings Bay and for quality growth and continued economic development in Camden County. e tournament will be a Best Ball, casual event tailored to hackers and strikers alike. e day begins with registration and brunch from 10 to 11:30 a.m., followed by a shotgun start at noon. An awards ceremony and reception cap o the event. e cost to participate is $75 per player, or $240 per foursome. Early Bird registration, at $60 per person or $200 per foursome, is available until Oct. 14. Fee includes brunch, cart, green fees, and awards reception. Mulligans will be available at a cost of $10 each. Prizes will be awarded for rst-, secondand third-place foursomes, closest to the pin and longest drive. Lilliston Ford is providing a chance to win a new car with the a hole-in-one. Providing scholarships to the children of our submariners, preserving the unique naval heritage of the Kings Bay area and supporting advocacy on behalf of all of the military in Camden County are worthy causes, and a great excuse to spend a day on the golf course, Up Periscope What would you do if not for what youre doing? Page 9 College Fair Kings Bay bus trip goes to national event Oct. 12 Page 2 Birthday The Navy turns 238 on Sunday, Oct. 13 Page 9 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Support Center has change of command Rubbed, sauced ribs, loaded burgers, sweet and spicey chicken delight dinersTantalizing Gorilla Ribs. Mouth-watering Hodad Burgers. Scrumptious blackened chicken with fruit salsa and candied sweet potatoes. ese culinary sensations thrilled hungry service members at Pirates Cove Galley Oct. 3 when Messlords returned to Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay. Guest chefs were Sarah Simington, Ho dads Michael Hardin and Brian Duy, who have shown their culinary prowess on the Food Networks Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives as well as Spike TVs Bar Rescue. Sailors Melissa Pierre, Ewah Victor, An thony Powell and Soren Jessen were pres ent and enjoyed the feast. ey all agreed the dishes were savory and exceeded their expec tations. Jessen, of USS Alaska, enjoys cooking and was pleased and satised with the black ened chicken dish prepared by chef Sarah Simington. Its a dish thats sweet and spic ey, mixing a creative burst of avors. e sweet potato mash was amazing with the touch of cinnamon, and it went well with the fruit salsa. e choices of fruit were great and all fresh, Jessen said. ETSN Dwayne Wake field of USS Tennes see Gold Crew enjoyed all of it. at was so good, he said. Everything had so much avor. I went back for seconds. Hardin presented his Hodad Burgers, Cmdr. Chuck Cohn relieves Cmdr. Greg McRae Naval Submarine Support Center held a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Oct. 3. Cmdr. Chuck Cohn relieved Cmdr. Greg McRae as the commanding ocer of the Kings Bay-based command during the time-honored ceremony. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, was the guest speaker for the event, and commended McRae for his superior leadership. You consistently provided me valuable judgment and expert advice, and have earned the full trust and condence of all Kings Bay area major command ers and commanding ofcers, Tofalo said. From supply and engineering assistance, to operational, medical and even spiritual support, NSSC Kings Bay constantly rises to the challenges placed in front of it. e outstanding professionals at NSSC are always getting the toughest of tasks, and every time they rise to the occasion. Success like that is no accident; it starts at the top with the commandCamden Partnerships Golf inaugural Classic Nov. 7 Federal workers returnDefense Department furloughed civilians recalled by Hagel Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Saturday, Oct. 5, that he was recalling most of the Defense Department civilians who were placed on furlough as a result of the government shutdown which began Oct. 1. Today, I am announcing that most DOD civilians placed on emergency furlough dur ing the government shutdown will be asked to return to work begin ning next week, he said. Immediately after President [Barack] Obama signed the Pay Our Military Act into law, I directed DODs acting general counsel to determine whether we could reduce the number of civilian personnel furloughed due to the shutdown, Hagel said. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was pleased by the decision. We are grateful for todays decision about our civilian workforce. I know this has been dicult on you and your families. We are still working through the details, but we will bring back as many of our civilians as we can under the new CFC Golf Tournament Oct. 18e Combined Federal Campaigns Golf Tournament at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Lakes Golf Course will begin with an 8:30 a.m. shotgun start Oct. 18. Open to all hands, the4person Captains Choice format tourney has a $35 entree fee, which includes lunch, greens fees, cart, and prizes. Call (912) 5738475 for reservations.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 e Jacksonville National College Fair will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Prime F. Osborn III Convention Center in Jacksonville. Sponsored by the National Association for College Admission Counseling and hosted by the Southern Association for College Admission Counseling, this event is free and open to the public. Complete information about this national college fair can be found online by searching Jacksonville National College Fair. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Child and Youth Education Program, with funding from the Governors Oce for Children and Families, has chartered a bus to take two dozen high schoolers, each accompanied by a parent or guardian, to this college fair. Active duty and retiree dependents will be oered preferential seating, but all students and parents interested in this trip are advised to contact the school liaison ocer at (912) 573-8986 or kingsbayslo@navy.mil. ere is no cost for this trip. e bus will depart the Kings Bay Youth Center at 7 a.m. with plans to return at 1 p.m. Students who wish to attend the 2013 National College Fair are advised to pre-register for the event at www.gotomyncf.com. e Youth Center does not require special base access. After entering the Jackson Gate, located just past Crooked River Elementary School on Charlie Smith Highway/Georgia Spur 40, make a right turn onto USS Wahoo Avenue. e main parking lot for the Youth Center is at the end of the street on the right. e fair allows students and parents to meet one-on-one with admission representatives from a wide range of national and international, public and private, two-year and four-year colleges and universities. Participants will learn about admission requirements, nancial aid, course oerings and campus environment, as well as other information pertinent to the college-selection process. At the fairs counseling center, students and parents can discuss their individual needs with college experts. e resources and opportunities that the National College Fairs provide for students and their families are invaluable, said Greg Ferguson, NACAC Director of National College Fairs Programs and Services, and admission professionals have been delighted by the caliber of students attending our programs. Now in its 41st year, the National College Fair program annually helps more than 675,000 students and families nationwide explore their options for higher education, making Every single service member deployed outside the United States deserves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syndicated radio program, and its listening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were successfully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed outside the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling together, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e purpose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fraternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, markers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Army Lt. Col. Jonathon A Shine will be the guest speaker at the Oct. 15 meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association monthy dinner, at starting at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Dinner is $20. RSVP with Capt. Oreen Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 7292389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net by Oct. 11.e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and historical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 882-7350.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemorative glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Welcome Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Reward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards for college. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. e upbeat music, lively dancing, rugged Highland games and cuisine of the colorful Celtic culture will be oered at the Jacksonville Celtic Festival, a free event noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16 at the oceanfront SeaWalk Pavilion, 75 1st St. N., Jacksonville Beach, Fla. For more information, visit jacksonvillecelticfestival.com/Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You Bus trip planned for college fairWhen a woman hears the words breast cancer, the world narrows dramatically. ough not the leading cause of death in women, it is one that can aect her quality of life and her relationships with family and community. Treatments include removing both breasts (mastectomy) with immediate reconstruction, simple biopsy or lumpectomy (just removing the aected breast tissue). According to the American Cancer Society and CDC, this year more than 200,000 people will be diagnosed with breast cancer, but only 40,000 will die from breast cancer. One percent, or approximtely 1,000, of breast cancers diagnosed will be men. In the last ve years, the death rate has decreased even as the rate of diagnosis has remained steady, due in large part to the tremendous eort made over the last decade encouraging women to have annual mammograms. I am a strong advocate of breast self exam/awareness and mammography. Despite the controversy over when, who and how often mammograms are done, women continue to vote with their breasts and have one annually. Since cancer has been in your breast at least ve to seven years before it can be identied on a mammogram, a monthly BSE can be life saving. Some cancers are found on mam mograms as tiny grains of salt or sand. Termed ductal carcinoma in situ and often called precancerous, this form of cancer has a greater than 95 percent cure rate and may be treated with simple surgery and radiation. While the majority of breast cancers start in the ducts of the breasts, some begin in the breast lobulesthe glands that produce milk. Lobular cancer is very difcult to detect with traditional mammography as it is less likely than other forms of breast cancer to cause a rm breast lump. Because of this, lobular cancer often appears as a thickening of the tissue, a new area of fullness, swelling or change in the texture of the skin, such as a dimpling or peau dorange, that suddenly appears. I hope you understand why many consider BSE an important component of a healthy routine. Treatment for most breast cancer is surgery, possible x-ray treatment and hormone or chemotherapy. Advances in technology have allowed operations that require less axilla lymph nodes, medical oncology to further identify tumor components and treatments. No longer is everyone getting toxic medications. Some may take a hormone blocking medication for ve to seven years while others have chemotherapy that is less physically taxing. Even radiation has changed to create a more targeted therapy with less disruption to underlying body parts such as the heart and lungs. It used to be a celebration when breast cancer patients reached the ve-year mark. While we know that some breast cancers can reoccur within two years, we are now looking to the 10-, 15or 20year mark. So what do we do? Lets celebrate the research and technology which have allowed women and men diagnosed with breast cancer to live longer, with less problems and side eects. Lets continue to advocate for annual mammograms and monthly BSE. Lets grow closer to our families that have supported us and the community that has fought for us. Lets continue to be the best we can possibly be and achieve that dream of a cure. Its something Im passionate about as a survivor of my mothers breast cancer. Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten is Breast Care Coordinator at the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Breast Care Center Breast Care By Nikki Levinson-LustgartenNaval Hospital JacksonvilleMammogram, self-exam important said Rear Adm. Chuck Beers (USN Ret.), former commander of Submarine Group 10, chairman of the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and honorary chair of the Golf Classic. Marty Klumpp, event chairman and member of e Camden Partnership board of directors, said civilians, veterans and active duty military members are encouraged to join the Partnership for a fun day on the course. Mix it up by registering as a single player and getting to know an amazing group of people you havent met before, he said. Or, register your team of heavy hitters and go for the gold. Register for the Classic at www.KingsBayCamdenCommunityGolfClassic or contact Marty Klumpp at martyklumpp@tds.net or (912) 227-2148 for additional information.Camden

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On Sept. 16, the Military Ocers Assocation of America and Syracuse Universitys Institute for Veterans and Military Families launched e Military Spouse Employment Survey. is anonymous survey provides a platform for all military spouses to share their challenges of employment while on active duty. Its results will enable MOAA and the IVMF to better understand military spouse unemployment and underemployment. e survey, which is voluntary, will take approximately 30 minutes to complete and will be available through Oct. 16. To access the survey and for additional information go to www.moaa.org/milspousesurvey. It will focus on the employment pattern of all military spouses, especially related to their longterm career trajectories. All active duty, National Guard and Reserve, veteran, and surviving spouses who are 18 years and older are encouraged to participate by sharing their stories, experiences and lessons learned. MOAA has been a leader in identifying and addressing issues related to spouse employment and this eort will allow us to further our work in this area, MOAA president Vice Adm. Norb Ryan said. We believe the data from this survey will shed light upon challenges spouses face with their employment goals so we can better address their issues. To encourage as much participation as possible, share the MilSpouseSurvey with other military spouse communities. Survey results will be released in the spring of 2014.Military spouse survey oeredScorby takes command of EURAFSWAguidance. And we will continue to press to bring back all our civilian family as soon as possible e Defense Depart ment, Hagel said, consulted closely with the De partment of Justice, which expressed its view that the law does not permit a blan ket recall of all civilians. However, DOD and DOJ attorneys concluded that the law does allow the Department of Defense to eliminate furloughs for employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capabilities and readiness of ser vice members, Hagel said. Consequently, I am now directing the military departments and other DOD components to move expeditiously to identify all employees whose activities fall under these categories, he said. Hagel said he expects the military departments to be able to signicantly reduce, but not eliminate, civilian furloughs under this process. e defense secretary said the department has tried to exempt as many DOD civilian personnel as possible. All Navy Department employees were to return to work with the exception of the employees in the categories listed below: Chief Information Officer functions, not previously excepted from furlough based on the Contingency Plan Guidance for Continuation of Essential Operations in the Absence of Available Appropriations of September 2013. Deputy Chief Management Officer functions not previously excepted. Should not be any below the Secretariat/Echelon I level. Legislative Aairs and Public Aairs functions not previously excepted or required in support of internal communications to members of the active service. Auditor and relat ed functions, includ ing Inspector General, not previously excepted. Employees supporting Financial Improvement Audit Readiness activities are excepted and can report to work. Work done in support of non-DoD activities and Agencies (except the U.S. Coast Guard) not previ ously excepted. Foreign Military Sales employ ees are excepted and can report to work. Employees in those cate gories were to receive calls from their supervisors ex plaining the situation. Secretary of the Navy Public Aairs and the Navy Oce of Information con tributed to this news story. Workers it one of the most visible college recruitment tools in the country. In addition to the National College Fairs program, NACAC also holds Performing and Visual Arts College Fairs. ese fairs are during the fall and are designed to serve students with particular interest in the ne arts. NACAC sponsors National College Fairs and Performing and Visual Arts College fairs in 78 locations across the country. For a complete schedule, visit www.nationalcollegefairs.org. Fair Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia held a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Activity Naples in the Capodichino district, Oct. 4. Rear Adm. John Scorby relieved Rear Adm. Anthony Gaiani as the Regions commander. I couldnt be more proud than to have this opportunity to lead and serve with the outstanding team here, said Scorby. To the men and women of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, its my privilege to take command here today. I look forward to building on the amazing successes of Rear Adm. Gaiani. Scorby, a 1981 graduate of the State University of New York at Cortland, was commissioned an Ensign after completing Aviation Ocer Candidate School in March 1983. Scorby holds a Master of Science in nancial management from the Naval Postgraduate School, a Master of Arts in national security and strategic studies from the College of Command and Sta, U.S. Naval War College, and a Master of Arts in national resource strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Gaiani has commanded Navy Region EURAFSWA since August 2010. Under his leadership, he has managed an annual budget of more than $400 million during fiscally chal lenging times; leading environmental stew ardship projects that have resulted in signicantly improved resource management, while actively engaging families, government ofcials and community leaders and strengthening key relationships in the Navys critically important Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia operating environment. It has been an honor and a privilege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, said Gaiani. For the past three years, we have worked together to eectively provide world-class shore service and support for our maritime strategy, for four Combatant Commanders and forces both ashore and at sea in some of the most challenging areas of the world. I am very proud of what we have accomplished as a team. Gaiani was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal during the ceremony, for his exceptional leadership and for 30 years faithful military service. Gaiani will retire from Naval service. Scorby will oversee a workforce of more than 4,000 host nation employees, U.S. employees and military members responsible for providing efcient and eective shore service support to U.S. and allied forces in the Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia area of responsibility. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 come to Pirates Cove Galley while Duy created his fall-o-the-bone ribs. Musi cian John Taglieri was part of the group and enter tained with his guitar and songs. Galley Supervisor CS1 James Bryant said he was grateful that the chefs took the time from their res taurants to give back the military service men and women of Kings Bay. e cooks at the galley had the chance to cook alongside the chefs, while learning their recipes and techniques. CS2 Gad Horton was happy for the experience. ey really know what they are talking about, he said. I hope to work with them again the future. Duy said he was approached to be part of the Messlords group and was happy to take part, just as Hardin and Simington are. Were all in here 100 percent, he said. Were not here to be on TV. is is not being lmed or anything. All we want to do is come out and stoke these guys up. Because to me theyre like my kids. Messlords returned to the galley as part of the Navy Entertainment CNIC program. It was their sec ond visit here. Mess Lords travel 300 days of the year to places as far as Bahrain and Okinawa. From the Sailors to the cooks, the return of the Messlords pleased the palates of all. Messlords Messlords From Page 1 photos Bill Wesselhoff and MC2 Cory Rose

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 5 ing ocer. A native of Dalton, Ga., McRae will be heading to his next assignment at Commander, Submarine Squadron Six in Norfolk, Va. McRae extended appreciation to his sta and said there were two main reasons why his time as the commanding ocer at NSSC was the most gratifying of his career. Command is exciting for a number of reasons, but for me there were two that I found particularly enjoyable, he said. e rst was the autonomy of command the second, and most enjoyable part of the job, was the ability to positively inuence people and make a dierence in their lives. Emphasizing the importance of personnel at NSSC, McRae likened his sta to being part of a football team and individually recognized each department for its eorts. I would argue that if Kings Bay is indeed a team, then NSSC is the offensive line ... oensive lineman labor in the trenches and each individual contributes mightily to the success of the team, he said. Everyone inside the team understands their signicance and their importance, but to the outside observer, they are invisible. So today, Id like to briey recognize my oensive lineman so you can appreciate their contribution to this teams success. Cohn, who hails from Houston, was most recently the Deputy Commander for Readiness at Commander, Submarine Squadron 16. As a part of Team Kings Bay while as CSS16, Cohn said, I personally witnessed the outstanding eort and seless dedication of the members of the NSSC team. Your eorts were and will continue to be critical to the successful operations of our nations strategic forces, and for that I say job well done. Naval Submarine Support Center Kings Bay Change of Command 03 Oct. 13 Change from Page 1

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A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 7, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social is sues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 15. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 15, 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 16 and 17. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for active duty females who have been sexually assaulted as adults. is group will oer active duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmosphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil When someone enlists in the Marine Corps, whether they do four years or 20, they are often found developing skills and traits they carry with them for the rest of their lives; no matter what they decide to do following their time in service. Carlos Guerra, photographer on Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, Calif., and former Marine Corps mortarman of ve years, is the epitome of this common characteristic. Guerra enlisted in the Marine Corps in 2001, the same year he graduated high school and developed a passion for photography. I wanted to know how cameras worked, so I took a camera mechanics class my senior year (in high school), Guerra said. He further explained he immediately developed a passion for the craft; however, he was set on becoming a Marine. e former infantryman spent more than two years of his enlistment deployed. Ive deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Africa, Israel and more, Guerra explained. I brought my camera to every deployment. Former mortarman now aims camera Two earn Stockdale Award Cmdr. Richard N. Massie and Cmdr. Leif E. Mollo are the 2013 recipients of the Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale Leadership Award, according to NAVADMIN 252/13 released Sept. 26. e award was established in honor of Vice Adm. Stockdale whose distinguished naval career symbolized the highest standards of excellence in both personal conduct and leadership. It is presented annually to two commis sioned ocers on active duty in the grade of commander or below who are serv ing in command of a single unit and who serve as examples of excellence in leader ship and conspicuous contribution to the improvement of leadership in the Navy. Massie, commanding ocer of the USS Maine (SSBN 741 Gold) is the Pacic Fleet winner and Mollo, commanding ocer of SEAL Team FOUR is the Fleet Forces Command winner. e two men were nominated by their peers and were chosen from among nine nalists to receive the award. Massie was nominated by six of his fellow SSBN commanders for his commitment to excellence and highly successful integra tion of women into the submarine force. It is clear that his personal initiative and performance has infused his crew with a sense of honor and commitment that embodies the essence of the warghting spirit , wrote Cmdr. Tiger Pittman, commanding ocer of USS Pennsylvania (SSBN 735 -Gold), about Massie. His clear expectations of dignity and respect foster a command culture that encourages teamwork and cohesiveness among all crew members. Mollo was nominated by fellow SEAL, Cmdr. J. Lasky, commanding ocer of SEAL Team TEN, for the leadership he provided through a time of change and adversity at two SEAL teams. Mollo was commanding ocer of SEAL Team EIGHT when its mission was changed from operations in Afghanistan to operations in Africa. He led the Team to become the vanguard of Admiral McRavens vision for the Global Special Operations Forces Network, wrote Lasky. Mollo was then hand-selected to assume command of SEAL Team FOUR following the death of the previous commanding ocer two months in to the Teams eightmonth combat tour in Afghanistan. Within weeks, through his ability to achieve excellence and balance, and to keep people focused on the mission, the Team built needed resiliency into the Af ghan Local Police Program, drove Afghan Special Operations Forces into the lead, and laid the foundation for transition, wrote Lasky. Massie and Mollo are scheduled to receive their awards from Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert at a ceremony later this fall. Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale, for whom the Stockdale Award is named, articulated ve roles for a leader moralist, jurist, teacher, steward and philosopher. A Naval Academy graduate and pilot, Stockdale ejected from his A-4E Skyhawk over North Vietnam in September 1965 and was held prisoner and frequently tortured until February 1973. He received the Medal of Honor in 1976 and served as president of the Naval War College from October 1977 until August 1979. He died in 2005 and is buried at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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e Parent & Child Golf Tournament is swinging your way Saturday, Oct, 12. Trident Lakes is presenting another great adventure for you and your child to do together. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with lunch served at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of parent & child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and lots of fun. For the younger crowd a 9-hole course is set up with cost of only $20. is is open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each person golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie Under the Stars in October Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presentation Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and movie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. NFL Sunday Kick-Off is coming Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, cheddarwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book with them before Sept. 30 and receive $50 o your room rental by mention ing Magnolias 50 o. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Monsters University Oct. 12 and 1, Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Mov ies for October are Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Mov ie Under the Stars scheduled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie listing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Camden Kids are out of school The Big EZ Movie Zone will be showing a Kids Matinee Movie at 1 p.m. on these special days: Monsters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11 and Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. For more information, call The Big EZ at (912) 573-4548. Combined Federal Campaign season has start ed Kings Bays Child and Youth Program team are two of the organizations you can support with your giving. The numbers are Youth Center School Age Care #37328 and Child Development Center #47018. Officials needed The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Monster University plays Just for kids Parent & Child golf Oct. 12 Liberty call THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 7

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During down-time on deployments, when he wasnt executing missions or training exercises, Guerra was honing his photography skills. I eventually became the un-ocial platoon photographer, Guerra explained. I took portrait shots of all of my fellow Marines. Guerra, who has albums full of photos from deployments, said his passion for photography and abilities greatly increased during his time in the Corps. e Edinburg, Texas, native honorably got out of the Marines as a sergeant to attend Brooks Institute of Photography in California. He recieved a degree in photography and worked at two photo studios before checking into MCLB Barstow. Guerra, specically looking for military photography jobs, applied as soon as an opening became available in Barstow. Carlos (Guerra) was very qualied for the job, explained Robert Jackson, ocer in charge of the public aairs section on base. All of his answers to my questions were knowledgeable and his photos were very impressive.Camera 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho What would you be doing if you werent doing what you are doing? That was the question I asked last week to service members at the Pirates Cove Galley. I know youre all dying to know my answer. Arent you? Well, if I wasnt here being editor of The Kings Bay Periscope, Id probably be on the sports desk of some paper someplace warm. But I really dont want to move, either, so maybe Id stay home and write The Great American Novel. Heres what others said.Lance Cpl. Adam Haseley Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Broadview Heights, Ohio Id probably be going to college for music. CS1 Adam Dalton Pirates Cove Galley Las Vegas Id either be on a cruise ship cooking or a chef in Las Vegas, where Im from. ETSA Anthony Ferraiolo USS Tennessee Gold Effort, Pa. Id be a computer programer. Thats what Im planning on doing when I get out of the Navy. MT1 Andrew Wear Trident Training Facility Roodhouse, Ill. Id probably be in (dirt bike) motorcross. I do it part time now. YN3 Darrian Murray USS Georgia Gold Jacksonville, Fla. Id basically be an entertainer, a singer and dancer. MMC Jay Faulkner Trident Training Facility Ciero, Texas I make holsters, so Id be making holsters. On Friday, Oct. 13, 1775, meeting in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to t out two sailing vessels, armed with 10 carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of 80, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to intercept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. is was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certicate of the navy. To understand the momentous signicance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the authority of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans rst took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their relationship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolutionary governments put in their places. e Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a central government for the colonies, created a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held superiority at sea, from which they threatened to stop up the colonies trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small eets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams of Massachusetts. For Navys 238th birthday Oct. 13 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 9

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In his rst two-year term as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey hasnt blinked when facing challenges that would make some men quit the Iraq withdrawal, the Afghan surge, the sexual assault epidemic, green-on-blue killings in Afghani stan, seques tration, Beng hazi, the Arab Spring, the Syrian War, a colder relationship with the Russians. And it goes on day after day after day. e chairman began his second two-year term today. But he, and his wife Deanie, will make it through the second twoyear term. He is in South Korea discussing the 31-year-old communist dictator that rules North Korea. And meanwhile the challenges elsewhere will pile up the arguments over the East and South China Sea, trying to cajole allies to see the wisdom of your ways. Some challenges he will expect, but other will crop up and he will have to deal with them along with all the things he has to do. And now the money that was there when he rst took oce is gone. In fact, instead of nding just $487 billion in savings in the defense budget, he needs to nd an additional $500 billion, forcing a $1 trillion cut to defense. And add that to the fact that the U.S. government just closed. When he started his rst term as chairman he issued four priorities. e rst was to achieve the national objectives that the military forces had Iraq and Afghanistan, deterrence in the Persian Gulf and so on. Second was to build Joint Force 2020 which was a look to the future to build the capabilities we will need in the future and not just today. e other two priorities dealt with the profession of arms. It occurred to me that after 10 years we needed to take a look at the values to which we claim to live to determine whether the personnel policies, training, deployment, all of that was contributing to our sense of professionalism or whether we had some points of friction, he said during an interview in Seoul. His nal priority was keeping faith with the military family. Dempsey is an Armor ocer by trade, and an English professor by heart and he is choosy about his words. I chose family not families, because its not just spouses and children; its about veterans and its about the many, many young men and women who will transition out of the military under my watch, he said. ese priorities will remain the same, he told reporters traveling with him. But what Ive learned over the past two years is where I have to establish some initiatives, some milestones, some programs and processes to achieve progress in those areas over the time remaining to me. He notes it is a much dierent budgetary and scal environment than when he started. In fact, its twice as bad. It was $487 billion when I started, and now its a trillion-dollar challenge, Dempsey said. Expectations about levels of support, the pace of training the pace of deployments are all going to change in the next couple of years, and I have to make sure the force adapts to that. Were going to transition 100,000-plus out of the military, and I have to make sure those young men and women are ready for that change, Dempsey said. I have to slow the growth of pay and health care, I dont have to reduce it, I have to slow the growth [and] make it sustainable. And Ive got to reshape the force both in size and capability, and weve got [to] renew our sense of professionalism because it is through that, that well get through this incredible uncertainty,. Dempsey is most worried about uncertainty in the force and what that is doing to the military family. Now, we are far more adaptable than we are given credit for, he said. eres this notion of the cumbersome military bureaucracy. Some is true, but there is also underneath the Pentagon an incredible group of young men and women leaders who change as they need to change to address the challenges as they nd them. And they will continue to do that. e United States and South Korea agreed to establish a bilateral strategy for tailored deterrence against North Korean nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said during a press conference in Seoul, South Korea, Oct. 2. Hagel and his counterpart, South Korean Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin, spoke to reporters after the 45th Security Consultative Meeting in the South Korean Ministry of Defense building this morning. e annual meeting brings together military and foreign aairs ocials from the two nations to discuss alliance, peninsular, regional and global issues. e tailored deterrence agreement will create a strategic, policy-level framework within the alli-U.S., Korea agree on deterence planDempsey gives hints on future priorities Seabees work in jungle Deep in the Northern Training Area 17,500 acres of dense jungle occupied by poisonous spiders and three species of venomous snakes 63 Seabees with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 3 woke to barking Marine Corps instructors Sept. 22, motivating them through the nal stage of their eight-day training at the Jungle Warfare Training Center. e 3.8-mile jungle endurance course cemented each block of prior practical instruction by splitting the group into 12-person squads to see which team could defeat the courses 31 obstacles in the shortest time. ey did a really great job, said Cpl. Dustin Davis, an instructor at the JWTC, Camp Gonsalves, Marine Corps Installations Pacic. e endurance course requires a lot of ground work, tons of running and communication. ey worked together well and none of them got heated, which was impressive. ey all kept a level head. During the previous seven days, students learned combat tactics, rst aid, jungle survival, rappelling, overcoming booby traps and land navigation. All 63 Seabees slept in tents through turbulent rain and stiing humidity, further strengthening the group as a team. Being in the elements the whole time gave me some real perspective on how our forefathers fought during past wars, said Petty Ocer 3rd Class Cale Vandertuin, a hospital corpsman with NMCB 3. ats all I could think about. I curled up with my legs crossed and ate my meals in the rain for only a few days they did it for months in real combat. It made me very appreciative of their service. Applying these lessons directly impacted how well the teams performed. With each person representing a pressure point, victory equated to no one breaking under the jungle stress. When challenges bore down, the team shared the weight. e stretcher hauling was the most dicult, said Petty Ocer 3rd Class Jorge Reyes, a religious program specialist with NMCB 3. It tested all of our patience because each step was teamwork when one moved, we all moved. During the obstacle, squads built improvised stretchers using uniform tops, sticks and belts. e teams strapped a member on the makeshift stretche USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group observed its 40th anniversary of the rst U.S. Navy aircraft carrier and carrier air wing operating from Japan, Oct. 5. In 1973, aircraft carrier USS Midway (CV 41) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 arrived in Japan with missions to stabilize the security and international peace of the region. I think the movement of USS Midway as the forward deployed carrier and Carrier Air Wing 5 as a forward deployed air wing to Yokosuka and Atsugi respectively was a watershed moment of the U.S., said Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, commander, Battle Force 7th Fleet. It was a peace-time forward deployment in a foreign country. If you look at the history of U.S. deployments at that time, they had generally been associated with wartime maneuvers and operations. is was recognition that forward deployed forces have a presence factor, which is to say the value of the forces is as much the fact that they are present than the idea that they bring a specic warghting capability. Our presence has a deterring eect on adversaries and our presence has an assuring eect on our allies and partners. Between 1973 and 1991, CVW-5 and Midway made several deployments throughout the Western Pacic, South China Sea, Indian Ocean and Northern Pacic to deter the Soviet threat in those areas. e most prominent deployments occurred in 1984, when CVW-5 completed 111 continuous days on guard in the North Arabian Sea, standing watch in the Strait of Hormuz to ensure the sustained ow of critical oil to our partners in Japan and Western Europe. August of 1991 marked the rst time Midway departed Yokosuka en route to Pearl Harbor for an air wing swap with aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV 62). Independence and CVW-5 returned to the Arabian Gulf in 1992 to participate in Operation Southern Watch. USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) ocially relieved Independence as the regional aircraft carrier August 1998. History was made ten years later as Kitty Hawk was relieved by nuclearpowered Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). e decision to have a nuclear powered aircraft carrier forward deployed to Yokosuka was a mutual agreement between the U.S. and Japan. With the carrier forward deployed, it also serves as an important reminder to our partners in the region that we support them and that our presence is forward. It shows that we care about our treaties, our alliances in support of our regional partners, said Capt. Greg Fenton, commanding oGroup marks 40 in Japan 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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ance for deterring specic threats, Hagel said, and help us work together more seamlessly to maximize the eects of our deterrence. Kim noted both sides have agreed on the need for a more future-oriented and comprehensive strategic alliance. In a joint communiqu issued after the meeting, Hagel and Kim condemned North Koreas December 2012 long-range missile launch and its February 2013 nuclear test, and urged North Korea to abandon all nuclear weapons and ex isting nuclear programs in a complete, veriable and irreversible manner and to cease its nuclear pro grams immediately, including its nuclear activities at Yongbyon, uranium enrich ment and construction of a light water reactor. In his remarks, Hagel also emphasized North Koreas stockpiles of chemical weapons. ere should be no doubt that any North Korean use of chemical weap ons would be completely unacceptable, he said. e communiqu reafrmed U.S. commitment to provide and strengthen deterrence for South Korea using the full range of military capabilities, including the U.S. nuclear umbrella, conventional strike, and missile defense capabilities. It also provides for a comprehensive countermissile strategy to, Kim said, detect, defend, deter and destroy threats from the North Korean arsenal. e agreement states South Korea will continue to build reliable interoperable response capabilities and to develop the Korean Air and Missile Defense system and that both sides will further interoperability of the alliances command and control system. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, also at tended discussions. Other senior U.S. military leaders were present as well, including Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, who leads U.S. Pacic Command, and the outgoing and incoming commanders of U.S. Forc es Korea, United Nations Command and Republic of Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command, Army Gen. James D. urman and Army Gen. Curtis Mike Scaparrotti. eir South Korean counterparts also attended. months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American eet. ey argued that a eet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders and make it possible to seek out among neutral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance possible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southerners agreed that a eet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would that of the southern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consider the break with England as nal and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest eet the world had seen. e most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to t out armed vessels for the protection of their coasts and harbors. en, on Oct. 3, Rhode Islands delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equipping of an American eet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the oor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Even pro-navy members found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet un willing to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on Oct. 5, Congress received intelli gence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress imme diately appointed a com mittee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its members were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. ey recommended rst that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until Oct. 13, when another fortuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise o Massachusetts to intercept enemy supply ships. e commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluctant to take the rst step of tting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. e committees proposal, now appearing eminently reasonable to the reluctant members, was adopted. e Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a eet. is committee directed the purchasing, outtting, manning, and operations of the rst ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navys conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fty armed vessels of various types. e navys squadrons and cruisers seized enemy supplies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. ey took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some o the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked diplomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. e Continental Navy began the proud tradition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cele brate each year in October. BirthdayPlan er and carried it through neck-high muddy water and ravines that pinned them on top of each other, while dodging the very real aspects of a living jungle. e snakes were no joke, said Reyes. e (Marine) instructors would see them, shout them out and help us, but we still got a guy on our backs relying on us to keep him safe. Big spiders the size of my hand there was nothing simulated during this training. It was amazing, and the instructors were the real deal. e JWTC is the only U.S. Department of Defense jungle training facility in existence. e Marines provide expert instruction that builds upon small-unit leadership, imparting a tactical mind-set and condence. e training environment is realistic and matches that found across the Pacic region, helping sustain NMCB 3s overall readiness as the only forward-deployed Pacic construction battalion ready to provide conventional combat, counterinsurgency and irregular warfare capabilities. anks, in part, to the Marine Corps-led JWTC training, NMCB 3 is able to perform critical construction projects in remote island areas such as Timor-Leste, Tonga, Cambodia and the Republic of the Philippines. NMCB 3 detachments are also conducting operations in Atsugi, Yokosuka and Okinawa, Japan; Chinhae, Republic of Korea and China Lake, Calif. NMCB 3 is part of the Naval Construction Force, a vital component of the U.S. maritime strategy that provides deployable battalions capable of providing disaster preparation and recovery support, humanitarian assistance and combat operations support.Seabees THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 President Ronald Reagan was elected president in 1980, partly on his pledge to restore Americas military superiority. In addition to strengthening the nations strategic retaliatory arm with advanced B-1B bombers, deploying Pershing II theater missiles to Europe, and producing sophisticated Abrams main battle tanks and Bradley armored ghting vehicles, his administration dramatically increased the size and capability of the U.S. Navy. In 1981 USS Ohio (SSBN-726), the largest submarine ever built and the rst of her class, was commissioned. e ship carried 24 Trident I nuclear missiles, each one capable of hitting targets 4,000 miles distant. Stepped up was construction of the 90,000-ton, nuclear-powered Nimitz-class carriers, Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarines, and the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers equipped with the revolutionary Aegis antiair warfare system. Also joining the eet during the 1980s were Tomahawk land attack, Harpoon antiship, and high-speed, anti-radiation missiles; improved versions of the F-14 Tomcat ghter, A-6 Intruder attack, and EA-6B Prowler electronic countermeasures aircraft; and the new F/A-18 Hornet strike ghter. e venerable battleships USS Iowa (BB-61), USS New Jersey (BB-62), USS Missouri (BB-63), and USS Wisconsin (BB-64) once again put to sea with their awesome 16-inch guns and new Tomahawk surface-to-surface missile batteries. With these advanced instruments of sea power, naval leaders concluded that if it came to war with the USSR, the Navy should follow a new strategy-a Maritime Strategy. Adm. omas B. Hayward and his successor as Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. James D. Watkins, argued that the Navy should exploit its inherent exibility and mobility by hitting the enemy when and where he was most vulnerable. Rather than passively trying to guard Americas sea lines of communication to Europe, the eet should mount oensive operations in northern Europe and the Far East and force the Soviet Union to ght a disadvantageous two-front war. Watkins and John Lehman, an outspoken, forceful, and media-wise Secretary of the Navy, persuaded Congress and many citizens that the Maritime Strategy was the right approach, and that the nation needed a ship Navy to carry it out. By 1990, the Navy had not reached the 600-ship number, but did operate the most powerful eet on earth with 15 carrier battle groups, four battleship surface action groups, 100 attack submarines, and scores more cruisers, destroyers, frigates, amphibious ships, and auxiliaries. Along with the new and improved ships, aircraft, and weapons came additional resources to recruit, Middle East, Caribbean hot in 1980s The NavyIn the Cold WarEighth in a series cer of George Washington. e size of the Pacic Ocean is a very important factor. It causes the necessity for us to be in this vicinity, said Capt. Michael Boyle, CVW-5 commander. Were living with our host nation, so not only are we closer to where we might be needed, but were making friends and building a relationship. George Washington and her embarked air wing CVW-5 shifted colors for their rst underway together in 2009. During the underway period, they par ticipated in a Talisman Saber exercise with the Aus tralians followed by a port call to Manila, Philippines. Im passionate about our commitment here. is 40 years represents 40 years of support to our principal allies, in northeast of Asia, Japan and Republic of Korea, said Montgomery. is is 40 years of maritime commitment to the region. What we may have recently, strategically rebalanced some level of eort, there has been a strong 40 year commitment from the United States Navy. Its been anchored here in Yokosuka and Astugi. Whether it is continued support of presence and deterrence in the Western Pacic, humanitarian assistance or a new threat that has yet to be determined, the George Washington Strike Group is ready for the next challenge. George Washington, its embarked air wing CVW5, and escort ships provide a combat-ready force that protects the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its partners and allies in the Indo-Asia-Pacic region. Group

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013 13 In late September, Hurricane Ingrid prompted a eet of 179 Mexican shrimp boats to request shelter in the port of Brownsville until it was safe to return to Mexican waters. Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection crews boarded each of the vessels, taking account of crew numbers and any pollution concerns that could adversely eect the port. e opportunity to do this was a unique challenge but at the core at what the Coast Guard pro vides safety of life at sea for all mariners. said Lt. Joshua Sagers, commanding ocer of Coast Guard Station South Padre Island. Normally, conscated lanchas, shing nets and dead sh populate empty parking spots of Coast Guard Station South Padre Island, Texas. On Sept. 17, the stations parking lot was unusually free of these tell-tale trophies. It was also oddly quiet. No crewmembers milled about, no sound at all except for the lapping of the waves on the shore and the occasional bird chirp. It was not usual for one of the busiest stations in Texas. Inside the station was a completely dierent story. It was a beehive of activity. Crewmembers bustled around, moving from one meeting to another, updating information on white boards and preparing for another potentially long day, their faces a mix of purpose, prideand exhaustion. Coast Guard and Customs and Border Protection crews boarded each of vessels, taking account of crew numbers and any pollution concerns that could adversely eect the port. is process took approximately 18 hours. On Sept. 17, approximately half of the 179 shrimp crews had decided to return home and the same boat crews that had processed them upon their arrival were now tapped to escort them out. Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos is recommending to the Secretary of the Navy that two commanding generals be relieved of their duties as a result of the September 2012 insurgent attack on Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Upon Amos request, the commander of U.S. Central Command, Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin, III, conducted a thorough investigation into the incident and both agreed that Maj. Gen. Charles M. Gurganus and Maj. Gen. Gregg A. Sturdevant did not take the necessary steps to ensure force protection, resulting in the Sept. 14 to 15, attack. e attack, which had been planned by insurgents since 2011, took the lives of Lt. Col. Christo pher Raible and Sgt. Bradley At well and resulted in the injury of eight others and the destruction of six AV-8B Harrier jets, costing roughly $24 million each. Gurganus, the commanding general of Regional Command Southwest and I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), and Sturdevant, the commanding general of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, were both operating in a coalition environment, with the Bastion Aireld under the command of British forces. e command and control structure was later considered sub-optimal by Austin, and this greatly inhibited Gurganus ability to create a unied and integrated defense for the BastionLeather-Shorabak Complex. In addition, Regional Command Southwest experienced signicant drawdowns under Gurganus command. Numbers there were reduced from 17,000 to 7,400 over a period of six months. Gurganus request for additional forces were turned down. Yet Gurganus area of responsibility spanned roughly 36,000 square miles and included 196 combat outposts and forward operating bases within 19 districts. However, Amos noted that the drawdown of forces was no excuse for the lack of security for the base as well as the underestimation of outside enemy forces. Whether it be 17,000 or 7,400, the commander still has the inherent responsibility to provide force protection for his or her forces, Amos said. Its in our doctrine; its in our Marine Corps Warghting publication So, regardless of where you are in a drawdown, youre required to balance protection versus force projection. Amos noted that Gurganus and Sturdevant neglected to fully prepare for the various types of threats they might face in Helmand and Nimroz province. e clear focus of the eort and their intelligence drove them to believe the threat was internal, Amos said. ey focused their eorts primarily on those areas, not so much on the area of the intrusion from the outside in. But on Sept. 14, the 15 insurgents who attacked the aireld came from outside the perimeter a perimeter the U.S. CENTCOM investigation later showed painfully vulnerable. In his remarks, Amos noted that he does not expect his commanders to always make perfect decisions, especially when in a combat zone. However, Amos pointed out that the attack on Camp Bastion was an example of a complete lack of judgment on the part of both generals. Amos wrote in the memorandum for the investigation, e fog of war, the uncertain risks of combat, and the actions of a determined foe do not relieve a commander of the responsibility for decisions that a reasonable, prudent commander of the same grade and experience would have made under similar circumstances. Although Gurganus and Sturdevant have both had long and successful careers, Amos asked both to retire. Additionally, the lieutenant general promotion for Gurganus, awaiting senate approval, will be rescinded. is is the hardest decision Ive had to make as commandant of the Marine Corps, Amos said. Im not asking you to feel sorry for me, but Mark Gurganus and Greg Sturdevant were close personal friends of mine. I served with them for decades. eyre extraordinary Marine ocers who have served their country with distinction and honor for many years. But commandership is a sacred responsibility and the standard for general ocers is necessarily high. In their duty to protect our forces these two generals did not meet that standard. Hurricane disrupts shing retain, and train the professional Sailors who were so essential to modern operations. As it had throughout its 200-year history, the U.S. Navy responded to a number of international crises during the 1980s. e decade began with Col. Muammar Qadda, the mercurial and bellig erent leader of Libya, announcing that the territorial waters of his nation extend ed far out into the interna tional waters of the Medi terranean. He announced that if any U.S. ships or aircraft proceeded south of 32.30 north latitude, a de marcation he labeled the line of death, his forces would attack them. To back up his outrageous claim, on 19 August 1981 Qadda dispatched two Soviet-built SU-22 Fitter ground attack planes toward the American eet. First contact with the single-seat, single-engine jets was made by Cmdr. Henry M. Hank Kleemann and his backseater, Lt. David J. Venlet, who were ying a combat air patrol in their F-14 Tomcat ghter. On their wing was the F-14 of Lt. Lawrence M. Muczynski and Lt. (jg) James P. Anderson. e Libyans were challenging one of the most lethal combat aircraft then in service. e F-14s were equipped with a radar that could detect another plane 200 miles away and could track as many as twenty-four targets at the same time. e Tomcats were armed with short-range AIM-9L Sidewinder heatseeking missiles and medium-range AIM-7F Sparrow radar-guided missiles. e two missile types had taken a huge toll of Communist aircraft in Southeast Asia. Venlet and a carrierbased E-2C Hawkeye early warning plane picked up the approaching bogeys, or unidentied contacts, about 80 miles from the F14s and approaching fast. e Libyans increased their speed to 550 knots. Fearing that the contacts might have hostile intent, the two F-14s got into a loose deuce formation that had served naval aviators well in Korea and Vietnam. Muczynski moved his ghter, with the call sign of Fast Eagle 107, 4,000 feet above and slightly forward of Kleemann in Fast Eagle 102. Whenever the Americans changed the direction of their ight, Libyan ground controllers directed the Fitters to do the same. e Americans upped their speed to 550 knots and soon made visual contact with the Fitters. In a standard eyeball/ shooter intercept tactic, Kleeman kept his jet ying straight toward the Fitters as Muczynski maneuvered his aircraft to get to the six or vulnerable rear of the fast-approaching jets. As Kleeman changed course to y parallel with the Libyans, one of the Fitters suddenly red an Atoll heat-seaking missile at him at a distance of 1,000 feet. e Libyan missed, but Kleeman did not. He worked his ghter behind the Fitter, now clearly a bandit, and destroyed the plane with one Sidewinder missile. Meanwhile Muczynski had outmaneuvered his opponent and launched a Sidewinder that tore the second Fitter apart in a bright explosion. Both Libyans managed to eject from their aming aircraft and parachute safely to the sea for later rescue. In this rst American air-to-air victory since the Vietnam War, the Navy dramatically underscored President Reagans determination to meet Qaddas challenge head-on. e Middle East continued to draw U.S. attention in 1982, when President Reagan ordered the Sixth Fleet to deploy U.S. Marines into Lebanon as part of a multinational peacekeeping force whose mission was to separate the Israeli army and its chief foe, the Palestine Liberation Organization. e U.S. eet then oversaw the evacuation by sea of the PLO. As American marines increasingly came under re from hostile militia groups in Lebanon, U.S. cruisers and destroyers provided gunre support. Matters came to a head on 23 October 1983, when a militiaman bent on martyrdom crashed a truck packed with 2,000 pounds of high explosive into the Marine barracks in Beirut, killing 241 marines and other Americans. e situation worsened that December, when Syrian antiaircraft re downed two Sixth Fleet aircraft, resulting in the death of one naval aviator and the capture of Lt. Robert O. Goodman. For the rst time since the Vietnam War, battleship New Jersey red her 16-inch guns in combat, bombarding hostile militia positions ashore. Finally, deciding early in the new year that the United States has nothing to gain by retaining forces in the war-torn country, the President ordered their withdrawal. Meanwhile, another crisis had developed in the Caribbean when Marxists on the island of Grenada seized control of the government. With evidence that the Cuban Communists intended to develop a military presence in Grenada and fearful for the safety of American students there, Reagan directed that American forces led by Vice Adm. Joseph Metcalf III occupy the island. On 25 October, in Operation Urgent Fury, Navy SEALs secured Government House in the capital of St.Georges while Marine helicopters operating from amphibious assault ship USS Guam (LPH-9) landed troops at Pearls Airport and later in the day at Grand Mal Bay. Simultaneously, Army paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division dropped onto an unnished airstrip at Point Salinas. Aircraft and ships of the Independence task group ensured that there would be no external interference with the operation. By the 27th, American forces had overcome spirited resistance by some 1,000 Cuban and Grenadan Marxist troops, rescued the American students, and liberated the island. e operation cost the lives of 18 Americans and revealed communications and other deciencies, but resulted in elimination of the Cuban presence and restoration of democratic government on the island. Next: e Persian Gulf and back to LibyaRelief recommended in wake of camp attack Cold War Navy College information

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 10, 2013