The Kings Bay periscope

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00320


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Clinic has Home PortE-mail service one way to stay in touch Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay oers multiple ways for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a primary care manager at NBHC Kings Bay can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Home Port Online, also known as RelayHealth. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for nonurgent issues, request lab results and medication rells, and request appointments. Because Medical Home Port Online is for non-urgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply to patient e-mails. e system is secure and condential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Home Port Online, go to www.relayhealth.com or the command website at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/NavalHospitalJax. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up. For technical help, call RelayHealth at (866) 735-2963). Patients can also sign up at their care teams front desk. And, as always, care teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and nurse advice is available after-hours. NBHC Kings Bay patients call weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. the appointment line at (904) 5424677 or (800) 529-4677. After-hours nurse advice is available, via the appointment line, on evenings, weekends and holidays. ese communication options are a few of the features of Medical Home Port, the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of quality care. Medical Home Port places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregivers, from doctors to nurses and case managers, led by the PCM. e patient and team work together for a coordinated, wholeperson approach to health, to meet the patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. Were strengthening the Precon Marine of Chesapeak, Va., to complete work in early 2015 Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast awarded a $10.5 million contract Sept. 20 to Precon Marine Inc., a small business entity based in Chesapeake, Va., for ret and repairs of Wharf One at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Wharf One was built in 1987 and now needs this recapitalization project, said James Moore, Public Works Department Kings Bay Waterfront Planner. ings you dont see, but are necessary for the structural integrity will be repaired. Our goal is to be good for another 30 years. e work to be performed provides for reinforced concrete repairs on piles, pile caps, bull rails and edge beams. An impressed current cathodic protection system also will be installed on reinforced concrete pile caps and will include the installation of anodes and a bonding harness system on steel fender piles and camel guide piles. ICCPs are commonly used where there are increased current requirements for corrosion protection, where the driving voltage is greater than what can be obtained with galvanic systems and where there may be a need for enhanced control of the system. Wharf One also will undergo a thorough cleaning, coating and installation of fender wraps to steel fender piles, and cleaning and coating of steel camel guide piles. is is a great opportunity for our small business partners, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business deputy. Up Periscope Done anything nice? Had anything nice done? Page 9 Cold War Grace Hopper, Navy move on after Nam Page 10 Cartoonists Plus Big Trucks visit, Adopt-A-School, more Pages 4, 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Contract awarded for Wharf One work Dr. Gary Chapmans seminar helps couples communicate during deploymentsDeployment can be hard military couples. Trying to stay emotionally connected to a deployed spouse can take its toll on an existing relationship. Dr. Gary Chapman, a relationship counselor and author of e Five Love Languages series, talked to Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Sept. 24 about how to show and understand emotional love. e purpose of this seminar is to help those who are married learn how to communicate love eectively, Chapman said. Most married couples love each other, but often they do not speak the right language. ey do not emotionally connect with each other. Chap man said there are ve ways to eectively show love to a spouse: communication, acts of service, gifts, quality time and physical touch and that that each person has a primary love language, but seldom do a husband and wife have the same one. His seminar is to help married spouses and others understand the concept of the dierent love languages and how to discover their own language, Chapman said. It also helps them discover their spouses language so that they can commu nicate effectively. Au dience mem ber YN2 Brian Williams said Chapmans seminar emphasized the importance of ways to make Translating e anag f ove Kings Bay Fire Department schedules activites around base Fire Department ocials at Kings Bay will observe Fire Prevention Week Oct. 6 to 12. is years theme is Prevent Kitchen Fire. Each year the National Fire Protection Association has a new theme based on national trends, such as common causes of res and common causes of injuries and deaths. Kings Bay Commanding Ocer Capt. Harvey Guey signed a proclamation letterfor this years theme. roughout the week, the re department prevention team will set up an information booth at the Navy Exchange and various places on base with fire safety infor mation, to introduce their latest re extinguisher trainer and to demonstrate on how to properly extinguish actual kitchen re. Fire Prevention Week is the longestrunning national safety education campaign. Fire Prevention Week set for Oct. 6 to 12 Photos on Page 5 Federal workers go home Government shutdown aects more than 100 here at NSB Kings Bay e Federal Government shutdown Oct. 1 in the wake of the abscence of funding beyond scal year 2013. How long workers remain away is unknown. Federal employees in positions such as all military members, air trac controllers and postal employees remain on the job. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Aairs Ocer Scott Bassett said more than 100 federal workers on the base are eected by the move. President Barrack Obama placed blame for the shutdown on Congress. Congress has failed to meet its responsibility to pass a budget before the scal year that begins today. And that means much of our Government must shut down eective today, he said in a statement published on navy.mil. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagle said Monday that while military personnel around the world would continue to serve in a normal duty status, a large number of civilian employees and contractors would likely be temporarily furloughed. To this end, DoD has been moving forward with necessary and prudent preparations, he said. Two government shutdowns in 1995 and 1996 totalled 28 days.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Every single service member deployed outside the United States deserves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syndicated radio program, and its listening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were successfully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed outside the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling together, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e purpose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fraternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, markers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss begins Oct. 3. ShipShape is an 8-week nutrition and weight management course. If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, ShipShape is your answer. Make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information or to sign-up. Class starts at 11 a.m. Oct. 3 in the base Fitness Center classroom.Is your pet due for vaccines or a heartworm test? Do you have trouble getting into see the veterinarian during the week? Its no problem anymore! e Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment facility is oering clinic hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 5. Call (912) 573-0755 to make your appointment. e pet must be registered with an active duty service member, retiree or dependent prior to the appointment. You can make an appointment for a healthy pet needing either vaccines (Rabies, $10; Distemper, Leptospirosis, $15; Kennel Cough, Feline Leukemia, $18) or heartworm testing ($25) by calling the clinic at (912) 573-0755. e pet needs to be registered with the clinic prior to the day of the appointment, and registration must be in person. Feel free to call with any questions. The 41st annual Rock Shrimp Festival is Saturday, Oct. 5, in St. Marys. The festival is full day of events including a 5K and 10K races, 1-mile Kids Fun Run, a parade, entertain ment, demonstrations, arts and crafts vendors and food concessionaires, plus dinners that include fresh rock shrimp. For information or questions contact the St. Marys Convention & Visitors Bureau at (912) 882-4000 visit www. smkiwanis.com.Army Lt. Col. Jonathon A Shine will be the guest speaker at the Oct. 15 meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association monthy dinner, at starting at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Dinner is $20. RSVP with Capt. Oreen Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 7292389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net by Oct. 11.e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and historical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 882-7350.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemorative glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Welcome Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Reward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards for college. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Now hear this! anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You On Sept. 16, the Military Ocers Assocation of America and Syracuse Universitys Institute for Veterans and Military Families launched e Military Spouse Employment Survey. is anonymous survey provides a platform for all military spouses to share their challenges of employment while on active duty. Its results will enable MOAA and the IVMF to better understand military spouse unemployment and underemployment. e survey, which is voluntary, will take approximately 30 minutes to complete and will be available through Oct. 16. To access the survey and for additional information go to www.moaa.org/milspousesurvey. is study will focus on the employment pattern of all military spouses, especially related to their long-term career trajectories. All active duty, National Guard and Reserve, veteran, and surviving spouses who are 18 years and older are encouraged to participate by sharing their stories, experiences and lessons learned. According to the 2010 Department of Defense Manpower Data Center, there are 725,877 spouses of active duty servicemembers and 413,295 spouses of Reserve and Guard members. In addition, an estimated 15 million veterans spouses and more than 5.8 million surviving spouses live in the U.S. MOAA has been a leader in identifying and addressing issues related to spouse employment and this effort will allow us to further our work in this area, MOAA president Vice Adm. Norb Ryan said. We believe the data from this survey will shed light upon challenges spouses face with their employment goals so we can better address their issues. We believe this research will provide insight into both employment and career barriers and opportunities for military spouses, including career progression, said Mike Haynie, IMVF executive director. Further understanding of these issues will also contribute to our ability to provide support as military families transition to being veteran families. We look forward to working with MOAA to identify important policy issues and practices related to military spouse employment that will impact both the military and veterans communities. To encourage as much participation as possible, please share the MilSpouseSurvey with other military spouse communities. Survey results will be released in the spring of 2014.MOAA has military spouse survey Sailors trying to access their NonResident Training Course online account may not be able to access them without assistance, said Center for Personal and Professional Development ocials Sept. 16. NRTC accounts not used in the last 30 days have been disabled, according to Tom Phillips, CPPDs NRTC program manager. Accounts were locked as a result of computer security measures ordered by the Defense Department and U.S. Navys cyber commands. Since the order took eect Aug. 21, more than 187,500 accounts have been locked. Users who have a locked account should contact the CPPD Voluntary Education Support Site in Pensacola, Fla., for assistance in regaining access. e VOLED team in Pensacola can be reached anytime via email at NRTC@navy.mil and Monday through Friday by commercial phone at 1-(877) 264-8583, or DSN at 753-6070. NRTC help desk sta members are unlocking accounts upon user request, Phillips said. As of Sept. 13, weve unlocked 2,865 accounts and are working to meet user requests as quickly as possible. Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs commanding ocer, said security risks are part of our daily lives, and managing that risk is necessary. While this can be seen as an inconvenience, security and risk management are important to keeping our Navy team as safe as possible, Newcomer said. We are working hard to ensure Sailors regain timely access to courses that will help them improve professionally and personally.Online training accounts locked CPPD Most home res are easily preventable when you narrow your focus and take personal steps to increase your safety. One way to do this is by proactively combing through each room in your home, nding signs of danger and xing them. e following are the dos and donts on kitchen res. To properly handle stove res:%  %  Never try to pick up a pan that is on fire. Its all too easy to burn your hand and spill the contents of the pan, which will allow the fire to spread. Never pour water on a stove fire, especially if there is any grease, as this can cause the fire to explode into a fireball. A small pan re on your stove can usually be extinguished by turning o the heat and covering the pan with its lid to smother the ames. You also can smother a small pan re using baking soda, so its a good idea to keep baking soda handy near your stove. For larger res, you will want to use a re extinguisher. So be sure to keep a tested, UL-rated re extinguisher easily accessible in your kitchen and to be familiar with its instructions and how to use it in an emergency. e best strategy for stove res is to prevent them from occurring in the rst place. Here are some tips to keep in mind for preventing stove res in your home: Never leave food unattended while cooking. Even a few seconds is enough for a fire to break out, especially if you are cooking with fats such as oil, or sugar. When cooking with any oil at a high temperature, give your stove your full attention. Grease, oils and fats are the most common cause of stove top res. e hotter they get, the more dangerous they become. Avoid loose-tting clothing, and tie back long hair when cooking at your stove. Make sure the stove top is always clean and clear. Never leave wooden or plastic tools, dish towels, or other items on the stove top. Take care to only turn on the burner you intend to use, to prevent igniting a re in the wrong place. Clean your stove after each use Fire Prevention Week Oct. 6 to 12 Kings Bay Fire Dept.

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e Navy has recommended three changes to security procedures following the Washington Navy Yard shooting Sept. 16 in which a Navy contrac tor killed 12 people at the facility. Juan M. Garcia, the assistant secretary of the Navy for manpower and reserve aairs, studied the service record of the shooter, Aaron Alexis, to see how his conduct did or did not meet the threshold for the sustainment of his security clearance and tness for Naval duty. One recommendation, which must go to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel for approval, is that all Oce of Personnel Management investigative reports include any available police documents related to the subject being backgrounded. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has already approved two other recommendations. e rst will require command security manager responsibilities be assigned to executive ocers or other senior members of commands. Currently, junior ocers hold those responsibilities. e second is to require senior-level accountability on all detachment of individual evaluations/tness reports. A senior Navy ocial discussed the timeline of Alexis service and what the Navy knew about security problems during a Pentagon background brieng. Alexis service went from 2007 to 2011. Looking individually at the events, as we knew them at the time, its very dicult to see a glaring indicator that there is any kind of potential for the events that took place last week, the senior Navy ofcial said. Many questions were raised about how Alexis, a former sailor and Navy contractor at the time of the shootings, received a secret security clearance. ree years prior to his enlistment, Alexis shot out to prevent spills that could later re on the burners. Clean under the burners regularly to prevent res from excess food. Cleaning the reflector pans under the burners also helps to maintain the energy eciency of your stove. If you have a gas stove, regularly check for gas leaks, and if you notice any stove parts getting rusty or old, be sure to get them replaced. Any time you smell gas, turn o your gas at the source, open windows and quickly exit the house. Do not touch any electrical switches, and do not use a phone to call the re department until you are outside your house. Switches and phones can emit tiny sparks that can ignite a gas cloud. e Kings Bay Fire Department sta is encouraging you and your family to put safety rst during Fire Prevention Week and year round. relationships work when both parties have dierent love languages. I really enjoyed it because it will help me prepare for a serious relationship in the future, he said. It may seem impossible to emotionally connect to a spouse many miles away. Chapman said that as long as communication has begun before deployment, it is possible to stay connected to a spouse. Often when we are deployed, we disconnect emotionally, he said. at makes re-entry more dicult. If we can learn the love language concept, speak each others love language when we are together, and when we deploy, continue to speak that language, you stay emotionally connected even though you are physically apart. Chapman said he continues to help couples around the globe. He is the director of Marriage and Family Life Consultants Inc. and has a radio program on marriage and relationships that airs on more than 100 stations via the Internet. His book e Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate has sold more than 6 million copies in English and has been translated into 38 dierent languages. In September 2013, e 5 Love Languages Military Edition was released. patient-provider relationship, in an environment where both sta and patients PCS and deploy, with team-based care, said Capt. Troy Borema, a family medicine physician. Patients secure email access to their team is one aspect of that care. NBHC Kings Bay Primary Care/Family Medicine has two teams a black team and a maroon team. To meet the PCMs on each team, click on Medical Home Port on the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities in Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population, about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families, more than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM at one of its facilities. FireLoveHealth Navy recommends security procedure changes Shooting probe to beginSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Sept. 26 that the Navy will conduct an ocial investigation into the fatal shooting incident at the Washington Navy Yard Sept. 16. Adm. John M. Richardson, Director Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, is designated as the investigating ocer. In the aftermath of the Sept. 16 tragedy at the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, it is critical for the Navy to undertake a comprehensive, critical assessment of all factors leading up to or inuencing this devastating event, Mabus said. is assessment must identify and address relevant deciencies, if any, in Navy policies and procedures in order to ensure the continued safety and well-being of all Department of the Navy and contractor personnel. e investigation into the incident will address associated security, personnel, and contracting policies and practices, in an eort to identify any deciencies in or noncompliance with applicable laws or regulations. e report of ndings will be submitted in November. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 3

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 the tires of a construction workers vehicle in Seattle. No charges were led. Upon entering the Navy Reserve in 2007, OPM initiated an investigation. e check turned up Alexis ngerprints in the FBI system and investigators became aware of the incident in Seattle. OPM sent investigators to speak to Alexis at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill. ere was no mention of the incident involving rearms in the OPM report to the Navy. e OPM report to the Department of the Navy Central Adjudication Facility determined Alexis was eligible for a secret clearance with one caveat he had negative credit information. During his Navy service, Alexis received a nonjudicial punishment for an unauthorized absence during service with VF-46 in Atlanta, Ga. His unauthorized absence coincided with a brief stay in jail after being arrested for disorderly conduct outside a nightclub. ere were other incidents, but there were no further Article 15s. In one, Alexis discharged a rearm in his quarters. He stated he accidently discharged the weapon while cleaning it. His commander initiated actions to administratively separate Alexis from the service, but once the charges were dropped, that process stopped. On December 2, 2010, Alexis requested separa tion from the service in ac cordance with a reductionin-force program. On Jan. 31, 2011, he received an honorable discharge with a reentry code of RE-1 the most favorable code.Security Mid-September is arguably the most important time of the year to a U.S. Navy chief petty ocer. is is when newly accepted chiefs are frocked during a time-honored pinning ceremony, when their plain khaki uniforms are transformed by the coveted fouled anchors. ese ceremonies, which are held worldwide regardless of where the chiefs are stationed, are the culmination of the nal piece of CPO 365. Although this process has changed names many times since the Navys inception of the chief petty ocer rank in 1893 the purpose has remained unchanged: to prepare rst class Sailors to be the chief. e role of a Sailor has changed drastically over the past decades. In order to respond to everchanging duties, chiefs determined that Sailors needed to start training immediately upon selection to rst class petty ofcer. e training expanded from a six-week crash course to a yearlong program geared toward constant and consistent preparation. CPO 365 was born, a program that thenMaster Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick West implemented three years ago. CPO 365 was developed for a few reasons, West said. First and foremost, it was brought forward to ensure our rst class petty ocers were more ready to enter the CPO Mess and to bring them alongside our CPOs early to gain the knowledge, skills and abilities to be successful. We continue to put a lot of responsibility on our rst classes and CPOs and we need to ensure they are trained and updated on continuing bases. e program was initially a three-phase training process that excluded FCPOs from participating in the second phase if they didnt pass their rating exam and then excluded them from participating in the third phase if they werent selected for chief. It has now evolved into a two-phase process that allows all FCPOs to continue their training whether or not they were selected. When the E-7 results are released, FCPOs who are selected are allowed to start a series of specialized training sessions, in addition to the regular CPO 365 events, to help prepare them for their transition to chief. Despite criticisms of the many changes, CPO 365 is a step in the right direction. At this particular point of time in our history, I believe CPO 365 provides us with the best training opportunity, said current MCPON Michael Stevens However, I am also condent that in time CPO 365 will also change because thats what we do, we constantly evolve. Ill be a retired MCPON years from now and there will be a new name, a new process and new way of doing business to train our chiefs. Ill trust that it was put in place because the times that our future Sailors will serve necessitate that. West, who retired as the 12th MCPON in 2012, said I made CPO in 1988. From where we were then to where we are now, we are absolutely moving in the right direction. Could it be better? You bet. It will continue to evolve as our great Navy moves forward and the collective mess combines their inputs. Despite the negatives, CPO 365 is designed to continue to deliver quality chiefs to the eet. is process is built by chiefs, run by chiefs and truly focused on Sailor development. One of its main purposes is to put newly selected E-7s in direct contact with seasoned chiefs. is allows an expedited development of the new CPOs as well as a chance for them to interact with their mess and grow comfortable with their selection. We are in a new era in with regard to training new chiefs, said retired MCPON Jim Herdt. Its important for chiefs who were brought up in another process to not condemn or measure them. ey are dierent, much like I was dierent from the chiefs who trained me. Most people think that we have this process so chiefs can prepare CPO selects to join the Chiefs Mess. I believe that its more than that, said Herdt, who served as the Navys 9th MCPON. is timeframe is set aside so chiefs worldwide are able to rededicate themselves and remind themselves of what being a chief is really about. Its like having a booster shot of Chief every year. MCPON Herdt stated that without this process, we would be more like our sister services and have three separate senior enlisted ratings with no continuity between them. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mary Ferguson was granted permission to go through CPO 365 while stationed at Fort Meade, Md., in 2011. After her rst request was denied, MCPON West nally granted her the ability to participate, but only after she led the correct forms and requests through her chain of command, wrote a point paper about how this process would benet both her and the Army, and attended CPO 365 in its entirety. She was able to convince her Army leadership that participating in CPO 365 would make her a better Soldier. Prior to [CPO 365] I had attended three dierent NCO education courses in the Army, each approximately three to six weeks in length. All of those were at academies with dedicated instructors. All of my normal missions completely halted while I attended those academies, said Ferguson. I had one, maybe two NCOs training me in each course, and those instructors were also completely pulled from doing their usual missions in the Army. I walked away from [CPO 365] with a great deal more from a Mess that continued to handle its daily missions, as did I. ere is nothing like the power of the Mess to train itself, take care of troops, and make things happen. One thing leaders need to understand is this is not supposed to be taking folks out of their commands all the time, said West. is is about providing a venue and an opportunity to bring quality training sessions to the particular group a building block, said West. e sad thing is you can make FCPO and not receive any other formal classroom training on leadership. is is another way to invest in the growth of our enlisted leaders. Ferguson agreed. I loved CPO 365. I loved what it put me through personally, and I loved what I saw it do to my brothers and sisters. I do agree that it should be a 365-day process. I think a mixture of the two is great. Having that lead o time to cover Navy programs and procedures really helped. e whole process was so foreign to me, because it is so unlike anything we go through in the Army. But it was one of the best experiences of my life. I love the Army, and Ive made some amazing lifelong friendships in the Army, been through some incredibly things with some folks, but nothing, absolutely nothing compares to that moment when somebody hears those words, Welcome to the Mess! ... its monumental, its motivating on a whole other level, said Ferguson. MCPON Herdt noted that arguably we are making better chiefs today than we ever have in the past. Todays chief petty ocers are no doubt taking the high road with their training. ey have the ability to be innovative and arent afraid of change, said Herdt. Im so proud of todays chiefs. ey dont understand how truly good they are at what they do. eir pride in appearance and physique and their leadership skill has never been better than it is today. Chief Hospital Corpsman Joe Santos, U.S Pacic Fleets Sailor of the Year and a newly promoted chief, noted that a lot of information gained during Phase II cant be learned in a classroom setting. An academy setting would truly take away from the importance of what it means to be called e Chief, Santos said. Growing up in the Navy, Ive always heard that chiefs are not born, chiefs are made by other chiefs, and I rmly believe the experience gained from Phase II prepares your mind to think, act and perform as a chief. You learn from each and every chief petty ocer regardless of pay grade or whether they are active, retired or reserve. CPO 365 is about our moment in history more than it is about my belief that this is the absolute right way to do it, Stevens said. I believe its the right way to do it today, but I certainly cant speak for the future. e Chiefs Mess has come a long way since its inception in 1893. No matter what the process is called today, U.S. Navy chiefs will continue to train their own and prepare them for the trials and tribulations of being and carrying the title chief petty ocer. I think CPO 365 has been hugely successful, mostly due to the many CPOs who have embraced the concept and moved it forward, said West. Of those groups that have embraced the concept you can see those messes ourish. I say embrace the brilliance of the past to forge the future. We simply cant be looking backward when it comes to training our Sailors. We have to determine what we can do and move forward at All Ahead Flank.Todays Chiefs embrace past, look to future

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e Parent & Child Golf Tournament is swinging your way Saturday, Oct, 12. Trident Lakes is presenting another great adventure for you and your child to do together. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with lunch served at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of parent & child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and lots of fun. For the younger crowd a 9-hole course is set up with cost of only $20. is is open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Night%  Glow%  Golf%  Tournament%  Its Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each person golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie%  Under%  the%  Stars%  in%  October% %  Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presentation Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets andmovie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 Canoeing%  on%  Crooked%  River Join Navy Adventures Unleashed when participants paddle down Crooked River to Harrietts Bluff and back on Saturday, Oct. 5. Leave Outdoor Adventure at 8 a.m. All interested patrons must pre-register. There is no cost to this event which is approximately 6.3 miles on Crooked River. Each canoe has space for a small cooler to hold snacks and drinks. The weekend of Oct. 18 NAU is offering a camping trip to Helen, Ga., with hiking and attend ing Oktoberfest on Oct. 19 and returning to Kings Bay on Oct. 20. The cost is $50 for active duty and $75 for guests. NFL%  Sunday%  Kick-Off%  is%  coming%  Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, cheddarwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias%  of%  Kings%  Bay%  %  Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book with them before Sept. 30 and receive $50 o your room rental by mention ing Magnolias 50 o. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. %  Tae%  Kwon%  Do%  %  Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Gnomeo and Juliet Oct. 5 and 6, Monsters University Oct. 12 and 1, Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Movies for October are Mon sters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Movie Under the Stars scheduled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie listing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548. Officials%  needed%  The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Gnomeo and Juliet plays Just for kids Parent & Child golf Oct. 12 Liberty call Every contract awarded to a small business helps to keep our nations economy rolling. Each year NAVFAC establishes target goals for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business, Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business categories. Smith explained that the maximum practicable utilization of small business concerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic benets. Work is expected to be completed by February 2015. NAVFAC manages the planning, design, construction, contingency engineering, real estate, environmental, and public works support for Navy shore facilities around the world. NAVFAC provides the Navys forces with the operating, expeditionary, support and training bases they need. It is a global organization with an annual volume of business in excess of $18 billion. Contract THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013

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Navy veteran, Paul Pappy Lowe, visited the Los Angeles Class submarine USS Louisville (SSN 724), in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Sept. 23. e former submariner had not been onboard his former platform in decades and was amazed by the changes. Lowe and his family, wife Herowina and son Marc, toured were given a guided tour of Louisville by Electronics Technician 2nd Class Paul Menchaca. e tour marked the rst time Lowe had been aboard a submarine for Lowe since 1967, when he served as an Electronics Mate aboard a Guppy class submarine. Stepping on the warship, brought back the familiar feeling of camaraderie, with fellow submariners, along with noticeable dierences. ere is so much more to learn, to qualify on, Lowe remarked. We operated in the era of vacuum tubes and had two large, manually-operated wheels for the dive planes in the control room. We only had one deck level for all our work. e tight spaces and passageways also revisited memories, as did the galley and wardroom. He spoke of SOS, his shipmates code word for a diet stable, dried beef on toast. As a crew member on USS Quillbeck (SSN 424) during the Cuban missile crisis, Lowe recalled the intensity of the situation and how the crew was inspired by President Kennedy, as they deployed to Guantanamo Bay. Lowe served on four dierent submarines in his Naval career and thanked the current shipmates for standing the watch while he continued in other elds supporting our country. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho My brother recently told me I am an ungrateful (expletive). So, for Do Something Nice Day Oct. 5 I plan to pop for his lunch, some prizes and just generally be as nice as pie. MC1 James Kimber just did something nice for me. Hes transferring to Japan and gave me an awesome TV set. What a nice guy he is! I went out to find out about niceties going on, whether people have done something nice, had something nice done for them or are going to do something nice Oct. 5.Leading%  Engineer%  Technician%  Chris%  Burke HMS%  Vanguard Port%  Talbot,%  Wales The Fraternal Order of the Eagles club here put on (chicken) wings and opened the bar and invit ed us to play pool and socialize. Sgt.%  Mark%  Pierson Marine%  Corps Security%  Force%  Battalion Coldwater,%  Mich. My mom watched the kids so my wife, Ashley, and I could go out for the first time in eight months. It was our anniversary. ET1%  James%  Grimm Trident%  Training%  Facility Coco,%  Fla. My instructor at TTF let me off early to go to Orlando and pick up my car, which is being shipped from Hawaii. Erick%  Roberson Navy%  Exchange%  employee New%  Cumberland,%  Pa. Ill probably buy my mom a present for Do Something Nice Day, like flowers or something. Elaine%  Deslauries Family%  member Thompson,%  Conn. Im baby sitting my granddogs this weekend. My daughter has a Weimaraner and a German Shorthair. Clayton%  Wade Retired%  Air%  Force Newark,%  N.J. I pick up co-workers who are too far away from the building for lunch and then take them back. Old salt takes tour of new submarine THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Despite its heavy commitment to the war in Southeast Asia, the U.S. Navy was responsible for other security missions around the globe during the 1960s and 1970s. e Seventh Fleet kept watch over northeast Asia while the Sixth Fleet asserted a powerful presence in the Mediter ranean. In both theaters, hostile forces attacked U.S. warships. In June 1967, Israeli planes and motor torpedo boats unexpectedly attacked USS Liberty (AGTR02), an intelligence ship gathering information on the Arab-Israeli war that had just broken out. After the rst attack, the Israelis struck again. In both instances hostile re killed and wounded many Liberty ocers and bluejackets. In the emergency, the Commanding Ocer, Cmdr. William L. McGonagle, displayed extraordinary courage and professionalism. Despite being seriously wounded and under re, he stayed at his post on the shot-up bridge to coordinate defense of the ship, the work of damage control parties, and medical treatment for the many wound ed Sailors. As a result of his steady and skillful leadership, Libertys crewmen eciently extinguished res that were ravaging the ship and prevented further ooding. He was instrumental in saving the ship. Not until a U.S. destroyer had reached the scene, 17 hours after the start of the attack, did the bleeding and injured ocer relinquish his post on the bridge so that his wounds could be treated. Even then, he insisted that the more grievously wounded of his shipmates get medical care rst. Cmdr. McGonagle received the Medal of Honor for his worthy leadership and valor under re. As demonstrated in the Liberty incident, Americas Cold War Sailors often risked life and limb to do their duty, even during periods of peace. is point was reemphasized the following February, when North Korean naval forces red on and seized USS Pueblo (AGER-2), another intelligence-collection vessel operating in international waters in the Sea of Japan. For the next year, the North Korean Communists imprisoned and tortured her crewmen, coercing some to sign confessions of guilt and to make political radio broadcasts. Other American Sailors died to help the Navy meet the serious threat posed by an increasingly capable and globe-ranging Soviet navy. As their fellow submariners in USS resher (SSN-593) which went down in 1,400 fathoms of water east of Boston in April 1963, the men of USS Scorpion (SSN-589) paid the ultimate price for their country when the ship imploded on the bottom of the Atlantic in the spring of 1968. e loss of these submarines and their crews reenergized the Navys eorts to make Americas submarine eet the safest and most capable in the world. roughout the Cold War, the U.S. attack submarine eets that operated in all the worlds oceans, but especially in the Atlantic, became more and more eective at nding and trailing Soviet submarines, often without the knowledge of the latter. Both U.S. and Soviet submariners knew that if war broke out between their nations, the Americans had a decided advantage with their technologically superior warships and professional skills. e 1970s marked a watershed in the social history of the U.S. Navy. Under the spirited stewardship of Admiral Zumwalt, who served as Chief of Naval Operations from 1970 to 1974, the Navy Department worked to accomplish the full integration into the naval service of African-Americans and women. In April 1971, Samuel L. Gravely became the rst black American to achieve promotion to ag rank and the following April, Alene B. Duerk became the rst female to do so when she Period of Peace marred by incidents The NavyIn the Cold WarSeventh in a series 2 killed in helo crash e Department of Defense announced the death of two Sailors who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. ey died Sept. 22, as a result of an MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter crash while operating in the central Red Sea. Both Sailors were assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 6 at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, Calif. Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, of Lompoc, Calif., and Chief Warrant Ofcer Jonathan S. Gibson, 32, of Aurora, Ore., were killed. e location of the crash site is known, and an extensive area has been searched multiple times by various ships and aircraft. e Knighthawk helicopter, attached to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6, crashed in the central Red Sea Sept. 22, after conducting a landing on the deck of guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) at approximately 12:40 p.m. Bahrain time. e following assisted in the search and rescue: USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Shoup (DDG 86), USS Stockdale (DDG 106) and USNS Rainier (TAOE 7) as well as MH-60S Knighthawks from HSC6, MH-60R Sea Hawks from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 and several P-3s from Patrol Squadron (VP) 47 and a U.S. Air Force HC-130. e crash was not due to any sort of hostile activity. e Navy is conducting an investigation to determine the cause of the incident. For most people, the thunderous setting of a NASCAR track on race day would not be considered a tranquil environment. However, thats not the case with Tech. Sgt. Erin L.Tallman, non commissioned ocer in charge of knowledge operations in the 14th Air Force Knowledge Management oce at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It may seem weird, but being on the track with 35 cars going 200 miles per hour, while I cant hear anything, is actually calming and very relaxing to me, Tallman said. In addition to her full time Air Force career, Tallman has been serving as a member of the Las Vegas Motor Speedway pit re crew for more than seven years. Back in 2005 I went to a race as a volunteer to work security, said the Rhinelander, Wis., native. I happened to meet the re chief, and he said I had a good eye for safety. He invited me to come back in January for training. So thats what I did, and I started working my rst race in March 2006. Tallmans training included hands-on lessons on how to maneuver re extinguishers over the tracks safety wall, as well as instructions on how to use the extinguisher if a driver is still in the car. Crew members are also trained on other aspects of their counterparts roles. ese duties include retrieving debris from the track, removing a driver from a wrecked car and proper procedures for calling in tow trucks. Its very intense training, Tallman said. But then again, racing is very intense and so are the crashes and res. You have to be ready to react at a moments notice. Fast forward to 2013, and Tallman had 16 races under her belt with No. 17 coming up during the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Race set for Sept. 28, in Airman at home on track

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Editors note: Vice Adm. Bill Moran assumed the duties as the 57th Chief of Naval Personnel Aug. 2. He is responsible for the overwhelming majority of policies and programs that directly aect Sailors and their families. Moran takes helm of a command that has an operating budget of $29 billion and a sta of more than 26,000 Sailors and civilians that perform a wide variety of missions, including managing Navy manpower, readiness, education and training, and professional development of Sailors. Moran sat down with All Hands Magazine Aug. 8 to talk about his priorities. Question: What are your expectations? What do you hope to be able to do during your tenure as Chief of Naval Personnel? Answer: Well, Ive thought about it a lot coming into the job. Principally, having come from the resource sponsorship over in director of air warfare and watching the challenges that we are going to be faced with in the Department of Defense and Department of the Navy going forward, the scal challenges ahead of us are going to be pretty dicult to deal with. So, any time youve got that kind of scal pressure on an organization, theres likely to be a lot of change, and theres likely to be a lot of pressure to reduce force structure, potentially reduce the number of folks we have in the Navy, and that creates a sense of uncertainty throughout the eet. So my goal, hopefully at the end of my tenure here, is that weve been able to manage that in such a way that there is less uncertainty for Sailors and their families and the workforce. And were able to nd the right balance for the eet so that they continue to operate forward, as Adm. Greenert [Chief of Naval Operations] talks about, we continue to put warghters on the front lines, and that we are ready to go operate in any environment when called upon. And I think the Navy, in this environment, is going to be called upon more and more because coming out of Afghanistan and coming out of Iraq, theres a great sense that someone still has to be forward, keeping watch, being out there ready to protect the nations interests, and I think the Navys going to be a principal force in that. You know, its a longwinded answer to basically saying a lot of change is coming, potentially, a lot of change, a lot of pressure and a lot of uncertainty. So if I can help reduce that uncertainty, and give some stability and balance to the force, I think well have a successful time here. Q: You mentioned a lot about uncertainty. What are some of the things that you can do in your position to quell some of that uncertainty in the eet and give a little reassurance to the eet? A: Its going to take me a little bit of time and going out and talking to the eet rst. I really have to understand whats on their minds, what are they reading, what do they believe is the future from their perspective? I have my own perspective as a resource sponsor, but Ive been locked up in the Pentagon for three years, and I havent had the opportunity to get out and listen to the Sailors ... and folks that are operating forward. So I look forward to doing that. And once I get that sense from them, I think Ill be able to get back here and talk to the N1 and the personnel workforce that is trying to set the right policies, set the right tone, so that they have condence in our decision making about the future. So its too early for me to say, I have the following things Im going to do to create certainty. I need to get out to the eet and really understand where they feel theres an uncertainty in the future. Q: Can you tell me about your three key words? A: I think they are words that resonate with everybody. Trust is one. I think if youre in the detailing business, or in the personnel business, often times, you dont feel like your constituents, the eet, trusts you because there are many policies that come out and they seem counterintuitive, and sometimes they counter each other, and so people arent real sure where youre trying to go. I think that if were going to be trusted by the eet and we have to be weve got to get out and weve got to talk to them. Weve got to understand what their concerns are, and weve got to show them through our actions and our policies, that we understand what is important to them, and whats important to the CNO, the Secretary, and the institution. And as long as we are doing that well, openly, and transparently, I think well earn their trust over time. Q: And what about balance? A: Balance is a lot of what youre seeing today when were talking about t ll. ere is a lot of discussion in the eet about, Do we have the right t for the type of Sailor with the right NEC, and the right experience levels at dierent places ... operating in the eet? And then theres the ll I just need a body to be able to do certain types of work. Admiral Gortney [Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command] and his team are really driving us to try to satisfy the demand signal for the right Sailor at the right place at the right time, and theres a balance to that because you can take all the Sailors you have at shore and put them to sea, and ll out the gaps that currently exist at sea, but then you leave big holes, potentially, in the shore establishments that train the Sailors that are going to sea. Weve got to balance the sea and the shore piece correctly. Weve got to balance the right training to eectively get the Sailor we want in a particular billet that is trained to the highest degree possible, given the time constraints, and making sure the ships and aircraft squadrons and submarines deploy with the right people. Q: So, it takes a combination of trust and balance to reach the stability were looking for? A: Yes, stability takes a lot of meaning, but youre right. It is a combination. If we nd the right balance and we achieve the trust, then there is a stabilizing inuence in the lives of Sailors and their families because they are not guessing whats coming next. In this environment, where a lot of change could occur, that stability is going to come in the form of making sure that we dont change policies just for changes sake. at we nd the right policies that are going to give that balance and trust back to the Sailors in a way that gives them ... a greater Las Vegas, Nev. As part of the tracks pit re crew, re safety is the chief concern for Tallman and her teammates. During races the crew is responsible for maintaining the re extinguishers next to the wall on pit road. When the cars come in for pit stops, they stand ready to act if a re breaks out from sparks that may ignite overow gasoline during refueling. ere are also teams that work in the tracks garage area to manage fuel stations that need assistance. In addition to re safety, trac control is also another area where crew members operate. After a promotion, Tallman now spends most her time on race day working in this capacity. I manage all the cars that come on and o the track, she said. I stand at the entrance/exit of pit road, and if there is an accident the cars will come through me for direction on which way they need to go. Tallman said one of her more memorable experiences working with the crew happened just after the LVMS track had been redone with new higher banks. It was the rst truck race and we were all excited about it, she said. e trucks had gone out on the track, and I had just been moved up to trac control. I was standing by the wall waiting for them to come down pit road when two trucks struck the inner wall and came sliding right at me. I had to jump back over the wall or I would have been hit. No one expected the trucks to actually come ying down pit road, but they did and they were sideways. ere are more than 100 members that come from Utah, Texas, California and Oregon on Tallmans team. I would have never thought I would be working on a NASCAR track so c lose to the action, Tallman said. Its an amazing feeling, and a once in a life time dream. However, there may be one thing that could possibly make the experience even better. If they would just let me drive, she said.Track A conversation with Vice Adm. Bill Moran THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 11

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A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 7, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through the practical and cre ative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful docu ment for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 7. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 15. For more information, call 573-4513. This class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 8. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 8, 15, 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human re sources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of ac tive duty personnel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, unless otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. This course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 3 and 4. For more information and to register call 573-4513. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 21 to 25. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 7 to 11. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more infor mation, call 573-4513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 9. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. A five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 28 to Nov. 1. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 16 and 17. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for active duty females who have been sexually assaulted as adults. is group will oer active duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmosphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil Silence hides violenceOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. You may see purple ribbons around the base during this month. ese ribbons are placed to recognize those who have been victims of domestic violence and to raise awareness about this issue. Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior, used against a partner in an intimate relationship. And not just physical abuse; emotional and sexual abuse also are domestic violence. People who abuse their partners in these ways do so to try to gain, maintain or regain power and control in the relationship. Domestic violence aects people of every race, age, sexual orientation, religion, educational and economic backgrounds. Unfortunately, it is not a rare issue; one-in-four women will be aected by domestic violence in their lifetime. Men are also victims of domestic violence, and they tend to underreport due to the social stigma around men being abused. Most of us know someone who has been the victim and/or perpetrator of domestic abuse. Domestic violence aects not only the victim of the abuse, but also any children in the home. Witnessing violence between ones parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of engaging in violent behavior as an adult. Boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their own partners and children when they become adults. Also, more than 50 percent of people who commit domestic violence also abuse children in the household. If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, there is help out there. e Fleet and Family Support Center has counselors and a Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate who can provide you with resources and support. e National Domestic Violence Hotline is a safe place to ask questions and get help. e hotline number is (800) 799-7233. If you need help, ask. If you know someone who needs help, call the FFSC at 573-4222 or the hotline for advice on how to help. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 13 took charge of the Navy Nurse Corps. Zumwalt, however, was dissatised with the status of blacks and women in the Navy. He initiated measures to increase their recruitment and retention, better their chances for promotion, and eliminate everyday discriminations. To shake up the personnel bureaucracy and eliminate needless regulations for all Sailors, Zumwalt issued a series of Navywide directives, labeled Z Grams. He also took steps to improve communication between ocers and enlisted personnel. Not all of Zumwalts actions succeeded, and his unconventional approach angered many traditionalists, but the Navy was long overdue for changes that the American people expected to see in the armed forces. Zumwalts successors continued his work, such that the rst women entered the U.S. Naval Academy in July 1976. Two years later other Navy women began serving on board naval vessels other than the traditional hospital ships and transports. One unique Navy woman was Rear Adm. Grace Murray Hopper, who dedicated her life to improving the Navys information technologies and systems. Early in her career, she helped develop the Navys rst computers, including the Mark I, II, III, and UNIVAC systems. Perhaps her greatest achievement was to pioneer the development of COBOL, a computer language that nonmathematicians could understand and employ. When Hopper retired from the service in 1966, the Navy realized it could not lose her unique skills and brought her back on active duty for an indenite time. During this period, she served as Director, Navy Programming Languages Group in the Oce of the Chief of Naval Operations. Grace Hopper served in the Navy for two more decades. When she nally retired, Rear Adm. Hopper was awarded the National Medal of Technology and many other distinctions. But, she considered her highest award to have been the privilege and honor of serving very proudly in the United States Navy. e Middle East remained a troubled region during the 1970s. In the Arab-Israeli Yom Kippur War of October 1973, the Sixth Fleet protected U.S. transport planes that ew emergency supplies of weapons and ammunition from the United States to the Israelis, who were ghting desperately to survive the Arab onslaught. Soon, however, the Israelis launched devastating counterattacks that threatened to overwhelm the Egyptian army. e Soviet Union moved strong naval forces into the Eastern Mediterranean and prepared to y paratroopers into Egypt to prevent the Israeli military from completely crushing the Egyptians. e Nixon administration put U.S. forces on alert worldwide and ordered the reinforced Sixth Fleet into waters o Egypt to signal the opposition of the United States to the proposed Soviet measures. At the same time, Washington helped arrange a cease-re between the belligerents and redoubled eorts to bring lasting peace to the region. In this vein, in 1974 the Navy deployed mine countermeasures forces, which had recently opened the mined waters o North Vietnam to merchant trafc, into the Eastern Mediterranean. Between April and December, Task Force 65 cleared mines from the Suez Canal and assisted in the removal of numerous ships sunk there during the war. Guided missile cruiser USS Little Rock (CLG-4) was among the rst ships to transit the newly opened canal. By the mid-1970s, a muscle-exing Soviet Union began to cause serious concern in Washington. e USSR spent enormous resources on its war-making establishment, hoping to take advantage of Americas postVietnam retrenchment. e Soviets deployed thousands of mobile, intercontinental ballistic missiles and other nuclear-armed weapons, built up large ground and air forces in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and aided Communist guerrilla movements in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Of greatest concern to the U.S. Navy, Soviet naval forces increased their presence around the world, challenging Americas overseas interests and control of the sea. A 1975 Soviet naval exercise, Okean 75, involved 220 ships and new, longrange bombers in mock strikes against the continental United States. Soviet warships steamed brazenly in all the worlds oceans, and even in the Gulf of Mexico. As a symbol of the changing naval balance of power, Soviet surface combatants and patrol planes began operating from the Americanbuilt base at Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam. Just before he retired as Chief of Naval Operations in June 1978, Adm. James L. Holloway III concluded that the U.S. Navy then had only a slim margin of superiority over the Soviet navy. Next:%  e%  1980s%  and%  Ronald%  Reagan Cold War Naval Undersea Warfare Center held a change of command ceremony Sept. 26 at NUWC headquarters in Newport, R.I. Rear Adm. David M. Duryea relieved Rear Adm. omas G. Wears as commander. Duryea comes to Newport after serving as deputy commander for undersea warfare at Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C. Duryea, a native of Orchard Park, N.Y., holds a bachelor of science degree from the University of Rochester and a masters degree from George Washington University. He earned his commission from the Naval Reserve Ocer Training Corps program at Rochester. Duryea has served aboard a variety of submarines and commanded the gold crew of the nuclear powered ballistic missile submarine USS Florida (SSBN 728). He also served as commanding ocer of the combined crews of Florida when the ship went through a refueling overhaul and conversion to a guided missile platform (SSGN). His operational shore assignments have included duty on the sta of the U.S. Strategic Command and the sta of Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. Since entering the Navys Acquisition Corps, Duryea has served in a range of program management assignments, including major program management responsibility for submarine imaging and electronic warfare systems and for the special operations forces undersea mobility program. Following the change of command, Wears will retire from the Navy after 30 years of service. NUWC is a shore command of the U.S. Navy within NAVSEA, which engineers, builds and supports Americas eet of ships and combat systems. NUWCs two divisions in Newport and Keyport work together to fulll NUWCs mission to operate the Navys full-spectrum research, development, test and evaluation, engineering, and eet support center for submarines, autonomous underwater systems, and oensive and defensive weapon systems associated with undersea warfare and related areas of homeland security and national defense.Undersea War Center changes command CGs Papp visits Korea I had the distinct honor this past week to represent the U.S. Coast Guard during an ocial visit to the Republic of Korea, hosted by Korea Coast Guard Commissioner General Kim Suk Kyoon. is was my third stop in a series of ocial visits to strengthen ties with partner maritime governance organizations and learn more about the dynamic Asia-Pacic Region. Like the U.S. Coast Guard, the Korea Coast Guard protects people on the sea, protects the nation against threats delivered by sea and protects the sea itself. We share common missions and challenges, so through sustained partnership we are able to exchange knowledge and coordinate planning and operations to ensure the safety, security and prosperity of our respective nations. Protecting people on the sea has always been a primary focus for the KCG, which is celebrating their 60th anniversary this year. Kims ongoing campaign to reduce maritime accidents by 30 percent underscores the KCGs commitment to maritime safety, and Kim and I discussed the importance of active prevention eorts and capable search and rescue response. National security relies upon secure borders and the South Korean peninsula, surrounded by the sea, demands a sustained and capable KCG oshore presence to protect their In discussions in Washington about the sequester and defense strategy and resources, a basic question is often asked: With the war in Iraq over and the war in Afghanistan winding down, why doesnt the U.S. military simply reset to its preSept. 11, 2001, capabilities? e underlying assumption behind this question is that we, as a nation, had funding mostly right then. Im not sure I agree. In any event, what sense would it make to plan for future challenges and requirements by arbitrarily looking back to how things were done more than 12 years ago? Consider what had happened to the Marine Corps by 2001. From 1990 to 2001, defense and security spending was cut by $100 billion on average each year. e focus on technology, and calls for cuts in manpower and procurement, assumed the U.S. would not need to commit ground troops to a major conict for the foreseeable future. During that decade, the Defense Department reduced total active-duty strength by 32 percent. In 2001, the Corps totaled roughly 172,000 Marines, down from 197,000 in the 1990 Gulf War. Even at that time, manning levels consistently fell below target and equipment readiness suered. At one point in 2000, one-third of the Marine aviation eet was grounded due to maintenance issues. While assigned missions were expanding and crises were multiplying for instance, in relation to developments in Iraq and terrorist threats in the wider Middle East Marine capabilities were stretched thin. en came 9/11. Over the past 12 years, ghting in some of the toughest corners of Afghanistan and Iraq, the Marine Corps has learned a lot about the force it went to war with, what worked and what did not. In many cases, our prewar focus on the ree Block War, which assumed that a modern Marine in the eld might be called upon to ght, conduct peacekeeping operations and deliver humanitarian aid, was spot on (although we didnt have the money and facilities to train all Marines to that very high standard). Over time, though, we found that as the conicts evolved, we needed some adjustments, and needed them quickly. For instance, Marines found themselves short of critical capabilities in intelligence collection and analysis, communication and mobility on land, sea and in the air. Marines didnt have enough light attack and utility aviation helicopters, for example. ey also didnt have all the training teams needed to advise and assist other countries in enhancing their own security. Furthermore, Marine logistics structure was not well-designed for our new, more spread-out style of ghting, which required supplying many small, autonomous units distributed across a large area. Unforeseen long-term conict ashore meant that the Corps had to add not only personnel, but more skills and equipment. e new challenges of the 21st century also meant rooting out technologically savvy enemies who blended into the urban terrain and populace that sheltered them. Marines played their part in this eort Marines look to future

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Active duty, Reserve, and retired service members along with military family members and civilians attended a ceremony to pay tribute to POW/ MIA Recognition Day at the Naval Undersea Warfare Museum, Sept. 20. e 5th annual ceremonys emerging theme was Keeping the Promise. e theme honors Americas promise to continue the search for POW/ MIA service members until they are found and brought home. POW/MIA recognition day is a day of remembrance, said Capt. Dave Kohnke, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport commander. is is a day we must not ignore, just as we must not ignore our uniformed personnel and those who never made it home. Kohnke continued onward and illustrated how many of our service members are still POW/MIA by stating that more than 80,000 men and women are still out there. He also discussed the measures that Joint Prisoner of War/Missing In Action Accounting Command is taking to nd and bring home our heroes. JPACs everyday operations involve researching case les, investigating leads, excavating sites and identifying Americans who were killed in action and never made it home. e United States pays homage to National POW/ MIA Recognition Day across the nation on the third Friday of September every year. e observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the ying of the National League of Families POW/MIA ag. e ve others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. Guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provided humanitarian assistance to an adrift shing dhow while operating in the Arabian Gulf, Sept. 24. Gettysburg stopped to render assistance after being signaled by the dhows crew shortly before 11:30 a.m. According to the crew, which consisted of one Omani and four Bangladeshi men, they had been at sea for ve days and had suered an engine failure on the third day, leaving the vessel powerless and drifting for two days. e crew were found in good health and had food and water on hand. Fire Controlman 2nd Class Yasser Rady, a close-in weapons systems (CIWS) technician assigned to Gettysburg, provided translation that facilitated mutual communication and allowed Gettysburg to provide the crew with additional food, water, and safety ares. We were able to quickly and eectively provide some assistance for the crew of the shing vessel while they awaited help from local authorities, Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Scherry, Gettysburgs executive ocer, said. Our assistance allowed us to enhance cooperation, build trust, and mutual respect to our fellow mariners in the region. Local authorities were contacted by U.S. 5th Fleet to provide further assistance. Guided-missile destroyer USS e Sullivans (DDG 68) was operating nearby and oered help to ensure the dhows security and welfare until that aid arrived. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, said the assistance provided by Gettysburg was a good example of how professional mariners help each other in time of need. is is what we do as professional mariners, Sweeney said. When someone at sea needs help, we help them. e assistance provided by Gettysburg and her crew will help ensure those shermen are safe until the local authorities arrive. Gettysburg is deployed with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation eorts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. sense of certainty. And I think inherent in that is the stability that comes from smart policies and smart manning in the eet.Q: What are the sorts of things, at this stage, do you imagine are going to keep you up at night? A: You know, nothing really stresses me out on the job. It is a big job, youre right. I am just beginning to understand the breadth and depth involved in the N1 organization. Were obviously split between Washington, D.C., and another major hub, Millington, [Tennessee], where the primary workforce that interfaces with the eet exists. So thats a big piece. e time-distance issue for the organization is important. And then, of course, the rest of our domain includes Great Lakes and all the recruiting districts around the country, and a variety of other smaller organizations. So theres a lot going on that, frankly, after one week, Im just beginning to understand. So its going to take a little time. I think what keeps me up at night is thinking about how were going to manage the force if we are asked to get smaller, and making sure that man ning does not become the rst thing we give up in this give-and-take over the amount of money that we are going to have to ac count for in the budget. So, manning is a fundable asset, in the sense that its a lot easier to carve out, or harvest cash to pay bills with manpower than it is [with] ships and air planes and submarines, because of all the intrica cies in building platforms. My job is to protect that manning, so we dont in advertently cut the man ning to the point where the force of the eet is not well-served, and we have an issue with the appropriate level of manning at sea. at is probably the biggest challenge just trying to ensure that we get the right manning for whatever size force comes in the future. Q: What can Sailors do at their level do to help you support them? A: My intent is to get out a lot and talk to the eet and to have a conversation with Sailors. at is the most important thing. eir direct feedback to me is really important as I bring that information back to my organization here in the N1 CNP. I obviously appreciate and observe the chain of command, but being out and about and listening and watching Sailors operate in the eet and seeing what their concerns are will only work if they are willing to have a conversation and ask me questions and give me feedback on what they think is working, and what they think is not working. Q: What is your message to the Sailors in the eet? A: Youve got a great organization up here that understands the interest of Sailors, families, civil ians, and retirees that we are trying very hard to stay on top of a changing environment and be re sponsive enough to make sure that were anticipat ing the issues that are going to face us in a very tough, challenging scal environment in the future. We have your best interest at heart and were going to work hard for Sailors and families to make sure that they understand whatever changes are being made, they understand the rea soning and the rationale behind them, but that also were here ghting for them every single day.Moran Navy rescues shermenby adding a Marine com ponent to the U.S. Special Operations Command. is and other expanded de mands led Congress in 2007 to authorize a Corps expan sion to 202,000 personnel. Yet demands for these hybrid war capabilities requiring highly adaptable Marines, able to shift rapidly between, say, a close-quarters reght and a humanitarian mission has not removed the need for more traditional capabilities. e suggestion that in an era of sequestration Marines simply go back to sea ignores the fact that Marines never left the sea. While most of our deployed force fought ashore, where the demand was, Marines continued to deploy Marine Expeditionary Units on amphibious ships. Despite the withdrawal from Iraq and the continuing drawdown in Afghanistan, the relatively new threat of cyber terror, and the traditional areas of embassy security and crisis response require uniquely skilled servicemen and women. Marines now provide a contribution to U.S. Cyber Command. ey also provide increased support for embassy security, and currently provide a Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force in order to increase U.S. crisis response capabilities in North Africa. While ghting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Corps, along with the Navy, continued to answer calls to respond to natural disasters and skirmishes in the rest of the world. Marines also provided training and assistance that underpinned Americas commitment to build partnerships and stability within the broader security environment. In our post-9/11 world, more of our people must remain ready to deploy on short notice, which demands increased readiness levels compared with the force of 2001. ese and many other commitments mean that even if you eliminate the requirements of Iraq and Afghanistan, commitments and requirements in other areas have vastly expanded since 2001. Today, the Marine Corps has planned for signicant budget and personnel reductions, even before U.S. forces are withdrawn from Afghanistan. Yet this doesnt mean the Marines will ignore the lessons learned from the past decade of combat operations. e world is a dierent place than it was on Sept. 10, 2001 its more dangerous. We continue to witness violent extremism, regional competition and increased sophistication and lethality among nonstate actors at unprecedented levels. As former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pointed out, since we cannot predict where and when we will respond to crises, we have to plan for multiple scenarios. e readiness and re sponsiveness of Marine Corps forces should not be anchored to a pre-2001 model of the Corps, be cause the world on which it was based no longer exists. waters. Regionally, the KCG is focused on building networks with other coast guards to better share information on transiting vessels and protect maritime commerce. e KCG is a founding member of the North Pacic Coast Guard Forum, which includes the coast guards of Russia, Japan, Canada, China and the U.S., and fosters multi-lateral cooperation to improve maritime governance in the region. e KCG is increasing its leadership in the Pacic, in cluding enforcement of in ternational conventions to regulate illegal, unregulat ed and unreported shing. is year, the highlycapable KCG Patrol Ship 3012 conducted a northern Pacic Ocean patrol to combat illegal high seas drft net shing. e KCG was the only maritime governance presence in the northern Pacic during that period. e KCG is striving to improve prociency, establishing a new academy to provide core and advanced training in a variety of areas. As I discussed with Kim, the U.S. Coast Guard is ready to assist in sharing our practices and training information and learning from their experiences as well. I was very impressed with the professionalism and pride of the KCG. ey are experienced operators, which I saw rsthand during a harbor patrol of Incheon aboard a KCG hovercraft and tour of KCG Patrol Ship 3008. Many thanks to Commissioner General Kim for his hospitality and happy 60th anniversary to the Korea Coast Guard. Redskins, DOD team up NFL Play 60 and the Washington Redskins visited Joint Base Andrews Sept. 24, with the Salute to Play 60 Military Challenge, teaching more than 230 military kids from the National Capital Region the importance of a healthy lifestyle. NFL Play 60 is the National Football Leagues campaign to encourage kids to be active for 60 minutes a day in order to help reverse the trend of childhood obesity. Redskins players Robert Grin III, Alfred Morris, Joshua Morgan, Adam Gettis, Niles Paul, Josh Wilson, Darrel Young and many others attended the event and helped the kids get active. During the opening ceremonies, Robert Grin III, the Redskins quarterback, spoke to the crowd about his life experiences. My mom and dad were both in the military, so I was a military brat growing up, Grin said. I was once sitting where you guys are, going to camps and events, even though Play 60 wasnt around. We are proud to be out here and we are going to get that win against Oakland. Stations were set up for the event at the turf eld on JBA, and children were as signed to celebrity train ers. For 60 minutes, train ers put the kids through drills and exercises. I play football and baseball so that keeps me active, and I eat well, said Andrew Marcos, 13, from Farquhar Middle School. My dad works on base and when he told me all the Redskins players were going to be here I said I am going to that.. For motivation, kids can track their daily activity for four weeks. Children with the highest involvement will be honored for their participation during a 2013 Redskins home game. Grins mom, Jackie, also attended the event and said that it meant a lot for her to give back to military families. It means a lot because it lets the other military kids know that they have the same opportunities that my son was afforded, Mrs. Grin said. I would tell kids here to stay focused and utilize all the resources that are afforded to them as military kids, and to understand that the sky is the limit. It happened for my son and it could happen for them. Wide receiver Josh Morgan was born and raised in Was said he wants to give back to the community all he can. What good would it do for me to get out of my situation and now not give anything back to the community? he said. ats why I make it my business to always be out here with the kids. ey make you really appreciate the little things in life. POW/MIAs rememberedMarines Papp

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013



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Clinic has Home PortE-mail service one way to stay in touch Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay oers multiple ways for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a primary care manager at NBHC Kings Bay can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Home Port On line, also known as RelayHealth. Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for nonurgent issues, request lab results and medication rells, and re quest appointments. Because Medical Home Port Online is for non-urgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply to pa tient e-mails. e system is se cure and condential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Home Port Online, go to www.relayhealth.com or the command website at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/NavalHospitalJax. Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up. For technical help, call RelayHealth at (866) 735-2963). Patients can also sign up at their care teams front desk. And, as always, care teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and nurse advice is available after-hours. NBHC Kings Bay patients call week days from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. the appointment line at (904) 5424677 or (800) 529-4677. After-hours nurse advice is available, via the appointment line, on evenings, weekends and holidays. ese communication options are a few of the features of Medical Home Port, the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of qual ity care. Medical Home Port places the patient at the center of a collab orative team of caregivers, from doctors to nurses and case man agers, led by the PCM. e patient and team work together for a coordinated, wholeperson approach to health, to meet the patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. Were strengthening the Precon Marine of Chesapeak, Va., to complete work in early 2015 Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast awarded a $10.5 million contract Sept. 20 to Precon Ma rine Inc., a small business entity based in Chesapeake, Va., for ret and repairs of Wharf One at Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay. Wharf One was built in 1987 and now needs this re capitalization project, said James Moore, Public Works Department Kings Bay Waterfront Planner. ings you dont see, but are necessary for the structural integrity will be repaired. Our goal is to be good for another 30 years. e work to be performed provides for reinforced concrete repairs on piles, pile caps, bull rails and edge beams. An impressed current ca thodic protection system also will be installed on rein forced concrete pile caps and will include the installation of anodes and a bonding har ness system on steel fender piles and camel guide piles. ICCPs are commonly used where there are increased current requirements for corrosion protection, where the driving voltage is greater than what can be obtained with galvanic systems and where there may be a need for enhanced control of the system. Wharf One also will undergo a thorough cleaning, coating and installation of fender wraps to steel fender piles, and cleaning and coating of steel camel guide piles. is is a great opportunity for our small business partners, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business deputy. Up Periscope Done anything nice? Had anything nice done? Page 9 Cold War Grace Hopper, Navy move on after Nam Page 10 Cartoonists Plus Big Trucks visit, Adopt-A-School, more Pages 4, 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Contract awarded for Wharf One work Dr. Gary Chapmans seminar helps couples communicate during deploymentsDeployment can be hard military cou ples. Trying to stay emotionally connect ed to a deployed spouse can take its toll on an existing relationship. Dr. Gary Chapman, a relationship coun selor and author of e Five Love Languages series, talked to Sailors at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Sept. 24 about how to show and understand emotional love. e purpose of this seminar is to help those who are married learn how to com municate love eectively, Chapman said. Most married couples love each other, but often they do not speak the right lan guage. ey do not emotionally connect with each other. Chap man said there are ve ways to eec tively show love to a spouse: communication, acts of service, gifts, quality time and physical touch and that that each person has a primary love language, but seldom do a husband and wife have the same one. His seminar is to help married spouses and others understand the concept of the dierent love languages and how to dis cover their own language, Chapman said. It also helps them discover their spouses language so that they can commu nicate ef fectively. Au dience mem ber YN2 Brian Williams said Chapmans seminar em phasized the importance of ways to make Translating e anag f ove Kings Bay Fire Department schedules activites around base Fire Department ocials at Kings Bay will observe Fire Pre vention Week Oct. 6 to 12. is years theme is Prevent Kitchen Fire. Each year the Na tional Fire Protection Associa tion has a new theme based on national trends, such as common causes of res and com mon causes of injuries and deaths. Kings Bay Commanding O cer Capt. Harvey Guey signed a proclamation letterfor this years theme. roughout the week, the re department prevention team will set up an information booth at the Navy Exchange and various places on base with fire safety infor mation, to introduce their latest re extinguisher trainer and to demonstrate on how to properly extinguish actual kitchen re. Fire Prevention Week is the longestrunning national safety education campaign. Fire Prevention Week set for Oct. 6 to 12 Photos on Page 5 Federal workers go home Government shutdown aects more than 100 here at NSB Kings Bay e Federal Government shut down Oct. 1 in the wake of the abscence of funding beyond scal year 2013. How long workers remain away is unknown. Federal employees in positions such as all military members, air trac controllers and postal employees remain on the job. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Aairs Ocer Scott Bassett said more than 100 federal workers on the base are eected by the move. President Barrack Obama placed blame for the shutdown on Congress. Congress has failed to meet its responsibility to pass a budget before the scal year that begins today. And that means much of our Government must shut down eective today, he said in a statement published on navy.mil. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagle said Monday that while mili tary personnel around the world would continue to serve in a nor mal duty status, a large number of civilian employees and contrac tors would likely be temporarily furloughed. To this end, DoD has been moving forward with necessary and prudent preparations, he said. Two government shutdowns in 1995 and 1996 totalled 28 days.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Every single service member de ployed outside the United States de serves to receive a letter of gratitude on anksgiving Day. e Bert Show, a nationally syn dicated radio program, and its lis tening community want to give our troops a Big ank You with a little taste of home this anksgiving. In 2007, 375,000 letters to troops all over the world were success fully sent. In 2011, e Bert Show community helped to express a Big ank You with more than 405,000 letters. is year the goal is the same, to provide a letter of appreciation to each service member deployed out side the United States. It can only be done with your help. By pulling to gether, this project can be a success Each letter should be heartfelt, handwritten, original and free of any political statements. e pur pose of the letter is to express thanks to the military personnel currently deployed outside the United States. e Bert Show reserves the right to eliminate those messages that are political in nature and do not reect a positive message in the spirit of anksgiving. Get a letter writing campaign started. Everyone in your school, church, civic group, sorority/ fra ternity, oce or neighborhood is welcome to write letters. Give that troops that much-deserved show of appreciation by writing a letter of thank you Here are some guildines: All letters must be on 8.5-inch by 11-inch paper or smaller. Do not use glue, tape, staples, cardboard, glitter or otherwise attach anything to the paper. No construction paper. Decorate using crayons, mark ers, pens or pencils. Use both sides if you like, but use one page per letter only. Do not send greeting cards or photographs. Feel free to include your mailing and e-mail address. Individual letters should not be sealed in envelopes. Do not send anything except letters. Donations of any kind should not be included or attached to letters and cannot be accepted. Letters can be dropped o by Oct. 22 at Lori Lamoureuxs oce at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay Security in Building 2026, 1115 Henry Clay Blvd. For more information, call Lamoureux at 573-4235. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss begins Oct. 3. Ship Shape is an 8-week nutrition and weight man agement course. If you are ready to adopt a weight-loss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, ShipShape is your answer. Make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington at 573-4731 for more information or to sign-up. Class starts at 11 a.m. Oct. 3 in the base Fitness Center classroom.Is your pet due for vaccines or a heartworm test? Do you have trouble getting into see the veterinarian during the week? Its no problem anymore! e Kings Bay Veterinary Treatment facility is oering clinic hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 5. Call (912) 573-0755 to make your appointment. e pet must be registered with an active duty service member, retiree or dependent prior to the appointment. You can make an appointment for a healthy pet need ing either vaccines (Rabies, $10; Distemper, Leptospirosis, $15; Kennel Cough, Feline Leukemia, $18) or heartworm testing ($25) by call ing the clinic at (912) 573-0755. e pet needs to be registered with the clinic prior to the day of the appointment, and registration must be in person. Feel free to call with any questions. The 41st annual Rock Shrimp Festival is Saturday, Oct. 5, in St. Marys. The festival is full day of events including a 5K and 10K races, 1-mile Kids Fun Run, a parade, entertain ment, demonstrations, arts and crafts vendors and food concessionaires, plus dinners that include fresh rock shrimp. For information or questions contact the St. Marys Convention & Visitors Bureau at (912) 882-4000 visit www. smkiwanis.com.Army Lt. Col. Jonathon A Shine will be the guest speaker at the Oct. 15 meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association monthy dinner, at start ing at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Dinner is $20. RSVP with Capt. Oreen Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 7292389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net by Oct. 11.e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is hosting a potluck dinner at 3 p.m., Oct. 20 for all military active or retired spouses at Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base, to celebrate the new Chief Petty Ocers at the Conference Center. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba will be the guest speaker. RSVP by Oct. 5 at e Dolphin Store, inside the base library, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday throught Friday with what dish you are making. For more details call (912) 573-6102 or e-mail at kbdolphinstore@ hotmail.com. Some of St. Marys most chilling and his torical gures will be out on Oct. 18 as the St. Marys Downtown Merchants Association presents its 5th Annual Haunted History Tour. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Once Upon a Bookseller at 207 Osborne St. and at the St. Marys Welcome Center. Advance tickets are $8 and $10 on the day of the event. Groups of 20 or more can purchase tickets for $5 each. For more information, call (912) 882-7350.Taste of Camden is 4 to 8 p.m., ursday, Oct. 17 at the Kings Bay Village Shopping Center. In addition to our food exhibitors, the event will now include wine tasting with commemora tive glasses. Tickets are available online or at Tribune & Georgian or the Kingsland Wel come Center; $15 with wine tasting and $10 without. Save $2 per ticket on any purchased before Oct. 17 while supplies last.In the Navy Exchanges A-OK Student Re ward Program qualied students participate quarterly drawings for monetary awards for college. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better may enter. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which en titles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Now hear this! anksgiving letters for troops sought Big ank You On Sept. 16, the Military Ocers Assocation of America and Syracuse Universitys Institute for Veterans and Military Families launched e Military Spouse Employment Sur vey. is anonymous survey provides a platform for all military spouses to share their challenges of employ ment while on active duty. Its results will enable MOAA and the IVMF to better understand mili tary spouse unemployment and un deremployment. e survey, which is voluntary, will take approximately 30 minutes to complete and will be available through Oct. 16. To access the sur vey and for additional information go to www.moaa.org/milspousesur vey. is study will focus on the em ployment pattern of all military spouses, especially related to their long-term career trajectories. All active duty, National Guard and Reserve, veteran, and surviv ing spouses who are 18 years and older are encouraged to participate by sharing their stories, experiences and lessons learned. According to the 2010 Depart ment of Defense Manpower Data Center, there are 725,877 spouses of active duty servicemembers and 413,295 spouses of Reserve and Guard members. In addition, an estimated 15 mil lion veterans spouses and more than 5.8 million surviving spouses live in the U.S. MOAA has been a leader in iden tifying and addressing issues related to spouse employment and this ef fort will allow us to further our work in this area, MOAA president Vice Adm. Norb Ryan said. We believe the data from this survey will shed light upon challenges spouses face with their employment goals so we can better address their issues. We believe this research will pro vide insight into both employment and career barriers and opportu nities for military spouses, including career progression, said Mike Haynie, IMVF executive director. Further understanding of these is sues will also contribute to our abil ity to provide support as military families transition to being veteran families. We look forward to working with MOAA to identify important policy issues and practices related to military spouse employment that will impact both the military and veterans communities. To encourage as much participation as possible, please share the MilSpouseSurvey with other mili tary spouse communities. Survey results will be released in the spring of 2014.MOAA has military spouse survey Sailors trying to access their NonResident Training Course online account may not be able to access them without assistance, said Cen ter for Personal and Professional Development ocials Sept. 16. NRTC accounts not used in the last 30 days have been disabled, according to Tom Phillips, CPPDs NRTC program manager. Accounts were locked as a result of computer security measures or dered by the Defense Department and U.S. Navys cyber commands. Since the order took eect Aug. 21, more than 187,500 accounts have been locked. Users who have a locked account should contact the CPPD Voluntary Education Support Site in Pensacola, Fla., for assistance in regaining access. e VOLED team in Pensacola can be reached anytime via email at NRTC@navy.mil and Monday through Friday by commercial phone at 1-(877) 264-8583, or DSN at 753-6070. NRTC help desk sta members are unlocking accounts upon user request, Phillips said. As of Sept. 13, weve unlocked 2,865 accounts and are working to meet user requests as quickly as possible. Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs commanding ocer, said security risks are part of our daily lives, and managing that risk is necessary. While this can be seen as an inconvenience, security and risk man agement are important to keeping our Navy team as safe as possible, Newcomer said. We are working hard to ensure Sailors regain timely access to courses that will help them improve professionally and person ally.Online training accounts locked CPPD Most home res are easily preventable when you narrow your focus and take personal steps to in crease your safety. One way to do this is by proactively combing through each room in your home, nding signs of danger and xing them. e following are the dos and donts on kitchen res. To properly handle stove res: Never try to pick up a pan that is on fire. Its all too easy to burn your hand and spill the contents of the pan, which will allow the fire to spread. Never pour water on a stove fire, especially if there is any grease, as this can cause the fire to explode into a fireball. A small pan re on your stove can usually be extinguished by turn ing o the heat and covering the pan with its lid to smother the ames. You also can smother a small pan re using baking soda, so its a good idea to keep baking soda handy near your stove. For larger res, you will want to use a re extinguisher. So be sure to keep a tested, UL-rated re extinguisher easily accessible in your kitchen and to be familiar with its instructions and how to use it in an emergency. e best strategy for stove res is to prevent them from occurring in the rst place. Here are some tips to keep in mind for preventing stove res in your home: Never leave food unattended while cooking. Even a few seconds is enough for a fire to break out, especially if you are cooking with fats such as oil, or sugar. When cooking with any oil at a high temperature, give your stove your full attention. Grease, oils and fats are the most common cause of stove top res. e hotter they get, the more dangerous they become. Avoid loose-tting clothing, and tie back long hair when cooking at your stove. Make sure the stove top is always clean and clear. Never leave wooden or plastic tools, dish towels, or other items on the stove top. Take care to only turn on the burner you intend to use, to prevent igniting a re in the wrong place. Clean your stove after each use Fire Prevention Week Oct. 6 to 12 Kings Bay Fire Dept.

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e Navy has recom mended three changes to security procedures fol lowing the Washington Navy Yard shooting Sept. 16 in which a Navy contrac tor killed 12 people at the facility. Juan M. Gar cia, the assistant secretary of the Navy for manpower and reserve aairs, studied the service record of the shooter, Aaron Alexis, to see how his conduct did or did not meet the threshold for the sustainment of his security clearance and tness for Naval duty. One recommendation, which must go to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel for approval, is that all Oce of Personnel Manage ment investigative reports include any available po lice documents related to the subject being back grounded. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has already approved two other rec ommendations. e rst will require command security manager responsibilities be assigned to executive o cers or other senior members of commands. Currently, junior o cers hold those responsibilities. e second is to require senior-level accountability on all detachment of individual evaluations/t ness reports. A senior Navy ocial discussed the timeline of Alexis service and what the Navy knew about se curity problems during a Pentagon background brieng. Alexis service went from 2007 to 2011. Looking individually at the events, as we knew them at the time, its very dicult to see a glaring indicator that there is any kind of potential for the events that took place last week, the senior Navy of cial said. Many questions were raised about how Alexis, a former sailor and Navy contractor at the time of the shootings, received a secret security clearance. ree years prior to his enlistment, Alexis shot out to prevent spills that could later re on the burners. Clean under the burners regularly to prevent res from excess food. Cleaning the reflector pans under the burners also helps to maintain the energy eciency of your stove. If you have a gas stove, regularly check for gas leaks, and if you notice any stove parts getting rusty or old, be sure to get them replaced. Any time you smell gas, turn o your gas at the source, open windows and quickly exit the house. Do not touch any electrical switches, and do not use a phone to call the re department until you are outside your house. Switches and phones can emit tiny sparks that can ignite a gas cloud. e Kings Bay Fire De partment sta is encour aging you and your family to put safety rst during Fire Prevention Week and year round. relationships work when both parties have dierent love languages. I really enjoyed it be cause it will help me pre pare for a serious relation ship in the future, he said. It may seem impossible to emotionally connect to a spouse many miles away. Chapman said that as long as communication has begun before deploy ment, it is possible to stay connected to a spouse. Often when we are de ployed, we disconnect emotionally, he said. at makes re-entry more dicult. If we can learn the love language concept, speak each oth ers love language when we are together, and when we deploy, continue to speak that language, you stay emotionally connect ed even though you are physically apart. Chapman said he continues to help couples around the globe. He is the director of Marriage and Family Life Consul tants Inc. and has a radio program on marriage and relationships that airs on more than 100 stations via the Internet. His book e Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Com mitment to Your Mate has sold more than 6 million copies in English and has been translated into 38 dierent languages. In September 2013, e 5 Love Languages Mili tary Edition was released. patient-provider relationship, in an environment where both sta and pa tients PCS and deploy, with team-based care, said Capt. Troy Borema, a family medicine physi cian. Patients secure email access to their team is one aspect of that care. NBHC Kings Bay Primary Care/Family Medicine has two teams a black team and a maroon team. To meet the PCMs on each team, click on Medical Home Port on the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jack sonvilles six health care facilities in Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population, about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families, more than 57,000 are enrolled with a PCM at one of its facilities. FireLoveHealth Navy recommends security procedure changes Shooting probe to beginSecretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Sept. 26 that the Navy will conduct an ocial in vestigation into the fatal shooting incident at the Washington Navy Yard Sept. 16. Adm. John M. Richardson, Director Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, is designated as the inves tigating ocer. In the aftermath of the Sept. 16 tragedy at the Naval Sea Systems Command Headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard, it is critical for the Navy to undertake a comprehensive, critical assessment of all factors leading up to or inuencing this devas tating event, Mabus said. is assessment must identify and address relevant deciencies, if any, in Navy policies and procedures in order to ensure the continued safety and well-being of all Depart ment of the Navy and contractor personnel. e investigation into the incident will address associated security, personnel, and contracting policies and practices, in an eort to identify any deciencies in or noncompliance with applicable laws or regulations. e report of ndings will be submitted in No vember. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 3

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 the tires of a construction workers vehicle in Seattle. No charges were led. Upon entering the Navy Reserve in 2007, OPM initiated an investiga tion. e check turned up Alexis ngerprints in the FBI system and investigators became aware of the incident in Seattle. OPM sent investigators to speak to Alexis at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, Ill. ere was no mention of the incident involving re arms in the OPM report to the Navy. e OPM report to the Department of the Navy Central Adjudication Fa cility determined Alexis was eligible for a secret clearance with one caveat he had negative credit information. During his Navy service, Alexis received a nonjudicial punishment for an unauthorized absence during service with VF-46 in Atlanta, Ga. His unau thorized absence coincided with a brief stay in jail after being arrested for disorderly conduct out side a nightclub. ere were other inci dents, but there were no further Article 15s. In one, Alexis discharged a re arm in his quarters. He stated he accidently discharged the weapon while cleaning it. His commander initiated actions to adminis tratively separate Alexis from the service, but once the charges were dropped, that process stopped. On December 2, 2010, Alexis requested separa tion from the service in ac cordance with a reductionin-force program. On Jan. 31, 2011, he received an honorable discharge with a reentry code of RE-1 the most favorable code.Security Mid-September is arguably the most important time of the year to a U.S. Navy chief petty ocer. is is when newly ac cepted chiefs are frocked during a time-honored pinning cer emony, when their plain khaki uniforms are transformed by the coveted fouled anchors. ese ceremonies, which are held worldwide regardless of where the chiefs are stationed, are the culmination of the nal piece of CPO 365. Although this process has changed names many times since the Navys inception of the chief petty ocer rank in 1893 the purpose has remained un changed: to prepare rst class Sailors to be the chief. e role of a Sailor has changed drastically over the past decades. In order to respond to everchanging duties, chiefs deter mined that Sailors needed to start training immediately upon selection to rst class petty of cer. e training expanded from a six-week crash course to a yearlong program geared toward constant and consistent prepa ration. CPO 365 was born, a program that thenMaster Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Rick West implemented three years ago. CPO 365 was developed for a few reasons, West said. First and foremost, it was brought forward to ensure our rst class petty ocers were more ready to enter the CPO Mess and to bring them alongside our CPOs early to gain the knowledge, skills and abilities to be successful. We continue to put a lot of responsibility on our rst classes and CPOs and we need to ensure they are trained and updated on continuing bases. e program was initially a three-phase training process that excluded FCPOs from par ticipating in the second phase if they didnt pass their rating exam and then excluded them from participating in the third phase if they werent selected for chief. It has now evolved into a two-phase process that al lows all FCPOs to continue their training whether or not they were selected. When the E-7 results are re leased, FCPOs who are selected are allowed to start a series of specialized training sessions, in addition to the regular CPO 365 events, to help prepare them for their transition to chief. Despite criticisms of the many changes, CPO 365 is a step in the right di rection. At this particular point of time in our history, I believe CPO 365 provides us with the best training opportunity, said current MCPON Michael Stevens However, I am also con dent that in time CPO 365 will also change because thats what we do, we constantly evolve. Ill be a retired MCPON years from now and there will be a new name, a new process and new way of doing business to train our chiefs. Ill trust that it was put in place because the times that our future Sailors will serve necessitate that. West, who retired as the 12th MCPON in 2012, said I made CPO in 1988. From where we were then to where we are now, we are absolutely moving in the right direction. Could it be bet ter? You bet. It will continue to evolve as our great Navy moves forward and the collective mess combines their inputs. Despite the negatives, CPO 365 is designed to continue to deliver quality chiefs to the eet. is process is built by chiefs, run by chiefs and truly focused on Sailor development. One of its main purposes is to put newly selected E-7s in direct contact with seasoned chiefs. is allows an expedited devel opment of the new CPOs as well as a chance for them to interact with their mess and grow com fortable with their selection. We are in a new era in with regard to training new chiefs, said retired MCPON Jim Herdt. Its important for chiefs who were brought up in another pro cess to not condemn or measure them. ey are dierent, much like I was dierent from the chiefs who trained me. Most people think that we have this process so chiefs can prepare CPO selects to join the Chiefs Mess. I believe that its more than that, said Herdt, who served as the Navys 9th MCPON. is timeframe is set aside so chiefs worldwide are able to rededicate themselves and remind themselves of what being a chief is really about. Its like having a booster shot of Chief every year. MCPON Herdt stated that without this process, we would be more like our sister services and have three separate senior enlisted ratings with no continuity between them. Army Sgt. 1st Class Mary Fer guson was granted permission to go through CPO 365 while stationed at Fort Meade, Md., in 2011. After her rst request was denied, MCPON West nally granted her the ability to par ticipate, but only after she led the correct forms and requests through her chain of command, wrote a point paper about how this process would benet both her and the Army, and attended CPO 365 in its entirety. She was able to convince her Army lead ership that participating in CPO 365 would make her a better Sol dier. Prior to [CPO 365] I had at tended three dierent NCO education courses in the Army, each approximately three to six weeks in length. All of those were at academies with dedi cated instructors. All of my nor mal missions completely halted while I attended those academies, said Ferguson. I had one, maybe two NCOs training me in each course, and those instruc tors were also completely pulled from doing their usual missions in the Army. I walked away from [CPO 365] with a great deal more from a Mess that continued to handle its daily missions, as did I. ere is nothing like the power of the Mess to train itself, take care of troops, and make things happen. One thing leaders need to un derstand is this is not supposed to be taking folks out of their commands all the time, said West. is is about providing a ven ue and an opportunity to bring quality training sessions to the particular group a building block, said West. e sad thing is you can make FCPO and not receive any other formal class room training on leadership. is is another way to invest in the growth of our enlisted lead ers. Ferguson agreed. I loved CPO 365. I loved what it put me through person ally, and I loved what I saw it do to my brothers and sisters. I do agree that it should be a 365-day process. I think a mix ture of the two is great. Having that lead o time to cover Navy programs and procedures re ally helped. e whole process was so foreign to me, because it is so unlike anything we go through in the Army. But it was one of the best experiences of my life. I love the Army, and Ive made some amazing lifelong friendships in the Army, been through some incredibly things with some folks, but nothing, absolutely nothing compares to that moment when somebody hears those words, Welcome to the Mess! ... its monumental, its motivating on a whole other level, said Ferguson. MCPON Herdt noted that ar guably we are making better chiefs today than we ever have in the past. Todays chief petty ocers are no doubt taking the high road with their training. ey have the ability to be innovative and arent afraid of change, said Herdt. Im so proud of todays chiefs. ey dont understand how truly good they are at what they do. eir pride in appear ance and physique and their leadership skill has never been better than it is today. Chief Hospital Corpsman Joe Santos, U.S Pacic Fleets Sailor of the Year and a newly promot ed chief, noted that a lot of infor mation gained during Phase II cant be learned in a classroom setting. An academy setting would truly take away from the im portance of what it means to be called e Chief, Santos said. Growing up in the Navy, Ive always heard that chiefs are not born, chiefs are made by other chiefs, and I rmly believe the experience gained from Phase II prepares your mind to think, act and perform as a chief. You learn from each and every chief petty ocer regardless of pay grade or whether they are active, retired or reserve. CPO 365 is about our mo ment in history more than it is about my belief that this is the absolute right way to do it, Ste vens said. I believe its the right way to do it today, but I certainly cant speak for the future. e Chiefs Mess has come a long way since its inception in 1893. No matter what the pro cess is called today, U.S. Navy chiefs will continue to train their own and prepare them for the trials and tribulations of being and carrying the title chief petty ocer. I think CPO 365 has been hugely successful, mostly due to the many CPOs who have em braced the concept and moved it forward, said West. Of those groups that have embraced the concept you can see those mess es ourish. I say embrace the brilliance of the past to forge the future. We simply cant be look ing backward when it comes to training our Sailors. We have to determine what we can do and move forward at All Ahead Flank.Todays Chiefs embrace past, look to future

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, Oct, 12. Trident Lakes is presenting another great ad venture for you and your child to do together. Registration begins at 11 a.m., with lunch served at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of parent & child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and lots of fun. For the younger crowd a 9-hole course is set up with cost of only $20. is is open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its Friday, Oct. 25 at Trident Lakes Golf Course, with a 4 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for military and $35 for civilians. Play nine holes in daylight, then dinner and drinks, and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-the dark balls. Cost includes for each person golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call for reservations now at (912) 573-8475. Movie Under the Stars in October Fall is here and so are the Movies Under the Stars, at dusk, about 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 at Youth Center Ballfields. Theres free admis sion with the feature presenta tion Epic (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets andmovie snacks. Novembers movie on Nov. 9 will be Despicable Me 2. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 Canoeing on Crooked River Join Navy Adventures Unleashed when participants paddle down Crooked River to Harrietts Bluff and back on Saturday, Oct. 5. Leave Outdoor Adventure at 8 a.m. All inter ested patrons must pre-register. There is no cost to this event which is approximately 6.3 miles on Crooked River. Each canoe has space for a small cooler to hold snacks and drinks. The weekend of Oct. 18 NAU is offer ing a camping trip to Helen, Ga., with hiking and attend ing Oktoberfest on Oct. 19 and returning to Kings Bay on Oct. 20. The cost is $50 for active duty and $75 for guests. NFL Sunday Kick-Off is coming Morale, Welfare and Recreation is offering it in The Big EZ Sports Zone. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. with first game kickoff at 1 p.m. Snacks, door prizes and trivia games offered, with a $5 buffet starting at 6 p.m., which will include variety of bratwurst, knockwurst, ched darwurst with side options and fixings. Call The Big EZ for more details and game schedules at (912) 573-4564. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party. Stop by and check it out. Someone always is ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book with them before Sept. 30 and receive $50 o your room rental by mention ing Magnolias 50 o. Contact Magnolias at (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free Movies for the Kids Weekends for October are Gnomeo and Juliet Oct. 5 and 6, Monsters University Oct. 12 and 1, Princess and the Frog Oct. 19 and 20 at 1 p.m.. A special School Break Movies for October are Mon sters University Oct. 10, Tooth Fairy Oct. 11, Where the Wild Things Are Oct. 14. The Mov ie Under the Stars scheduled for Oct. 20 is Epic See Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page for the daily movie listing. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open view ing. For the latest informa tion, call (912) 573-4548. Officials needed The upcoming Youth Sports Soccer season runs September through October and if you are 14 years or older and interested in earn ing a little extra money, you are needed, certified or uncertified. A training date is to be announced. Basic knowledge of sports is required. For more information, contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202.Gnomeo and Juliet plays Just for kids Parent & Child golf Oct. 12 Liberty call Every contract awarded to a small business helps to keep our nations econ omy rolling. Each year NAVFAC es tablishes target goals for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Busi ness, Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business categories. Smith explained that the maximum practicable utilization of small busi ness concerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic benets. Work is expected to be completed by February 2015. NAVFAC manages the planning, design, con struction, contingency engineering, real estate, environmental, and public works support for Navy shore facilities around the world. NAVFAC provides the Navys forces with the op erating, expeditionary, support and training bas es they need. It is a global organiza tion with an annual vol ume of business in excess of $18 billion. Contract THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 7

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Navy veteran, Paul Pappy Lowe, visited the Los Angeles Class submarine USS Louisville (SSN 724), in Pearl Harbor, Ha waii, on Sept. 23. e former submariner had not been onboard his former platform in decades and was amazed by the changes. Lowe and his family, wife Herowina and son Marc, toured were given a guided tour of Lou isville by Electronics Technician 2nd Class Paul Menchaca. e tour marked the rst time Lowe had been aboard a subma rine for Lowe since 1967, when he served as an Electronics Mate aboard a Guppy class subma rine. Stepping on the warship, brought back the familiar feel ing of camaraderie, with fellow submariners, along with notice able dierences. ere is so much more to learn, to qualify on, Lowe remarked. We operated in the era of vacuum tubes and had two large, manually-operated wheels for the dive planes in the control room. We only had one deck level for all our work. e tight spaces and passageways also revisited memories, as did the galley and wardroom. He spoke of SOS, his shipmates code word for a diet stable, dried beef on toast. As a crew member on USS Quillbeck (SSN 424) during the Cuban missile crisis, Lowe re called the intensity of the situ ation and how the crew was in spired by President Kennedy, as they deployed to Guantanamo Bay. Lowe served on four dierent submarines in his Naval career and thanked the current shipmates for standing the watch while he continued in other elds supporting our country. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho My brother recently told me I am an ungrateful (expletive). So, for Do Something Nice Day Oct. 5 I plan to pop for his lunch, some prizes and just generally be as nice as pie. MC1 James Kimber just did something nice for me. Hes transferring to Japan and gave me an awesome TV set. What a nice guy he is! I went out to find out about niceties going on, whether people have done something nice, had something nice done for them or are going to do something nice Oct. 5.Leading Engineer Technician Chris Burke HMS Vanguard Port Talbot, Wales The Fraternal Order of the Eagles club here put on (chicken) wings and opened the bar and invit ed us to play pool and socialize. Sgt. Mark Pierson Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Coldwater, Mich. My mom watched the kids so my wife, Ashley, and I could go out for the first time in eight months. It was our anniversary. ET1 James Grimm Trident Training Facility Coco, Fla. My instructor at TTF let me off early to go to Orlando and pick up my car, which is being shipped from Hawaii. Erick Roberson Navy Exchange employee New Cumberland, Pa. Ill probably buy my mom a present for Do Something Nice Day, like flowers or something. Elaine Deslauries Family member Thompson, Conn. Im baby sitting my granddogs this week end. My daughter has a Weimaraner and a German Shorthair. Clayton Wade Retired Air Force Newark, N.J. I pick up co-workers who are too far away from the building for lunch and then take them back. Old salt takes tour of new submarine THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Despite its heavy com mitment to the war in Southeast Asia, the U.S. Navy was responsible for other security missions around the globe during the 1960s and 1970s. e Seventh Fleet kept watch over northeast Asia while the Sixth Fleet asserted a powerful presence in the Mediter ranean. In both theaters, hostile forces attacked U.S. war ships. In June 1967, Israeli planes and motor tor pedo boats unexpect edly attacked USS Liberty (AGTR02), an intelligence ship gathering informa tion on the Arab-Israeli war that had just broken out. After the rst attack, the Israelis struck again. In both instances hostile re killed and wounded many Liberty ocers and blue jackets. In the emergency, the Commanding Ocer, Cmdr. William L. Mc Gonagle, displayed ex traordinary courage and professionalism. Despite being seriously wounded and under re, he stayed at his post on the shot-up bridge to coordinate defense of the ship, the work of damage control parties, and medical treatment for the many wound ed Sailors. As a result of his steady and skillful leadership, Libertys crewmen eciently extinguished res that were ravaging the ship and prevented further ooding. He was instrumental in saving the ship. Not until a U.S. destroy er had reached the scene, 17 hours after the start of the attack, did the bleeding and injured ocer relinquish his post on the bridge so that his wounds could be treated. Even then, he insisted that the more grievously wounded of his shipmates get medi cal care rst. Cmdr. McGonagle received the Medal of Honor for his worthy leadership and valor under re. As demonstrated in the Liberty incident, Americas Cold War Sailors of ten risked life and limb to do their duty, even during periods of peace. is point was reemphasized the following February, when North Korean naval forces red on and seized USS Pueblo (AGER-2), another intelligence-collection vessel operating in international waters in the Sea of Japan. For the next year, the North Korean Communists imprisoned and tortured her crewmen, coercing some to sign confessions of guilt and to make political radio broadcasts. Other American Sailors died to help the Navy meet the serious threat posed by an increasingly capable and globe-ranging Soviet navy. As their fellow submariners in USS resher (SSN-593) which went down in 1,400 fathoms of water east of Boston in April 1963, the men of USS Scorpion (SSN-589) paid the ultimate price for their country when the ship imploded on the bot tom of the Atlantic in the spring of 1968. e loss of these submarines and their crews reenergized the Navys eorts to make Americas submarine eet the safest and most capable in the world. roughout the Cold War, the U.S. attack submarine eets that oper ated in all the worlds oceans, but especially in the Atlantic, became more and more eective at nding and trailing Soviet submarines, often without the knowledge of the latter. Both U.S. and Soviet sub mariners knew that if war broke out between their nations, the Americans had a decided advantage with their technologically superior warships and professional skills. e 1970s marked a wa tershed in the social his tory of the U.S. Navy. Under the spirited stew ardship of Admiral Zumwalt, who served as Chief of Naval Operations from 1970 to 1974, the Navy Department worked to ac complish the full integration into the naval service of African-Americans and women. In April 1971, Samuel L. Gravely became the rst black American to achieve promotion to ag rank and the following April, Alene B. Duerk became the rst female to do so when she Period of Peace marred by incidents The NavyIn the Cold WarSeventh in a series 2 killed in helo crash e Department of Defense announced the death of two Sailors who were supporting Opera tion Enduring Freedom. ey died Sept. 22, as a result of an MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter crash while operating in the central Red Sea. Both Sailors were as signed to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 6 at Naval Air Station North Is land, San Diego, Calif. Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, of Lompoc, Ca lif., and Chief Warrant Of cer Jonathan S. Gibson, 32, of Aurora, Ore., were killed. e location of the crash site is known, and an extensive area has been searched multiple times by various ships and air craft. e Knighthawk he licopter, attached to Helicopter Sea Com bat Squadron (HSC) 6, crashed in the central Red Sea Sept. 22, after conducting a landing on the deck of guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) at approximately 12:40 p.m. Bahrain time. e following assisted in the search and rescue: USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Shoup (DDG 86), USS Stockdale (DDG 106) and USNS Rainier (TAOE 7) as well as MH-60S Knighthawks from HSC6, MH-60R Sea Hawks from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 75 and several P-3s from Pa trol Squadron (VP) 47 and a U.S. Air Force HC-130. e crash was not due to any sort of hostile activity. e Navy is conducting an investigation to deter mine the cause of the in cident. For most people, the thunderous setting of a NASCAR track on race day would not be considered a tranquil environment. However, thats not the case with Tech. Sgt. Erin L.Tallman, non commis sioned ocer in charge of knowledge operations in the 14th Air Force Knowl edge Management oce at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It may seem weird, but being on the track with 35 cars going 200 miles per hour, while I cant hear anything, is actually calm ing and very relaxing to me, Tallman said. In addition to her full time Air Force career, Tall man has been serving as a member of the Las Vegas Motor Speedway pit re crew for more than seven years. Back in 2005 I went to a race as a volunteer to work security, said the Rhinelander, Wis., native. I hap pened to meet the re chief, and he said I had a good eye for safety. He invited me to come back in January for training. So thats what I did, and I started work ing my rst race in March 2006. Tallmans training in cluded hands-on lessons on how to maneuver re extinguishers over the tracks safety wall, as well as instructions on how to use the extinguisher if a driver is still in the car. Crew members are also trained on other aspects of their counterparts roles. ese duties include retrieving debris from the track, removing a driver from a wrecked car and proper procedures for call ing in tow trucks. Its very intense train ing, Tallman said. But then again, racing is very intense and so are the crashes and res. You have to be ready to react at a moments notice. Fast forward to 2013, and Tallman had 16 races under her belt with No. 17 com ing up during the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Race set for Sept. 28, in Airman at home on track

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Editors note: Vice Adm. Bill Moran assumed the duties as the 57th Chief of Naval Personnel Aug. 2. He is responsible for the overwhelming majority of policies and programs that directly aect Sailors and their families. Moran takes helm of a command that has an operating budget of $29 billion and a sta of more than 26,000 Sailors and civilians that perform a wide variety of missions, including managing Navy manpower, readiness, edu cation and training, and professional development of Sailors. Moran sat down with All Hands Magazine Aug. 8 to talk about his pri orities. Question: What are your expectations? What do you hope to be able to do during your tenure as Chief of Naval Personnel? Answer: Well, Ive thought about it a lot com ing into the job. Principally, having come from the resource sponsorship over in director of air warfare and watching the chal lenges that we are going to be faced with in the Department of Defense and Department of the Navy going forward, the scal challenges ahead of us are going to be pretty dicult to deal with. So, any time youve got that kind of scal pressure on an organization, theres likely to be a lot of change, and theres likely to be a lot of pressure to reduce force structure, potentially reduce the number of folks we have in the Navy, and that creates a sense of uncertainty throughout the eet. So my goal, hopefully at the end of my tenure here, is that weve been able to manage that in such a way that there is less uncer tainty for Sailors and their families and the work force. And were able to nd the right balance for the eet so that they con tinue to operate forward, as Adm. Greenert [Chief of Naval Operations] talks about, we continue to put warghters on the front lines, and that we are ready to go operate in any environment when called upon. And I think the Navy, in this environ ment, is going to be called upon more and more be cause coming out of Af ghanistan and coming out of Iraq, theres a great sense that someone still has to be forward, keep ing watch, being out there ready to protect the na tions interests, and I think the Navys going to be a principal force in that. You know, its a longwinded answer to basically saying a lot of change is coming, potentially, a lot of change, a lot of pressure and a lot of uncertainty. So if I can help reduce that uncertainty, and give some stability and balance to the force, I think well have a successful time here. Q: You mentioned a lot about uncertainty. What are some of the things that you can do in your posi tion to quell some of that uncertainty in the eet and give a little reassur ance to the eet? A: Its going to take me a little bit of time and go ing out and talking to the eet rst. I really have to understand whats on their minds, what are they reading, what do they be lieve is the future from their perspective? I have my own perspective as a resource sponsor, but Ive been locked up in the Pen tagon for three years, and I havent had the opportu nity to get out and listen to the Sailors ... and folks that are operating forward. So I look forward to doing that. And once I get that sense from them, I think Ill be able to get back here and talk to the N1 and the per sonnel workforce that is trying to set the right policies, set the right tone, so that they have condence in our decision making about the future. So its too early for me to say, I have the following things Im going to do to create certainty. I need to get out to the eet and really un derstand where they feel theres an uncertainty in the future. Q: Can you tell me about your three key words? A: I think they are words that resonate with every body. Trust is one. I think if youre in the detailing business, or in the person nel business, often times, you dont feel like your constituents, the eet, trusts you because there are many policies that come out and they seem counterintuitive, and sometimes they counter each other, and so people arent real sure where youre trying to go. I think that if were going to be trusted by the eet and we have to be weve got to get out and weve got to talk to them. Weve got to understand what their concerns are, and weve got to show them through our actions and our poli cies, that we understand what is important to them, and whats important to the CNO, the Secretary, and the institution. And as long as we are doing that well, openly, and trans parently, I think well earn their trust over time. Q: And what about bal ance? A: Balance is a lot of what youre seeing today when were talking about t ll. ere is a lot of dis cussion in the eet about, Do we have the right t for the type of Sailor with the right NEC, and the right experience levels at dierent places ... oper ating in the eet? And then theres the ll I just need a body to be able to do certain types of work. Admiral Gortney [Com mander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command] and his team are really driving us to try to satisfy the demand signal for the right Sailor at the right place at the right time, and theres a balance to that because you can take all the Sail ors you have at shore and put them to sea, and ll out the gaps that currently exist at sea, but then you leave big holes, potential ly, in the shore establish ments that train the Sail ors that are going to sea. Weve got to balance the sea and the shore piece correctly. Weve got to bal ance the right training to eectively get the Sailor we want in a particular billet that is trained to the highest degree possible, given the time constraints, and making sure the ships and aircraft squadrons and submarines deploy with the right people. Q: So, it takes a combi nation of trust and bal ance to reach the stability were looking for? A: Yes, stability takes a lot of meaning, but youre right. It is a combination. If we nd the right balance and we achieve the trust, then there is a stabiliz ing inuence in the lives of Sailors and their fami lies because they are not guessing whats coming next. In this environment, where a lot of change could occur, that stability is going to come in the form of making sure that we dont change policies just for changes sake. at we nd the right policies that are going to give that balance and trust back to the Sailors in a way that gives them ... a greater Las Vegas, Nev. As part of the tracks pit re crew, re safety is the chief concern for Tallman and her teammates. During races the crew is responsible for maintain ing the re extinguishers next to the wall on pit road. When the cars come in for pit stops, they stand ready to act if a re breaks out from sparks that may ignite overow gasoline during refueling. ere are also teams that work in the tracks garage area to manage fuel stations that need assistance. In addition to re safety, trac control is also another area where crew members operate. After a promotion, Tallman now spends most her time on race day working in this ca pacity. I manage all the cars that come on and o the track, she said. I stand at the entrance/exit of pit road, and if there is an ac cident the cars will come through me for direction on which way they need to go. Tallman said one of her more memorable experiences working with the crew happened just after the LVMS track had been redone with new higher banks. It was the rst truck race and we were all excited about it, she said. e trucks had gone out on the track, and I had just been moved up to trac control. I was standing by the wall waiting for them to come down pit road when two trucks struck the inner wall and came sliding right at me. I had to jump back over the wall or I would have been hit. No one expected the trucks to actually come ying down pit road, but they did and they were sideways. ere are more than 100 members that come from Utah, Texas, California and Oregon on Tallmans team. I would have never thought I would be work ing on a NASCAR track so close to the action, Tall man said. Its an amazing feeling, and a once in a life time dream. However, there may be one thing that could pos sibly make the experience even better. If they would just let me drive, she said.Track A conversation with Vice Adm. Bill Moran THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 11

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A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, Oct. 7, 21 and 28. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Oct. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 8 to 11 a.m., Oct. 23. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. This three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through the practical and cre ative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful docu ment for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and tran scripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Oct. 22 and 29 and Nov. 5. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 7. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Oct. 15. For more information, call 573-4513. This class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Oct. 8. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513. A New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 8, 15, 22 and 29. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. FFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human re sources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of ac tive duty personnel. All classes listed here are held at the Fleet and Family Support Center, un less otherwise noted. Hours are 8 a.m.to 4:30 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., ursdays. This course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 3 and 4. For more information and to register call 573-4513. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 21 to 25. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 7 to 11. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more infor mation, call 573-4513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Oct. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Oct. 9. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Oct. 28. Registration required by calling 573-4513. A five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oct. 28 to Nov. 1. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 16 and 17. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Survivors support group starting Audra is a group for ac tive duty females who have been sexually as saulted as adults. is group will oer ac tive duty female survivors of sexual assault as an adult a safe, open atmo sphere for discussion and activities to facilitate the healing process. Audra means nobility and strength in French. For more information, contact Jennice Jent at (912) 573-4479 or leslie. jent.ctr@navy.mil Silence hides violenceOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. You may see purple ribbons around the base during this month. ese ribbons are placed to recognize those who have been vic tims of domestic violence and to raise aware ness about this issue. Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior, used against a partner in an intimate relationship. And not just physical abuse; emotional and sexual abuse also are domestic violence. People who abuse their partners in these ways do so to try to gain, maintain or regain power and control in the relationship. Domestic violence aects people of every race, age, sexual orientation, religion, educational and economic backgrounds. Unfortunately, it is not a rare issue; one-in-four women will be aected by domestic violence in their lifetime. Men are also victims of domestic violence, and they tend to underreport due to the social stigma around men being abused. Most of us know someone who has been the victim and/or perpetrator of domestic abuse. Domestic violence aects not only the victim of the abuse, but also any children in the home. Witnessing violence be tween ones parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of engaging in violent behavior as an adult. Boys who witness do mestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their own partners and children when they become adults. Also, more than 50 percent of people who commit domestic violence also abuse children in the household. If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic vio lence, there is help out there. e Fleet and Family Support Center has counselors and a Domestic Abuse Victim Advocate who can provide you with resources and support. e National Domestic Violence Hotline is a safe place to ask questions and get help. e hotline number is (800) 799-7233. If you need help, ask. If you know someone who needs help, call the FFSC at 573-4222 or the hotline for advice on how to help. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 13 took charge of the Navy Nurse Corps. Zumwalt, however, was dissatised with the status of blacks and women in the Navy. He initiated measures to increase their recruitment and retention, better their chances for promotion, and eliminate everyday discriminations. To shake up the person nel bureaucracy and eliminate needless regulations for all Sailors, Zumwalt issued a series of Navywide directives, labeled Z Grams. He also took steps to improve communication between ocers and enlisted personnel. Not all of Zumwalts ac tions succeeded, and his unconventional approach angered many traditionalists, but the Navy was long overdue for changes that the American people ex pected to see in the armed forces. Zumwalts successors continued his work, such that the rst women en tered the U.S. Naval Acad emy in July 1976. Two years later other Navy women began serving on board naval vessels other than the traditional hos pital ships and transports. One unique Navy woman was Rear Adm. Grace Murray Hopper, who dedicated her life to improv ing the Navys information technologies and systems. Early in her career, she helped develop the Navys rst computers, including the Mark I, II, III, and UNIVAC systems. Perhaps her greatest achievement was to pioneer the devel opment of COBOL, a computer language that nonmathematicians could understand and employ. When Hopper retired from the service in 1966, the Navy realized it could not lose her unique skills and brought her back on active duty for an inde nite time. During this pe riod, she served as Direc tor, Navy Programming Languages Group in the Oce of the Chief of Naval Operations. Grace Hopper served in the Navy for two more decades. When she nally retired, Rear Adm. Hopper was awarded the National Medal of Technology and many other distinctions. But, she con sidered her highest award to have been the privilege and honor of serving very proudly in the United States Navy. e Middle East re mained a troubled region during the 1970s. In the Arab-Israeli Yom Kippur War of October 1973, the Sixth Fleet protected U.S. transport planes that ew emergency supplies of weapons and ammunition from the United States to the Israelis, who were ghting desperately to survive the Arab onslaught. Soon, however, the Is raelis launched devastat ing counterattacks that threatened to overwhelm the Egyptian army. e Soviet Union moved strong naval forces into the Eastern Mediterra nean and prepared to y paratroopers into Egypt to prevent the Israeli military from completely crushing the Egyptians. e Nixon administra tion put U.S. forces on alert worldwide and or dered the reinforced Sixth Fleet into waters o Egypt to signal the opposition of the United States to the proposed Soviet measures. At the same time, Wash ington helped arrange a cease-re between the belligerents and redou bled eorts to bring last ing peace to the region. In this vein, in 1974 the Navy deployed mine counter measures forces, which had recently opened the mined waters o North Vietnam to merchant traf c, into the Eastern Mediterranean. Between April and December, Task Force 65 cleared mines from the Suez Canal and assisted in the removal of numerous ships sunk there during the war. Guided missile cruiser USS Little Rock (CLG-4) was among the rst ships to transit the newly opened canal. By the mid-1970s, a muscle-exing Soviet Union began to cause serious concern in Washington. e USSR spent enormous resources on its war-making establishment, hoping to take advantage of Americas postVietnam retrenchment. e Soviets deployed thousands of mobile, in tercontinental ballistic missiles and other nucle ar-armed weapons, built up large ground and air forces in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and aid ed Communist guerrilla movements in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Of greatest concern to the U.S. Navy, Soviet na val forces increased their presence around the world, challenging Americas overseas interests and control of the sea. A 1975 Soviet naval ex ercise, Okean 75, involved 220 ships and new, longrange bombers in mock strikes against the conti nental United States. Soviet warships steamed brazenly in all the worlds oceans, and even in the Gulf of Mexico. As a sym bol of the changing naval balance of power, Soviet surface combatants and patrol planes began oper ating from the Americanbuilt base at Cam Ranh Bay in Vietnam. Just be fore he retired as Chief of Naval Operations in June 1978, Adm. James L. Hol loway III concluded that the U.S. Navy then had only a slim margin of su periority over the Soviet navy. Next: e 1980s and Ronald Reagan Cold War Naval Undersea Warfare Center held a change of command ceremony Sept. 26 at NUWC headquarters in Newport, R.I. Rear Adm. David M. Duryea relieved Rear Adm. omas G. Wears as com mander. Duryea comes to Newport after serv ing as deputy commander for undersea warfare at Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, D.C. Duryea, a native of Orchard Park, N.Y., holds a bachelor of science degree from the University of Rochester and a mas ters degree from George Washington University. He earned his commission from the Na val Reserve Ocer Training Corps pro gram at Rochester. Duryea has served aboard a variety of submarines and com manded the gold crew of the nuclear pow ered ballistic missile submarine USS Flori da (SSBN 728). He also served as commanding ocer of the combined crews of Florida when the ship went through a refueling over haul and conversion to a guided missile platform (SSGN). His operational shore assignments have included duty on the sta of the U.S. Strategic Command and the sta of Com mander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. Since entering the Navys Acquisition Corps, Duryea has served in a range of program management assignments, including major program management responsibility for submarine imaging and electronic war fare systems and for the special opera tions forces undersea mobility program. Following the change of command, Wears will retire from the Navy after 30 years of service. NUWC is a shore command of the U.S. Navy within NAVSEA, which engineers, builds and supports Americas eet of ships and combat systems. NUWCs two divisions in Newport and Keyport work together to fulll NUWCs mission to operate the Navys full-spec trum research, development, test and evaluation, engineering, and eet sup port center for submarines, autonomous underwater systems, and oensive and defensive weapon systems associated with undersea warfare and related areas of homeland security and national de fense.Undersea War Center changes command CGs Papp visits Korea I had the distinct honor this past week to represent the U.S. Coast Guard dur ing an ocial visit to the Republic of Korea, hosted by Korea Coast Guard Commissioner General Kim Suk Kyoon. is was my third stop in a series of ocial visits to strengthen ties with part ner maritime governance organizations and learn more about the dynamic Asia-Pacic Region. Like the U.S. Coast Guard, the Korea Coast Guard protects people on the sea, protects the na tion against threats deliv ered by sea and protects the sea itself. We share common missions and challenges, so through sustained partnership we are able to exchange knowledge and coordi nate planning and opera tions to ensure the safety, security and prosperity of our respective nations. Protecting people on the sea has always been a primary focus for the KCG, which is celebrating their 60th anniversary this year. Kims ongoing campaign to reduce maritime accidents by 30 percent underscores the KCGs commitment to maritime safety, and Kim and I dis cussed the importance of active prevention eorts and capable search and rescue response. National security relies upon secure borders and the South Korean peninsula, surrounded by the sea, demands a sustained and capable KCG oshore presence to protect their In discussions in Washington about the sequester and defense strategy and resources, a basic question is often asked: With the war in Iraq over and the war in Afghanistan winding down, why doesnt the U.S. military simply reset to its preSept. 11, 2001, capabilities? e underlying assumption behind this question is that we, as a nation, had funding mostly right then. Im not sure I agree. In any event, what sense would it make to plan for future challenges and requirements by arbitrarily looking back to how things were done more than 12 years ago? Consider what had happened to the Marine Corps by 2001. From 1990 to 2001, defense and security spending was cut by $100 billion on average each year. e focus on technology, and calls for cuts in manpower and procurement, as sumed the U.S. would not need to com mit ground troops to a major conict for the foreseeable future. During that decade, the Defense De partment reduced total active-duty strength by 32 percent. In 2001, the Corps totaled roughly 172,000 Marines, down from 197,000 in the 1990 Gulf War. Even at that time, manning levels consistently fell below target and equipment readiness suered. At one point in 2000, one-third of the Marine aviation eet was grounded due to maintenance issues. While assigned missions were expanding and crises were multiplying for instance, in relation to developments in Iraq and terrorist threats in the wider Middle East Ma rine capabilities were stretched thin. en came 9/11. Over the past 12 years, ghting in some of the toughest corners of Afghanistan and Iraq, the Marine Corps has learned a lot about the force it went to war with, what worked and what did not. In many cases, our prewar focus on the ree Block War, which assumed that a modern Marine in the eld might be called upon to ght, conduct peacekeeping op erations and deliver humanitarian aid, was spot on (although we didnt have the money and facilities to train all Marines to that very high standard). Over time, though, we found that as the conicts evolved, we needed some adjustments, and needed them quickly. For instance, Marines found them selves short of critical capabilities in intelligence collection and analysis, communication and mobility on land, sea and in the air. Marines didnt have enough light attack and utility aviation helicopters, for example. ey also didnt have all the training teams needed to advise and assist other countries in enhancing their own security. Furthermore, Marine logistics struc ture was not well-designed for our new, more spread-out style of ghting, which required supplying many small, autono mous units distributed across a large area. Unforeseen long-term conict ashore meant that the Corps had to add not only personnel, but more skills and equipment. e new challenges of the 21st century also meant rooting out technologically savvy enemies who blended into the ur ban terrain and populace that sheltered them. Marines played their part in this eort Marines look to future

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Active duty, Reserve, and retired service mem bers along with military family members and civil ians attended a ceremony to pay tribute to POW/ MIA Recognition Day at the Naval Undersea War fare Museum, Sept. 20. e 5th annual ceremo nys emerging theme was Keeping the Promise. e theme honors Americas promise to con tinue the search for POW/ MIA service members until they are found and brought home. POW/MIA recognition day is a day of remembrance, said Capt. Dave Kohnke, Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport commander. is is a day we must not ignore, just as we must not ignore our uni formed personnel and those who never made it home. Kohnke continued on ward and illustrated how many of our service members are still POW/MIA by stating that more than 80,000 men and women are still out there. He also discussed the measures that Joint Pris oner of War/Missing In Action Accounting Com mand is taking to nd and bring home our heroes. JPACs everyday opera tions involve researching case les, investigating leads, excavating sites and identifying Americans who were killed in action and never made it home. e United States pays homage to National POW/ MIA Recognition Day across the nation on the third Friday of September every year. e observance is one of six days throughout the year that Congress has mandated the ying of the National League of Families POW/MIA ag. e ve others are Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day. Guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) provided humanitarian assis tance to an adrift shing dhow while op erating in the Arabian Gulf, Sept. 24. Gettysburg stopped to render assis tance after being signaled by the dhows crew shortly before 11:30 a.m. According to the crew, which consisted of one Omani and four Bangladeshi men, they had been at sea for ve days and had suered an engine failure on the third day, leaving the vessel powerless and drifting for two days. e crew were found in good health and had food and water on hand. Fire Controlman 2nd Class Yasser Rady, a close-in weapons systems (CIWS) technician assigned to Gettysburg, pro vided translation that facilitated mutual communication and allowed Gettysburg to provide the crew with additional food, water, and safety ares. We were able to quickly and eective ly provide some assistance for the crew of the shing vessel while they awaited help from local authorities, Lt. Cmdr. Nathan Scherry, Gettysburgs executive ocer, said. Our assistance allowed us to enhance cooperation, build trust, and mutual respect to our fellow mariners in the region. Local authorities were contacted by U.S. 5th Fleet to provide further assis tance. Guided-missile destroyer USS e Sullivans (DDG 68) was operating nearby and oered help to ensure the dhows security and welfare until that aid arrived. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, command er, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, said the assistance provided by Gettys burg was a good example of how profes sional mariners help each other in time of need. is is what we do as professional mariners, Sweeney said. When someone at sea needs help, we help them. e assistance provided by Gettysburg and her crew will help ensure those sher men are safe until the local authorities arrive. Gettysburg is deployed with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group support ing maritime security operations and theater security cooperation eorts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. sense of certainty. And I think inherent in that is the stability that comes from smart policies and smart manning in the eet.Q: What are the sorts of things, at this stage, do you imagine are going to keep you up at night? A: You know, nothing re ally stresses me out on the job. It is a big job, youre right. I am just beginning to understand the breadth and depth involved in the N1 organization. Were obviously split between Washington, D.C., and another major hub, Milling ton, [Tennessee], where the primary workforce that interfaces with the eet exists. So thats a big piece. e time-distance issue for the organization is impor tant. And then, of course, the rest of our domain in cludes Great Lakes and all the recruiting districts around the country, and a variety of other smaller or ganizations. So theres a lot going on that, frankly, after one week, Im just begin ning to understand. So its going to take a little time. I think what keeps me up at night is thinking about how were going to manage the force if we are asked to get smaller, and making sure that man ning does not become the rst thing we give up in this give-and-take over the amount of money that we are going to have to ac count for in the budget. So, manning is a fundable asset, in the sense that its a lot easier to carve out, or harvest cash to pay bills with manpower than it is [with] ships and air planes and submarines, because of all the intrica cies in building platforms. My job is to protect that manning, so we dont in advertently cut the man ning to the point where the force of the eet is not well-served, and we have an issue with the appropriate level of manning at sea. at is probably the biggest challenge just trying to ensure that we get the right manning for whatever size force comes in the future. Q: What can Sailors do at their level do to help you support them? A: My intent is to get out a lot and talk to the eet and to have a conversa tion with Sailors. at is the most important thing. eir direct feedback to me is really important as I bring that information back to my organization here in the N1 CNP. I ob viously appreciate and observe the chain of com mand, but being out and about and listening and watching Sailors oper ate in the eet and seeing what their concerns are will only work if they are willing to have a conversa tion and ask me questions and give me feedback on what they think is working, and what they think is not working. Q: What is your message to the Sailors in the eet? A: Youve got a great organization up here that understands the interest of Sailors, families, civil ians, and retirees that we are trying very hard to stay on top of a changing environment and be re sponsive enough to make sure that were anticipat ing the issues that are going to face us in a very tough, challenging scal environment in the future. We have your best interest at heart and were going to work hard for Sailors and families to make sure that they understand whatever changes are being made, they understand the rea soning and the rationale behind them, but that also were here ghting for them every single day.Moran Navy rescues shermenby adding a Marine com ponent to the U.S. Special Operations Command. is and other expanded de mands led Congress in 2007 to authorize a Corps expan sion to 202,000 personnel. Yet demands for these hybrid war capabilities requiring highly adapt able Marines, able to shift rapidly between, say, a close-quarters reght and a humanitarian mis sion has not removed the need for more tradi tional capabilities. e suggestion that in an era of sequestration Marines simply go back to sea ignores the fact that Marines never left the sea. While most of our deployed force fought ashore, where the demand was, Marines continued to deploy Marine Expedi tionary Units on amphibious ships. Despite the withdrawal from Iraq and the con tinuing drawdown in Af ghanistan, the relatively new threat of cyber terror, and the traditional areas of embassy security and crisis response require uniquely skilled service men and women. Marines now provide a contribution to U.S. Cyber Command. ey also provide increased support for embassy security, and currently provide a Spe cial Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force in or der to increase U.S. crisis response capabilities in North Africa. While ghting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Corps, along with the Navy, continued to answer calls to respond to natural disasters and skirmishes in the rest of the world. Marines also provided training and assistance that underpinned Ameri cas commitment to build partnerships and stability within the broader secu rity environment. In our post-9/11 world, more of our people must remain ready to deploy on short notice, which demands increased readiness levels compared with the force of 2001. ese and many other commitments mean that even if you eliminate the requirements of Iraq and Afghanistan, commit ments and requirements in other areas have vastly expanded since 2001. To day, the Marine Corps has planned for signicant budget and personnel reductions, even before U.S. forces are withdrawn from Afghanistan. Yet this doesnt mean the Marines will ignore the lessons learned from the past de cade of combat operations. e world is a dier ent place than it was on Sept. 10, 2001 its more dangerous. We continue to witness violent extrem ism, regional competition and increased sophistica tion and lethality among nonstate actors at unprec edented levels. As former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pointed out, since we can not predict where and when we will respond to crises, we have to plan for multiple scenarios. e readiness and re sponsiveness of Marine Corps forces should not be anchored to a pre-2001 model of the Corps, be cause the world on which it was based no longer exists. waters. Regionally, the KCG is focused on building net works with other coast guards to better share information on transiting vessels and protect mari time commerce. e KCG is a founding member of the North Pacic Coast Guard Forum, which in cludes the coast guards of Russia, Japan, Canada, China and the U.S., and fosters multi-lateral cooperation to improve mari time governance in the region. e KCG is increasing its leadership in the Pacic, in cluding enforcement of in ternational conventions to regulate illegal, unregulat ed and unreported shing. is year, the highlycapable KCG Patrol Ship 3012 conducted a north ern Pacic Ocean patrol to combat illegal high seas drft net shing. e KCG was the only maritime governance presence in the northern Pacic dur ing that period. e KCG is striving to improve prociency, es tablishing a new academy to provide core and ad vanced training in a variety of areas. As I discussed with Kim, the U.S. Coast Guard is ready to assist in sharing our practices and training information and learning from their experiences as well. I was very impressed with the professionalism and pride of the KCG. ey are experienced opera tors, which I saw rsthand during a harbor patrol of Incheon aboard a KCG hovercraft and tour of KCG Patrol Ship 3008. Many thanks to Com missioner General Kim for his hospitality and happy 60th anniversary to the Korea Coast Guard. Redskins, DOD team up NFL Play 60 and the Washington Redskins vis ited Joint Base Andrews Sept. 24, with the Salute to Play 60 Military Challenge, teaching more than 230 military kids from the National Capital Region the importance of a healthy lifestyle. NFL Play 60 is the National Football Leagues campaign to encourage kids to be active for 60 minutes a day in order to help reverse the trend of childhood obesity. Redskins players Rob ert Grin III, Alfred Mor ris, Joshua Morgan, Adam Gettis, Niles Paul, Josh Wilson, Darrel Young and many others attended the event and helped the kids get active. During the opening cer emonies, Robert Grin III, the Redskins quarter back, spoke to the crowd about his life experiences. My mom and dad were both in the military, so I was a military brat grow ing up, Grin said. I was once sitting where you guys are, going to camps and events, even though Play 60 wasnt around. We are proud to be out here and we are going to get that win against Oakland. Stations were set up for the event at the turf eld on JBA, and children were as signed to celebrity train ers. For 60 minutes, train ers put the kids through drills and exercises. I play football and baseball so that keeps me active, and I eat well, said Andrew Marcos, 13, from Farquhar Middle School. My dad works on base and when he told me all the Redskins players were going to be here I said I am going to that.. For motivation, kids can track their daily activity for four weeks. Children with the highest involvement will be honored for their participation dur ing a 2013 Redskins home game. Grins mom, Jackie, also attended the event and said that it meant a lot for her to give back to military families. It means a lot because it lets the other military kids know that they have the same opportunities that my son was af forded, Mrs. Grin said. I would tell kids here to stay focused and utilize all the resources that are af forded to them as military kids, and to understand that the sky is the limit. It happened for my son and it could happen for them. Wide receiver Josh Mor gan was born and raised in Was said he wants to give back to the community all he can. What good would it do for me to get out of my situation and now not give anything back to the com munity? he said. ats why I make it my business to always be out here with the kids. ey make you really appreciate the little things in life. POW/MIAs rememberedMarines Papp

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, October 3, 2013