<%BANNER%>

The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-20-2013 )

DARK ITEM
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00306

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00306


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

NAS Jax, Mayport adopt new policyNavy Region Southeast drivers will no longer be required to dis play a Department of Defense vehicle decal to gain access to installations beginning July 1. e change will be made to comply with a new Commander, Navy Installations Command policy intended to enhance base security by providing electronic credentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identi cation cards. Eliminating the DoD decals and implementing electronic credentialing will improve our security posture because it will allow our gate security personnel to more carefully scrutinize authorized identication cards without the added distraction of having to verify the decal, said Capt. Brett Calkins, Navy Region Southeast operations and plans ocer. In addition to enhancing se curity at the gate, the new policy will also work to protect De partment of Defense person nel when they are o the base, Calkins said. You really never know where or when you are going to en counter terrorism, he said. Vehicle decals can be easily recognizable to those out there that would like to do our service members harm, so not having them on vehicles o base will help to lower visibility and, in essence, help protect our people from potential harm. e new policy will also have a major impact on installation budgets, resulting in an esti mated $750,000 in annual sav ings Navy-wide, as well as a drastic reduction in administra tive tasks. ose savings will be diverted to critical AT/FP pro grams, reported Navy Times. First and foremost, this pol icy change is going to help us better protect personnel, but the nancial benets to not having stickers are obvious, said Bruce Toth, NRSE regional security of cer. Sticker costs can add up, especially when families have multiple vehicles and people are constantly buying and selling used vehicles not to mention the manpower it takes to supply them. Our goal is to take those funds and reinvest them back into our force protection eorts. According to Toth, the original purpose of the DoD decal was to not only for base access, but also to ensure that drivers on instal lations possessed a valid drivers license, proof of adequate insur ance and a current state vehicle registration. While the decals are set for elimination next month, the requirement for vehicles to be registered with the installation security departments will con tinue. Personnel and residents that are permanently assigned to a Up Periscope Our all-time favorite sports movies Page 9 Legacy Adm. Fluckey and his exploits with USS Barb Page 6 Happening Command Picnic, Run For Fallen, Ride to Work Pages 5, 8 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Southeast Region joins eliminating vehicle stickers DEFY musters for 2-week summer camp Kings Bay drug-awareness unit undergoes mentoring, character building e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Drug Education For Youth programs sum mer day camp was June 3 through June 14 onboard Kings Bay. DEFY is geared toward children to help them build character, instill leadership and give them condence to follow a posi tive, healthy lifestyle as drug-free citizens. is program is specically tailored for military children between the ages of nine to 12, and what we do is teach them about legal and il legal drugs such as alcohol, tobac co, marijuana and other things of that nature, said Sallie Galyean, Kings Bay assistant local program manager. We teach them other things that they can do to build up some resiliency skills or life skills for them to be supportive of themselves if someone ever comes up to them and they have an opportunity to try drugs or alcohol, that they have some positive ways to respond. During the twoweek program, the children par ticipated in dif ferent sports ac tivities, such as golng, bowling and swimming. At the beginning and end of the camp, the campers completed the presidential We want the kids to know that it is OK to talk to an adult ... MTC John Cook DEFY Mentor White House will up aid to oppositione White House in a state ment June 13 condemned Bashar Assads regime in Syria for multiple uses of chemical weapons against Syrian citizens, and pledged increased aid to opposition forces there. In a statement to Congress and the public, the administra tion alleged that the Assad regime has used chemical weap ons, including the nerve agent sarin, on a small scale against the opposition multiple times in the last year. e statement, credited to deputy national security advi sor for strategic communications Ben Rhodes, noted Presi dent Barack Obama has said his strategic approach to the Syrian conict would change given clear evidence of chemical weapons use. Following on the credible evidence that the regime has used chemical weapons against the Syrian people, the president has augmented the provision of non-lethal assistance to the civilian opposition, and also authorized the expansion of our assistance to the Supreme Military Council, and we will be consulting with Congress on these matters in the coming weeks, the statement reads in part. Put simply, the Assad regime should know that its ac tions have led us to increase the scope and scale of assistance that we provide to the opposi tion, including direct support to the SMC. ese eorts will increase going forward. e United States and the in ternational community have a number of other legal, nancial, diplomatic, and military re sponses available, Rhodes said. We are prepared for all contingencies, and we will make decisions on our own timeline, he said. Any future action we take will be consistent with our Leaks causing harmNational Security director testies before SenateLeaks to the public about a classied National Security Agency terrorist surveillance program that collects data from the phone calls of Americans already have jeopardized national security, the NSA director told a Senate panel in Washington, D.C., June 12. On June 6, from a hotel in Hong Kong where he had ed, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked information to two news papers about classied NSA sur veillance practices. Testifying before the full Sen ate Appropriations Commit tee with representatives from Homeland Security, the FBI and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, who is also commander of U.S. Cyber Command, shared his concern for the nation. Obama condemns Syrias chem weapon use Marines train in JordanMarines of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Units amphibious assault vehicle platoon had its rst bilateral training event of Exercise Eager Lion 2013 in Al Quweira, Jordan, June 12, con ducting a live-re shoot in their AAVs with members of the Jor danian armed forces in their own light armored mechanized vehicles.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Every summer, many escape the hustle of daily life by taking time to relax in the great outdoors. Campres add ambience to a campsite but should be used with caution. Following a few basic re safety rules will ensure the preserva tion of our natural resources for the years to come. As you are enjoying your camp re, remember these safety tips: Always build your campfire downwind from your tent or RV in an area that is clear of vegetation. Clear an area at least 15 feet surrounding your tent and/or buildings. Never leave your campre unat tended and remember to fully extin guish the re before going to bed or leaving your campsite by pouring lots of water on the re. Drown all embers, not just the red ones, con tinue to pour water until hissing sound stops. Stir the campre ashes and embers with a shovel and make sure everything is wet and they are cold to the touch. If you do not have water, use dirt. Mix enough dirt or sand with the embers. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cool. Remember, do not bury the re as the re will continue to smolder and could catch roots on re that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildre. And one last thing, if its too hot to touch, its too hot to leave! Tips to remember when camping with RV and tent before leaving on a trip: Thoroughly check vehicle exhaust system, generator engines and smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. If you dont have smoke or carbon monoxide detectors in your RV, install them. Park the RV in clear area so the exhaust system on your car or truck doesnt ignite dry vegetation. Properly ventilate your RV when cooking by opening a window or over head vent and turn on exhaust fan. Place a 5-pound, ABC-rated re extinguisher near each exit and know how to use them. Campers who carry extra fuel for propane/gasoline type stoves in the trunk of their car should take the precaution of opening the trunk periodically to ventilate the compartment. According to statistics 2012 the 2012 National Interagency Fire Cen ter Georgia had 3,331 land wild res and the re consumed 19,136 acres. When camping with a campre is to rst make sure campres are per mitted. Have a safe and enjoyable sum mer, and if you have any questions dont hesitate to call the NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Prevention Team at (912) 573-9998. e Navy announced last month its plans to change the way ocial Navy messages are delivered, which is the result of an ongoing eort to increase eciency and cut costs. e eciencies and savings are part of an ongoing message im provement process that is culminat ing with a new system known as the Command and Control Oce Infor mation Exchange, which will come online in August 2013. It is designed to simplify messages for both the user and administrator and will save the Navy more than $15 million a year when operational. e Navy gains signicant cost eciencies by eliminating the cur rent Defense Message System infra structure and simply using the ex isting email infrastructure for nal delivery, said James McCarty, the naval messaging program manager at U.S. Fleet Cyber Command. By utilizing this methodology we will be able to send messages at 10 per cent of the cost and size of current systems. In the rst phase, C2OIX is replac ing the Navys current DMS messaging program with a new version of the existing Navy Interface for Com mand Email software, which will be deployed on the secret and top secret networks, as well as create a uniform system for sea and shore duty commands. As background, part of the ongo ing upgrade process has been the implementation of NICE, the mes saging system that has been in place on the Non-classied Internet Pro tocol Router Network since 2011. In phase one, we are going to in stall all the hardware, said McCar ty. One hundred servers are going to be replaced by ve new servers that will handle all messaging for SIPRNet (secret internet protocol router network). Another major change in the Na vys messaging will be seen in the format on the classied systems. Navy messages had historically been formatted in all capital letters. However, a message sent to all com mands on April 30, 2013 (ALCOM 085/13) notied Navy users that both upper and lower case (or sentence case) messages could be sent. Lowercase messages are here to stay; they provide a more readable format, which can delivered to and shared on any of the current Web 3.0 technologies (chat, portals, wikis, blogs, etc.), McCarty said. It is true that we still have systems that are unable to process mixed case; in these instances, the C2OIX sys tem will be able to convert the text to upper case before making nal delivery. By 2015, C2OIX will seamlessly interface with or absorb the existing legacy messaging capabilities and allow mixed case messages to be de livered to all messaging systems. e nal phase of C2OIX is scheduled to begin in 2014 and will bring mes saging into a true net-centric cloud computing virtual environment. is nal stage will remove 66% of the remaining servers and save the Navy an additional $5 million annu ally compared to current costs. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 21. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program in formation, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will con duct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civil ians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more informa tion or to enroll your teen.Red Cross seeking volunteerse American Red Cross has reopened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Tennessee Ave. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, dia monds and the most popular brands of watch es that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits includ ing 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Navy adopts new messaging service Navy Cyber Command Campers, be aware of re hazzards Kings Bay Fire Dept. Stable housing leads to long-term stability, which factors into reliabil ity and other characteristics of suc cessful employees. Are you aware that loans guaran teed by the VA Home Loan Program have had the lowest foreclosure rate in the past 19 quarters compared to all other types of home loans? is is pretty signicant given the trials and tribulations of the housing market during the past several years. Many do not know that VAs Home Loan Program Benet is not a onetime benet, but can be reused. Since 1944, more than 20 million Veterans and Service Members have enjoyed the benet of a home pur chase through the VA Home Loan program. Veterans who have already used their VA benet in their home pur chase may reuse that benet to pur chase another residence, or to renance to a lower rate. is is referred to as an Interest Rate Reduction Renance Loan, or or Streamline Renance Loan. No appraisal or credit underwriting is required. Consider this, if a Veteran used their benet, perhaps while on ac tive duty, to purchase a home, they should compare their interest rate with current rates in their area. at veteran can reuse their VA benet to renance their home with no money out of pocket, as costs may be included in the loan. If that veteran has since separated or retired from the military and receives disability compensation of at least 10 percent, he or she is exempt from the funding fee. is can be a considerable monthly or total savings for the Veteran. On average, Veterans saved more than $200 per monthly payment on IRRRLs last year, saving those Vet erans over $900 million in their rst two years alone! Veterans may obtain a Certicate of Eligibility online through eBen ets or through their lender. I encourage Veterans to seek the advice of a nancial professional and to contact several lenders for quotes to determine what is in their best interest. If you have any questions, you can contact your closest VA regional of ce with Loan Guaranty sta by call ing (877) 827-3702, or visiting the www.va.gov Web site. Curtis Coy is VAs Deputy Under secretary for Economic Opportunity and a U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force Veteran.VA home loans more than buying Veterans Aairs HUD, VA team to help homelessApproximately 9,000 home less Veterans living on the streets and in the nations shel ter system will soon nd a per manent place to call home. Housing and Urban Devel opment Secretary Shaun Don ovan andDepartment of Vet erans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki recently announced that HUD will provide $60 mil lion to local public housing agencies across the country to oer permanent supportive housing to homeless Veterans, many of whom are living with chronic disabling conditions. e supportive housing as sistance announced is provided through the HUD-Veterans Af ars Supportive Housing Pro gram, which combines rental assistance from HUD with case management and clinical ser vices provided by VA. Since 2008, a total of 48,385 vouchers have been awarded and 42,557 formerly homeless Veterans are currently in homes because of HUD-VASH.

PAGE 3

Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center held a change of com mand at Naval Base Point Loma, June 4. Capt. Scott Dugan re lieved Capt. Richard omas as commanding ocer. omas assumed com mand of the training cen ter in June 2011. During his tenure, he led the renewal of eet anti-submarine warfare training by linking school house education to war ships ready for tasking, and implementing the Advanced Warfare Train ing program to enhance shipboard operator and maintainer prociency. Capt. Don Schmieley, Center for Surface Com bat Systems commanding ocer, spoke of omas successful tour. As commanding ocer, Rich positively impacted more than 220 Sailors and civilian employees, pro moted more than 50 sta members, and designated almost 70 Master Training Specialists, Schmieley said. He re-aligned his command by seamlessly integrating the Littoral Combat Ship Training Facility, which included assuming responsibility for close to 40 civilian employees, ve training simulators, and associated support spaces. Schmieley highlighted omas achievements while at the command. He was also a very good steward of the training facility by spearheading an extensive renovation to maximize use of avail able space, which consoli dated workspaces, said Schmieley. He relocated 11 courses of instruction to capitalize on training and instructor cross-utilization and greatly reduce operating costs. omas was presented the Legion of Merit, and reected on his tour at FLEASWTRACEN. Fleet ASW has a long and proud heritage of training Sailors and pre paring them to sail into harms way, ready to search, classify and destroy the enemy if called upon, and to control the seas, said omas. ere will be resource challenges, new weapons systems and platforms, changes in how training is delivered and real world events, but I urge you to remember three things as we move forward. Do the right things, do things right and mission rst...people always. Dugan previously served on the Oce of the Chief of Naval Operations Sta, Assessment Divi sion (OPNAV N81), where he served as Sea Shield Branch Head, the Execu tive Assistant to the Direc tor, and as the Warghting Support Branch Head. Dugan said he looks forward to working with the sta and students at FLEASWTRACEN. Im excited, grateful, and humble for the op portunity to be your com manding ocer, said Dugan. I look forward to working with you to com plete our critical mission of developing and deliv ering world class surface combat systems training to the eet. As commanding o cer of FLEASWTRACEN, Dugan assumes responsibility for the Navys AntiSubmarine Warfare and Combat Direction and Control Training Center of excellence. e command was established in 1960 and realigned with CSCS in 2004. Rich has been an ex ceptional driving force at FLEASWTRACEN and a great colleague, said Schmieley. e Univer sity of Nebraska-Lincoln Navy Reserve Ocer Training Corps will be fortunate to have Rich as their commanding ocer. Im condent he will have great success training and developing knowledgeable leaders who will positively impact the future of our Navy. Center for Surface Com bat Systems oversees the development of surface warfare training and its headquarters sta over sees 14 learning sites, including FLEASWTRA CEN, and provides al most 70,000 hours of cur riculum and close to 700 courses a year to more than 40,000 Sailors. e training center uses a mix of blended learning comprised of instructor led classes, hands on labs, simulation and computerbased training. Courses include spe cialized training support ing nine enlisted ratings, Fire Controlmen, Elec tronic Technicians, Interior Communications, So nar Technician (surface), Gunners Mates, Mineman, Operations Specialists, Boatswains Mates, and Quartermasters, as well as training surface warfare ocers in skills required to tactically operate and employ Aegis, Ship Self Defense System, and Tomahawk weapon system equipped ships. Building maritime part nerships, the command also provides training to many international students. Anti-sub warfare center changes commandNavy installation will inprocess and out-process at the installation Pass and Identication Oce. According to the new CNIC policy, motorcycle operators safety requirements, barment control and enforcement of state licensing, registration, insurance and safety requirements will be enforced through random vehicle inspections and routine trac enforcement. Our requirements will not change. Anyone op erating a motor vehicle on base will still be required to carry proof of insurance and registration in accor dance with their respec tive state law, Toth said. e policy change will take eect on board ev ery CNIC installation July 1. Drivers who still need access to other services installations that may still require a decal will be per mitted to display the decal until it expires. Under the new policy, base visitors will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the installation com manding ocer. For more information, contact your local installation Security Department or Pass and I.D. oce.Sticker THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 challenge that promotes physical health and tness. We tie a message to exercis ing, said Megan Hendricks, one of the six Sea Cadets participat ing as a DEFY junior mentor. We teach them that exercise gives you endorphins which produce natural highs. We tell them that these are the things you can do instead of drugs. Service members from Kings Bay helped mentor the children during the course of the camp. We want the kids to know that it is OK to talk to an adult, not to have the stigma that I cant talk to them because they are an adult, but to ask a question before they get into something silly, said DEFY Mentor Chief Missile Technician John Cook. e DEFY program is split into two phases. Phase 1 is a two-week summer leadership day camp. Phase 2 are a series of oncea-month meetings on Saturdays from August through May. Each phase is run by positive role-model mentoring and com munity outreach to improve the quality of life for military person nel and their families, through education on health, physical t ness, citizenship and life skills.DEFY

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 rough to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is oering Punch Cards for dis counted prices on golf. For Mili tary E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all others 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party, so stop by and check it out. Someone is always ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book before Aug. 1, and receive $50 off your room rental just by mentioning Magnolias 50 off. Call (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dier ent for each camp. Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp is July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must pro vide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 5738475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp For ages 5 to 14 its June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be avail able for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials need ed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergar ten through age 12 and runs through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for spon sor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Single/dual military parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Liberty call Golf course oers punch cards MWR Sports Lets eat national interest, and must ad vance our objectives, which include achieving a negotiated political settlement to establish an authority that can provide basic stability and administer state institutions; protecting the rights of all Syrians; securing unconventional and advanced conventional weapons; and countering terrorist activity. e statement cites intelligence reports, witness inter views, medical reports and open-source reporting, including on social media platforms, as providing multiple, indepen dent streams of information on which to base the assessment of chemical weapons use. e intelligence community estimates that 100 to 150 people have died from detected chemical weapons attacks in Syria to date; however, casu alty data is likely incomplete, Rhodes said. While the lethality of these attacks make up only a small portion of the catastrophic loss of life in Syr ia, which now stands at more than 90,000 deaths, the use of chemical weapons violates in ternational norms and crosses clear red lines that have existed within the international com munity for decades. He added, We believe that the Assad regime maintains control of these weapons. We have no reliable, corroborated reporting to indicate that the opposition in Syria has acquired or used chemical weapons. e White House and allies will present a credible, evi dentiary case to share with the international community and the public, Rhodes said. We will also be providing a let ter to [United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon], calling the U.N.s attention to our up dated intelligence assessment and specic incidents of alleged chemical weapons use. We re quest that the U.N. mission in clude these incidents in its on going investigation and report, as appropriate, on its ndings. Great harm has already been done by opening this up, and the consequence, I believe, is [that] our security is jeopardized, Al exander said. Alexander said the surveillance program has disrupted or helped to disrupt in the United States and abroad dozens of terrorist events, including the 2009 case of Najibullah Zazi, an Afghan-American arrested as part of the 2009 U.S. al-Qaida group accused of planning sui cide bombings on the New York City subway system. Director of National Intelli gence James R. Clapper told the Senate in March that the NSA collection program was critical to discovery and disruption of the Zazi case. Discovery in the case began with phone data sur veillance information based on operatives overseas. We saw connections to a per son in Colorado, and that was passed to the FBI. e FBI de termined who that was Zazi and [associated] phone num bers, Alexander said. e phone numbers on Zazi were the things that then al lowed us to use the business-records [Federal Intelligence Sur veillance Act] to go and nd out connections from Zazi to other players throughout communi ties, specically in New York City, the general added. As they questioned Alexander and the other witnesses, some of the senators wanted to know how Snowden, a 29-year-old high-school and communitycollege dropout who held shortterm and relatively low-level positions with the CIA, NSA and then was an NSA contractor, had access to such highly classied information. Alexander said that in the information technology arena, some of these folks have tremendous skills to operate networks. at was [Snowdens] job for the most part, from 2009 to 2010, as an IT system admin istrator within those networks. He had great skills in that area. Snowden was a system administrator with access to key parts of the network, Alexander said. So weve got to address that, he acknowledged. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine addressed Alexander at one point during the hearing. I saw an interview in which Mr. Snowden claimed that due to his position at NSA he could tap into virtually any Americans phone calls or emails, she said. True or false? False, the general replied. I know of no way to do that. e senators also asked Alex ander how the NSA and other intelligence organizations could avoid the need to hire young people with so little experience to make up the future cyber workforce. In the military, we are going to hire young folks who gradu ate from high school to work in this area, and the key will be the training that we give them, the general said. Ideally wed like to get four years out of a top-notch engineering school for some of the military positions, but we wont get that, so we have a re sponsibility to bring them into the force and train them.SyriaSecurity

PAGE 6

6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 In any training event, one of the major end states is that we build re lationships and the understanding that were not just building military skills, but also establishing rapport on a personal and professional level, said Marine Corps Capt. Jona than Riebe, the platoons commander. I think its important that we take part in these multinational operations in order to share methods on how we maintain our military and how we em ploy our military, added Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Michael Conners, platoon sergeant. Eager Lion has proven to be more than just a yearly exercise in the high deserts of Jordan involv ing service members from the United States, Jordan and other partner nations, Riebe said. It is a signicant train ing exercise solidifying already strong partnerships, he added. Jordan has been a part ner of ours, supporting us through Operation Endur ing Freedom, Riebe said. Eager Lion is an annual training exercise with the Jordanians to strength en our military and politi cal ties and foster a friend ly relationship in the area. e platoons Marines are focusing their training by tailoring to their Jorda nian hosts and thoroughly observing the Jordanian skillsets. Were approaching the training in a logical fashion [by] really getting the host nations input on what theyre trying to get out of the training, Riebe ex plained. Were adapting the assets we have to give them the training [that will most benet them]. e Marines of AAV Platoon and the rest of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit will be in Jordan for the remainder of Eager Lion, training with their Jordanian and United Kingdom counterparts.Marines Navy College information e USS Barb, a 1,525-ton Gato class submarine built at Groton, Connecticut, was com missioned in July 1942. at fall the submarine was sent to operate in European wa ters, taking part in the Morocco invasion in November. Four more war patrols in the rst half of 1943 took her to the Bay of Biscay, the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea but pro duced no damage to the enemy. In mid-1943 Barb went to the Pacic. at fall her sixth war patrol took her o China, where it damaged two enemy ships. Fol lowing a West Coast overhaul, Barb operated in the central and western Pacic during March and April 1944, sinking one ship and bombarding an enemy shore facility. After that, under Cmdr. Eu gene B. Fluckey, Barbs skipper for the rest of the war, the sub marines combat record became remarkably successful. Barbs eighth war patrol, o northern Japan in May through July, deprived the enemy of ve ships and saw the rst of many gunre actions that ultimately destroyed some 20 small vessels. On her ninth war patrol, oper ating with two other submarines between the Philippines and China in August and Septem ber 1944, Barb sank three more Japanese ships, among them the escort carrier Unyo. In addition, Barb rescued 14 Allied prisoners of war. e subs next two cruises, in the East China Sea during Oc tober 1944 through February 1945, were also made in close cooperation with other U.S. submarines. Barb sank two ships on its 10th patrol and four more on its 11th, with a partial credit for another. e 11th patrol was conduct ed in the Formosa Straits and East China Sea o the east coast of China, from Shanghai to Kam Kit. During this patrol, Barb, dis playing the ultimate in skill and daring, penetrated Namkwan Harbor on the China coast and wrought havoc upon a convoy of some 30 enemy ships at anchor. Riding dangerously in shallow waters, Barb launched its tor pedoes into the enemy group and then retired at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heav ily mined, and rock-obstructed waters. In recognition of this out standing patrol, Fluckey was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and Barb re ceived the Presidential Unit Ci tation. e Presidential Unit Citation read as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface forces in restricted waters of the Pacic. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the Barb relent lessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomitable fury despite unfavorable attack USS Barb, submarine star of World War II Eugene Bennett Fluckey was born in Wash ington, D.C., on 5 October 1913. Following four years at the U.S. Naval Academy, he graduated with the Class of 1935 and re ceived a commission. Ensign Fluckeys rst as signments, as an ocer of the battleship Nevada and the destroyer McCormick, were followed in 1938 by instruction at the Submarine School, New London, located at Groton, Connecticut. In December of that year Lt. j.g. Fluckey was assigned to the submarine S-42. He served in USS Bonita in 1941 to 1942, during which time he was promoted to Lieutenant. From mid-1942 into early 1944, Fluckey received Naval Engineering instruction and attended Prospective Com manding Ocers School at New London, then went to the Pacic where he made a war patrol as Prospective Commanding Ocer of the submarine Barb, Promoted to Lt. Commander in May 1943 and Commander in March 1944, he assumed command of Barb in late April Fluckeys daring set Barbs pace

PAGE 7

opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled superbly, she held unde viatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerously, surfaced, in shallow water, the Barb launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retir ing at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed waters. Inexorable in combat, the Barb also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpe doing and sinking of a hos tile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japa nese Empire. Determined in carrying the ght to the en emy, the Barb has achieved an illustrious record of gal lantry in action, reecting the highest credit upon her valiant ocers and men and upon the United States Na val Service. Another Mare Island overhaul gave Barb a larg er deck gun and a rocket launcher. Returning to northern Japan in June 1945 for its 12th war patrol, both of these weapons were used to sink small craft and bom bard shore facilities. Barbs torpedoes sank two more ships, a freighter and the escort Kaibokan No. 112, and some of its crew made raid ashore that de stroyed a railroad train. Barb ended World War II among the dozen topscoring U.S. submarines in terms of ships sunk, and third in terms of tonnage. If a disputed credit for an other ship is counted, Barb would have ranked rst in the latter category. After returning to the U.S. East Coast in September 1945, Barb was generally inactive until formally de commissioned in February 1947. e intensied Cold War brought Barb back into commission in December 1951, and it performed training service until midJanuary 1954. Barb then underwent conversion to the stream lined Guppy conguration and operated briey on tri als and training from August until December 1954, when it was loaned to Italy and re named Enrico Tazzoli. e submarine served ac tively with the Italian Navy until 1972 and was sold for scrapping in April 1975.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, June 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Barb of the latter year. During ve war pa trols Cmdr. Fluckeys initiative and agressive ness cost the enemy at least 16 ships, many small craft and facilities ashore, earning a Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses for himself, and Presidential Unit Cita tions and the Navy Unit Commendation for Barb. In August 1945 Cmdr. Fluckey became Prospective Commanding Ocer of the new submarine Dogsh, then under construction at Groton, Connecticut. However, this assign ment ended after a few months and he began duty in Washington, D.C., rst in the Oce of the Secretary of the Navy, then at the War Plans Di vision and, beginning in late 1945, as Personal Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz. In June 1947 he again received a seagoing command, the modernized submarine Halfbeak. In 1949-1950 Fluckey served on the sta of Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet and from Oc tober 1950 to July 1953 was U.S. Naval Attache at Lisbon, Portugal. Com mand of Submarine Division 52 in 1953 to 1954 was followed, after his promotion to the rank of Captain, by command of the submarine tender Sperry and of Submarine Squadron FIVE. During the later 1950s Captain Fluckey was assigned to the Naval Academy, attended the National War College and served with the Na tional Security Council. Selection for promo tion to Rear Admiral in mid-1960 was followed by tours as Commander Amphibious Group Four, presidency of the Board of Inspection and Sur vey and a temporary as signment as Task Force Director of the Shipyards Appraisal Group. In June 1964 Rear Ad miral Fluckey became Commander Submarine Force, Pacic, and in July 1966 he reported as Director of Naval Intelligence. Two years later he became Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Portugal. Fluckey retired from active duty at the begin ning of August 1972. He died in 2007 at age 93.Fluckey THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

PAGE 8

Run For The Fallen Ride Your Bike To Work 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 9

Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho With more than 20 years of my 35-year newspa per career in sports, I gotta admit I love sports. Is there anything better than, to borrow from the opening of ABCs Wide World of Sports, the thrill of victory ... and the agony of defeat ... the human drama of athletic competition? I like sports movies, too. But with them, I like the funny ones. My three favorite sports movies are Slap Shot, Caddy Shack and The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings. Heres what others said.Lance Cpl. Dakota Clark Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Jena, La. Friday Night Lights, The Longest Yard and Happy Gilmore. ET3 Katheren Lenocker NSB Kings Bay Farmington, N.M. Remember the Titans, We are Marshall and The Blind Side. Lance Cpl. Jeffrey Torres Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Bronx, N.Y. The Scout, Facing the Giants and Remember the Titans Cpl. John Rudd Marine Corps Security Force Battalion St. Charles, Ill. Hoosiers, Friday Night Lights and The Rookie. CS1 James Bryant Pirates Cove Galley Suffolk, Va. The old Longest Yard with Burt Reynolds, A League of their Own and The Fan . CS2 Devon Dumas Pirates Cove Galley Aurora, Ill. The Mighty Ducks, Happy Gilmore and Love & Basketball. e Sailor, Seaman 2nd Class George Luther Self, was killed in action the day before his 25th birth day when a Japanese submarine red torpedoes that sunk the destroyer USS Hammann. I am so happy that my brother is recognized and his memory is kept alive, said Virginia Self Trent, 90, after the ceremony. e Hammann was towing the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown back to Pearl Harbor when it was at tacked near the end of the battle. e destroyer sank in four minutes with heavy loss of life, and the York town went down early the next day. Trent and other family members watched as NSWCDD Sailors lowered and ceremoniously folded a 48-star ag in honor of Self. I felt honored to be able to honor a fallen Sail or who gave the ultimate sacrice for his family and the country that he loved so much, said Chief Fire Control Technician Chris topher Morge. We were extremely happy to be part of something that provided a little closure to a story that should have had the proper ceremony so many years ago. NSWCDD Commander Capt. Michael Smith presented the ag to Trent, telling her that its a sym bol of appreciation for her brothers service to the United States and a grate ful Navy. Smith also presented Trent with a certicate stating that the ag was own over NSWCDD in Selfs honor with printed words expressing grati tude for Selfs courageous service. is 48-star ag is just as alive as any ag today, said Trents son, Bill ColeFlag ies for Midway Sailor THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

PAGE 10

10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 What dierentiates his command from Army, Navy and Air Force cyber operations is a focus on the forward-deployed na ture of Americas expeditionary force in readiness, the commander of Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command said during a recent interview at Quan tico, Va. As commander of MAR FORCYBER, Lt. Gen. Rich ard P. Mills heads one of four service components of U.S. Cyber Command. e Marine command stood up in January 2010. Today, 300 Marines, fed eral civilians and contrac tors are performing cyber operations, Mills said. at number, he added, will grow to just under 1,000, at least until scal year 2016. Each of the services cy ber commands protects its own networks, Mills noted. Where we dier is that we look more at tacticallevel cyber operations and how we will be able to pro vide our forward-deployed ... Marine Air-Ground Task Force commanders with the capability to reach back into the cyber world [at home] to have their de ployed units supported, the general said. e basic structure for deployed Marine units, he said, is an air-ground task force that integrates ground, aviation and lo gistics combat elements under a common com mand element. Were more focused at the tactical level, the tac tical edge of cyber operations, in supporting our forward-deployed commanders, and thats what we should do, Mills said. Its an important capa bility, the general said, and one that will become more important and eective for deployed commanders in the years ahead. Cyber to me is kind of like artillery or air support, Mills explained. e actual weapon sys tems are well to your rear, back here in the continen tal United States, and what you need to be able to do is request that support be given to you and have it take eect wherever youre operating. e Marine Corps cyber mission is to advise the commander of U.S. Cyber Command, Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, on the capabilities of the Marines within the cyber world and how to best use those forces in accomplishing the Cybercom mission, Mills said. ats our rst job, he added. Our second job is to be able to conduct cyber operations across all three lines of cyber op erations defensive and oensive cyber ops so we have to man, train and equip Marine forces to ac complish those missions. In testimony to Con gress in March, Alexander described the three Cyber com lines, or missions. A Cyber National Mission Force and its teams will help to defend the country against national-level threats; A Cyber Combat Mission Force and its teams will be assigned to the operational control of individual combatant commanders to support their objectives; and A Cyber Protection Force and its teams will help to operate and defend the Defense Departments information environment. Of the nearly 1,000 MARFORCYBER forces that will come online between now and scal 2016, Mills estimated that a third will be in uniform, a third will be federal civil ian employees, and a third will be contractors. MARFORCYBER has Marines in the joint community who work throughout Cybercom at Fort Meade in Maryland. e Marine Corps cyber organization also is devel oping teams to be tasked by Cybercom to conduct operations across the spectrum of cyber opera tions. Its very similar to what we do today, Mills said. e units train and go forward from the United States and work for other commanders well for ward, and cyber will be the same way. Well ship forc es to Cybercom when requested, fully trained, fully manned, fully equipped, ready to operate. MARFORCYBER is a full-up component com mand under Cybercom along with the Air Force, Navy and Army, the gen eral said. All four of the component commanders talk regularly to each other and meet regularly at Cybercom to coordinate our growth, coordinate our requirements, [provide] input to Cybercom and take its guidance and direc tion, and operate together in big exercises like Cyber Flag, he said. Cyber Flag is an annual exercise at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., which Cyber com conducts with U.S. interagency and international partners. For the Marines, the smallest U.S. military ser vice branch, contractors play an important part in cyber, the general said. One of the challenges of cyber is that its such a dynamic environment, he explained. You need people who are educated and current in their special ties and who are available to stay on the job for long periods of time, whereas Marines come and go in the normal assignment process. Contractors have skill sets that arent always available in the active-du ty Marine Corps, and can t neatly into short-term projects, he added. ey all operate under the same clearance re quirements, the same authorities, the same rules, the general said. ats one of the things that make them so expensive. ey come at a cost, but you have to bear it to make sure that your cyber ca pabilities are current and that you stay on the cut ting edge. In the newest domain of warfare, the battleeld is evolving, Mills said, and Marine commanders have come to understand the impact cyber can have on defensive and oensive operations. I think cyber commanders now understand when you go forward you have to be able to defend your systems against in trusion by other states, by rogue elements, and even by hobbyists who are just trying to break in and in ltrate your nets, the general said. But theyre also beginning to understand the positive eects cyber can have in your opera tions against potential enemies. Its a very valu able tool in that quiver of arrows that a commander takes forward, and they want to understand how it operates. In the new domain, even a discussion of weapons veers o the traditional path. A cyber weapon, Mills said, can be something as simple as a desktop computer. Its also a vulnerability to you, because its a way in which the enemy can enter your Web system if you put the wrong hardware on there or open the wrong attachment or email. Cyber weapons are much more nuanced than big cannons and large bombs and weapons sys tems. e armories of the cyber world are very so phisticated computers and very sophisticated smart people who sit behind those computers and work those issues for you, the general said. Mills said hes an infan try ocer by trade, so he tends to view everything he does through a com bat-arms prism. I think the denition of combat arms is expand ing a little bit these days, he said. I dont think cy ber is any longer a com municators environment its an operators en vironment. So we want that cyber expert to sit in the operations shop right next to the air expert, right next to the artillery expert, because we think thats where it belongs. Mills pointed out the contrast between a Ma rine kitted out for battle with a Marine dressed for a cyber operation who may be sitting behind a desk in the United States. Hes got access to a huge computer system that allows him to operate within that domain, the general said. He may go home at night and never have to deploy forward. But hes providing sup port to deployed forces, hes conducting actions against designated targets, hes doing a lot of things but from the foxhole or the ghting hole at his desk, rather than some foxhole or ghting hole forward. Corps taking critical look at cyber tactics Global drier bouys set free Sailors from the oce of Naval Meteorology and Oceanography released 10 global drifter buoys belonging to the Univer sity of California, San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography from the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52), May 28, during Pacic Partnership 2013. e buoys measure ocean currents up to 15 meters in depth, sea sur face temperatures and at mospheric pressure. All are important el ements in creating an observation network, al lowing for more accurate weather forecasts. e mission of Pacic Partnership is disaster re lief preparedness, said Lt.j.g. Jerey S. Grabon, Pacic Partnership Mobile Environment Team division ocer. Most of the disasters that are going on in this region are from typhoons and tsunamis, so if we have observations that we can use to help forecast typhoons, that benets the area. e buoys were de ployed at specic coor dinates while USS Pearl Harbor transited the Pa cic Ocean to Samoa, the rst mission port of Pacic Partnership. Both Scripps and the Navy seek to benet from the buoy drop and subse quent data to be collected. e global drifter buoys provide real-time data in support of both civilian and DoD activities. at data can be used to improve forecasts, which can benet the ef fectiveness of activities like search and rescue missions and disaster re sponse operations. I think it is absolutely crucial we have the abil ity to engage with the U.S. Navy and work in a syner gistic way to collect useful data and create deploy ment opportunities in re gions that are hard to ac cess with commercial and scientic vessels, said Luca Centurioni, scientist, Scripps physical oceanog raphy research division. We really welcome the opportunity to work to gether with the U.S. Navy 3rd Fleet. Grabon said that much of the ongoing research has the potential to impact the Navy. Because the Navy is a sea-going, war-ghting force, the better the uni versities understand the ocean, the better the Navy will understand it, Gra bon said. Pacic Partnership is about bringing people to gether. e collaboration of the University of Cali fornia, San Diego Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the United States Navy demonstrates a co operative approach to both disaster preparedness and prevention by working to understand the many variables that con tribute to the long history of natural disasters that have earned the whole region the moniker, e Pacic Ring of Fire. Four Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, were awarded med als at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., for their actions during the units deployment to Afghanistan, June 11. First Lt. Stephen C. Hu, the 81 mm mortar pla toon commander serving with the battalion and Cpl. Jorge Salazar, a re team leader serving with the battalion, were presented the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V for valor. Sergeant Trey T. Cholewa, a section leader serving with the battalion, and Gunnery Sgt. Benjamin C. Stryeler, a platoon ser geant with the battalion, were presented the Navy and Marine Corps Com mendation Medal with combat V for valor. Hu, led more than 50 Marines and Afghan soldiers in an assault on an insurgent stronghold of more than 25 highly trained ghters. During the 60 hour ght, he exposed himself to en emy re while maneuver ing his Marines, directing their re and evacuating the casualties from the battleeld. To me the award stands as a representation, a small token of remembrance of my men, my platoon and what we accomplished to gether in pursuing the en emy, said Hu, a native of Franklin County, Va. Salazar took charge of his squad after his squad leader was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He directed the re of his squad even after his legs were severed below the knee by a subsequent IED blast. My squad leader was injured and I immediately took over the squad and directed them to re, said Salazar, a native of Delano Calif. On the way out, I stepped on an IED and it took out my legs immedi ately, but I continued to lead my Marines. Cholewa, led 47 opera tions in the volatile Trek Nawa area of southern Helmand provence. He fought the enemy during 72 hours of sus tained combat after in serting by helicopter into an insurgent stronghold where he exposed himself to enemy re to maneuver his Marines and destroy key enemy positions. Stryeler led his Ma rines on 74 mounted and dismounted combat patrols in the battalionss area of operations, neu tralizing a determined enemy in several erce small arms engagements and conducting four casualty evacuations for wounded Marines and their Afghan National Army counter parts. His superiors cite Stryelers professionalism o the battleeld as the foundation for his platoons success in 19 engagements with the en emy. After the awards were given, Hu said it was an honor serving with the Marines who were recognized. Today was a humbling experience, said Hu. We were able to come out here and remember what we accomplished out there and what we were able to accomplish together. We relived as a unit, as a family, some of the actions that took place during our deployment to Afghanistan. Marines earn Bronze Star

PAGE 11

Retired Coast Guard Cmdr. Ray Evans, 92, was laid to rest June 5, with full military honors. Evans, who passed away May 30, was the nal sur vivor of a dramatic res cue of a group of Marines pinned down by machine gun re during the battle of Guadalcanal, Septem ber 1942 where he earned the Navy Cross. Among those who at tended the memorial service were his wife of more than 70 years, Doro thy; his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and Coast Guard Vice Commandant Vice Adm. John Currier. Members of the Marine Corps Security Battalion Force Battalion Bangor performed a three-volley salute at the funeral signi fying the bond Evans and the Marine Corps have shared since the darkest days of World War II. Evans joined the Coast Guard alongside the ser vices only Medal of Honor recipient, Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro, in September 1939. [I] Came out of high school and looked for a job all summer in 1939 and it was a very poor time for jobs and went to the Coast Guard and they said they had not taken a recruit in seven years, said Evans in an oral history recorded in 1992. ey called me back in September and said, Are you still interest ed? Weve got seven open ings. I said, yes I am. And thats how it started, as an apprentice seaman at $21 a month. After joint assignments that took Evans and Munro from Washington to New York City found themselves aboard the Hunter Liggett. It was during a trip to India, 250 miles south of Cape Town, South Af rica, on a quiet December morning in 1941, they heard over the radio bombs had fallen on Pearl Harbor. In less than a year Ev ans and Munro were re assigned as coxswain and crew of a Higgins boats responsible for transport ing Marines to and from Guadalcanal. In the Second Battle of the Matanikau, part of the Guadalcanal campaign, after successfully taking Marines from the 1st Bat talion 7th Marines 1st Ma rine Division ashore, the two Coast Guardsmen returned to their previously assigned position. Almost immediately, they learned that conditions ashore were dierent than had been anticipated and the Marines were sur rounded by enemy Japanese forces on the beachhead. e Marines needed to be evacuated. Both men volunteered for the job, brought their boats to shore under heavy enemy re and pro ceeded to evacuate the men on the beach. Evans remained at his post during the entire evacuation. He maintained control of his boat with one hand on the wheel and con tinued to re his weapon with the other until the last boat cleared the beach. When the majority of the Marines were in the boats, complications arose in evacuating the last men, whom Munro realized would be in the greatest danger. Munro placed himself and his boats to serve as cover for the last men to leave. I saw that Doug was facing forward, and I was standing up by the cox swain looking back, I saw this line of waterspouts coming across the water, and I yelled at Doug to get down, said Evans dur ing his oral history. He couldnt hear me over the engine noise, and it hit him. It was one burst of re. And thats how he died. And thats how it happened. Munro remained con scious long enough to say just four words. He said did they get o? and thats about all he said. And then he died. I dont think he ever heard me answer him. It was very quick fortunately, re called Evans. Evans remained hum ble about his service on Guadalcanal, despite the heroics exhibited that day. We just did a job, said Evans. We were asked to take them over there, and we were asked to bring them back o [of] there, and [thats] what we did. ats what the Coast Guard does. We do what were asked to do. e Coast Guards rst major participation in the Pacic war was at Gua dalcanal. During the war, the Coast Guard manned more than 350 ships and hundreds more amphibi ous type assault craft. Evans, and others serv ing alongside him, per formed their mission with valor and bravery that has left an indelible mark in our services legacy. He was a multi-dimen sional man. He was a man both ordinary and extraor dinary. An ocer, a leader, a husband, a father, a hero. He was iconic in Coast Guard history, amongst the very giants in our 220 year past, said Currier at his memorial service. While another chapter of a heroic World War II veteran has closed, his sacrices will never be for gotten.WWII CG hero saluted DARPA tests sub hunters e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agen cys Distributed Agile Submarine Hunting Program has tested two complementary prototype sys tems as part of its Phase 2 development eort. e prototypes demonstrated functional sonar, communications and mobility at deep depths. e successful tests fur thered DASHs goals to apply advances in deepocean distributed sonar to help nd and track quiet submarines. e rst prototype is the Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System, de veloped by a team led by Science Applications In ternational Corporation. TRAPS is a xed passive sonar node designed to achieve large-area cover age by exploiting advantages of operating from the deep seaoor. is ex pendable, low-size, weight and power node communicated to a stationary surface node via wireless acoustic modems, with further secure RF reach back to the performers facilities via satellite. e goal is not only to show we can address the most challenging problem in ASW [anti-submarine warfare], but that we can do so with systems that are scalable and aord able, said Andy Coon, DARPA program manager. A single deep sea node provides a eld of view with signicant cover age allowing for a limited number of nodes to scale to large areas. Within the trade space of deep ocean sonar, we need to get creative to achieve aordable hardware and operations. We purposely have avoided increasing the size and complexity of arrays to achieve our aims. is is a gamble, but we believe the potential payo will be high. e second prototype is the Submarine Hold at RisK, an unmanned underwater vehicle devel oped by a team led by Applied Physical Systems. SHARK intends to provide a mobile active sonar platform to track submarines after initial detec tions are made. APS team member Bluen Robotics recently deployed the prototype to depth in February 2013. Sending the prototype deep for the rst time was like going to another planet and took nerve, Coon said. I am very pleased with the team and the vehicles performance at sea. We knew the design requirements of the sys tem were challenging for industry to meet, especially when constrained to a price point that required designers to incorporate Commercial O-the-Shelf (COTS) components not normally used at these depths. A third DASH team member, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, supported the physical network layers that both teams used. TRAPS and SHARK are scheduled to demonstrate their core sonar functionality together. Subsequent eorts may follow to realize multiple sonar nodes as well as the integration of the SHARK UUV with its sonar. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Army researchers are responding to a request from the U.S. Special Operations Command for technologies to help de velop a revolutionary Tac tical Assault Light Opera tor Suit. e Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS, is an advanced in fantry uniform that promises to provide superhuman strength with greater ballistic protection. Using wide-area net working and on-board computers, operators will have more situational awareness of the action around them and of their own bodies. the Army Re search, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, is submitting TALOS pro posals in response to the May 15 request. ere is no one industry that can build it, said SO COM Senior Enlisted Ad visor Command Sgt. Maj. Chris Faris during a panel discussion at a conference at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., recently, reported De fense Media Network. e request, currently posted on Federal Busi ness Opportunities, is looking for technology demonstration submis sions from research and development organizations, private industry, individuals, government labs and academia to support the command-direct ed requirement issued by Adm. William McRaven, USSOCOM commander. [e] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat ar mor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power moni toring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that, a whole bunch of stu that RDECOM is playing heavily in, said. Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, an RDECOM science advisor assigned to SOCOM. TALOS will have a phys iological subsystem that lies against the skin that is embedded with sensors to monitor core body tem perature, skin temperature, heart rate, body posi tion and hydration levels. Scientists at the Mas sachusetts Institute of Technology are currently developing armor made from magnetorheological uids liquid body armor that transforms from liquid to solid in milliseconds when a mag netic eld or electrical current is applied. ough still in development, this technology will likely be submitted to support TALOS. RDECOM cuts across every aspect making up this combat armor suit, Borjes said Its advanced armor. Its communica tions, antennas. Its cog nitive performance. Its sensors, miniature-type circuits. ats all going to t in here, too. SOCOM demonstrations will take place July 8 to 10, at or near MacDill Air Force Base. e request asked par ticipants to submit a white paper summary of their technology by May 31, de scribing how TALOS can be constructed using cur rent and emerging tech nologies. A limited number of participant white papers will be selected and those selected will demonstrate their technologies. e initial demonstration goal is to identify technologies that could be integrated into an initial capability within a year. A second goal is to de termine if elding the TALOS within three years is feasible. Army science advisors, such as Borjes, are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solu tions to Soldiers needs. e Field Assistance in Science and Technology programs 30 science advi sors, both uniformed of cers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the RDECOMs thousands of subject matter experts. RDECOM has the mis sion to develop tech nology and engineering solutions for Americas Soldiers, and is a major subordinate command of the Army Materiel Command. AMC is the Armys premier provider of mate riel readiness technol ogy, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projec tion and sustainment to the total force, across the spectrum of joint military operations. If a Soldier shoots it, drives it, ies it, wears it, eats it or communicates with it, AMC provides it. Combat uniform in works Navy Secretary Ray Mabus would like to see the number of dierent camouage uniforms in the military come down. e notion that we have all this camouage doesnt make a whole lot of sense to me, he told the Defense Writers Group recently. He said the blueberries which is what sailors call their blue cammies work only when sailors fall overboard. e secretary said he would support an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Bill for scal year 2014 that would man date a single camouage uni form for all the services. At one time that was the case. In the late 1980s, all services wore the battle-dress uniform, a green, brown and black uniform that grew out of Army research, said Lt. Col. Jerry Pionk, an Army spokesman. For the Gulf War, the Army also developed the chocolate chip uniforms worn in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq. e Marines broke away from the uniform uniform when they went with their digital cam mies in 2002. Not to be outdone, the Army also went digital with the Army combat uniform, using the uni versal combat pattern. e Air Force followed, and then the Navy went digital. In all, there are 18 dierent camouage uniforms.Navy secretary calls for cut in number of camoage uniforms 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 13

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 13 Marines take Sailors along e very nature of the 26th Marine Ex peditionary Unit, embarking thousands of Marines on Navy amphibious assault ships, means that Marines are, by rote, exposed to the Navy way of life; to watch es, to ight quarters, to a life of passage ways, ladder wells, decks, and hatches. Occasionally, though, it goes in reverse. A number of junior ocers from the USS Carter Hall accompanied the Ma rines of the 26th MEU, joining them in the deserts of Jordan during Exercise Ea ger Lion 2013 from June 9 to June 20. ey attached to the platoons of Com pany K, Battalion Landing Team 3/2, 26th MEU. Heading wherever the Marines go, the ocers are here to gain experience working with the Marines in their natural environment ashore. e theory is that as naval ocers, the more we understand about our mission, to get Marines ashore, the more eective we can be as a whole, said Ensign Alex Cramer, USS Carter Hall main propulsion division ocer, from Knoxville, Tenn. Naval ocers are not typically exposed to the Marine Corps in an operational capacity, aside from transporting the Marines, rarely leaving the ship during a MEU deployment. I usually just see [the Marines] launch on a screen. I wanted to see what the Ma rines actually do, here on the other side, said Ensign Irvin Pajarillo, USS Carter Hall combat information ocer from Ar nold, Md. ere are currently four naval ocers from the ship ashore, with plans to rotate them out for another four after a span of days, allowing all of the Carter Halls ju nior ocers to experience life in the dirt by the end of Eager Lion. We all volunteered to go for the whole time, said Ensign Ethan Strauser, USS Carter Hall gunnery ocer from Chesa peake, Va. Sometimes, its good to have a little time away from ship. e ocers, assigned to the platoons as they are, are undergoing instructions in the basics of Marine life. Living out side, going on patrols, the basics of mili tary operations in the high, dead-dry hills of Jordan, as well as dierences between Marine and Navy leadership. You get to see dierent leadership styles, dierent issues they have to deal with out here, Strauser said. As a Navy ocer new to the eet, youre kind of expected to rely on the chief petty ocers, said Ensign George Stevenson, USS Carter Hall repair divi sion ocer, from Twinsburg, Ohio. As a Marine second lieutenant, youre im mediately expected to lead, to run that platoon. With that furthered understanding of the Marine Corps, the ocers said they hoped to increase the eciency of opera tions between the Navy and the Marine Corps in the future. Some of our guys may not understand how much responsibility the Marine Corps gives its sergeants and corporals, said Stevenson. Maybe we can learn something. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the next three joint high speed vessels (JHSV) will be named USNS Yuma, USNS Bismarck and USNS Burlington, and two lit toral combat ships (LCS) will be named USS Billings and USS Tulsa. It is my privilege as Secretary of the Navy to name these ships after ve great American cities, Mabus said. Several cities will be represented for the rst time in the Navy eet, establishing a new con nection and tradition that forms a bond between a citys residents and the Sailors and Marines who serve in its namesake ship. For decades to come, these ships will sail in the eet, building partner ships and projecting pow er around the world. Joint high speed ves sels are named after small American cities and counties. e future USNS Yuma (JHSV 8) honors the city in Arizona and will be the fourth ship to bear this name. USNS Bismarck (JHSV 9) is the rst naval ves sel to be named in honor of North Dakotas capi tal city. USNS Burlington (JHSV10) is the rst to be named for the city in Vermont. JHSV are high-speed transport vessels that serve in a variety of roles for the military branches in support of overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster re lief and supporting special operations forces. Austal USA in Mobile, Ala., will build the three new JHSV, which will be 338 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 93.5 feet, displace approxi mately 2,362 tons, and op erate at speeds of approximately 40 knots. Littoral combat ships are named to recognize cities that are one of the ve most-populated com munities in a state. USS Billings (LCS 15) is named in honor of Mon tanas largest city and will be the rst ship to bear the name. USS Tulsa (LCS 16) will be the second ship named for Oklahomas second-largest city. ese ships are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal waters. A fast, agile surface combatant, the LCS provides the required war ghting capabilities and operational exibility to execute focused missions close to the shore such as mine warfare, anti-sub marine warfare and sur face warfare. USS Billings is a Free dom-variant littoral combat ship and will be constructed by Lockheed Martin with Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wis. is ship will be 378 feet long, have a beam length of 57.4 feet and travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots. USS Tulsa is an Inde pendence-variant littoral combat ship and is being built by Austal USA in Mo bile, Ala. It will be 419 feet long and have a beam length of 103.7 feet and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 40 knots.Newest ships get names man, NSWCDD Rapid Development and Integration Branch Head. Its keeping my uncles mem ory alive. Coleman located the vintage 48-state ag that would have been own during World War II and contacted the NSWCDD commander in mid-May with a request to y the ag at the NSWCDD head quarters building in honor of his uncle. Imagine nding out that your brother is miss ing in action and pre sumed dead several days after the battle was over, Coleman said. at is how my grandfathers family found out, and my grandmother especially never got over losing her son or not having a way to honor her son. As Coleman informed the command about his uncles story, the request to y a ag evolved into a long awaited ceremony for family members. Were thankful to ev eryone who made this pos sible, said Coleman. e commands support is overwhelming. We greatly appreciate the Navy teams (three NSWCDD Sailors) ag folding ceremony. I could feel the gratitude from them for my uncles sacrice. Trent said her brother enlisted in November 1941. e family saw him for a day in South Carolina the following month, where he was on shore leave. After that, he sent postcards from the Pacic. ey were mainly about how much he missed us, she said. eres not a day goes by that I dont think of him. e Battle of Midway, fought June 4 to 7, 1942, near the Central Pacic is land of Midway, was con sidered the decisive battle of the war in the Pacic, ending Japanese naval superiority. e U.S. Pacic Fleet surprised Japanese forces, sinking four Japa nese carriers, while losing only one.Flag

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013



PAGE 1

NAS Jax, Mayport adopt new policyNavy Region Southeast drivers will no longer be required to display a Department of Defense vehicle decal to gain access to installations beginning July 1. e change will be made to comply with a new Commander, Navy Installations Command policy intended to enhance base security by providing electronic credentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identication cards. Eliminating the DoD decals and implementing electronic credentialing will improve our security posture because it will allow our gate security personnel to more carefully scrutinize authorized identication cards without the added distraction of having to verify the decal, said Capt. Brett Calkins, Navy Region Southeast operations and plans ocer. In addition to enhancing security at the gate, the new policy will also work to protect Department of Defense personnel when they are o the base, Calkins said. You really never know where or when you are going to encounter terrorism, he said. Vehicle decals can be easily recognizable to those out there that would like to do our service members harm, so not having them on vehicles o base will help to lower visibility and, in essence, help protect our people from potential harm. e new policy will also have a major impact on installation budgets, resulting in an estimated $750,000 in annual savings Navy-wide, as well as a drastic reduction in administrative tasks. ose savings will be diverted to critical AT/FP programs, reported Navy Times. First and foremost, this policy change is going to help us better protect personnel, but the nancial benets to not having stickers are obvious, said Bruce Toth, NRSE regional security ofcer. Sticker costs can add up, especially when families have multiple vehicles and people are constantly buying and selling used vehicles not to mention the manpower it takes to supply them. Our goal is to take those funds and reinvest them back into our force protection eorts. According to Toth, the original purpose of the DoD decal was to not only for base access, but also to ensure that drivers on installations possessed a valid drivers license, proof of adequate insurance and a current state vehicle registration. While the decals are set for elimination next month, the requirement for vehicles to be registered with the installation security departments will continue. Personnel and residents that are permanently assigned to a Up Periscope Our all-time favorite sports movies Page 9 Legacy Adm. Fluckey and his exploits with USS Barb Page 6 Happening Command Picnic, Run For Fallen, Ride to Work Pages 5, 8 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Southeast Region joins eliminating vehicle stickers DEFY musters for 2-week summer camp Kings Bay drug-awareness unit undergoes mentoring, character building e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Drug Education For Youth programs summer day camp was June 3 through June 14 onboard Kings Bay. DEFY is geared toward children to help them build character, instill leadership and give them condence to follow a positive, healthy lifestyle as drug-free citizens. is program is specically tailored for military children between the ages of nine to 12, and what we do is teach them about legal and illegal drugs such as alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and other things of that nature, said Sallie Galyean, Kings Bay assistant local program manager. We teach them other things that they can do to build up some resiliency skills or life skills for them to be supportive of themselves if someone ever comes up to them and they have an opportunity to try drugs or alcohol, that they have some positive ways to respond. During the twoweek program, the children participated in different sports activities, such as golng, bowling and swimming. At the beginning and end of the camp, the campers completed the presidential We want the kids to know that it is OK to talk to an adult ... MTC John Cook DEFY Mentor White House will up aid to oppositione White House in a statement June 13 condemned Bashar Assads regime in Syria for multiple uses of chemical weapons against Syrian citizens, and pledged increased aid to opposition forces there. In a statement to Congress and the public, the administration alleged that the Assad regime has used chemical weapons, including the nerve agent sarin, on a small scale against the opposition multiple times in the last year. e statement, credited to deputy national security advisor for strategic communications Ben Rhodes, noted President Barack Obama has said his strategic approach to the Syrian conict would change given clear evidence of chemical weapons use. Following on the credible evidence that the regime has used chemical weapons against the Syrian people, the president has augmented the provision of non-lethal assistance to the civilian opposition, and also authorized the expansion of our assistance to the Supreme Military Council, and we will be consulting with Congress on these matters in the coming weeks, the statement reads in part. Put simply, the Assad regime should know that its actions have led us to increase the scope and scale of assistance that we provide to the opposition, including direct support to the SMC. ese eorts will increase going forward. e United States and the international community have a number of other legal, nancial, diplomatic, and military responses available, Rhodes said. We are prepared for all contingencies, and we will make decisions on our own timeline, he said. Any future action we take will be consistent with our Leaks causing harmNational Security director testies before SenateLeaks to the public about a classied National Security Agency terrorist surveillance program that collects data from the phone calls of Americans already have jeopardized national security, the NSA director told a Senate panel in Washington, D.C., June 12. On June 6, from a hotel in Hong Kong where he had ed, former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked information to two newspapers about classied NSA surveillance practices. Testifying before the full Senate Appropriations Committee with representatives from Homeland Security, the FBI and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, who is also commander of U.S. Cyber Command, shared his concern for the nation. Obama condemns Syrias chem weapon use Marines train in JordanMarines of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Units amphibious assault vehicle platoon had its rst bilateral training event of Exercise Eager Lion 2013 in Al Quweira, Jordan, June 12, conducting a live-re shoot in their AAVs with members of the Jordanian armed forces in their own light armored mechanized vehicles.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Every summer, many escape the hustle of daily life by taking time to relax in the great outdoors. Campres add ambience to a campsite but should be used with caution. Following a few basic re safety rules will ensure the preservation of our natural resources for the years to come. As you are enjoying your campre, remember these safety tips: Always build your campfire downwind from your tent or RV in an area that is clear of vegetation. Clear an area at least 15 feet surrounding your tent and/or buildings. Never leave your campre unattended and remember to fully extinguish the re before going to bed or leaving your campsite by pouring lots of water on the re. Drown all embers, not just the red ones, continue to pour water until hissing sound stops. Stir the campre ashes and embers with a shovel and make sure everything is wet and they are cold to the touch. If you do not have water, use dirt. Mix enough dirt or sand with the embers. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cool. Remember, do not bury the re as the re will continue to smolder and could catch roots on re that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildre. And one last thing, if its too hot to touch, its too hot to leave! Tips to remember when camping with RV and tent before leaving on a trip: Thoroughly check vehicle exhaust system, generator engines and smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. If you dont have smoke or carbon monoxide detectors in your RV, install them. Park the RV in clear area so the exhaust system on your car or truck doesnt ignite dry vegetation. Properly ventilate your RV when cooking by opening a window or over head vent and turn on exhaust fan. Place a 5-pound, ABC-rated re extinguisher near each exit and know how to use them. Campers who carry extra fuel for propane/gasoline type stoves in the trunk of their car should take the precaution of opening the trunk periodically to ventilate the compartment. According to statistics 2012 the 2012 National Interagency Fire Center Georgia had 3,331 land wild res and the re consumed 19,136 acres. When camping with a campre is to rst make sure campres are permitted. Have a safe and enjoyable summer, and if you have any questions dont hesitate to call the NSB Kings Bay Fire Department Prevention Team at (912) 573-9998. e Navy announced last month its plans to change the way ocial Navy messages are delivered, which is the result of an ongoing eort to increase eciency and cut costs. e eciencies and savings are part of an ongoing message improvement process that is culminating with a new system known as the Command and Control Oce Information Exchange, which will come online in August 2013. It is designed to simplify messages for both the user and administrator and will save the Navy more than $15 million a year when operational. e Navy gains signicant cost eciencies by eliminating the current Defense Message System infrastructure and simply using the existing email infrastructure for nal delivery, said James McCarty, the naval messaging program manager at U.S. Fleet Cyber Command. By utilizing this methodology we will be able to send messages at 10 percent of the cost and size of current systems. In the rst phase, C2OIX is replacing the Navys current DMS messaging program with a new version of the existing Navy Interface for Command Email software, which will be deployed on the secret and top secret networks, as well as create a uniform system for sea and shore duty commands. As background, part of the ongoing upgrade process has been the implementation of NICE, the messaging system that has been in place on the Non-classied Internet Protocol Router Network since 2011. In phase one, we are going to install all the hardware, said McCarty. One hundred servers are going to be replaced by ve new servers that will handle all messaging for SIPRNet (secret internet protocol router network). Another major change in the Navys messaging will be seen in the format on the classied systems. Navy messages had historically been formatted in all capital letters. However, a message sent to all com mands on April 30, 2013 (ALCOM 085/13) notied Navy users that both upper and lower case (or sentence case) messages could be sent. Lowercase messages are here to stay; they provide a more readable format, which can delivered to and shared on any of the current Web 3.0 technologies (chat, portals, wikis, blogs, etc.), McCarty said. It is true that we still have systems that are unable to process mixed case; in these instances, the C2OIX system will be able to convert the text to upper case before making nal delivery. By 2015, C2OIX will seamlessly interface with or absorb the existing legacy messaging capabilities and allow mixed case messages to be delivered to all messaging systems. e nal phase of C2OIX is scheduled to begin in 2014 and will bring messaging into a true net-centric cloud computing virtual environment. is nal stage will remove 66% of the remaining servers and save the Navy an additional $5 million annually compared to current costs. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 21. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program information, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will conduct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civilians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more information or to enroll your teen.Red Cross seeking volunteerse American Red Cross has reopened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Tennessee Ave. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Navy adopts new messaging service Navy Cyber Command Campers, be aware of re hazzards Kings Bay Fire Dept. Stable housing leads to long-term stability, which factors into reliability and other characteristics of successful employees. Are you aware that loans guaranteed by the VA Home Loan Program have had the lowest foreclosure rate in the past 19 quarters compared to all other types of home loans? is is pretty signicant given the trials and tribulations of the housing market during the past several years. Many do not know that VAs Home Loan Program Benet is not a onetime benet, but can be reused. Since 1944, more than 20 million Veterans and Service Members have enjoyed the benet of a home purchase through the VA Home Loan program. Veterans who have already used their VA benet in their home purchase may reuse that benet to purchase another residence, or to renance to a lower rate. is is referred to as an Interest Rate Reduction Renance Loan, or or Streamline Renance Loan. No appraisal or credit underwriting is required. Consider this, if a Veteran used their benet, perhaps while on active duty, to purchase a home, they should compare their interest rate with current rates in their area. at veteran can reuse their VA benet to renance their home with no money out of pocket, as costs may be included in the loan. If that veteran has since separated or retired from the military and receives disability compensation of at least 10 percent, he or she is exempt from the funding fee. is can be a considerable monthly or total savings for the Veteran. On average, Veterans saved more than $200 per monthly payment on IRRRLs last year, saving those Veterans over $900 million in their rst two years alone! Veterans may obtain a Certicate of Eligibility online through eBenets or through their lender. I encourage Veterans to seek the advice of a nancial professional and to contact several lenders for quotes to determine what is in their best interest. If you have any questions, you can contact your closest VA regional ofce with Loan Guaranty sta by calling (877) 827-3702, or visiting the www.va.gov Web site. Curtis Coy is VAs Deputy Undersecretary for Economic Opportunity and a U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force Veteran.VA home loans more than buying Veterans Aairs HUD, VA team to help homelessApproximately 9,000 homeless Veterans living on the streets and in the nations shelter system will soon nd a permanent place to call home. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan andDepartment of Veterans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki recently announced that HUD will provide $60 million to local public housing agencies across the country to oer permanent supportive housing to homeless Veterans, many of whom are living with chronic disabling conditions. e supportive housing assistance announced is provided through the HUD-Veterans Afars Supportive Housing Program, which combines rental assistance from HUD with case management and clinical services provided by VA. Since 2008, a total of 48,385 vouchers have been awarded and 42,557 formerly homeless Veterans are currently in homes because of HUD-VASH.

PAGE 3

Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Training Center held a change of command at Naval Base Point Loma, June 4. Capt. Scott Dugan relieved Capt. Richard omas as commanding ocer. omas assumed command of the training center in June 2011. During his tenure, he led the renewal of eet anti-submarine warfare training by linking schoolhouse education to warships ready for tasking, and implementing the Advanced Warfare Training program to enhance shipboard operator and maintainer prociency. Capt. Don Schmieley, Center for Surface Combat Systems commanding ocer, spoke of omas successful tour. As commanding ocer, Rich positively impacted more than 220 Sailors and civilian employees, promoted more than 50 sta members, and designated almost 70 Master Training Specialists, Schmieley said. He re-aligned his command by seamlessly integrating the Littoral Combat Ship Training Facility, which included assuming responsibility for close to 40 civilian employees, ve training simulators, and associated support spaces. Schmieley highlighted omas achievements while at the command. He was also a very good steward of the training facility by spearheading an extensive renovation to maximize use of available space, which consolidated workspaces, said Schmieley. He relocated 11 courses of instruction to capitalize on training and instructor cross-utilization and greatly reduce operating costs. omas was presented the Legion of Merit, and reected on his tour at FLEASWTRACEN. Fleet ASW has a long and proud heritage of training Sailors and preparing them to sail into harms way, ready to search, classify and destroy the enemy if called upon, and to control the seas, said omas. ere will be resource challenges, new weapons systems and platforms, changes in how training is delivered and real world events, but I urge you to remember three things as we move forward. Do the right things, do things right and mission rst...people always. Dugan previously served on the Oce of the Chief of Naval Operations Sta, Assessment Division (OPNAV N81), where he served as Sea Shield Branch Head, the Executive Assistant to the Director, and as the Warghting Support Branch Head. Dugan said he looks forward to working with the sta and students at FLEASWTRACEN. Im excited, grateful, and humble for the opportunity to be your commanding ocer, said Dugan. I look forward to working with you to complete our critical mission of developing and delivering world class surface combat systems training to the eet. As commanding ocer of FLEASWTRACEN, Dugan assumes responsibility for the Navys AntiSubmarine Warfare and Combat Direction and Control Training Center of excellence. e command was established in 1960 and realigned with CSCS in 2004. Rich has been an exceptional driving force at FLEASWTRACEN and a great colleague, said Schmieley. e University of Nebraska-Lincoln Navy Reserve Ocer Training Corps will be fortunate to have Rich as their commanding ocer. Im condent he will have great success training and developing knowledgeable leaders who will positively impact the future of our Navy. Center for Surface Combat Systems oversees the development of surface warfare training and its headquarters sta oversees 14 learning sites, including FLEASWTRACEN, and provides almost 70,000 hours of curriculum and close to 700 courses a year to more than 40,000 Sailors. e training center uses a mix of blended learning comprised of instructor led classes, hands on labs, simulation and computerbased training. Courses include specialized training supporting nine enlisted ratings, Fire Controlmen, Electronic Technicians, Interior Communications, Sonar Technician (surface), Gunners Mates, Mineman, Operations Specialists, Boatswains Mates, and Quartermasters, as well as training surface warfare ocers in skills required to tactically operate and employ Aegis, Ship Self Defense System, and Tomahawk weapon system equipped ships. Building maritime partnerships, the command also provides training to many international students. Anti-sub warfare center changes commandNavy installation will inprocess and out-process at the installation Pass and Identication Oce. According to the new CNIC policy, motorcycle operators safety requirements, barment control and enforcement of state licensing, registration, insurance and safety requirements will be enforced through random vehicle inspections and routine trac enforcement. Our requirements will not change. Anyone operating a motor vehicle on base will still be required to carry proof of insurance and registration in accordance with their respective state law, Toth said. e policy change will take eect on board every CNIC installation July 1. Drivers who still need access to other services installations that may still require a decal will be permitted to display the decal until it expires. Under the new policy, base visitors will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the installation commanding ocer. For more information, contact your local installation Security Department or Pass and I.D. oce.Sticker THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 challenge that promotes physical health and tness. We tie a message to exercising, said Megan Hendricks, one of the six Sea Cadets participating as a DEFY junior mentor. We teach them that exercise gives you endorphins which produce natural highs. We tell them that these are the things you can do instead of drugs. Service members from Kings Bay helped mentor the children during the course of the camp. We want the kids to know that it is OK to talk to an adult, not to have the stigma that I cant talk to them because they are an adult, but to ask a question before they get into something silly, said DEFY Mentor Chief Missile Technician John Cook. e DEFY program is split into two phases. Phase 1 is a two-week summer leadership day camp. Phase 2 are a series of oncea-month meetings on Saturdays from August through May. Each phase is run by positive role-model mentoring and community outreach to improve the quality of life for military personnel and their families, through education on health, physical tness, citizenship and life skills.DEFY

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 rough to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf Course is oering Punch Cards for discounted prices on golf. For Military E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all others 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party, so stop by and check it out. Someone is always ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book before Aug. 1, and receive $50 off your room rental just by mentioning Magnolias 50 off. Call (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp. Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp is July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 5738475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp For ages 5 to 14 its June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials needed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergar ten through age 12 and runs through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for spon sor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Single/dual military parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Liberty call Golf course oers punch cards MWR Sports Lets eat national interest, and must ad vance our objectives, which include achieving a negotiated political settlement to establish an authority that can provide basic stability and administer state institutions; protecting the rights of all Syrians; securing unconventional and advanced conventional weapons; and countering terrorist activity. e statement cites intelligence reports, witness inter views, medical reports and open-source reporting, including on social media platforms, as providing multiple, indepen dent streams of information on which to base the assessment of chemical weapons use. e intelligence community estimates that 100 to 150 people have died from detected chemical weapons attacks in Syria to date; however, casualty data is likely incomplete, Rhodes said. While the lethality of these attacks make up only a small portion of the catastrophic loss of life in Syria, which now stands at more than 90,000 deaths, the use of chemical weapons violates international norms and crosses clear red lines that have existed within the international community for decades. He added, We believe that the Assad regime maintains control of these weapons. We have no reliable, corroborated reporting to indicate that the opposition in Syria has acquired or used chemical weapons. e White House and allies will present a credible, evi dentiary case to share with the international community and the public, Rhodes said. We will also be providing a let ter to [United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon], calling the U.N.s attention to our up dated intelligence assessment and specic incidents of alleged chemical weapons use. We re quest that the U.N. mission in clude these incidents in its on going investigation and report, as appropriate, on its ndings. Great harm has already been done by opening this up, and the consequence, I believe, is [that] our security is jeopardized, Alexander said. Alexander said the surveillance program has disrupted or helped to disrupt in the United States and abroad dozens of terrorist events, including the 2009 case of Najibullah Zazi, an Afghan-American arrested as part of the 2009 U.S. al-Qaida group accused of planning suicide bombings on the New York City subway system. Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper told the Senate in March that the NSA collection program was critical to discovery and disruption of the Zazi case. Discovery in the case began with phone data surveillance information based on operatives overseas. We saw connections to a person in Colorado, and that was passed to the FBI. e FBI determined who that was Zazi and [associated] phone numbers, Alexander said. e phone numbers on Zazi were the things that then allowed us to use the business-records [Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act] to go and nd out connections from Zazi to other players throughout communities, specically in New York City, the general added. As they questioned Alexander and the other witnesses, some of the senators wanted to know how Snowden, a 29-year-old high-school and communitycollege dropout who held shortterm and relatively low-level positions with the CIA, NSA and then was an NSA contractor, had access to such highly classied information. Alexander said that in the information technology arena, some of these folks have tremendous skills to operate networks. at was [Snowdens] job for the most part, from 2009 to 2010, as an IT system administrator within those networks. He had great skills in that area. Snowden was a system administrator with access to key parts of the network, Alexander said. So weve got to address that, he acknowledged. Sen. Susan Collins of Maine addressed Alexander at one point during the hearing. I saw an interview in which Mr. Snowden claimed that due to his position at NSA he could tap into virtually any Americans phone calls or emails, she said. True or false? False, the general replied. I know of no way to do that. e senators also asked Alexander how the NSA and other intelligence organizations could avoid the need to hire young people with so little experience to make up the future cyber workforce. In the military, we are going to hire young folks who graduate from high school to work in this area, and the key will be the training that we give them, the general said. Ideally wed like to get four years out of a top-notch engineering school for some of the military positions, but we wont get that, so we have a responsibility to bring them into the force and train them.SyriaSecurity

PAGE 6

6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 In any training event, one of the major end states is that we build relationships and the understanding that were not just building military skills, but also establishing rapport on a personal and professional level, said Marine Corps Capt. Jonathan Riebe, the platoons commander. I think its important that we take part in these multinational operations in order to share methods on how we maintain our military and how we employ our military, added Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Michael Conners, platoon sergeant. Eager Lion has proven to be more than just a yearly exercise in the high deserts of Jordan involving service members from the United States, Jordan and other partner nations, Riebe said. It is a signicant training exercise solidifying already strong partnerships, he added. Jordan has been a partner of ours, supporting us through Operation Enduring Freedom, Riebe said. Eager Lion is an annual training exercise with the Jordanians to strengthen our military and political ties and foster a friendly relationship in the area. e platoons Marines are focusing their training by tailoring to their Jordanian hosts and thoroughly observing the Jordanian skillsets. Were approaching the training in a logical fashion [by] really getting the host nations input on what theyre trying to get out of the training, Riebe ex plained. Were adapting the assets we have to give them the training [that will most benet them]. e Marines of AAV Platoon and the rest of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit will be in Jordan for the remainder of Eager Lion, training with their Jordanian and United Kingdom counterparts.Marines Navy College information e USS Barb, a 1,525-ton Gato class submarine built at Groton, Connecticut, was commissioned in July 1942. at fall the submarine was sent to operate in European waters, taking part in the Morocco invasion in November. Four more war patrols in the rst half of 1943 took her to the Bay of Biscay, the North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea but produced no damage to the enemy. In mid-1943 Barb went to the Pacic. at fall her sixth war patrol took her o China, where it damaged two enemy ships. Following a West Coast overhaul, Barb operated in the central and western Pacic during March and April 1944, sinking one ship and bombarding an enemy shore facility. After that, under Cmdr. Eugene B. Fluckey, Barbs skipper for the rest of the war, the submarines combat record became remarkably successful. Barbs eighth war patrol, o northern Japan in May through July, deprived the enemy of ve ships and saw the rst of many gunre actions that ultimately destroyed some 20 small vessels. On her ninth war patrol, operating with two other submarines between the Philippines and China in August and September 1944, Barb sank three more Japanese ships, among them the escort carrier Unyo. In addition, Barb rescued 14 Allied prisoners of war. e subs next two cruises, in the East China Sea during October 1944 through February 1945, were also made in close cooperation with other U.S. submarines. Barb sank two ships on its 10th patrol and four more on its 11th, with a partial credit for another. e 11th patrol was conducted in the Formosa Straits and East China Sea o the east coast of China, from Shanghai to Kam Kit. During this patrol, Barb, displaying the ultimate in skill and daring, penetrated Namkwan Harbor on the China coast and wrought havoc upon a convoy of some 30 enemy ships at anchor. Riding dangerously in shallow waters, Barb launched its torpedoes into the enemy group and then retired at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined, and rock-obstructed waters. In recognition of this outstanding patrol, Fluckey was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and Barb received the Presidential Unit Citation. e Presidential Unit Citation read as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action during the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh War Patrols against enemy Japanese surface forces in restricted waters of the Pacic. Persistent in her search for vital targets, the Barb relent lessly tracked down the enemy and struck with indomitable fury despite unfavorable attack USS Barb, submarine star of World War II Eugene Bennett Fluckey was born in Washington, D.C., on 5 October 1913. Following four years at the U.S. Naval Academy, he graduated with the Class of 1935 and received a commission. Ensign Fluckeys rst assignments, as an ocer of the battleship Nevada and the destroyer McCormick, were followed in 1938 by instruction at the Submarine School, New London, located at Groton, Connecticut. In December of that year Lt. j.g. Fluckey was assigned to the submarine S-42. He served in USS Bonita in 1941 to 1942, during which time he was promoted to Lieutenant. From mid-1942 into early 1944, Fluckey received Naval Engineering instruction and attended Prospective Commanding Ocers School at New London, then went to the Pacic where he made a war patrol as Prospective Commanding Ocer of the submarine Barb, Promoted to Lt. Commander in May 1943 and Commander in March 1944, he assumed command of Barb in late April Fluckeys daring set Barbs pace

PAGE 7

opportunity and severe countermeasures. Handled superbly, she held unde viatingly to her aggressive course and, on contacting a concentration of hostile ships in the lower reaches of a harbor, boldly penetrated the formidable screen. Riding dangerously, surfaced, in shallow water, the Barb launched her torpedoes into the enemy group to score devastating hits on the major targets, thereafter retir ing at high speed on the surface in a full hours run through uncharted, heavily mined and rock obstructed waters. Inexorable in combat, the Barb also braved the perils of a topical typhoon to rescue fourteen British and Australian prisoners of war who had survived the torpe doing and sinking of a hos tile transport ship en route from Singapore to the Japa nese Empire. Determined in carrying the ght to the en emy, the Barb has achieved an illustrious record of gal lantry in action, reecting the highest credit upon her valiant ocers and men and upon the United States Na val Service. Another Mare Island overhaul gave Barb a larger deck gun and a rocket launcher. Returning to northern Japan in June 1945 for its 12th war patrol, both of these weapons were used to sink small craft and bombard shore facilities. Barbs torpedoes sank two more ships, a freighter and the escort Kaibokan No. 112, and some of its crew made raid ashore that destroyed a railroad train. Barb ended World War II among the dozen topscoring U.S. submarines in terms of ships sunk, and third in terms of tonnage. If a disputed credit for another ship is counted, Barb would have ranked rst in the latter category. After returning to the U.S. East Coast in September 1945, Barb was generally inactive until formally decommissioned in February 1947. e intensied Cold War brought Barb back into commission in December 1951, and it performed training service until midJanuary 1954. Barb then underwent conversion to the stream lined Guppy conguration and operated briey on tri als and training from August until December 1954, when it was loaned to Italy and re named Enrico Tazzoli. e submarine served actively with the Italian Navy until 1972 and was sold for scrapping in April 1975.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Monday, June 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Barb of the latter year. During ve war patrols Cmdr. Fluckeys initiative and agressiveness cost the enemy at least 16 ships, many small craft and facilities ashore, earning a Medal of Honor and four Navy Crosses for himself, and Presidential Unit Citations and the Navy Unit Commendation for Barb. In August 1945 Cmdr. Fluckey became Prospective Commanding Ocer of the new submarine Dogsh, then under construction at Groton, Connecticut. However, this assignment ended after a few months and he began duty in Washington, D.C., rst in the Oce of the Secretary of the Navy, then at the War Plans Division and, beginning in late 1945, as Personal Aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz. In June 1947 he again received a seagoing command, the modernized submarine Halfbeak. In 1949-1950 Fluckey served on the sta of Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet and from October 1950 to July 1953 was U.S. Naval Attache at Lisbon, Portugal. Command of Submarine Division 52 in 1953 to 1954 was followed, after his promotion to the rank of Captain, by command of the submarine tender Sperry and of Submarine Squadron FIVE. During the later 1950s Captain Fluckey was assigned to the Naval Academy, attended the National War College and served with the National Security Council. Selection for promotion to Rear Admiral in mid-1960 was followed by tours as Commander Amphibious Group Four, presidency of the Board of Inspection and Survey and a temporary assignment as Task Force Director of the Shipyards Appraisal Group. In June 1964 Rear Admiral Fluckey became Commander Submarine Force, Pacic, and in July 1966 he reported as Director of Naval Intelligence. Two years later he became Chief of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Portugal. Fluckey retired from active duty at the beginning of August 1972. He died in 2007 at age 93.Fluckey THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

PAGE 8

Run For The Fallen Ride Your Bike To Work 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 9

Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho With more than 20 years of my 35-year newspa per career in sports, I gotta admit I love sports. Is there anything better than, to borrow from the opening of ABCs Wide World of Sports, the thrill of victory ... and the agony of defeat ... the human drama of athletic competition? I like sports movies, too. But with them, I like the funny ones. My three favorite sports movies are Slap Shot, Caddy Shack and The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings. Heres what others said.Lance Cpl. Dakota Clark Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Jena, La. Friday Night Lights, The Longest Yard and Happy Gilmore. ET3 Katheren Lenocker NSB Kings Bay Farmington, N.M. Remember the Titans, We are Marshall and The Blind Side. Lance Cpl. Jeffrey Torres Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Bronx, N.Y. The Scout, Facing the Giants and Remember the Titans Cpl. John Rudd Marine Corps Security Force Battalion St. Charles, Ill. Hoosiers, Friday Night Lights and The Rookie. CS1 James Bryant Pirates Cove Galley Suffolk, Va. The old Longest Yard with Burt Reynolds, A League of their Own and The Fan . CS2 Devon Dumas Pirates Cove Galley Aurora, Ill. The Mighty Ducks, Happy Gilmore and Love & Basketball. e Sailor, Seaman 2nd Class George Luther Self, was killed in action the day before his 25th birthday when a Japanese submarine red torpedoes that sunk the destroyer USS Hammann. I am so happy that my brother is recognized and his memory is kept alive, said Virginia Self Trent, 90, after the ceremony. e Hammann was towing the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown back to Pearl Harbor when it was attacked near the end of the battle. e destroyer sank in four minutes with heavy loss of life, and the Yorktown went down early the next day. Trent and other family members watched as NSWCDD Sailors lowered and ceremoniously folded a 48-star ag in honor of Self. I felt honored to be able to honor a fallen Sailor who gave the ultimate sacrice for his family and the country that he loved so much, said Chief Fire Control Technician Christopher Morge. We were extremely happy to be part of something that provided a little closure to a story that should have had the proper ceremony so many years ago. NSWCDD Commander Capt. Michael Smith presented the ag to Trent, telling her that its a symbol of appreciation for her brothers service to the United States and a grateful Navy. Smith also presented Trent with a certicate stating that the ag was own over NSWCDD in Selfs honor with printed words expressing gratitude for Selfs courageous service. is 48-star ag is just as alive as any ag today, said Trents son, Bill ColeFlag ies for Midway Sailor THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

PAGE 10

10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 What dierentiates his command from Army, Navy and Air Force cyber operations is a focus on the forward-deployed nature of Americas expeditionary force in readiness, the commander of Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command said during a recent interview at Quantico, Va. As commander of MARFORCYBER, Lt. Gen. Richard P. Mills heads one of four service components of U.S. Cyber Command. e Marine command stood up in January 2010. Today, 300 Marines, federal civilians and contractors are performing cyber operations, Mills said. at number, he added, will grow to just under 1,000, at least until scal year 2016. Each of the services cyber commands protects its own networks, Mills noted. Where we dier is that we look more at tacticallevel cyber operations and how we will be able to provide our forward-deployed ... Marine Air-Ground Task Force commanders with the capability to reach back into the cyber world [at home] to have their deployed units supported, the general said. e basic structure for deployed Marine units, he said, is an air-ground task force that integrates ground, aviation and logistics combat elements under a common command element. Were more focused at the tactical level, the tactical edge of cyber operations, in supporting our forward-deployed commanders, and thats what we should do, Mills said. Its an important capability, the general said, and one that will become more important and eective for deployed commanders in the years ahead. Cyber to me is kind of like artillery or air support, Mills explained. e actual weapon systems are well to your rear, back here in the continental United States, and what you need to be able to do is request that support be given to you and have it take eect wherever youre operating. e Marine Corps cyber mission is to advise the commander of U.S. Cyber Command, Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, on the capabilities of the Marines within the cyber world and how to best use those forces in accomplishing the Cybercom mission, Mills said. ats our rst job, he added. Our second job is to be able to conduct cyber operations across all three lines of cyber operations defensive and oensive cyber ops so we have to man, train and equip Marine forces to accomplish those missions. In testimony to Congress in March, Alexander described the three Cybercom lines, or missions. A Cyber National Mission Force and its teams will help to defend the country against national-level threats; A Cyber Combat Mission Force and its teams will be assigned to the operational control of individual combatant commanders to support their objectives; and A Cyber Protection Force and its teams will help to operate and defend the Defense Departments information environment. Of the nearly 1,000 MARFORCYBER forces that will come online between now and scal 2016, Mills estimated that a third will be in uniform, a third will be federal civilian employees, and a third will be contractors. MARFORCYBER has Marines in the joint community who work throughout Cybercom at Fort Meade in Maryland. e Marine Corps cyber organization also is developing teams to be tasked by Cybercom to conduct operations across the spectrum of cyber operations. Its very similar to what we do today, Mills said. e units train and go forward from the United States and work for other commanders well forward, and cyber will be the same way. Well ship forces to Cybercom when requested, fully trained, fully manned, fully equipped, ready to operate. MARFORCYBER is a full-up component command under Cybercom along with the Air Force, Navy and Army, the general said. All four of the component commanders talk regularly to each other and meet regularly at Cybercom to coordinate our growth, coordinate our requirements, [provide] input to Cybercom and take its guidance and direction, and operate together in big exercises like Cyber Flag, he said. Cyber Flag is an annual exercise at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., which Cybercom conducts with U.S. interagency and international partners. For the Marines, the smallest U.S. military service branch, contractors play an important part in cyber, the general said. One of the challenges of cyber is that its such a dynamic environment, he explained. You need people who are educated and current in their specialties and who are available to stay on the job for long periods of time, whereas Marines come and go in the normal assignment process. Contractors have skill sets that arent always available in the active-duty Marine Corps, and can t neatly into short-term projects, he added. ey all operate under the same clearance requirements, the same authorities, the same rules, the general said. ats one of the things that make them so expensive. ey come at a cost, but you have to bear it to make sure that your cyber capabilities are current and that you stay on the cutting edge. In the newest domain of warfare, the battleeld is evolving, Mills said, and Marine commanders have come to understand the impact cyber can have on defensive and oensive operations. I think cyber commanders now understand when you go forward you have to be able to defend your systems against intrusion by other states, by rogue elements, and even by hobbyists who are just trying to break in and inltrate your nets, the general said. But theyre also beginning to understand the positive eects cyber can have in your operations against potential enemies. Its a very valuable tool in that quiver of arrows that a commander takes forward, and they want to understand how it operates. In the new domain, even a discussion of weapons veers o the traditional path. A cyber weapon, Mills said, can be something as simple as a desktop computer. Its also a vulnerability to you, because its a way in which the enemy can enter your Web system if you put the wrong hardware on there or open the wrong attachment or email. Cyber weapons are much more nuanced than big cannons and large bombs and weapons systems. e armories of the cyber world are very sophisticated computers and very sophisticated smart people who sit behind those computers and work those issues for you, the general said. Mills said hes an infantry ocer by trade, so he tends to view everything he does through a combat-arms prism. I think the denition of combat arms is expanding a little bit these days, he said. I dont think cyber is any longer a communicators environment its an operators environment. So we want that cyber expert to sit in the operations shop right next to the air expert, right next to the artillery expert, because we think thats where it belongs. Mills pointed out the contrast between a Marine kitted out for battle with a Marine dressed for a cyber operation who may be sitting behind a desk in the United States. Hes got access to a huge computer system that allows him to operate within that domain, the general said. He may go home at night and never have to deploy forward. But hes providing support to deployed forces, hes conducting actions against designated targets, hes doing a lot of things but from the foxhole or the ghting hole at his desk, rather than some foxhole or ghting hole forward. Corps taking critical look at cyber tactics Global drier bouys set free Sailors from the oce of Naval Meteorology and Oceanography released 10 global drifter buoys belonging to the University of California, San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography from the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52), May 28, during Pacic Partnership 2013. e buoys measure ocean currents up to 15 meters in depth, sea surface temperatures and atmospheric pressure. All are important elements in creating an observation network, allowing for more accurate weather forecasts. e mission of Pacic Partnership is disaster relief preparedness, said Lt.j.g. Jerey S. Grabon, Pacic Partnership Mobile Environment Team division ocer. Most of the disasters that are going on in this region are from typhoons and tsunamis, so if we have observations that we can use to help forecast typhoons, that benets the area. e buoys were deployed at specic coordinates while USS Pearl Harbor transited the Pacic Ocean to Samoa, the rst mission port of Pacic Partnership. Both Scripps and the Navy seek to benet from the buoy drop and subsequent data to be collected. e global drifter buoys provide real-time data in support of both civilian and DoD activities. at data can be used to improve forecasts, which can benet the effectiveness of activities like search and rescue missions and disaster response operations. I think it is absolutely crucial we have the ability to engage with the U.S. Navy and work in a synergistic way to collect useful data and create deployment opportunities in regions that are hard to access with commercial and scientic vessels, said Luca Centurioni, scientist, Scripps physical oceanography research division. We really welcome the opportunity to work together with the U.S. Navy 3rd Fleet. Grabon said that much of the ongoing research has the potential to impact the Navy. Because the Navy is a sea-going, war-ghting force, the better the universities understand the ocean, the better the Navy will understand it, Grabon said. Pacic Partnership is about bringing people together. e collaboration of the University of California, San Diego Scripps Institute of Oceanography and the United States Navy demonstrates a cooperative approach to both disaster preparedness and prevention by working to understand the many variables that contribute to the long history of natural disasters that have earned the whole region the moniker, e Pacic Ring of Fire. Four Marines with 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, were awarded medals at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., for their actions during the units deployment to Afghanistan, June 11. First Lt. Stephen C. Hu, the 81 mm mortar platoon commander serving with the battalion and Cpl. Jorge Salazar, a re team leader serving with the battalion, were presented the Bronze Star Medal with Combat V for valor. Sergeant Trey T. Cholewa, a section leader serving with the battalion, and Gunnery Sgt. Benjamin C. Stryeler, a platoon sergeant with the battalion, were presented the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with combat V for valor. Hu, led more than 50 Marines and Afghan soldiers in an assault on an insurgent stronghold of more than 25 highly trained ghters. During the 60 hour ght, he exposed himself to enemy re while maneuvering his Marines, directing their re and evacuating the casualties from the battleeld. To me the award stands as a representation, a small token of remembrance of my men, my platoon and what we accomplished together in pursuing the enemy, said Hu, a native of Franklin County, Va. Salazar took charge of his squad after his squad leader was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He directed the re of his squad even after his legs were severed below the knee by a subsequent IED blast. My squad leader was injured and I immediately took over the squad and directed them to re, said Salazar, a native of Delano Calif. On the way out, I stepped on an IED and it took out my legs immediately, but I continued to lead my Marines. Cholewa, led 47 operations in the volatile Trek Nawa area of southern Helmand provence. He fought the enemy during 72 hours of sustained combat after inserting by helicopter into an insurgent stronghold where he exposed himself to enemy re to maneuver his Marines and destroy key enemy positions. Stryeler led his Marines on 74 mounted and dismounted combat patrols in the battalionss area of operations, neutralizing a determined enemy in several erce small arms engagements and conducting four casualty evacuations for wounded Marines and their Afghan National Army counterparts. His superiors cite Stryelers professionalism o the battleeld as the foundation for his platoons success in 19 engagements with the enemy. After the awards were given, Hu said it was an honor serving with the Marines who were recognized. Today was a humbling experience, said Hu. We were able to come out here and remember what we accomplished out there and what we were able to accomplish together. We relived as a unit, as a family, some of the actions that took place during our deployment to Afghanistan. Marines earn Bronze Star

PAGE 11

Retired Coast Guard Cmdr. Ray Evans, 92, was laid to rest June 5, with full military honors. Evans, who passed away May 30, was the nal survivor of a dramatic rescue of a group of Marines pinned down by machine gun re during the battle of Guadalcanal, September 1942 where he earned the Navy Cross. Among those who attended the memorial service were his wife of more than 70 years, Doro thy; his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and Coast Guard Vice Commandant Vice Adm. John Currier. Members of the Marine Corps Security Battalion Force Battalion Bangor performed a three-volley salute at the funeral signifying the bond Evans and the Marine Corps have shared since the darkest days of World War II. Evans joined the Coast Guard alongside the services only Medal of Honor recipient, Signalman 1st Class Douglas Munro, in September 1939. [I] Came out of high school and looked for a job all summer in 1939 and it was a very poor time for jobs and went to the Coast Guard and they said they had not taken a recruit in seven years, said Evans in an oral history recorded in 1992. ey called me back in September and said, Are you still interested? Weve got seven openings. I said, yes I am. And thats how it started, as an apprentice seaman at $21 a month. After joint assignments that took Evans and Munro from Washington to New York City found themselves aboard the Hunter Liggett. It was during a trip to India, 250 miles south of Cape Town, South Africa, on a quiet December morning in 1941, they heard over the radio bombs had fallen on Pearl Harbor. In less than a year Evans and Munro were reassigned as coxswain and crew of a Higgins boats responsible for transporting Marines to and from Guadalcanal. In the Second Battle of the Matanikau, part of the Guadalcanal campaign, after successfully taking Marines from the 1st Battalion 7th Marines 1st Marine Division ashore, the two Coast Guardsmen returned to their previously assigned position. Almost immediately, they learned that conditions ashore were dierent than had been anticipated and the Marines were surrounded by enemy Japanese forces on the beachhead. e Marines needed to be evacuated. Both men volunteered for the job, brought their boats to shore under heavy enemy re and proceeded to evacuate the men on the beach. Evans remained at his post during the entire evacuation. He maintained control of his boat with one hand on the wheel and continued to re his weapon with the other until the last boat cleared the beach. When the majority of the Marines were in the boats, complications arose in evacuating the last men, whom Munro realized would be in the greatest danger. Munro placed himself and his boats to serve as cover for the last men to leave. I saw that Doug was facing forward, and I was standing up by the coxswain looking back, I saw this line of waterspouts coming across the water, and I yelled at Doug to get down, said Evans during his oral history. He couldnt hear me over the engine noise, and it hit him. It was one burst of re. And thats how he died. And thats how it happened. Munro remained conscious long enough to say just four words. He said did they get o? and thats about all he said. And then he died. I dont think he ever heard me answer him. It was very quick fortunately, recalled Evans. Evans remained humble about his service on Guadalcanal, despite the heroics exhibited that day. We just did a job, said Evans. We were asked to take them over there, and we were asked to bring them back o [of] there, and [thats] what we did. ats what the Coast Guard does. We do what were asked to do. e Coast Guards rst major participation in the Pacic war was at Guadalcanal. During the war, the Coast Guard manned more than 350 ships and hundreds more amphibious type assault craft. Evans, and others serving alongside him, performed their mission with valor and bravery that has left an indelible mark in our services legacy. He was a multi-dimensional man. He was a man both ordinary and extraordinary. An ocer, a leader, a husband, a father, a hero. He was iconic in Coast Guard history, amongst the very giants in our 220 year past, said Currier at his memorial service. While another chapter of a heroic World War II veteran has closed, his sacrices will never be forgotten.WWII CG hero saluted DARPA tests sub hunters e Defense Advanced Research Projects Agencys Distributed Agile Submarine Hunting Program has tested two complementary prototype systems as part of its Phase 2 development eort. e prototypes demonstrated functional sonar, communications and mobility at deep depths. e successful tests furthered DASHs goals to apply advances in deepocean distributed sonar to help nd and track quiet submarines. e rst prototype is the Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System, developed by a team led by Science Applications International Corporation. TRAPS is a xed passive sonar node designed to achieve large-area coverage by exploiting advantages of operating from the deep seaoor. is expendable, low-size, weight and power node communicated to a stationary surface node via wireless acoustic modems, with further secure RF reach back to the performers facilities via satellite. e goal is not only to show we can address the most challenging problem in ASW [anti-submarine warfare], but that we can do so with systems that are scalable and aordable, said Andy Coon, DARPA program manager. A single deep sea node provides a eld of view with signicant coverage allowing for a limited number of nodes to scale to large areas. Within the trade space of deep ocean sonar, we need to get creative to achieve aordable hardware and operations. We purposely have avoided increasing the size and complexity of arrays to achieve our aims. is is a gamble, but we believe the potential payo will be high. e second prototype is the Submarine Hold at RisK, an unmanned underwater vehicle developed by a team led by Applied Physical Systems. SHARK intends to provide a mobile active sonar platform to track submarines after initial detections are made. APS team member Bluen Robotics recently deployed the prototype to depth in February 2013. Sending the prototype deep for the rst time was like going to another planet and took nerve, Coon said. I am very pleased with the team and the vehicles performance at sea. We knew the design requirements of the system were challenging for industry to meet, especially when constrained to a price point that required designers to incorporate Commercial O-the-Shelf (COTS) components not normally used at these depths. A third DASH team member, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, supported the physical network layers that both teams used. TRAPS and SHARK are scheduled to demonstrate their core sonar functionality together. Subsequent eorts may follow to realize multiple sonar nodes as well as the integration of the SHARK UUV with its sonar. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Army researchers are responding to a request from the U.S. Special Operations Command for technologies to help develop a revolutionary Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit. e Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS, is an advanced infantry uniform that promises to provide superhuman strength with greater ballistic protection. Using wide-area networking and on-board computers, operators will have more situational awareness of the action around them and of their own bodies. the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, known as RDECOM, is submitting TALOS proposals in response to the May 15 request. ere is no one industry that can build it, said SO COM Senior Enlisted Ad visor Command Sgt. Maj. Chris Faris during a panel discussion at a conference at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., recently, reported De fense Media Network. e request, currently posted on Federal Business Opportunities, is looking for technology demonstration submissions from research and development organizations, private industry, individuals, government labs and academia to support the command-directed requirement issued by Adm. William McRaven, USSOCOM commander. [e] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that, a whole bunch of stu that RDECOM is playing heavily in, said. Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, an RDECOM science advisor assigned to SOCOM. TALOS will have a physiological subsystem that lies against the skin that is embedded with sensors to monitor core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, body position and hydration levels. Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are currently developing armor made from magnetorheological uids liquid body armor that transforms from liquid to solid in milliseconds when a magnetic eld or electrical current is applied. ough still in development, this technology will likely be submitted to support TALOS. RDECOM cuts across every aspect making up this combat armor suit, Borjes said Its advanced armor. Its communications, antennas. Its cognitive performance. Its sensors, miniature-type circuits. ats all going to t in here, too. SOCOM demonstrations will take place July 8 to 10, at or near MacDill Air Force Base. e request asked participants to submit a white paper summary of their technology by May 31, describing how TALOS can be constructed using current and emerging technologies. A limited number of participant white papers will be selected and those selected will demonstrate their technologies. e initial demonstration goal is to identify technologies that could be integrated into an initial capability within a year. A second goal is to determine if elding the TALOS within three years is feasible. Army science advisors, such as Borjes, are embedded with major units around the world to speed technology solutions to Soldiers needs. e Field Assistance in Science and Technology programs 30 science advisors, both uniformed ofcers and Army civilians, provide a link between Soldiers and the RDECOMs thousands of subject matter experts. RDECOM has the mission to develop technology and engineering solutions for Americas Soldiers, and is a major subordinate command of the Army Materiel Command. AMC is the Armys premier provider of materiel readiness technology, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projection and sustainment to the total force, across the spectrum of joint military operations. If a Soldier shoots it, drives it, ies it, wears it, eats it or communicates with it, AMC provides it. Combat uniform in works Navy Secretary Ray Mabus would like to see the number of dierent camouage uniforms in the military come down. e notion that we have all this camouage doesnt make a whole lot of sense to me, he told the Defense Writers Group recently. He said the blueberries which is what sailors call their blue cammies work only when sailors fall overboard. e secretary said he would support an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Bill for scal year 2014 that would mandate a single camouage uniform for all the services. At one time that was the case. In the late 1980s, all services wore the battle-dress uniform, a green, brown and black uniform that grew out of Army research, said Lt. Col. Jerry Pionk, an Army spokesman. For the Gulf War, the Army also developed the chocolate chip uniforms worn in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq. e Marines broke away from the uniform uniform when they went with their digital cammies in 2002. Not to be outdone, the Army also went digital with the Army combat uniform, using the universal combat pattern. e Air Force followed, and then the Navy went digital. In all, there are 18 dierent camouage uniforms.Navy secretary calls for cut in number of camoage uniforms 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 13

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 13 Marines take Sailors along e very nature of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, embarking thousands of Marines on Navy amphibious assault ships, means that Marines are, by rote, exposed to the Navy way of life; to watches, to ight quarters, to a life of passageways, ladder wells, decks, and hatches. Occasionally, though, it goes in reverse. A number of junior ocers from the USS Carter Hall accompanied the Marines of the 26th MEU, joining them in the deserts of Jordan during Exercise Eager Lion 2013 from June 9 to June 20. ey attached to the platoons of Company K, Battalion Landing Team 3/2, 26th MEU. Heading wherever the Marines go, the ocers are here to gain experience working with the Marines in their natural environment ashore. e theory is that as naval ocers, the more we understand about our mission, to get Marines ashore, the more eective we can be as a whole, said Ensign Alex Cramer, USS Carter Hall main propulsion division ocer, from Knoxville, Tenn. Naval ocers are not typically exposed to the Marine Corps in an operational capacity, aside from transporting the Marines, rarely leaving the ship during a MEU deployment. I usually just see [the Marines] launch on a screen. I wanted to see what the Marines actually do, here on the other side, said Ensign Irvin Pajarillo, USS Carter Hall combat information ocer from Arnold, Md. ere are currently four naval ocers from the ship ashore, with plans to rotate them out for another four after a span of days, allowing all of the Carter Halls junior ocers to experience life in the dirt by the end of Eager Lion. We all volunteered to go for the whole time, said Ensign Ethan Strauser, USS Carter Hall gunnery ocer from Chesapeake, Va. Sometimes, its good to have a little time away from ship. e ocers, assigned to the platoons as they are, are undergoing instructions in the basics of Marine life. Living outside, going on patrols, the basics of military operations in the high, dead-dry hills of Jordan, as well as dierences between Marine and Navy leadership. You get to see dierent leadership styles, dierent issues they have to deal with out here, Strauser said. As a Navy ocer new to the eet, youre kind of expected to rely on the chief petty ocers, said Ensign George Stevenson, USS Carter Hall repair division ocer, from Twinsburg, Ohio. As a Marine second lieutenant, youre immediately expected to lead, to run that platoon. With that furthered understanding of the Marine Corps, the ocers said they hoped to increase the eciency of opera tions between the Navy and the Marine Corps in the future. Some of our guys may not understand how much responsibility the Marine Corps gives its sergeants and corporals, said Stevenson. Maybe we can learn something. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced the next three joint high speed vessels (JHSV) will be named USNS Yuma, USNS Bismarck and USNS Burlington, and two littoral combat ships (LCS) will be named USS Billings and USS Tulsa. It is my privilege as Secretary of the Navy to name these ships after ve great American cities, Mabus said. Several cities will be represented for the rst time in the Navy eet, establishing a new connection and tradition that forms a bond between a citys residents and the Sailors and Marines who serve in its namesake ship. For decades to come, these ships will sail in the eet, building partnerships and projecting power around the world. Joint high speed vessels are named after small American cities and counties. e future USNS Yuma (JHSV 8) honors the city in Arizona and will be the fourth ship to bear this name. USNS Bismarck (JHSV 9) is the rst naval vessel to be named in honor of North Dakotas capi tal city. USNS Burlington (JHSV10) is the rst to be named for the city in Vermont. JHSV are high-speed transport vessels that serve in a variety of roles for the military branches in support of overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief and supporting special operations forces. Austal USA in Mobile, Ala., will build the three new JHSV, which will be 338 feet in length, have a waterline beam of 93.5 feet, displace approximately 2,362 tons, and operate at speeds of approximately 40 knots. Littoral combat ships are named to recognize cities that are one of the ve most-populated communities in a state. USS Billings (LCS 15) is named in honor of Montanas largest city and will be the rst ship to bear the name. USS Tulsa (LCS 16) will be the second ship named for Oklahomas second-largest city. ese ships are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal waters. A fast, agile surface combatant, the LCS provides the required war ghting capabilities and operational exibility to execute focused missions close to the shore such as mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare. USS Billings is a Freedom-variant littoral combat ship and will be constructed by Lockheed Martin with Marinette Marine in Marinette, Wis. is ship will be 378 feet long, have a beam length of 57.4 feet and travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots. USS Tulsa is an Independence-variant littoral combat ship and is being built by Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. It will be 419 feet long and have a beam length of 103.7 feet and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 40 knots.Newest ships get names man, NSWCDD Rapid Development and Integration Branch Head. Its keeping my uncles memory alive. Coleman located the vintage 48-state ag that would have been own during World War II and contacted the NSWCDD commander in mid-May with a request to y the ag at the NSWCDD headquarters building in honor of his uncle. Imagine nding out that your brother is missing in action and presumed dead several days after the battle was over, Coleman said. at is how my grandfathers family found out, and my grandmother especially never got over losing her son or not having a way to honor her son. As Coleman informed the command about his uncles story, the request to y a ag evolved into a long awaited ceremony for family members. Were thankful to everyone who made this possible, said Coleman. e commands support is overwhelming. We greatly appreciate the Navy teams (three NSWCDD Sailors) ag folding ceremony. I could feel the gratitude from them for my uncles sacrice. Trent said her brother enlisted in November 1941. e family saw him for a day in South Carolina the following month, where he was on shore leave. After that, he sent postcards from the Pacic. ey were mainly about how much he missed us, she said. eres not a day goes by that I dont think of him. e Battle of Midway, fought June 4 to 7, 1942, near the Central Pacic island of Midway, was considered the decisive battle of the war in the Pacic, ending Japanese naval superiority. e U.S. Pacic Fleet surprised Japanese forces, sinking four Japanese carriers, while losing only one.Flag

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 20, 2013