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The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-27-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00307

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00307


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Donations made to Dolphin Scholarship, Navy-Marine Relief In celebration of the 35th An niversary of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the cities of Camden County St. Marys, Woodbine and Kingsland along with the St. Marys Con vention & Visitors Bureau, the Camden County Board of Com missioners, the Camden County PSA and the State of Georgia hosted a community activity tent at the Party in the Park May 22 that attracted more than 1,200 guests. e celebration event was hosted by Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation and allowed the op portunity for the community to show support and pride in NSB Kings Bay. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has always been a great community partner to each of our cities and is an inte gral part of the successful eco nomic viability and growth of Camden County, said Angela Wigger, CMP-director of tour ism, St. Marys Convention & Visitors Bureau. It was a special day for our military and their families, and we were proud to be a play a part in the day. e community tent oered sno-cones, popcorn, a build-acupcake station, photo opportu nities with various cut outs, city mascots and a dunk tank. Wigger recognized dignitar ies who supported the Dunk-ADignitary station Woodbine Mayor Steve Parrott, Camden County Sheri Jim Proctor, St. Marys Councilman Keith Post and Submarine Squadron 20 Commodore Capt. Chris Har kins. All the dignitaries were great sports when it came to being dunked hundreds of times each throughout the day, she said. Tickets to various stations were sold for a nominal fee to at tendees and the $900 in activity proceeds were split evenly and donated to the Dolphin Scholar ship Foundation and the NavyMarine Corp Relief Society. e money was presented June 12 to Jennifer Rorstrom, president of the Submarine Of cers Spouses Association for DSF and to Brandi Frazier, direc tor of NMRCS Kings Bay. e DSF sponsors 127 stu dents who each receive an an nual scholarship. e DSF has awarded more than $8 million to more than 1,000 students. e NMRS is a private, nonprot charitable organization sponsored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 250 oces ashore and aoat to provide nancial, educational and other assistance to eligible military and family members when in need. Additional activity tent spon sorship was provided by Bre nau University, Comfort SuitesKingsland, Dollar General Woodbine, Woodbine IGA and Councilman Keith Post. 4th of July The Periscope is off next week, but back July 11. Have a safe, happy 4th! Family Day Marine Security Force bonds with fun Page 4 Diversity Kings Bay has its 3rd Culture & Diversity Fair Page 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com County, communities help celebrate Kings Bay Week-long seminars promote awareness of assault, suicideCommander, Submarine Group Ten held a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response and Suicide Awareness Prevention training June 19 at the Trident Training Facility Auditorium. e training was directed at Kings Bay commanding ocers, executive ocers and chiefs of the boat in addition to civilian employees in senior positions around the base and is part of a Navy-wide eort mandating all military service members and Department of Defense employees completing command-SAPR training before July 1. With the Navys ongoing ef forts to increase sexual assault awareness, Kings Bay Sailors are doing their part to help erase it from Navy culture. Accord ing to the Navys Fis cal Year 2012 Annual Report to the DOD, there were 425 unrestricted re ports and 204 restricted reports of sexual assault made by fe male victims, 55 unrestricted reports and 37 restricted reports were made by male victims. If broken down, 89 percent of vic tims were female and 11 percent were male. Tofalo quoted e Charge of Command, a CNO memorandum for all pro spec tive command ing of ficers em pha sizing the principles of authority, re sponsibility and accountability, which, according to the memo randum, are the heart and soul of Command. Home in Georgia Branch clinic honoredKings Bay awarded Medical Blue H Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay as one of six Naval Hospital Jacksonville facilities, Navy Operational Support Center Jacksonville and Navy Operational Health Support Unit Detachment G earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. e Blue H award symbolizes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and ev ery one of our patients, our na tions heroes, and their families, stated Capt. Gayle Shaer, Na val Hospital Jacksonville commanding ocer. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. NOSC Jacksonville and NH OHSU Detachment G each re ceived the Gold Star level. Kings Bay focus on sexual assault prevention Working together, we can, we must, eliminate this from our ranks. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group 10

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Red Cross seeking volunteerse American Red Cross has reopened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Tennessee Ave. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, dia monds and the most popular brands of watch es that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits includ ing 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! Commander, Navy Installations Command announced June 19 a plan to conduct a Reduction in Force action in scal year 2013 that will be completed in 2014. Over the course of the next seven months, CNIC will eliminate 745 ci vilian positions throughout its shore enterprise in seven Navy Regions across 20 states, the District of Co lumbia, the Island of Guam, and in the countries of Italy, Greece and Cuba. e actual total number of people directly impacted by this RIF ac tion will be determined once other workforce shaping measures such as Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments, Voluntary Early Retire ment Authority and placement into current vacancies have been com pleted. CNIC, along with other Navy com mands, has experienced reduced budgets and must implement costsaving measures across the entire force. is action is not taken lightly, but is part of a conscious, risk-based approach to future shore capabili ties that are aligned with the Navy Mission, said Vice. Adm. William French, CNIC. I am committed to ensuring that we do all we can to as sist those people directly impacted by this action by providing them ac cess to all tools available under Re duction in Force rules and assisting them with nding future employ ment. Career transition services for the employees aected by the RIF ac tion will vary depending on their needs, but services available will in clude skills assessment, resume and cover letter preparation, networking and interviewing techniques, coun seling, job search assistance, and retraining, if necessary. Reducing these positions may have marginal impacts on the ser vices CNIC has provided in the past. However, it will not have any direct impacts to CNICs capability to sup port the mission of providing service to the eet, ghter and family.Installations plan reduction in force Navy Installations Planning ahead can be one of the biggest stress relievers when it comes to a permanent change of station move, Fleet and Family Ser vice Center ocials said June 20. For a lot of people [who move], the pre-departure can be both positive and negative, said Diane Brown, Work and Family Life spe cialist, Fleet and Family Support Center. Youre leaving what youre familiar with, which can be very uncomfortable. But going on to something new can be exciting too, especially if its a location that you may have never been to. So it really depends on the person, on how up you are for change and how exible you are. After a Sailor receives their orders, the rst thing they should do is visit their local FFSC and meet with a Relocation Assistance Program spe cialist, then attend a Smooth Move class or Moving Overseas workshop to learn the basics about a PCS move and how to start the process. Applications like Plan my Move on the Military OneSource Web site at www.militaryonesource.com will organize a Sailors to do list prior to their move. It provides a three-month calen dar of steps a Sailor needs to take to ensure a smooth move for them selves and their family. Brown says sponsors also can help reduce a Sailors stress by nd ing answers ahead of time to any questions they have about their new location. Sailors who have not been as signed a sponsor can request one on the Military OneSource website with the Electronic Sponsorship Applica tion and Training tool. Service members should ask their sponsor a lot of questions, Brown said. I think good questions that the incoming service member can ask the sponsor is your best bet to relieving stress. Other helpful Web sites include: Housing Early Application Tool at www.dko.mil/heat/apply Housing Service Center locator at www.cnic.navy.mil/ HousingQuickReference Schedule your PCS move at www.smartwebmove.navsup.navy. mil Families denitely want to take a team approach to their PCS move, whether you divvy up whose going to do what each day, or what chores each person is responsible for prior to the move. e more informa tion you share with your family, the smoother your move will be, Brown said. Dont forget that moving can be especially stressful on children, said Brown. From a kids perspective, youre leaving your house, your friends, youre going to a new school...thats hard, thats really hard, Brown said. If you are struggling and are tense and stressed out, your children will notice that. e more positive you are, the more positive theyre going to be. Brown suggests getting kids involved in learning about the new location and the new installation by doing research. Maybe even let them help pack and let them decide what items they may have outgrown and dont want to bring with. Preparation, communication and family involvement are key to a less stressful PCS move says Brown. Be aware that you and your spouse may handle things dier ently... and recognize dierences in coping strategies, Brown said. Some people look at moving as a really fun experience and as some thing positive. Some people who may have made really good friends or are leaving family may dread moving. Listen to each other. Stay positive.Ways to stress less, when you PCS Personnel Command e Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training and Center for Information Dominance are the latest commands to con tinue receiving recommended college credits for their training. e American Council on Education completed its review June 20. e courses reviewed were either new or had undergone revi sions since the last ACE review. We promise our Sailors a life time of career opportunities, said Roland Perez, Naval Educa tion and Training Commands educational program and management analyst. Sailors have the chance to submit credits they receive from their training towards most colleges and uni versities. Capt. Katherine Erb, CNATT commanding ocer, spoke to civilian academic professionals from ACE before their review. I think the ACE training eval uations are a fabulous idea. e courses we instruct provide our Sailors and Marines with skills for their military careers; the fact that this training also provides an opportunity to gain civilian college credit is of even more benet to our personnel, Erb said. is is a great experience for the instructors, as well. It is motivational to teach a military course that you know is equiva lent to a college course. We are very appreciative for what ACE continues to do for our military. ACE supports the educational goals of the Navys Sailors throughout all learning centers within NETC. By recommending academic credits for training course work and/or occupational experience, ACE provides an addition al benet to military. We have a great working re lationship with ACE. e Navy is leading the way for other mili tary branches in regard to in struction, training courses and number of academic credits rec ommended by ACE, Perez said. e life span of credit rec ommendation is 10 years, after which the particular training course or occupation, if still ac tive, must be re-evaluated. Training courses may be rec ommended for academic cred its on four levels vocational-certificate associate/lower division baccalaureate degree upper division baccalaureate and graduate degree e content of the training courses or service occupations value aects the number of aca demic credits that may be rec ommended by ACE. Sailors should refer to their Sailor/Marine ACE Registry Transcript, a complete educa tional and training history of a member while serving in the Navy, when planning for their education or career, Perez said. ACE credit recommendations are published online in the ACE Guide. e Navy College Oce counselors use this guide as a standard reference for both ac tive duty personnel and veter ans. e results of the ACE review will be announced in the next few months.Training counts for college credits Education & Training At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. e Blue H award recognizes excellence in clinical primary prevention ser vices, community health promotion and medical sta health. e award assesses health topics such as al cohol abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutri tion physical activity, psy chological health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were select ed for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquartered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue-H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organizations. Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jackson villes six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care man ager at one of its facilities. Clinic

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GSA Expo Based on the paragraph of e Charge of Command that states, Trust is a fun damental building block of our command and control structure and our abil ity to achieve mission success, Tofalo said. I can think of nothing that more di rectly attacks trust physically, emotion ally, mentally and professionally than sexual assault, he continued. Working together, we can, we must, elimi nate this from our ranks. e Navy has a zero tolerance policy regarding sexual assault and sexual harassment. Last weeks training, in addition to the seminars and trainings sessions scheduled for this week, aim to emphasize that fact. During the stand-down, Commanders and lead ers will engage with all service members to reinforce SAPR principles and instill a climate of dignity and respect within the Navy workplace. All personnel will understand their accountability and role in eliminating sexual assault from the Navy, fostering a command climate of dignity and respect, and upholding our core values of honor, courage, and commitment. In a separate training held last week at the base theater, Cmdr. Ed Callahan, Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay executive ocer, said the current all hands discus sions focus more on our individual roles and responsibilities in ending this behav ior within our ranks, which is a change in how sexual assault awareness is typically talked about. We are reinforcing previous training in support of the overall DoD eort to emphasize the commitment to eliminate sexual assault from the military, said Cal lahan. By opening our current training to allow an interactive dialogue between the presenters and the audience, were hoping to encourage more open dialogue within our community to raise awareness with the end goal of having sexual assault eliminated from our Navy. Sexual assault is not limited to any one rank in the military, and it can happen to anyone, male or female. One of the statistics that really stands out, said Senior Chief Fire Technician Jerey Bortzeld, Submarine Group Ten Com mand SAPR. [In] 11-percent of the reported sexual assaults, men were the victims. For every report ed assault, three to ve more as saults or harass ments go unreported. ats a lot of Sail ors suering in silence. It comes down to the Sailor to be the rst line of defense. Whether through better personal choic es, avoiding risky behavior, or stepping in to help a shipmate, it takes deckplate leadership at all levels to overcome this problem. e Oce of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, reports sexual assaults negatively impact the militarys warghting capability and are incompatible with its core values, high standards of professionalism and personal discipline. Our goal is to foster a command cli mate which encourages reporting assault, while providing support to victims and holding those responsible accountable, Bortzeld said. We are reinforcing previ ous training in support of the overall DoD eort to emphasize the commitment to eliminate sexual assault from the military. Aware It takes deckplate leadership at all levels to overcome this problem. FTCS Jeffrey Bortzfield Group 10 Command SAPR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 Photos by India Winslow, and courtesy photos Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay Family Day Ens. David Thomas winds up while MACM Alan Tapley points out the Dunk Tank fir ing line during Fun Day at Marine Corps Security Force Battalions Dunham Barracks, July 13 onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5 After being rained out once, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay held its 3rd annual Cultural and Diversity Fair June 21. Despite the heat and humidity, not to mention a heavy down pour towards the end of the event, it didnt stop Kings Bay service members and civilians from enjoying dierent booths displaying cultures from around the world. Cmdr. Edward Callahan, the new executive ocer onboard NSB Kings Bay, welcomed ev eryone and spoke about how he viewed culture and diversity. How many people like pres ents? Callahan asked the crowd. I know everybody likes pres ents. Each present is wrapped in dierent packaging, right? Are you really concerned with the outer package? You just want to rip it open and get to whats in side. at is what diversity is all about. It is not about the outer package. It is about what each in dividual brings to enhance each and every one of our lives. Every body is unique and special. A highlight of the event was when representatives from the Montford Point Marine Asso ciation spoke to the crowd about the legacy of the rst African Americans who entered the Ma rine Corps from 1942 to 1949 at Montford Point Camp, New Riv er, N.C. Guests also enjoyed dance performances that represented cultures form around the world, inlcuding a Filipino folk dance, Trinity Praise Dancers and a per formance by the Deep Forest Native Americans. Tables with foods from around the world were set up buet-style for guests to exhibit tastes from around the world. It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerances to embracing and celebrating rich diversity within our individuals, said Lt. Cmdr. Bob Arias, executive o cer of the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. At the end of the day, the event represented what the Navy con siders a priority to remain an ef fective naval force diversity. e Navy is a melting pot of dif ferent races, cultures and diver sities. Men and women with vari ous backgrounds can proudly say they serve A Global Force for Good where each takes the lead to create an environment of ex cellence.

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Navy College information President Barack Obama June 19 an nounced his intention to seek deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear arsenal, pro vided Russia is willing to negotiate similar reduc tions. In an address before several thou sand people at Ber lins Branden burg Gate, Obama said a comprehensive review has determined America can ensure its own safety and that of its allies by reducing the number of deployed strategic nuclear weapons in the U.S. arsenal by up to one-third. I intend to seek nego tiated cuts with Russia to move beyond Cold War nuclear postures, he said, and repeated the goal he articulated in 2009 of pursuing the security of a world without nuclear weapons, no matter how distant that dream may be. U.S. ocials said the proposed cuts would take the number of strategic warheads for both countries below the limit of 1,550 established by the 2010 New START Treaty, provided Russia is willing to agree to those levels as well. Administration ocials said the reductions would still leave the United States with a credible nuclear deterrent as well as strategic stability with Russia and China, while reducing the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. national security strategy. At the same time, well work with our NATO allies to seek bold reductions in U.S. and Russian tactical weapons in Europe, the president said, and he added that the United States will host a summit in 2016 to continue our eorts to secure nuclear materials around the world while working to build support in the Unit ed States for ratication of the long-stalled Compre hensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Obama also touched on a theme he raised during a counterterrorism address he delivered last month, stressing again the need to remain vigilant about the terror threat, while mov ing beyond a mindset of perpetual war. In America, that means redoubling our eorts to close the prison at Guanta namo, he said. It means tightly controlling our use of new technologies like drones. It means balanc ing the pursuit of security with the protection of pri vacy, the latter being a reference to recently dis closed data-mining programs run by the National Security Agency that ad ministration ocials say have prevented more than 50 terrorist attacks since 9/11.Obama calls for nuke reductions 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho My good friend CS1 Dennis Briggs suggested this question. I think he was missing those great cheesesteaks you only can get in Philly. I decided to add other than family and friends because just about everybody misses that. I lived most of my life in DeKalb, Ill., but I dont miss a lot about it, other than family and friends. Just about anything you can get there you can get in Jacksonville. Most importantly, I dont miss winter. I dreaded it. It was five months or more of being cooped up indoors. But there was one thing about winter that I guess is the only thing I miss about DeKalb. Thats going ice fish ing. It was really fun. There no good ice fishing here.Linda Elders Family member Reidsville, Ga. Absolutely nothing. I like it better here than my hometown. MA2 Alicia Mayhew Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Little Rock, Ark. I guess the big bridge we used to run and walk on. ET3 Christopher Herring USS Florida Gold West Palm Beach, Fla. Going to St. Louis Cardinals spring training games. ET1 Tyron Peterson USS Rhode Island Blue Columbia, S.C. My hometown is beautiful. It has a big city atmosphere, with restau rants, stores and malls. Lt. j.g. Ryan Ferrao USS Wyoming Gold Mexico, N.Y. The weather. Its too hot and humid here, and it rains too much. MASN Alexandra Wiens Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Llano, Texas The dry heat. Its not as hot there. e Los Angeles-class submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) was welcomed by friends and families at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, after completing a de ployment to the Western Pacic and Ara bian Gulf, June 18. Commissioned in May 1981, Jackson ville is named for Jacksonville, Fla. Nick named e Bold One, it is a Los Angelesclass nuclear attack submarine that is 360-feet long and displaces 6,900 tons. It can be tted with Mk-48 torpedoes and harpoon missiles. I am incredibly proud of the crew of the warship Jacksonville, said Cmdr. Richard Seif, commanding ocer. ese Sailors have impressed me from day one, and I could not be more proud of their outstanding eorts. . During the deployment, 31 Sailors be came qualied in submarines, now wear ing the dolphin warfare insignia. Additionally, more than 60 Sailors received their senior watch station qualications. ough this was the rst deployment for half of the crew, everyone performed their duties like an experienced team. Id like to especially thank our com mand Ombudsman, Kim Cowdrey and the Family Readiness Group for their out standing support, said Seif. e pierside welcome from families re ally made the crew of the Jacksonville feel appreciated. Its great to be back home, said Sief. e Sailors and their families are all look ing forward to a well deserved stand down. Many families could not hold back their joy and relief for the safe return of their loved ones. I am super proud of him, said Jackie Combs, a Jacksonville spouse. He has done a fantastic job. Its been a long, tough deployment, but hes home, and Im happy.USS Jacksonville home THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 9

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., July 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar July 31Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, July 31. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, July 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for July 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., July 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recom mends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writ ing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 8 to 12. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 p.m., July 29 to Aug. 2. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is 1 to 4 p.m., July 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., July 9 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., July 23. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting July 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., July 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This pro gram will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, July 17. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, July 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., July 25. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.How to survive Learn how to reduce finan cial stress of the holidays. This workshop helps participants plan for holiday spending and make the most effective use of money this holiday season. This class is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., July 26. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-4514.Car-buying strategies examined Nov. 7This two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include nego tiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This class is for 2 to 4 p.m., July 23. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation, call 573-9783.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Dads Are Our Heros Submarine Group Sev en held a change of command ceremony at Fleet Activities Yokosuka, June 18. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Stuart B. Munsch relieved Rear Adm. Phillip G. Sawyer as commander of Submarine Group 7, also assuming responsibility as commander of Task Forces 54 and 74. Vice Adm. Scott H. Swift, commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet, was the honored guest and keynote speaker during the change of com mand ceremony. Swift commended Saw yer for a job well-done in his capacities as CSG 7, commander task forces 74 and 54. Group 7 changes command 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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rough to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is oering Punch Cards for dis counted prices on golf. For Mili tary E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all oth ers 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Rack-N-Roll Movie Night On July 13 inside Rack-NRoll Lanes Disneys OZ: The Great and Powerful starts at 5 p.m.. Dominos will be offering a special prices for Any Way any Size Pizza for $10 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. All games will be $1.50 plus shoe rental from 5 to 9 p.m. There will be additional chances to win free game passes throughout the event. Dusk to Dawn IM OnePitch Softball Tournament Scheduled for Saturday, July 20 at 7 p.m, registration is open until July 18. Pre-registration is required. e team fee is $250. Championship trophy and $500 for rst place and runner-up tro phy and $250 to second place. Average Joes Golf League at Trident Lakes Golf Club Registration is open now. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m. July 9 in Fitness Complex class room. e league chips o on July 10. Weekly play fee is $12 for active duty and $15 for DoD civilian. Weekly prizes, plus tro phies and t-shirts for champion and runner up. League format is two-person teams, foursomes, Captains Choice and Flighted. For more questions, contact IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Average Joes Wallyball League Registration is open now with a captains meeting at 5 p.m., July 10 in Fitness Complex classroom. e league starts July 15 and is free. Team trophies for rst and second place. For more, contact IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. July Dive-In Movie On Saturday, July 20 the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. en when it gets dark enough, the feature presentation Escape from Planet Earth (PG) will be shown. Bring your own oata tion devices and lawn chairs. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dier ent for each camp. Second Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is being of fered at Trident Lakes Golf Club. e camp is July 22 to 26. Camp is $150 per person and limited to 16 golfers per. is is a full-day golf camp. Be prepared for full sun expo sure, walking and lots of golf. Golf instruction on chipping, putting, drivers and golng situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up early as the sessions ll quickly. Call (912) 573-8475 for more information. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202. Lights Out Lock-In at Rack-N-Roll Lanes This is a night you dont want child to miss out on. From 11:30 p.m. until 7:30 a.m. August 3-4, youth ages 8 to 12, can bowl all night long. Karaoke music, music videos, unlim ited snacks, soda and water, breakfast provided in the morning, plus 15 free game tokens. Chances to win more tokens and free game passes throughout the event. Pre-registration cost is $35 and $40 on the day of event. Register now through Aug. 1. There must be a minimum of 25 youths to have this event. Call (912) 573-9492. Free movies for kids Junes free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. are The Croods June 29 and 30, Disney: Oz the Great & Powerful July 6 and 7, Despicable Me July 13 and 14, Brave July 20 and 21,and Finding Nemo July 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 5734548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials need ed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergar ten through age 12 and runs through Aug. 7. Call for spots. To have your child attend, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Golf course oers punch cards MWR Sports 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Donations made to Dolphin Scholarship, Navy-Marine Relief In celebration of the 35th Anniversary of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the cities of Camden County St. Marys, Woodbine and Kingsland along with the St. Marys Convention & Visitors Bureau, the Camden County Board of Commissioners, the Camden County PSA and the State of Georgia hosted a community activity tent at the Party in the Park May 22 that attracted more than 1,200 guests. e celebration event was hosted by Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation and allowed the opportunity for the community to show support and pride in NSB Kings Bay. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has always been a great community partner to each of our cities and is an integral part of the successful economic viability and growth of Camden County, said Angela Wigger, CMP-director of tourism, St. Marys Convention & Visitors Bureau. It was a special day for our military and their families, and we were proud to be a play a part in the day. e community tent oered sno-cones, popcorn, a build-acupcake station, photo opportunities with various cut outs, city mascots and a dunk tank. Wigger recognized dignitaries who supported the Dunk-ADignitary station Woodbine Mayor Steve Parrott, Camden County Sheri Jim Proctor, St. Marys Councilman Keith Post and Submarine Squadron 20 Commodore Capt. Chris Harkins. All the dignitaries were great sports when it came to being dunked hundreds of times each throughout the day, she said. Tickets to various stations were sold for a nominal fee to attendees and the $900 in activity proceeds were split evenly and donated to the Dolphin Scholarship Foundation and the NavyMarine Corp Relief Society. e money was presented June 12 to Jennifer Rorstrom, president of the Submarine Ofcers Spouses Association for DSF and to Brandi Frazier, director of NMRCS Kings Bay. e DSF sponsors 127 students who each receive an annual scholarship. e DSF has awarded more than $8 million to more than 1,000 students. e NMRS is a private, nonprot charitable organization sponsored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 250 oces ashore and aoat to provide nancial, educational and other assistance to eligible military and family members when in need. Additional activity tent sponsorship was provided by Brenau University, Comfort SuitesKingsland, Dollar General Woodbine, Woodbine IGA and Councilman Keith Post. 4th of July The Periscope is off next week, but back July 11. Have a safe, happy 4th! Family Day Marine Security Force bonds with fun Page 4 Diversity Kings Bay has its 3rd Culture & Diversity Fair Page 5 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com County, communities help celebrate Kings Bay Week-long seminars promote awareness of assault, suicideCommander, Submarine Group Ten held a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response and Suicide Awareness Prevention training June 19 at the Trident Training Facility Auditorium. e training was directed at Kings Bay commanding ocers, executive ocers and chiefs of the boat in addition to civilian employees in senior positions around the base and is part of a Navy-wide eort mandating all military service members and Department of Defense employees completing command-SAPR training before July 1. With the Navys ongoing efforts to increase sexual assault awareness, Kings Bay Sailors are doing their part to help erase it from Navy culture. Accord ing to the Navys Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report to the DOD, there were 425 unrestricted reports and 204 restricted reports of sexual assault made by female victims, 55 unrestricted reports and 37 restricted reports were made by male victims. If broken down, 89 percent of victims were female and 11 percent were male. Tofalo quoted e Charge of Command, a CNO memorandum for all pro spec tive command ing officers em pha sizing the principles of authority, responsibility and accountability, which, according to the memorandum, are the heart and soul of Command. Home in Georgia Branch clinic honoredKings Bay awarded Medical Blue H Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay as one of six Naval Hospital Jacksonville facilities, Navy Operational Support Center Jacksonville and Navy Operational Health Support Unit Detachment G earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. e Blue H award symbolizes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and every one of our patients, our nations heroes, and their families, stated Capt. Gayle Shaer, Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding ocer. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. NOSC Jacksonville and NH OHSU Detachment G each received the Gold Star level. Kings Bay focus on sexual assault prevention Working together, we can, we must, eliminate this from our ranks. Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo Commander, Submarine Group 10

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Red Cross seeking volunteerse American Red Cross has reopened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Tennessee Ave. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! Commander, Navy Installations Command announced June 19 a plan to conduct a Reduction in Force action in scal year 2013 that will be completed in 2014. Over the course of the next seven months, CNIC will eliminate 745 civilian positions throughout its shore enterprise in seven Navy Regions across 20 states, the District of Columbia, the Island of Guam, and in the countries of Italy, Greece and Cuba. e actual total number of people directly impacted by this RIF action will be determined once other workforce shaping measures such as Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments, Voluntary Early Retirement Authority and placement into current vacancies have been completed. CNIC, along with other Navy commands, has experienced reduced budgets and must implement costsaving measures across the entire force. is action is not taken lightly, but is part of a conscious, risk-based approach to future shore capabilities that are aligned with the Navy Mission, said Vice. Adm. William French, CNIC. I am committed to ensuring that we do all we can to assist those people directly impacted by this action by providing them access to all tools available under Reduction in Force rules and assisting them with nding future employment. Career transition services for the employees aected by the RIF action will vary depending on their needs, but services available will include skills assessment, resume and cover letter preparation, networking and interviewing techniques, counseling, job search assistance, and retraining, if necessary. Reducing these positions may have marginal impacts on the services CNIC has provided in the past. However, it will not have any direct impacts to CNICs capability to support the mission of providing service to the eet, ghter and family.Installations plan reduction in force Navy Installations Planning ahead can be one of the biggest stress relievers when it comes to a permanent change of station move, Fleet and Family Service Center ocials said June 20. For a lot of people [who move], the pre-departure can be both positive and negative, said Diane Brown, Work and Family Life specialist, Fleet and Family Support Center. Youre leaving what youre familiar with, which can be very uncomfortable. But going on to something new can be exciting too, especially if its a location that you may have never been to. So it really depends on the person, on how up you are for change and how exible you are. After a Sailor receives their orders, the rst thing they should do is visit their local FFSC and meet with a Relocation Assistance Program specialist, then attend a Smooth Move class or Moving Overseas workshop to learn the basics about a PCS move and how to start the process. Applications like Plan my Move on the Military OneSource Web site at www.militaryonesource.com will organize a Sailors to do list prior to their move. It provides a three-month calendar of steps a Sailor needs to take to ensure a smooth move for themselves and their family. Brown says sponsors also can help reduce a Sailors stress by nding answers ahead of time to any questions they have about their new location. Sailors who have not been assigned a sponsor can request one on the Military OneSource website with the Electronic Sponsorship Application and Training tool. Service members should ask their sponsor a lot of questions, Brown said. I think good questions that the incoming service member can ask the sponsor is your best bet to relieving stress. Other helpful Web sites include: Housing Early Application Tool at www.dko.mil/heat/apply Housing Service Center locator at www.cnic.navy.mil/ HousingQuickReference Schedule your PCS move at www.smartwebmove.navsup.navy. mil Families denitely want to take a team approach to their PCS move, whether you divvy up whose going to do what each day, or what chores each person is responsible for prior to the move. e more information you share with your family, the smoother your move will be, Brown said. Dont forget that moving can be especially stressful on children, said Brown. From a kids perspective, youre leaving your house, your friends, youre going to a new school...thats hard, thats really hard, Brown said. If you are struggling and are tense and stressed out, your children will notice that. e more positive you are, the more positive theyre going to be. Brown suggests getting kids involved in learning about the new location and the new installation by doing research. Maybe even let them help pack and let them decide what items they may have outgrown and dont want to bring with. Preparation, communication and family involvement are key to a less stressful PCS move says Brown. Be aware that you and your spouse may handle things dierently... and recognize dierences in coping strategies, Brown said. Some people look at moving as a really fun experience and as something positive. Some people who may have made really good friends or are leaving family may dread moving. Listen to each other. Stay positive.Ways to stress less, when you PCS Personnel Command e Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training and Center for Information Dominance are the latest commands to continue receiving recommended college credits for their training. e American Council on Education completed its review June 20. e courses reviewed were either new or had undergone revisions since the last ACE review. We promise our Sailors a lifetime of career opportunities, said Roland Perez, Naval Education and Training Commands educational program and management analyst. Sailors have the chance to submit credits they receive from their training towards most colleges and universities. Capt. Katherine Erb, CNATT commanding ocer, spoke to civilian academic professionals from ACE before their review. I think the ACE training evaluations are a fabulous idea. e courses we instruct provide our Sailors and Marines with skills for their military careers; the fact that this training also provides an opportunity to gain civilian college credit is of even more benet to our personnel, Erb said. is is a great experience for the instructors, as well. It is motivational to teach a military course that you know is equivalent to a college course. We are very appreciative for what ACE continues to do for our military. ACE supports the educational goals of the Navys Sailors throughout all learning centers within NETC. By recommending academic credits for training course work and/or occupational experience, ACE provides an additional benet to military. We have a great working relationship with ACE. e Navy is leading the way for other military branches in regard to instruction, training courses and number of academic credits recommended by ACE, Perez said. e life span of credit recommendation is 10 years, after which the particular training course or occupation, if still active, must be re-evaluated. Training courses may be recommended for academic credits on four levels vocational-certificate associate/lower division baccalaureate degree upper division baccalaureate and graduate degree e content of the training courses or service occupations value aects the number of academic credits that may be recommended by ACE. Sailors should refer to their Sailor/Marine ACE Registry Transcript, a complete educational and training history of a member while serving in the Navy, when planning for their education or career, Perez said. ACE credit recommendations are published online in the ACE Guide. e Navy College Oce counselors use this guide as a standard reference for both active duty personnel and veterans. e results of the ACE review will be announced in the next few months.Training counts for college credits Education & Training At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. e Blue H award recognizes excellence in clinical primary prevention services, community health promotion and medical sta health. e award assesses health topics such as alcohol abuse prevention, injury prevention, nutrition physical activity, psychological health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were selected for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquartered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue-H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organizations. Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. Clinic

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GSA Expo Based on the paragraph of e Charge of Command that states, Trust is a fundamental building block of our command and control structure and our ability to achieve mission success, Tofalo said. I can think of nothing that more directly attacks trust physically, emotionally, mentally and professionally than sexual assault, he continued. Working together, we can, we must, eliminate this from our ranks. e Navy has a zero tolerance policy regarding sexual assault and sexual harassment. Last weeks training, in addition to the seminars and trainings sessions scheduled for this week, aim to emphasize that fact. During the stand-down, Commanders and leaders will engage with all service members to reinforce SAPR principles and instill a climate of dignity and respect within the Navy workplace. All personnel will understand their accountability and role in eliminating sexual assault from the Navy, fostering a command climate of dignity and respect, and upholding our core values of honor, courage, and commitment. In a separate training held last week at the base theater, Cmdr. Ed Callahan, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay executive ocer, said the current all hands discussions focus more on our individual roles and responsibilities in ending this behavior within our ranks, which is a change in how sexual assault awareness is typically talked about. We are reinforcing previous training in support of the overall DoD eort to emphasize the commitment to eliminate sexual assault from the military, said Callahan. By opening our current training to allow an interactive dialogue between the presenters and the audience, were hoping to encourage more open dialogue within our community to raise awareness with the end goal of having sexual assault eliminated from our Navy. Sexual assault is not limited to any one rank in the military, and it can happen to anyone, male or female. One of the statistics that really stands out, said Senior Chief Fire Technician Jerey Bortzeld, Submarine Group Ten Command SAPR. [In] 11-percent of the reported sexual assaults, men were the victims. For every reported assault, three to ve more assaults or harassments go unreported. ats a lot of Sailors suering in silence. It comes down to the Sailor to be the rst line of defense. Whether through better personal choices, avoiding risky behavior, or stepping in to help a shipmate, it takes deckplate leadership at all levels to overcome this problem. e Oce of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, reports sexual assaults negatively impact the militarys warghting capability and are incompatible with its core values, high standards of professionalism and personal discipline. Our goal is to foster a command cli mate which encourages reporting assault, while providing support to victims and holding those responsible accountable, Bortzeld said. We are reinforcing previ ous training in support of the overall DoD eort to emphasize the commitment to eliminate sexual assault from the military. Aware It takes deckplate leadership at all levels to overcome this problem. FTCS Jeffrey Bortzfield Group 10 Command SAPR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 Photos by India Winslow, and courtesy photos Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Kings Bay Family Day Ens. David Thomas winds up while MACM Alan Tapley points out the Dunk Tank fir ing line during Fun Day at Marine Corps Security Force Battalions Dunham Barracks, July 13 onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5 After being rained out once, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay held its 3rd annual Cultural and Diversity Fair June 21. Despite the heat and humidity, not to mention a heavy downpour towards the end of the event, it didnt stop Kings Bay service members and civilians from enjoying dierent booths displaying cultures from around the world. Cmdr. Edward Callahan, the new executive ocer onboard NSB Kings Bay, welcomed everyone and spoke about how he viewed culture and diversity. How many people like presents? Callahan asked the crowd. I know everybody likes presents. Each present is wrapped in dierent packaging, right? Are you really concerned with the outer package? You just want to rip it open and get to whats inside. at is what diversity is all about. It is not about the outer package. It is about what each individual brings to enhance each and every one of our lives. Everybody is unique and special. A highlight of the event was when representatives from the Montford Point Marine Association spoke to the crowd about the legacy of the rst African Americans who entered the Marine Corps from 1942 to 1949 at Montford Point Camp, New River, N.C. Guests also enjoyed dance performances that represented cultures form around the world, inlcuding a Filipino folk dance, Trinity Praise Dancers and a performance by the Deep Forest Native Americans. Tables with foods from around the world were set up buet-style for guests to exhibit tastes from around the world. It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerances to embracing and celebrating rich diversity within our individuals, said Lt. Cmdr. Bob Arias, executive ocer of the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. At the end of the day, the event represented what the Navy considers a priority to remain an effective naval force diversity. e Navy is a melting pot of different races, cultures and diversities. Men and women with various backgrounds can proudly say they serve A Global Force for Good where each takes the lead to create an environment of excellence.

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Navy College information President Barack Obama June 19 announced his intention to seek deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear arsenal, provided Russia is willing to negotiate similar reductions. In an address before several thou sand people at Berlins Branden burg Gate, Obama said a comprehensive review has determined America can ensure its own safety and that of its allies by reducing the number of deployed strategic nuclear weapons in the U.S. arsenal by up to one-third. I intend to seek negotiated cuts with Russia to move beyond Cold War nuclear postures, he said, and repeated the goal he articulated in 2009 of pursuing the security of a world without nuclear weapons, no matter how distant that dream may be. U.S. ocials said the proposed cuts would take the number of strategic warheads for both countries below the limit of 1,550 established by the 2010 New START Treaty, provided Russia is willing to agree to those levels as well. Administration ocials said the reductions would still leave the United States with a credible nuclear deterrent as well as strategic stability with Russia and China, while reducing the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. national security strategy. At the same time, well work with our NATO allies to seek bold reductions in U.S. and Russian tactical weapons in Europe, the president said, and he added that the United States will host a summit in 2016 to continue our eorts to secure nuclear materials around the world while working to build support in the United States for ratication of the long-stalled Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Obama also touched on a theme he raised during a counterterrorism address he delivered last month, stressing again the need to remain vigilant about the terror threat, while moving beyond a mindset of perpetual war. In America, that means redoubling our eorts to close the prison at Guantanamo, he said. It means tightly controlling our use of new technologies like drones. It means balancing the pursuit of security with the protection of privacy, the latter being a reference to recently disclosed data-mining programs run by the National Security Agency that administration ocials say have prevented more than 50 terrorist attacks since 9/11.Obama calls for nuke reductions 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho My good friend CS1 Dennis Briggs suggested this question. I think he was missing those great cheesesteaks you only can get in Philly. I decided to add other than family and friends because just about everybody misses that. I lived most of my life in DeKalb, Ill., but I dont miss a lot about it, other than family and friends. Just about anything you can get there you can get in Jacksonville. Most importantly, I dont miss winter. I dreaded it. It was five months or more of being cooped up indoors. But there was one thing about winter that I guess is the only thing I miss about DeKalb. Thats going ice fish ing. It was really fun. There no good ice fishing here.Linda Elders Family member Reidsville, Ga. Absolutely nothing. I like it better here than my hometown. MA2 Alicia Mayhew Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Little Rock, Ark. I guess the big bridge we used to run and walk on. ET3 Christopher Herring USS Florida Gold West Palm Beach, Fla. Going to St. Louis Cardinals spring training games. ET1 Tyron Peterson USS Rhode Island Blue Columbia, S.C. My hometown is beautiful. It has a big city atmosphere, with restaurants, stores and malls. Lt. j.g. Ryan Ferrao USS Wyoming Gold Mexico, N.Y. The weather. Its too hot and humid here, and it rains too much. MASN Alexandra Wiens Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Llano, Texas The dry heat. Its not as hot there. e Los Angeles-class submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699) was welcomed by friends and families at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, after completing a deployment to the Western Pacic and Arabian Gulf, June 18. Commissioned in May 1981, Jacksonville is named for Jacksonville, Fla. Nicknamed e Bold One, it is a Los Angelesclass nuclear attack submarine that is 360-feet long and displaces 6,900 tons. It can be tted with Mk-48 torpedoes and harpoon missiles. I am incredibly proud of the crew of the warship Jacksonville, said Cmdr. Richard Seif, commanding ocer. ese Sailors have impressed me from day one, and I could not be more proud of their outstanding eorts. . During the deployment, 31 Sailors became qualied in submarines, now wearing the dolphin warfare insignia. Additionally, more than 60 Sailors received their senior watch station qualications. ough this was the rst deployment for half of the crew, everyone performed their duties like an experienced team. Id like to especially thank our command Ombudsman, Kim Cowdrey and the Family Readiness Group for their outstanding support, said Seif. e pierside welcome from families really made the crew of the Jacksonville feel appreciated. Its great to be back home, said Sief. e Sailors and their families are all look ing forward to a well deserved stand down. Many families could not hold back their joy and relief for the safe return of their loved ones. I am super proud of him, said Jackie Combs, a Jacksonville spouse. He has done a fantastic job. Its been a long, tough deployment, but hes home, and Im happy.USS Jacksonville home THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013 9

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., July 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar July 31Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, July 31. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, July 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for July 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., July 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writ ing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., July 8 to 12. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 p.m., July 29 to Aug. 2. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is 1 to 4 p.m., July 22. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., July 9 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., July 23. For more information, call 573-4513. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting July 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., July 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, July 17. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. These workshops are scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, July 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., July 25. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.How to survive Learn how to reduce financial stress of the holidays. This workshop helps participants plan for holiday spending and make the most effective use of money this holiday season. This class is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., July 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-4514.Car-buying strategies examined Nov. 7This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and high-pressure sales tactics. This class is for 2 to 4 p.m., July 23. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Dads Are Our Heros Submarine Group Seven held a change of command ceremony at Fleet Activities Yokosuka, June 18. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Stuart B. Munsch relieved Rear Adm. Phillip G. Sawyer as commander of Submarine Group 7, also assuming responsibility as commander of Task Forces 54 and 74. Vice Adm. Scott H. Swift, commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet, was the honored guest and keynote speaker during the change of command ceremony. Swift commended Sawyer for a job well-done in his capacities as CSG 7, commander task forces 74 and 54. Group 7 changes command 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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rough to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is oering Punch Cards for discounted prices on golf. For Military E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all others 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Rack-N-Roll Movie Night On July 13 inside Rack-NRoll Lanes Disneys OZ: The Great and Powerful starts at 5 p.m.. Dominos will be offering a special prices for Any Way any Size Pizza for $10 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. All games will be $1.50 plus shoe rental from 5 to 9 p.m. There will be additional chances to win free game passes throughout the event. Dusk to Dawn IM OnePitch Softball Tournament Scheduled for Saturday, July 20 at 7 p.m, registration is open until July 18. Pre-registration is required. e team fee is $250. Championship trophy and $500 for rst place and runner-up trophy and $250 to second place. Average Joes Golf League at Trident Lakes Golf Club Registration is open now. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m. July 9 in Fitness Complex classroom. e league chips o on July 10. Weekly play fee is $12 for active duty and $15 for DoD civilian. Weekly prizes, plus trophies and t-shirts for champion and runner up. League format is two-person teams, foursomes, Captains Choice and Flighted. For more questions, contact IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. Average Joes Wallyball League Registration is open now with a captains meeting at 5 p.m., July 10 in Fitness Complex classroom. e league starts July 15 and is free. Team trophies for rst and second place. For more, contact IM Sports at (912) 409-1611. July Dive-In Movie On Saturday, July 20 the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. en when it gets dark enough, the feature presentation Escape from Planet Earth (PG) will be shown. Bring your own oatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp. Second Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is being offered at Trident Lakes Golf Club. e camp is July 22 to 26. Camp is $150 per person and limited to 16 golfers per. is is a full-day golf camp. Be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Golf instruction on chipping, putting, drivers and golng situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up early as the sessions ll quickly. Call (912) 573-8475 for more information. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202. Lights Out Lock-In at Rack-N-Roll Lanes This is a night you dont want child to miss out on. From 11:30 p.m. until 7:30 a.m. August 3-4, youth ages 8 to 12, can bowl all night long. Karaoke music, music videos, unlimited snacks, soda and water, breakfast provided in the morning, plus 15 free game tokens. Chances to win more tokens and free game passes throughout the event. Pre-registration cost is $35 and $40 on the day of event. Register now through Aug. 1. There must be a minimum of 25 youths to have this event. Call (912) 573-9492. Free movies for kids Junes free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. are The Croods June 29 and 30, Disney: Oz the Great & Powerful July 6 and 7, Despicable Me July 13 and 14, Brave July 20 and 21,and Finding Nemo July 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 5734548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials needed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergar ten through age 12 and runs through Aug. 7. Call for spots. To have your child attend, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Golf course oers punch cards MWR Sports 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 27, 2013

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