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The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-13-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00305

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00305


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PAGE 1

Register now for June 24 to 28 Chapel activityVacation Bible School registration has been ex tended to Friday, June 21. Its not too late to have your child enjoy great fun for a week this summer. e Command Re ligious Program of the Kings Bay Chapel invites your family to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School. Scheduled for June 24 to June 28, from 9 a.m. noon daily, children who have completed kin dergarten through fth grade are invited to join all the fun. Registration will con tinue through Friday, June 21. ere is limited space, so all are encouraged to register early to avoid being placed on a waiting list. The theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Children will begin each day in the Kingdom Castle where they will learn motions to upbeat Bible songs, hear the days lesson and learn Bible lessons from Victoria the Fox, Duke the Stallion, and Sir Valient the Lion. What happens next? ere are theme-based crafts, games, snacks and Bible drama. Partici pants will enjoy hours of fun with knights to lead them through the morn ing to Bible lessons, funlled games and activi ties and delicious treats served in Kings Kitchen. Each days activities will end with children gathering in the King dom Castle again to sing songs, review the days activities, and prepare for the more culinary treats. Interested? Stop by the Chapel oce located directly across the parking lot from the Kings Bay Navy Exchange. Want to help? To make this years VBS a success volunteers are needed to help build and decorate sets, preassemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so much more. Whether you are a par ent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is wel comed. Volunteers may sign up for one of the many service opportunities by lling out a vol unteer forms available at registration table. For more program in formation, call the Cha pel 573-4501 or to stop by the Chapel oce. Vehicle decals to endPersonal ID cards more ecient As of July 1, the Navy will no longer issue or use vehicle decals for base access, including Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Vehicle decals were used to ensure vehicles on Navy in stallations complied with state requirements for vehicle reg istration and insurance. State programs have become more ecient, eliminating one of the main reasons for decals. After Sept. 11, 2001, security at all Department of Defense instal lations requires 100 percent identification checks of driv ers at the installation gates, said Lt. Cmdr. Gregory Ver linde, Security Ocer for Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay. Subase Kings Bay has conducted 100 percent identication card checks for all personnel accessing the installation since Sept 2008. e use of vehicle decals is redundant since identication card checks are arguably more eective verify ing the authority of an individual entering the base. Vehicle decals are a force protection vulnerability. ey are easily counterfeited, moved from one car to another, or found in used-car parking lots. Other issues that helped change this policy were the expense and administrative burden of the program. Elimination of the vehicle decal requirement will not elimi nate the requirement for an in dividual to properly register and ensure their vehicle. All vehicles on Navy Instal lations must continue to be li censed, registered and insured in accordance with state and local laws, Verlinde said. In addition, all Navy Installations will conduct random anti-terrorism checks. We will be conducting authorized administrative checks, similar to the way security departments conduct DUI checks. With this, we will be verifying the identication and to ensure the vehicle has a valid license, registration, and insurance. For frequent visitors to installations requiring decals, the current decal may be left on the vehicle until the expiration date. Otherwise, it is recommended that the decal be removed. Up Periscope Your favorite toy when you were a kid Page 9 NSB hoops Intramural action hits high gear Page 5 Souda Two Kings Bay SSGNs make port visits Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Stirring up tranquility Task Force set up, comprehensive plan due by January 2014Commander, Naval Subma rine Forces in Norfolk estab lished a ag ocer-led task force in May to focus on eec tively integrating enlisted wom en Sailors on board multiple submarine platforms. Vice Adm. Michael Connor stood up the task force to spe cically look at best integration practices for SSBNs, SSGNs, and Virginia-class SSNs. Commander of Submarine Group Two, Rear Adm. Kenneth Perry is leading the task force. e group is charged with de veloping a comprehensive Plan of Actions and Milestones by January 2014. is POAM will mirror the pre vious deliberate process used to successfully integrate female ocers by including feasibility studies, potential courses of ac tion and candidate timelines. Pending the results, a detailed implementation plan will be presented to the Chief of Naval Operations by March 2015. Female ocers have been successfully integrated on board OHIO-Class SSBNs and SSGNs, and will be integrated onboard VIRGINIA-Class SSNs in scal year 2015. e Navy is working with industry to design the Ohio replacement SSBN to sup port both ocers and enlisted mixed-gender crews. en-commander of Submarine Group 10, Rear Adm. Barry Bruner, announced the Depart ment of the Navys plan to allow women to serve on submarines, during a press conference at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay, April 29, 2010. With the Ohio-class ballistic submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) providing the backdrop, Bruner formally announced the Navys policy change to various regional and local electronic and print outlets on the subma rine bases waterfront. On Dec. 5, 2012, Lt. j.g. Mar quette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), became one of the rst female unrestricted line of cers to qualify in submarines, receiving her submarine Dolphins during a ceremony at NSB Kings Bay. Navy eyes plans for enlisted females on subs Vacation Bible School signup extended

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 e American Red Cross has re opened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e oce will be staed entirely by volunteers and is on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Ten nessee Ave. Its focus is to better assist service members and their families and to develop volunteer programs that enhance the base environment. e Red Cross regularly provides assis tance to troops overseas who have emergencies back home, such as a death in the family or a family mem ber having a serious medical issue. Having an oce on base will en able the Red Cross to assist troops faster and more eectively. Volunteers can engage in pro grams that assist hospital personnel and patients; make follow up calls to military families who have used the Red Cross emergency message service to ensure their needs have been met; act as a community refer ral source for families in need; dis patch volunteers out to re scenes when house res or other disasters occur; serve as a point of contact for commands; and provide briengs about Red Cross services to deploy ing and returning service members and their families. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695. Hurricane season began June 1. For 120 years, the American Red Cross has been providing relief for disaster victims in the path of dev astating hurricanes. e rst Red Cross organized hur ricane response eort occurred in August 1893, when the Red Cross came to the aid of a community in the Sea Islands o the coast of South Carolina. At that time, the Sea Islands were a largely African American popu lation, known for their farms that produced the long silky Sea Island cotton. Without the aid of modern warning systems, the islanders had little notice and no time to prepare when the storm shifted course and struck overnight. e Sea Islands Hurricane deliv ered a destructive blow to southern communities and coastlines, leaving approximately 2,000 people dead and 20,000 to 30,000 people homeless. Damage was estimated at about $1 million with the storm washing crops, livestock, homes and hundreds of victims out to sea. According to the NOAA Web site, a Category 3 storm made landfall on August 27 near Savannah, Ga. Pieced together from the few existing me teorological records, the storm surge was approximately 16 feet, causing massive damage along the coastline, destroying most of the barrier islands structures, and ruining the crops that were nearing harvest. e hurricane then moved through Beaufort and Charleston, S.C. continuing its destructive path. With so much devastation inland, it was initially thought that no one survived on the barrier islands; but as news ltered in, the extent of the damage and plight of the surviving inhabitants became clear. Government ocials requested the Red Cross inspect and provide whatever aid they could. Clara Bar ton, founder of the Red Cross and organization leader at that time, was concerned that the Red Cross could not provide ample resources to help survivors because of the over whelming size of the relief eort, but the 72-year-old Barton was not one to turn away pleas for help. With limited funds, the Red Cross helped storm victims recover and re build their lives. Barton decided food was the most important priority and from meager Red Cross rations, sup plied each family a peck of corn and a pound of bacon per week. From the beginning it had been evident this would be a prolonged work, for it was necessary to provide for the people until their next crop could be harvested, nearly a year later, as noted in Clara Barton: Pro fessional Angel by Elizabeth Brown Pryor, published in 1987. In addition to food, for nearly a year, the Red Cross administered medical aid, tools, seeds, and hous ing materials along with a planting rehabilitation project that helped sustain the islanders. Barton stayed in the Sea Islands until the summer of 1894 and the remaining Red Cross sta left just before the cotton harvest in early autumn. When the relief eort was over, elds of Sea Island cotton had been reestablished and homes, schools and churches rebuilt. With another above average hur ricane season predicted, it is im portant we take a minute to learn from our history and prepare for the storm season ahead. Learn more about Red Cross history. www.redcross.org contributed to this report. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Life, Health meeting June 18Per the instruction SUBASE 1700_6D, a fo rum to voice any quality of life or health and wellness issues onboard the base will be held at 6 p.m., June 18 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel Fellowship hall. Note that attendance is required for elding any issues, complaints, suggestions or needs at this forum. is is your opportunity to share what needs to be addressed. ere is a survey and e-mail that are being established for your input anony mously and that will be sent out separately.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will con duct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civil ians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more informa tion or to enroll your teen.MOAA dinner meeting June 18e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Of cers of America Associations monthly din ner meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., June 18 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Guest speaker will be Antoinette Toni Ca ruso. Cost for dinner is $20. RSVP by June 14 with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, dia monds and the most popular brands of watch es that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits includ ing 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Kings Bay Red Cross oce reopens Red Cross Burial at sea is a means of nal disposition of remains that is per formed on United States Navy ves sels. e committal ceremony is per formed while the ship is deployed. erefore, family members are not allowed to be present. e commanding ocer of the ship assigned to perform the cer emony will notify the family of the date, time and longitude and lati tude once the committal service has been completed. Active duty, retired Sailors and their dependents are entitled to burial at sea. Anyone desiring this honor should indicate that preference in writing and have the next-of-kin or executor of the estate contact Navy Mortuary Aairs at the following ad dress to coordinate arrangements: Burial-at-Sea Coordinator Naval Hospital Branch Medical Clinic P.O. Box 280148 Mayport, FL 32288-0148 Phone: (904) 270-4285 Web site: www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/casualty/mor tuary/Pages/BurialAtSea.aspx) If the preference for burial-at-sea was not in writing by the retired member, the person authorized to direct disposition may authorize burial-at-sea. e following documents must be submitted to the commanding ocer of the Navy or Coast Guard vessel/aircraft that will conduct the ceremony: Copy Civil Death Certificate Certicate of Cremation or tran sit permit issued by the appropriate civil authority Signed request/authorization for committal from the primary next-of-kin or PADD Copy of DD-214 and marriage certicate e authorization should include the decedents full name, grade, SSN and/or serial number, branch of ser vice, dates of service and retirement, date of death, religious service de sired and where remains are com mitted. Sea burial available to Sailors, family With the high cost of the summer vacation season here, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau leaders remind Sailors to be wary of predatory lending practices. Holly Petraeus, assistant director of the CFPB Oce of Service Mem ber Aairs, said the number of ser vice members aected by predatory lending acts is hard to measure. It can be embarrassing to go and tell somebody that you got ripped o, Petraeus said. Its so common for Sailors to walk into [a nancial counselor] with signicant nancial problems that unfortunately have gotten really severe by the time they walk in and ask to see a counselor. Predatory loans are usually small, short-term arrangements designed to bridge cash-strapped borrowers until their next paycheck. However, they are expensive, high-interest loans that often cost $10 to $44 dollars per week per $100 dollars borrowed, plus fees. If a loan is not paid at the original payment due date and rolled-over multiple times, it can lead to a situation where most Sailors cannot pay o the loan. Financial diculties can threaten a service members security clearance and career. Addressing nancial issues openly can work to a Sailors advantage. Service members may appeal to predatory lenders because they have a guaranteed source of income. e Military Lending Act caps payday loans, auto title loans, and tax refund anticipation loans to military on active duty and their de pendents at an annual rate of 36 per cent, Petraeus said. at sounds high, I know, but the average payday loan is actually about 390 percent. e Military Lending Act denes payday loans as loans of closed-end credit, 91 days or less, and less than $2,000 dollars. It denes auto title loans as loans of closed-end credit that are 181 days or less. e problem is that some folks have just changed the denition of their product enough to get outside of that law, Petraeus said. So youll see some sites online advertising that type of loan that will say right on there, were not subject to the Mili tary Lending Act because our loan is for more than 90 days. Sailors experiencing nancial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command nancial specialist to develop a budget and explore addi tional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief.Beware danger of predatory lenders Military Lending Act

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During their two-days of informal talks in Rancho Mirage, Calif., that concluded June 8, President Barack Obama and Chi nese President Xi Jingpin agreed that North Korea must denuclearize, and that the United States and China will work together to resolve cybersecurity and other issues, Nation al Security Advisor Tom Donilon told reporters in Palm Springs, Calif.. Id say at the outset that the President had very good discussions in an informal atmosphere, uniquely informal atmo sphere, with President Xi over the last two days, Donilon told reporters. e discussions were positive and constructive, wide-ranging and quite successful in achieving the goals that we set forth for this meeting. A specic goal of the talks, Donilon said, was to build a personal re lationship between the President and Presi dent Xi, and have an op portunity not under the pressure of being on the margins of another mul tilateral meeting to really sit down and explore the contours of the U.S.-China relationship. During dinner on June 7, Obama and Xi had a lengthy discussion about North Korea, Donilon said. China, he added, has taken a number of steps in recent months to send a clear message to North Korea, including through enhanced enforcement of sanctions and through public statements by the senior leadership in Chi na. Obama and Xi agreed that North Korea has to denuclearize; that neither country will accept North Korea as a nuclear-armed state; and that we would work together to deepen U.S.-China cooperation and dialogue to achieve denuclearization, Donilon said. Obama also empha sized to President Xi that the United States will take any steps that we need to take to defend ourselves and our allies from the threat that North Korea presents, he added. e two sides stressed the importance of continuing to apply pressure both to halt North Koreas ability to proliferate and to make clear that its con tinued pursuit of nuclear weapons is incompatible with its economic development goals, Donilon said. e discussions on this issue, I believe, will allow us to continue to move ahead and work in a careful way in terms of our cooperation to work together to achieve our ends. e bottom line, Do nilon said, is I think we had quite a bit of align ment on the Korean issue North Korean issue, and absolute agreement that we would continue to work together on concrete steps in order to achieve the joint goals that the United States and China have with respect to the North Korean nuclear program. Yesterday morning, Obama and Xi discussed economic issues, during which cybersecurity and other cyber issues were an important topic, Donilon said. e United States and China, he said, have a half-a-trillion-dollar-ayear trade relationship. Obviously, given the importance of our eco nomic ties, the President made clear the threat posed to our economic and national security by cyber-enabled economic espionage, Donilon said. And I want to be clear on exactly what were talking about here. What were talking about here are ef forts by entities in China to, through cyber attacks, engage in the theft of pub lic and private property intellectual property and other property in the Unit ed States. And that is the focus here, which is why it was in the economic dis cussion this morning. And again, we had a detailed discussion on this, he continued. e Presi dent underscored that re solving this issue is really key to the future of U.S.China economic relations. He asked President Xi to continue to look seriously at the problem that weve raised here. e Chinese have agreed to look at this, Donilon said, noting that Obama and Xi have pro vided guidance to the new cyber working group thats been established as part of the U.S.-China strategic economic dialogue. e cyber working group will engage in a dialogue on the rules and norms of behavior in cy berspace that will explore condence-building measures, Donilon said. And we instructed the teams to report back on their dis cussions to the leaders. Obama and Xi also discussed military-tomilitary relationships between the United States and China, Donilon said. Its the military-tomilitary relationship that lags behind our political and our economic rela tionship, Donilon said. is was acknowledged on the Chinese side, and we actually have some momentum behind in creasing and deepening these relationships as we go forward here, as we try to build a comprehensive and positive relationship with China. Returning to the two presidents discussion about North Korea, Donilon said, e important point here is full agree ment on the goals that is denuclearization; full agreement that in fact the Security Council resolutions which put pressure on North Korea need to be enforced, and full agree ment that we will work together to look at steps that need to be taken in order to achieve the goal. If North Korea continues to pursue a nuclear weapons program, that would allow it to become a proliferator, which would present a threat to the United States and which would allow them to really up-end, if you will, security in Northeast Asia, Donilon said. A recognized nuclear weapon state in Pyong yang, weapons program in Pyongyang would of course have profound implications in the rest of Northeast Asia, and these are obviously results that the Chinese dont want to see, Donilon added. eyre results the United States doesnt want to see. So I think what you have essentially underway here is a shared threat analysis and a shared analysis as to what the implications and impact would be of North Korea pursuing a nuclear weapons program. Obama, Chinese leader talk North Korea THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 e Flag Day Golf Tourna ment is Friday, June 14 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. e cost is $26 and includes lunch, green fees and cart. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. with shotgun start at 1 p.m. e new format is an indi vidual format where you add 72 to your handi cap and play as far as you can until you reach that number. Once there plant your ag. e winner will be the person who gets the furthest on the course. Reserve your spot today at (912) 573-8475. Happy Fathers Day from Rack-N-Roll Lanes All fathers bowl free on from 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, June 16 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. is does not include shoe rental. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per person, catch and release or $7 per per son, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Preregister at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guard ian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Starting Friday, June 14 and running through to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf course is offering Punch Cards for discounted prices on golf. For Military E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all others 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your pur chase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party, so stop by and check it out. Someone is always ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book before Aug. 1, and receive $50 off your room rental just by mentioning Magnolias 50 off. Call (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dier ent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp is July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must pro vide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 5738475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp For ages 5 to 14 its June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats play ing, call (912) 573-4548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials need ed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergarten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for spon sor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Single/dual military parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Liberty call Flag Day golf outing June 14 MWR Sports Media coverage focused on violence and other challenges in Afghanistan loses sight of the larger picture of progress and promising developments, Air Force Gen. Philip M. Breedlove said after returning from his rst trip there as supreme allied commander for Europe. Breedlove noted in his From the Cockpit blog posted May 24 on the U.S. European Command Web site how impressed he was with the commitment and professionalism of both the International Security Assistance Force and the Afghan troops he met. e work they do and the sacrices they make every day are astonish ing, he said. Given the challenges in Afghanistan, the progress that ISAF and their Afghan partners continue to make is monu mental. Unfortunately, that progress isnt widely reected in much of the me dia coverage of Afghanistan, he said. Coverage that concentrates on the negatives, gives an incom plete depiction of events on the ground, making it easy to miss the forest for the trees, he said. It is understandable that some who focus on these incidents can come away uncertain whether the eorts and sacrices made over the past 12 years have been worthwhile, he said. To these people, I would suggest they take a step back and take a look at the larger picture before making a judgment about the current and future state of aairs in Afghani stan. Breed love rec ognized major changes more than a decade ago, when the Af ghan peoples lives were dictated by the Taliban government and the country served as a breeding ground for international terrorism. Today, the Taliban remains a threat, but it continues to be degraded thanks to the relentless pressure put on them by the Afghan security forc es, Breedlove said. is capability ensures that Afghanistan is no longer a haven for terrorists. ISAF has played a denitive role in changing that, he recognized. By battling extremist or ganizations, it created the space and time for Afghan national security forces to grow and take on the ght. It has helped the Af ghan government to crawl out from Taliban control and stand freely on its own two feet, Breedlove said. Today, Afghanistan is being progressively built, secured and maintained by the Afghan people, he said. NATO and ISAF have served as a scaolding of sorts, which has enabled Afghans to rebuild their structures, he said. But as those structures near completion, the scaf folding is being carefully removed, leaving the n ished product to stand freely. Big milestones are ahead as Afghan security forces prepare in the com ing weeks to take the secu rity lead across the coun try. ey currently plan, lead, and implement over 87 percent of security mis sions throughout Afghanistan, providing security for nearly 90 percent of the population, Breedlove noted. Breedlove said other fundamental changes that have taken place across Afghanistan in the last 10 years, but are not often reected in front-page news: education, health care, transportation and communication improvements, a GDP growing at 7 percent a year, among them. While noting progress, the general recognized stumbling blocks along the way and said more work will be needed in the coming months. But Afghanistan is worth the cost, Breedlove said, echoing NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. e United States and NATO have an enduring commitment to Afghanistan, and recognize that the security of their na tions is inextricably linked to the stability of other re gions, he said. But their enduring com mitment in Afghanistan, he added, also is based on the sweat and sacrices ISAF and Afghan national security forces have given the people of Afghanistan. e general said the Afghan people have the opportunity to build on progress already made and to secure their future. It is now within their grasp and soon will be fully in their hands, Breed love said. He emphasized, how ever, that the completion of the ISAF mission at the end of 2014 wont signal an end to the NATO and international commit ment to Afghans secu rity. Resolute Support, NATOs post-2014 mission in Afghanistan, will focus on the training, advising and assisting of Afghan se curity forces. Of course there will be more challenges, but our support for Afghan security remains steadfast and will remain so through 2014 and beyond, Breed love said. Big picture overshadowed

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Weather forecasts upgraded e Navy has adopted a new global weather fore casting model with the support of the Oce of Naval Research to the Na val Research Laboratory, ocials, May 30. e Naval Global Environmental Model became fully operational this spring, and today serves as a cutting-edge predic tion system for Navy plan ners who depend on reliable weather forecasts. When a global weather model for the Navy gets replaced, that is huge news, said Dr. Ronald Fe rek, ONR program ocer. e previous forecasting model had been in use for over 20 years. e Navys Fleet Numer ical and Meteorology and Oceanography Center, which provides meteorological data to U.S. forces, switched over to NAVGEM in March. It is being used to provide detailed, ac curate global forecasts up to10 days out. e system could in form Navy operations for years to come. It is par ticularly important as U.S. eet presence increases throughout the Asia-Pa cic region, known for intense weather events like typhoons. Accurate forecasts are critical for naval commanders who need allweather capability to avoid damaging high winds and seas. is includes to plan and con duct military operations, execute timely evacua tions of vulnerable assets, and plan humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, which the Navy has supported over the years. NAVGEM is one of the most sophisticated computer models in the world. It will give Navy leaders, quite literally, a clearer picture of what the weath er is going to be like across the globe as they deploy the eet. e new system runs at a higher resolution than the previous global model, said Ferek. With NAVGEM, the Navy can get better, more detailed forecases. More skill than in the past. NRL Marine Meteorology Division Superintentant Dr. Simon Chang said the particular algorithm developed with ONR funding allows very e cient computation, mak ing it feasible for NAVGEM to run at much higher res olution, on smaller opera tional computers. e path to better forecasts is not easy, and re quires years of research, testing and development. It was tough to make weather computations signicantly more ecient, Ferek said. But the principal investigators at NRL said We need to do this, and I could see it was going to be really useful. NAVGEM was support ed by PEO C4I-Program Executive Oce Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence for advanced development, and ulti mately deployment. e development team was honored recently with the Navys prestigious 2012 Acquisition Excellence Award for its NAV GEM work. More remains to be done, however. While NAVGEM gives military leaders better global data, the Navy also needs forecast models that can provide local ized high-res weather analysis. With ONR sup port, NRL and academic partners have developed the Coupled Ocean/At mosphere Mesoscale Prediction System-Tropical Cyclone, which looks at the detailed meteorological process of dangerous tropical storms, and gives accurate predictions of a storms intensity one-tove days out. e COAMPS-TC eort will work in conjunction with NAVGEM to provide accurate long-term and short-term forecasts for Navy leaders. ink of it as your weather news on televi sion, Ferek said. e long-term forecasts use the equivalent of the global model. e next-day forecasts rely on more detailed, or mesoscale, mod els like COAMPS-TC. ONR provides the science and technology nec essary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institu tions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, com prising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 17 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Money Management for Couples upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will pro vide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommend ed. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops While Permanent Change of Station moves are a part of mil itary life, they can take a toll not only on the service member but their families as well. e impact on children is quite often overlooked as we sometimes think they are too young to understand, their lives will have minimal impact or they are resilient enough to handle it. Military moves do impact children. Some chil dren may be excited about moving to a new place while others may be sad about leav ing their friends and their familiar environment. Whether the feeling of mov ing is a positive or negative, we need to include the children as active participants in the re location process. Below are a few tips on how to include the children in this process. Take the time to sit down and talk with your children about the move and tell them that the military is sending you to a new duty station. The more informed they are, the quicker they will adjust to the new situation. They will have time to let their friends know that they will be moving and it will be a good time to share contact information so they will be able to keep in touch. Inform the children about the moving process. Let them know that there will be people coming to the house to pack up their belongings to move to the new location. is will be a great time for the kids to gure out the things in their rooms they want to keep, throw away or donate. Also, let them pick the comfort items they would like to take with them as they travel. Research the new loca tion and surrounding areas. Children always love a new adventure, so why not make the PCS one? As a fam ily, research what attractions, such as museums, parks or theme parks, are nearby. is would be the perfect time to get in contact with the Morale, Welfare, and Recreation at the new duty station to see the dif ferent deals and activities they have to oer. Make a plan and do it once youve settled in. When you get to the new duty station and the new house, let your kids have input on how to decorate or arrange their room. is will keep them busy and give a sense of accomplishment that theyve helped with the move. Also, make sure they learn the new phone number and address as soon as you get there. By following a few of these basic relocating tips, you can help alleviate any uncertainties your child may have with the move. ey can turn the experience of relocating into a positive one and begin their new adventure. Here are other resources to help: Military Youth on the Move apps.militaryonesource.mil/ myom: This Web site is for all school aged children and their parents. Information is divided into age appropriate sections of Kids (age 6 to 8), Preteens (age 9 to 12), Teenagers (13 to 17), and Parents. Information is written on a level that each age can easily read and under stand. MYOM is an easy-touse Web site with good basic information covering a range of topics that are very relevant to military families. Smooth Move Plus: Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing referral oce and relocation services. Plus, while attend ing the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it aects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. If you would like any more information or resources re garding relocation, contact the Relocation Assistance Pro gram at the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 5734513. Moving can be stressful for children

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Navy triathletes made history June 1, when both the mens and womens teams took home gold medals at the Armed Forc es Triathlon Champion ship at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu. e mens team repeat ed last years gold medal victory, but this was the rst time the womens team nished in rst place, coach Jim Felty said. Weve never won! he said. Weve never been above third! is is a deep, deep team. e Armed Forces Triathlon Championship consists of a 1,500-meter (approximately one-mile) ocean swim, 40-kilome ter (24.8-mile) draft-legal bike ride, and 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) run. Teams from the Navy, Air Force, Army and Ma rine Corps compete for points; a team made up of members of the Canadian armed forces participates but does not compete for points. e Air Force mens and womens teams both came in a close second this year, with only two points sepa rating the womens teams and one point separating the mens. Individual gold med als went to Army Capt. Nicholas Sterghos of Fort Hood, Texas, who nished with a time of one hour, 49 minutes, 21 seconds, and to Air Force Lt. Samantha Morrison, who nished in two hours, seven minutes. Morrison graduated three days before com peting from the U.S. Air Force Academy, and is preparing to report to her rst duty station, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina. Its been a good week, she said. In the mens competition, Air Force Major James Bales of Keesler Air Force Base in Missis sippi took the silver med al, and Navy Lt. omas Brown, who works in ex plosive ordnance dispos al at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, took the bronze. is was the rst time in 16 months Bales had competed in a triathlon. He won the mens race at Point Mugu in both 2010 and 2011, but missed last year because of the birth of his son, Joshua. Family takes priority, he said, adding that he was more than pleased with a second-place nish after taking so much time o. Brown, together with the fourth-place mens nisher, Lt. j.g. Derek Oskutis of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 in San Diego, had led the race throughout the swim and the bike ride. But Os kutis developed a cramp in the fth mile of the run. Derek and I know each other and have raced a number of years together, Brown said. We planned to work together in this race, and it went well. We had a big gap right away. Hes a better runner than I am nine out of 10 rac es, but this time he got a cramp in the fth mile. But I was glad to see the team pull together. Im glad to have been a part of it. In the womens race, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Colleen OConnor of Naval Air Station North Island gar nered silver with a time of 2:10:37. Lt. Rachel Beck mann, a chemical engi neer at the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center in Washington, D.C., brought home the bronze medal for the Navy. OConnor, who has competed several times at Point Mugu, eyed the conditions before the race started at 9 a.m. and was optimistic. Warmed by a late-week heat wave, the ocean temperature was 62 degrees, compared to the low 50s of previous years. ank goodness! OConnor said. Its been 53 degrees in the past, and thats miserable. Its something Capt. Kenneth Corigliano of MacDill Air Force Base in Florida knows all about. Saturday was his seventh triathlon at Point Mugu. Its always rough be cause the water is so cold, he said. Your body is still cold on the bike and then it heats up on the run. Its a thermoregulation night mare. With the recent heat wave, the athletes were anticipating an extremely hot run and were pre pared to drink more water and electrolytes, but the marine layer still hadnt burned o by the noon time awards ceremony. Conditions were great, said Marine Corps Major Casey McKinney of Camp Pendleton. e wind didnt pick up either. Unlike in past years, there were no cases of hypothermia. In fact, only two competitors didnt nish the race, one because of a broken bicycle crankshaft, the other be cause of a bike that was damaged in a collision; the other cyclist involved continued on with a nasty road rash. e triathletes who had competed at Point Mugu before also noticed an other change: e Admi rals Cup, a sprint triathlon for the public tradition ally held before the Armed Forces event, didnt take place due to funding is sues. Many Admirals Cup participants would stay on after nishing their race to watch some of the best athletes in the sport. at really added to the ambiance, Felty said, adding that as a coach, he liked having the built-in cheering section. Event organizers noticed the dierence as well. Its a lot less chaotic, said Kevin Ludwig of NBVCs Morale, Welfare and Recreation. But the smaller crowd didnt take away from the inspiration and excitement generated by the event not for Capt. Lar ry Vasquez, commanding ocer of the base. Its always inspiring to see the dedication of these athletes. Dedication not only to their country but also to their sport, he said. And talk about lead ing a healthy lifestyle. is is the epitome of that. Navy triathletes sweep Armed Forces titles THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho The first childhood toy I can remember having was my Roy Rogers Chuck Wagon. It was way cool. But my favorite toys were Airfix 1:72 scale figures that came about 50 to a box. I had World War I Doughboys and Germans with spiked helmets, French and British troops. There were World War II Germans, GIs, Marines, Soviets, Japanese, Afrika Corps, British in shorts and I had scale model tanks and vehicles to go with them. Id build hill-top fortifications on the high ground of a pillow or mountain-top forts on chairs. There were cowboys, cav alry, Native Americans, Robin Hood and even Tarzan. I must have had over a thousand of these things at one time. I still have about a dozen left. One day I heard my grand mother tell my mom how nice it was that I played quietly by myself. I didnt know what she meant until later in life.MA3 Rodney Clevenger Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Mansfield, Ohio My Ninja Turtles. I grew up with that on TV. That was my thing. MA3 Christopher Edmunds MCSFBn Salt Lake City Toy guns. I had plenty, little six shooters with caps. EM2 Brandon Tucker Trident Refit Facility McComb, Miss. A water gun. I had a Super Soaker with a back pack tank. MT1 Bran Stark USS Maryland Withee, Wisc. My Megatron, a toy gun from Transformers. He was a bad guy and powerful. Tara Scott Family member Appomattox, Va. Probably my Sitn Spin. They still make those. Karen Reasoner Exchange employee Indianapolis A Pez dispenser. My favorites were Walt Disney characters. Twelve members of the Naval Hospital Pensacola Chief Petty Ocers Association went to the home of 94-year-old Charles Chuck Wheeler, retired chief and Battle of Mid way veteran, to help with the everyday tasks he is no longer able to complete, May 29. A 28-year veteran, Wheeler served as an aviation ordinanceman aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise CV-6 from May 1941 to Feb 1944. During that time, the Enterprise participated in numerous engagements against the Japanese Navy including the Battle of Midway, the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands and various other air-sea engagements dur ing the Guadalcanal Campaign. I dont have the words to express my gratitude in relations to what you all are doing for me, Wheel er said. Any little thing helps me tremendously. I used to be able to mow the lawn, pick up blown down limbs and leaves and maintain the place. Once a Chief, Always a Chief has signicant meaning to the U.S. Navy eternal brotherhood of chief petty ocers. When the NHP CPOA was ap proached about the op portunity to assist Wheeler, they embraced it whole heartedly. As soon as this was presented to the chiefs, no one in the association hesitated for a second, said Chief Hospital Corps man Chi Patrick. [Helping] is what we do. When a fellow chief needs help, we just do it. At Wheelers home, the chiefs split up into groups to accomplish several tasks such as mowing the lawn, removing a section Midway chief gets helpers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 e Kings Bay Community Water System is owned and operated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Georgia for all SUBASE activities. To report leaks or concerns with your water: For Family Housing Areas: 882-1211 or 882-2653 For SUBASE Immediate Needs Call SCADA: 573-2724. Routine work orders by Building Managers: 573-2300. e Kings Bay Water Source ree 900 foot deep artesian wells from the Upper Floridan Aquifer located on the Naval Submarine Base (SUBASE) Kings Bay provide our water. ey are housed in secure buildings to protect them from outside sources that could contaminate our water supply. A Source Water As sessment Plan (SWAP) completed in May 2003 by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division indicates our wells are at low risk for contamination. e plan also explains procedures for protecting our water supply. In the USA drinking water can come from a number of sources in cluding rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, res ervoirs, springs and wells. Groundwater from conned aquifers such as the Up per Floridan is considered to be among the best water available to consumers. As water moves over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves natu rally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the pres ence of animals or from human activity. Our testing does not show this to be a problem with our water supplies. Testing to Keep You Safe: e water we provide is tested con stantly; each year more than 14,000 tests are run to ensure safe, high quality pota ble water for our customers. is report provides you with the information you need to know about the sources of SUB ASE drinking water, what is in it and how it compares to regulatory agency stan dards. All plant operators and lab tech nicians hold state certication. e Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requires all water systems to provide their custom ers with an annual water quality report. e tests reported here are from January 1 through December 31, 2012 except for a few tests as noted in this report that are not done annually. Your Kings Bay Wa ter Department is committed to provid ing you with clean and safe water. We are pleased to report again this year our water meets the standards of the SDWA without any exceptions. How We Produce Water e Kings Bay Water System provides treated water 24 hours every day. Water is treated to remove contaminants by membrane ltration, aeration, chlorination and uoridation. Water testing is performed throughout the system on a variety of schedules ranging from daily to annually and other intervals, depending on the test. An inspection conducted by Georgia Environmental Protection Divi sion in April 2013 found no problems. Ensuring Safe Water To insure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Bottled water is regulated by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration and must provide the same protection for public health as public water supplies. Drinking water and bottled water may reasonably be expected to contain small amounts of some contaminants. e presence of contaminants does not necessarily indi cate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and po tential health eects can be obtained at: EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 Or on-line at www.epa.gov/ safewater. Water Conservation: USING WATER EFFICIENTLY Water conservation is always a good idea. A good way to think of it is using water eciently. Its a gift that we can give ourselves that provides for the fu ture. is takes added importance be cause of continuing drought conditions in Georgia. e past few years have been quite dry and these conditions appear to be continuing. Coastal Georgia has an additional set of issues besides drought due to in creased demand for water in this area. High withdrawal rates in some areas have resulted in saltwater intrusion into water resources used along the coast. is is al ready causing restrictions on growth and greater regulation of groundwater sup plies along the coast which SUBASE is subject to just as local communities are. SUBASE is complying with Presidential Executive orders mandating reductions for water usage at all facilities. e goal is to reduce usage by 2% per year through 2025. We have exceeded this ambitious goal, but the help of every person at SUB ASE is needed to continue to meet it. ere are many simple ways to be ef cient in use of water in daily activities. Lets use them and reap the benets. One good information source for water sav ings at home is: http://www.conserve watergeorgia.net/ An additional benet when we con serve water is the energy savings that nearly always accompanies it When you nd a new way to be water ecient, SHARE it with your neighbors and co workers. Working together we can all benet from these eorts. Vulnerability to Contaminants Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. People with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing chemotherapy, with organ transplants, with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants may be at risk from in fection. ese people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and mi crobial contaminants are available from: e Safe Drinking Water Hotline: (800) 426-4791 or on-line at www.epa.gov/ safewater. Drought Conditions in Georgia Because of the low rainfall in the State of Georgia, EPD has declared Level One Drought Rules to be in eect that require done from midnight to 10:00 AM and from 4:00 pm to midnight three days a week based on the odd/even schedule in which odd numbered addresses may water on Tuesdays, ursdays & Sundays while even number address may water on Mondays, Wednesdays & Saturdays. ere is no watering on Fridays ere is an exception for newly landscaped areas for 30 days after installation. ghting or other public health & safety purposes. For more information on wa tering see the following web site: http:// www.gaepd.org/Documents/outdoor water.html NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT: e Kings Bay Public Works Dept. teamed up with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command to upgrade our Water Treatment Plant to a state of the art treatment plant that alleviates trihalo methanes (THMs) of concern in the wa ter chlorination process. With two suc cessful years of operation completed in 2012 we continue with excellent results in reducing THMs as shown in the table below. Denitions of Terms and Abbreviations in this Report: Action Level (AL): e concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): e highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as a close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): e level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): reasonable goals for drinking water quality. Exceeding SMCLs may adversely aect odor or appear ance, but there is no known risk to human health. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Lev el (MRDL): e highest level of a disin fectant allowed in drinking water. ere is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of mi crobiological contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Lev el Goal (MRDLG): e level of a drink ing water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reect the benets of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. N/A : Not Applicable. N/D : Not Detected, e contaminant was not detected ppb or g/l: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (g/l) (Note that one ppb is equivalent to one second in 32 years) ppm or mg/l: parts per million or mil ligram per liter (mg/l) (Note that one ppm is equivalent to one second in 12 days) pCi/l: picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. Potential Contaminants Microbial contaminants [None Detected] such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural live stock operations, and wildlife. Data are given in Table 5. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-oc curring or result from urban stormwater runo, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, min ing or farming. ere were only low levels of a few naturally-occurring ones out of all tests run. See Tables 1, 3 and 4. ere were none that exceeded the MCL. Pesticides and herbicides which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runo, and residential uses. None Detected at SUBASE. See Table 2. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of in dustrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runo and septic systems. Only byproducts of wa ter disinfection as shown in Table 2 were found. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the results of oil and gas production and mining activi ties. ere were none detected. See Table 6.Kings Bay Community Water System 2012 Community Condence Report TABLE 1 Inorganic Contaminants DetectedParameter Units Sample Date MCL / [SMCL] MCLG Highest Level Detected Range of Detections Violation (Yes / No) Possible source of Contaminants Barium ppb 2012 2,000 N/A < 10 < 10 No Barium, Copper & Fluoride: Erosion of natural deposits; Fluoride is an additive that promotes strong teeth. Chlorine is an additive used to control microbes. Copper ppb 2012 1,500 1,300 3.5 4.4 No Chlorine ppm 2012 4 [ 2 ] N/A 3.5 0.3 3.5 No Fluoride ppm 2012 4 4 1.11 0.24 1.11 NoResults of Testing Table 2: Detected Organic ContaminantsParameter Units Sample Date MCL MCLG Kings Bay Results1Range of Detections Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination TTHMs1 ppb 2012 80 N/A 48.2 (4QRA) 46.3 52.7 No1, 2By-product of drinking water chlorination Total HAA5s1 ppb 2012 60 N/A 7.8 (4QRA) 7.6 8.7 No1, 21. Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5s) is the sum of detected concentrations of individual byproducts. They form because chlorine used for disinfec tion also reacts with low concentrations of organic materials present in the raw water. The data are evaluated by averaging the current quarter result with the previous three quar ters to obtain a Four Quarter Running Average (4QRA). A violation occurs when the 4QRA exceeds the MCL. With the new Kings Bay Water Plant, the levels have dropped well below the MCL. 2. Trihalomethane Health Effects: Some individuals who drink water containing Trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kid neys or central nervous systems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. As can be seen in the table, our results are much lower than the applicable standard.Table 3: Unregulated Inorganic Monitoring ResultsParameter Units Sample Date SMCL MCLG Kings Bay Results Range of Detections Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Erosion of natural deposits Sodium ppm 2012 N/A N/A 13.51N/A No Sulfate ppm 2012 250 N/A 35.9 N/A No 1. Based on this value Kings Bays water has 8 mg of sodium per 8 oz. serving. This is provided for individuals on sodium restricted diets. This is value is much less than the values seen in previous years past due to the membrane filtration process used in the new water plant.Table 4: Lead and Copper (Tap Water) Monitoring ResultsParameter Units Sample Date Action Level MCLG 90th Percentile No. of Sites Exceeding AL (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Lead (ppb) ppm 8/11 15 0 2.5 0 of 10 Copper (ppb) ppm 8/11 1300 1300 48 0 of 10 Because our results have been acceptable in previous testing 2011 was the first time we have had to test for lead and copper since 2008. The 2011 results are better than seen previ ously and in part attributed to the new water plant. USEPA and Georgia EPD have asked that we inform you about the health effects of lead as outlined below. Health Effects of Lead If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Kings Bay Community Water System is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 or at http:// www.epa.gov.safewater/lead. Table 5: Bacteriological Monitoring ResultsBiological Parameter(Presence or absence of bacteria in sample)Units Sample Date MCL MCLG Kings Bay Results Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Total Coliform (Number of Detections) 2012 0 0 0 No Naturally present in the environment Fecal Coliform 2012 0 0 0 No Warm blooded animals 1. Thirty sample points routinely tested at Kings Bay. Ten points are sampled each month with a total of 124 regular and special tests in 2012. Table 6: Radionuclides TableParameter Units Sample Date MCL MCLG Kings Bay Results Range of Detections Violations (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Alpha Emitters pCi/l 2004 15 0 <2 N/A No Erosion of natural deposits Radium 226 pCi/l 2004 5 0 <1 N/A No Radium 228 pCi/l 2004 5 0 <1 N/A No pCi/l: = picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. For copies of this report or for more information on it, please contact Mr. Scott Bassett, Kings Bays Public Aairs Oce, at (912) 573-4714.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11 President Barack Obama spoke May 23 on U.S. counterterrorism pol icy and looked at how the United States can defend itself from terrorism, yet remain true to core beliefs. e presidents speech at the National Defense University on Fort Lesley J. McNair took a broad view of counterterrorism ef forts. Obama reviewed what has taken place since September 11, 2001, and how the counterterrorism ef fort has changed. In 2001, Al-Qaida was the threat. It was that or ganization, led by Osama bin Laden, that planned and executed the attacks that killed 3,000 people on 9/11. Now the core of alQaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan is on a path to defeat, the president said. e United States has relentlessly pursued alQaidas senior leader ship and the threat of a 9/11-scale attack is greatly reduced, he said. At the same time the threat has morphed. AlQaida aliates notably those located in North Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula remain threats to the American homeland. reats have grown fol lowing the unrest in the Arab world, although those are mostly local or regionally based. Finally, there is a threat from homegrown extremists like those who are al leged to be responsible for the bombing in Boston. Attacks like those from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, like those against our embassy in Benghazi and like those in Boston represent the future of the threats we face from terrorism, the presi dent said. We must recognize, however, that the threat has shifted and evolved from the one that came to our shores on 9/11, he said. With a decade of experience to draw from, now is the time to ask ourselves hard questions about the nature of to days threats, and how we should confront them. Since 9/11, the United States has spent well over a trillion dollars on war. Our service members and their families have sacriced far more on our behalf, he said. Nearly 7,000 Americans have made the ultimate sacrice. Many more have left a part of themselves on the battleeld, or brought the shadows of battle back home. From our use of drones to the detention of terrorist suspects, the de cisions we are making will dene the type of nation, and world, that we leave to our children. No one can promise the total defeat of terror. ere will always be people mis guided enough to resort to attacks on society, the president said. What we can do, what we must do, is dismantle networks that pose a direct danger, and make it less likely for new groups to gain a foothold, all while maintaining the freedoms and ideals that we defend, Obama said. To dene that strategy, we must make decisions based not on fear, but hard-earned wisdom. e threats do not arise in a vacu um, the president said. There is the be lief in many parts of the world that Islam is in conict with the Unit ed States and the West, and that violence against Western targets is justied in pursuit of a larger cause. Of course, this ideol ogy is based on a lie, for the United States is not at war with Islam; and this ideology is rejected by the vast majority of Muslims, who are the most frequent victims of terrorist acts, Obama said. e ideology persists, however, and all parts of the U.S. government must work to counter it, he said. e United States must continue to defeat al-Qai da and its associated forc es, the president said. In Afghanistan, U.S. forces will follow the NATO plan and continue training Afghan security forces up to the end of NATO combat operations there at the end of next year, Obama said. Beyond Afghanistan, we must dene our eort not as a boundless global war on terror, but rather as a series of persistent, tar geted eorts to dismantle specic networks of violent extremists that threat en America, he said. Most of these will be done in partnership with other nations, he said, specically mentioning Pakistan, Yemen and So malia. e United States will continue to cooperate with other nations and share counterterrorism intelligence with these na tions, he emphasized, but will not be afraid to work alone when the situation calls for it. Al-Qaida looks for un governed areas to set up and plan, he noted. In some of these places the state has only the most tenuous reach into the ter ritory, Obama said. In other cases, the state lacks the capacity or will to take action. In cases when using American troops in these places isnt possible and lethal action is needed, he said, e United States has taken lethal, targeted action against al-Qaida and its associated forces, including with remotely piloted aircraft commonly referred to as drones. e technology raises profound questions about targeting, civilian casual ties and the risks of creat ing new enemies, he said, but Obama maintained the strikes strikes have been eective and are le gal nationally and interna tionally. Simply put, these strikes have saved lives, he said. Beyond Afghanistan, the United States only tar gets al-Qaida and its as sociated forces, the presi dent said. America does not make strikes when we have the ability to capture in dividual terrorists. Our preference is always to detain, interrogate, and prosecute them, Obama said. America cannot take strikes wherever we choose. Our actions are bound by consultations with partners, and respect for state sovereignty. America does not take strikes to punish individu als. We act against terror ists who pose a continuing and imminent threat to the American people, and when there are no other governments capable of eectively addressing the threat. And before any strike is taken, there must be near-certainty that no civilians will be killed or injured, the highest stan dard we can set. e president insists on strong oversight of all le thal action. After I took oce, my administration began brieng all strikes outside of Iraq and Afghanistan to the appropriate commit tees of Congress, he said. Let me repeat that, not only did Congress authorize the use of force, it is briefed on every strike that America takes. e use of force must be part of a larger discussion about a comprehensive counter-terrorism strat egy, he said, adding that. force alone cannot make America safe. We cannot use force ev erywhere that a radical ide ology takes root; and in the absence of a strategy that reduces the well-spring of extremism, a perpetual war, through drones or Special Forces or troop deployments, will prove selfdefeating, and alter our country in troubling ways, the president said. Navy College information President delineates counterterrorism policy

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 From their rst appear ance in mid-World War I, the Royal Navys K-class submarines were perhaps the most badly-conceived and ill-starred submers ibles ever built by any na tion. In both their original conguration and in the several derivatives that followed, the K-boats compiled an almost un broken record of disaster and death, unredeemed by even a single instance of combat eectiveness. Spawned by a awed tactical concept, imple mented with immature and dangerous technolo gies and kept at sea by the Admiraltys stubborn refusal to admit the most obvious deciencies, the K-class left in their wake a fascinating, even humor ous, tale of operational and technical folly for which the query, What were they thinking? has seldom been more appro priate. At the outbreak of World War I, the Royal Navy could eld only 64 subma rines, and of these, only 17 had more than coastal ca pabilities. With so much of the pre-war naval budget consumed by the dread nought race, submarine construction had indeed lagged in the years 1910 to 1914, and need to catch up with the Germans be came an immediate prior ity when war came in Au gust 1914. Several of the Admiraltys senior futurists, among them Commodore Roger Keyes, Inspector Captain of Submarines, envisioned a line abreast of high-speed submarines working with the cruiser screen ahead of the main battle force, and thus po sitioned to submerge and attack an on-coming enemy battle line even before the latter could engage its British counterpart. is scheme would re quire a submarine capable of 21 knots surfaced, even under typically adverse North Sea conditions. In June 1915, four submarines were assigned for construction, two each, to Vickers and the Ports mouth Dockyard, and the ill-fated K-class was born. By every measure of the time, they were prodigious submarines. At 339-feet long and displacing 1,800 tons surfaced, 2,600 tons submerged, they were larger than a contempo rary destroyer. Powered on the surface by two oil-red boilers and a pair of steam tur bines, which developed 10,500 horsepower and also charged lead-acid batteries, they were tted with four electric motors to drive twin shafts while submerged. Adm. Jackie Fisher had also insisted on an auxiliary diesel engine, and it was to prove a life saver on many occasions. e K-class could make nine knots underwater, with a submerged endur ance of approximately 80 nautical miles at two knots, and a maximum design depth of 150 feet. e ships were originally armed with 10 18-inch torpedo tubes: four in the bow, four mounted trans versely amidships and two above water in trainable mounts for surface at tacks. ere were also two four-inch deck guns and a three-incher on the super structure. However, the most dis tinctive features of the Kclass derived directly from their steam power plants. Aft of the Control Room and the Beam Torpedo Rooms were located suc cessively the Boiler, Tur bine and Motor Rooms. Above the boilers were six large hull openings two funnel uptakes and four air intakes, all closed by motor-operated valves. Each of the air intakes was 37 inches in diameter. e ve-foot high funnels themselves pro truded from a substantial superstructure aft of the conning tower and were tilted downward by elec tric motors and stowed in the superstructure prior to submerging. To dive the submarine, the boilers had to be shut down, the funnels retract ed, and all the valves tight ly seated to seal the Boiler Room while blowing bal last and converting over to electric drive. e residual heat was so erce that the boiler spac es were totally uninhabit able during submergence, and had to be abandoned. All the hatches, valves, hull penetrations, intakes, and uptakes necessitated by this Rube Goldberg ar rangement led one experi enced submariner to sum up the K-class boats with one pithy phrase: Too many holes! e handling character istics of the class, both on the surface and underwater, compounded their dif culties. Above water, the boats were insuciently buoyant forward, and tended to plow into on coming waves, shipping tons of water over the conning tower. e large, at foredeck then tended to force the bow even deeper, as if the boat were teetering on the brink of a dive. Although the entire class was later tted with a bulbous, freeooding prow known as a swan bow, they were seldom able to operate at speed with the Battle Fleet in the North Sea except under the most favorable weather conditions. Both the forward deck gun and the superstruc ture torpedo tubes were unworkable and later re moved. Even worse, the ships were easily, and regular ly, pooped by following seas. eir overall wetness caused regular inunda tions of the Boiler Room through the funnels, ex tinguishing the res and leaving the boats wallowing in the waves. With self-compensating fuel tanks open from be low, seawater contami nation of the fuel oil was also common, especially in rough weather, and caused frequent losses of power. K-class handling was even more precarious in a dive. Because of their great length and weight, once they started down, they were hard to stop. Loss of depth control was common, and nosing into the bottom was a regular occurrence. Even if all went well in preparing the ship for diving, shutting down the steam plant, sealing the hull and ballasting down, the K-class submarines could rarely submerge in less than ve minutes, and attempting to accelerate the process only invited dangerous mishaps, like ooding or Boiler Room res. Despite their enormous size, habitability aboard the K-class boats was rela tively poor. Although the ocers had fairly capa cious accommodations, and even a small bathtub, the crews quarters were cramped and poorly ventilated. Lingering heat from the boilers kept the interior at a stiing tem perature, and the humidity was oppressive. To make matters worse, the Admiralty, in per petuating the myth that the K-class submarines were self-contained, independent warships, required the crew to live aboard, even in port. ese wretched living conditions, coupled with a growing reputation for crew lethality, made the Kclass unpopular boats to serve in, and morale was a recurring problem. e Admiralty authorized ten more K-class submarines in 1915 and then another seven the next year for a total of 21. Virtually all of these were ordered even before the earliest of the rst batch, K3, was commissioned at the Vickers yard in August 1916. K3s sea trials had been memorable. During speed runs, her Boiler and Tur bine Rooms became so hot that the hatches had to be left open, and a head sea cracked the conning tower windows. en, in January 1917, on one of her rst war patrols from the Grand Fleets main op erating base at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, she shipped a beam sea and took so much water down the funnels that her Boiler Room nearly lled up. e second of the class to be completed, K13, began her career with a tragic accident. On Jan. 29, 1917, during what was supposed to be the nal test dive of her acceptance trials in Gareloch, one or more of the 37-inch Boiler Room ventilators failed to close, and the entire sub marine abaft the midships Torpedo Room ooded. Emergency procedures were unavailing, and K13 settled to the bottom in 60 feet of water, with 49 survi vors trapped forward and 31 dead aft. A tortuous 50-hour res cue operation, in which the bow of the submarine was lifted to the surface and an escape hole cut through the pressure hull, succeeded in extricating the living. e ensuing in quiry resulted in All 13 K-boats with sea trials in the rst half of 1917 had serious problems. K14 sprang a leak at anchor in the Gareloch, ooded its batteries, and nearly asphyxiated the crew with chlorine gas. It had to be towed in. K7 earned the distinc tion of being the only Kclass submarine ever to re in anger when she at tacked the German U-95 on June 16, 1917. Firing ve torpedoes, she scored one hitand that was a dud. After a short surface chase, with K7 gaining, U-95 submerged and es caped. e K-boats sailed south of Rosyth, where they joined the Fifth Battle Squadron and the Second Battle Cruiser Squadron under Vice Adm. Hugh Evan-omas. In the early evening of Jan. 31, Evanomas, in the cruiser HMS Courageous, led his forces down the Firth of Forth in a long, single lineahead. After Courageous came the 13th Submarine Flotilla K11, K17, K14, K12, and K22 (formerly K13) all following their Commodore, Cmdr. Ed ward Leir, in the otilla leader HMS Ithuriel. Several miles behind them were the battle cruis ers Australia, New Zea land, Indomitable and In exible, and then the 12th Submarine Flotilla: the light cruiser HMS Fear less, with Capt. Charles Little, Commodore, K4, K3, K6, and K7. e initial speed of advance was 16 knots, but Evan-omas had ordered his forces to in crease speed to 22 knots when they passed May Is land, which lay just at the entrance to the Forth estuary. e night was clear and the seas relatively calm, but the moon had not yet come up, and each of the K-boats was essentially steering on the shrouded stern light of the vessel ahead. At approximately 7 p.m., Courageous passed May Island and increased speed, just as a low-lying bank of mist settled over the sea. Almost simultaneously, Evan-omas force unexpectedly encountered a small otilla of mine sweeping trawlers cross ing their path. As K14 ma neuvered to avoid them, her helm jammed, and she veered out of line to port and slowed. Meanwhile, K22, having lost sight of her next ahead, K12, had also straggled to port o the intended track, and when K14 managed to regain steering and turned back to starboard, K22 plowed into her at 19 knots, nearly tearing o her bow. us began a chain re action of misadventures that was later dubbed the Battle of May Is land. With both K22 and K14 now dead in the wa ter, and the latter nearly in extremis, out of the mist loomed the battle cruisers, with Australia in the van. e rst three succeeded in avoiding the crip pled submarines, but Inexible, last in line, struck K22 a glancing blow and tore down her side making 18 knots, removing all her external tankage. Surprisingly, both submarines survived, and K22 even made it back to port the next day under her own power. By 10 p.m., Commodore Leir on Ithuriel had re ceived word of the initial collision, and turned back with K11, K17 and K12 in train to render as sistance. Leir blundered right across the bows of the oncoming 12th Sub marine Flotilla, with Fear less in the lead, and the latter rammed full speed into K17, just forward of the conning tower. Fear less lost 20 feet of her bow, and K17 sank within eight minutes. In the resulting confu sion, K6 collided with K4, nearly cutting her in half. K4 sank almost immediately, but not before K7 ran over her in turn. ese events left the confused remnant of both submarine squadrons sta tionary in the path of the battleships and their de stroyers at the end of the column. Destroyers killed many K17 survivors in the water. At dawn when the mist had lifted, the losses in the Battle of May Island were revealed: K4 and K17 sunk; Fearless, K14, and K22 badly damaged; and over 100 men drowned. In June 1918, the Ad miralty ordered six more, intended to be numbered K23 through K28. e Admiralty had de cided to follow up on a post-retirement sugges tion of Lord Fisher, who proposed arming large submarines with 12-inch guns to create a class of submarine dreadnoughts that would be more eective against surface ships than boats armed with torpedoes alone. e Director of Naval Construction pro duced a design in 1916 for a class of four such boats, which were laid down on the keels of K18, K19, K20, and K21, all just starting construction. Each carried a single 12-inch gun in a large casing forward of the conning tower that could be red from periscope depth with the muzzle protruding from the wa ter. ough fty rounds of ammunition were car ried for the gun, it could only be reloaded on the surface. On one occasion M1s hydraulically-oper ated tampion what was supposed to seal the barrel allowed water to leak in ahead of the shell. When the gun was red, the projectile tore o the muzzle, which ew away with the wire winding of the barrel trailing behind, like a giant y-cast. M1 was only readied for action in June 1918 and was sent to the Mediterranean, where she never red a shot in anger. M2 and M3 were commis sioned in 1919 and 1920, respectively, but M4 was cancelled on the stocks at wars end. By the time World War I ground to a halt in No vember 1918, and particularly in the aftermath of the Battle of May Island, the reputation of the Kclass had sunk so low that the Royal Navy was having diculty nding subma riners all volunteers willing to serve in them. Consequently, the Naval Society issued a lengthy treatise minimizing their many deciencies and defending their performance in the war. Even after the Armistice, the K-class submarines continued their erratic be havior, and several more nearly foundered. On Jan. 20 1921, K5 disappeared with all hands during eet exercises 120 miles westsouthwest of the Scilly Islands, probably the vic tim of a loss of control in a dive. Except for an oil slick and some wood fragments, It was never found. Only six months later, K15 sank at her pier in Portsmouth, and although raised, did not return to service and was eventually scrapped. en on Nov. 12 1925, M1 disappeared while on a routine training exer cise only 15 miles south of Start Point on the southeast coast of England. Its whereabouts remained a mystery for the 10 days it took the Swedish freight er Vidar to arrive at Kiel and report striking a sub merged object precisely where M1 had gone miss ing. Paint scrapings on Vidars hull revealed that the submerged object had indeed been the lost sub marine. After this tragedy, the Royal Navy disbanded the 1st Submarine Flotilla, and all of the remaining K-boats, save K26, were disposed of. K26 spent most of the rest of her days in the Mediterranean, but she too went to the break ers in 1931, as trouble some as her sisters to the very end. is left only M2 and M3 originally K19 and K20 to carry on the fate ful tradition. After the loss British K-class: Worst submarines in history

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13 Naval Support Activity Mid-South ocially welcomed into service the Navys rst solar-powered electric car charging sta tion with a ribbon cutting ceremony, May 29. NSA Mid-South Execu tive Ocer Cmdr. Brad Meeks thanked the com bined Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Commander, Navy Installations Command team that brought the station online, and he said the new photovoltaic carports were a sign of how the base was evolving to face new challenges. Naval Support Activity Mid-South is leading the way, said Meeks. is is the rst solar power charging station in the Navy, and I want to thank our NAVFAC public works team for seeing this project through. eir eorts have ensured NSA Mid-Souths role in building a clean, sustainable future for our Navy and our nation. e carport will enable NSA Mid-South to re charge its current eet of 17 electric vehicles with renewable electricity in approximately four hours, while reducing demand on the commercial power grid. In addition to charg ing vehicles connected through either 110V or 220V plugs, the carport will also provide excess electricity to the local power grid, further reduc ing the bases electricity costs. e 150-foot-long panel structure tilts automatically to track the sun and includes several safety features to protect against high wind or lightning strikes. Public Works Depart ment Mid-South will monitor the carports pro duction via a Web-based system and will rely on the base operations support contractor to maintain the individual solar arrays and components over its expected 25-year lifespan. NSA Mid-Souths car port is part of an ongoing $10-million CNIC project to install seven sites with E85 alternative-fuel sta tions, nine sites with so lar carports and ve sites with stand-alone electric vehicle charging stations at Navy installations in the U.S. Construction began in March 2013, and was completed in late April. Since then, the carport has successfully gener ated enough electricity to power more than 60 typical homes for a day. Local energy eciency eorts like this help the Navy achieve energy ef ciency goals required by presidential executive or ders, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy In dependence and Security Act of 2007. Navy opens solar carportof M1, the gun on M2 was removed and its housing converted into an airplane hangar to carry a collaps ible Parnall Peto sea plane, which could be catapulted from the forecastle for scouting in advance of the eet. Similarly, in 1927, M3 was converted into a large submers ible minelayer, with capacity for over a hundred mines. e Navy used both boats in the late 1920s and early 1930s for a variety of operational experiments, but on Jan. 26, 1932, M2 disappeared o Port land Bill with 60 men aboard. When her wreck was found on the bottom a week later, both the hangar door and the conning tower hatch were open, suggesting that the ship had ooded in the act of surfacing and attempting to launch the aircraft as quickly as possible. M3 escaped the Kclass nemesis, and she was scrapped that same year, thus bringing our sorry tale to a close. Of the 22 Kand Mclass boats ultimately commissioned, only one saw combat. But seven, nearly a third, were lost to accidents, half with all hands. Edward C. Whit man, Ph.D. is the Naval Science Advisor at the Center for Security Strategies and Operations at Techmatics, and is a former Senior Editor of Undersea Warfare magazine.Worst Wikileaks trial underwayof an old fence and digging up fence posts. Were just doing some yard work and simple home beauti cation for a retired chief, Chief Hospital Corpsman Chris McKenzie said. e fact that he, as a chief, paved the way for who I am today, blows my mind. To think what [veterans] went through so that we could have the luxury that we have today makes me feel really honored to be here. About halfway through the morning, Wheeler came outside to talk with this new generation of chiefs. Im excited, I really am, said McKenzie. When I talked to him, he came alive talking about his battle ex periences and some of the things he went through. It is one thing to read a history book, but when you can talk to living history, its just a phenomenal thing for me. Its been a truly great experi ence. After several sea stories reminiscing of old times and a few shared laughs, Wheeler returned inside and the chiefs resumed their work. Chief Logistics Spe cialist Brian Gareld appreciated Wheelers service to the country. Its priceless, Gar eld said. ats one of the types of services that can never be re paid. We can only stay committed to make sure we meet the mis sion all the time like [veterans] did back in that time. We will al ways be in debt for that service. With the prosecution accusing Army Pfc. Bradley Manning of causing immeasurable harm to national security and Mannings attorney portraying the soldier as young and nave, but goodintentioned, Mannings courtmartial in what has become known as the WikiLeaks case be gan at Fort Meade, Md., June 4. Manning, 25 is charged with committing various crimes, in cluding aiding the enemy, by leaking classied information to the WikiLeaks Web site while as signed to Iraq as an intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010. If convicted, Manning could be sentenced to life in prison. In his opening statement, Army Capt. Joe Morrow, the prosecutor, called the leaks the biggest ever in U.S. history, involving hundreds of thousands of clas sied documents, and that they provided potentially actionable information for targeting U.S. forces. David Coombs, Mannings at torney, said in his opening statement that Manning was selec tive about the documents he released and was hoping to make the world a better place by doing so. e judge, Army Col. Denise Lind, asked Manning if he want ed to reconsider trial by a mili tary judge alone, herself, rather than by jury, which is termed a panel by the military. Manning declined. In the afternoon, the prosecutor called the rst witness, Army Sgt. 1st Class omas Smith, who was the senior enlisted Criminal Investigative Division agent at the time. He and another case agent, Tony Graham, were the rst to investigate the the sensitive compartmented information facility where Manning worked in Iraq. Chief

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Register now for June 24 to 28 Chapel activityVacation Bible School registration has been extended to Friday, June 21. Its not too late to have your child enjoy great fun for a week this summer. e Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapel invites your family to be a part of this years Vacation Bible School. Scheduled for June 24 to June 28, from 9 a.m. noon daily, children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited to join all the fun. Registration will continue through Friday, June 21. ere is limited space, so all are encouraged to register early to avoid being placed on a waiting list. The theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Children will begin each day in the Kingdom Castle where they will learn motions to upbeat Bible songs, hear the days lesson and learn Bible lessons from Victoria the Fox, Duke the Stallion, and Sir Valient the Lion. What happens next? ere are theme-based crafts, games, snacks and Bible drama. Participants will enjoy hours of fun with knights to lead them through the morning to Bible lessons, funlled games and activities and delicious treats served in Kings Kitchen. Each days activities will end with children gathering in the Kingdom Castle again to sing songs, review the days activities, and prepare for the more culinary treats. Interested? Stop by the Chapel oce located directly across the parking lot from the Kings Bay Navy Exchange. Want to help? To make this years VBS a success volunteers are needed to help build and decorate sets, preassemble craft projects, decorate classrooms and so much more. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer, your help is welcomed. Volunteers may sign up for one of the many service opportunities by lling out a volunteer forms available at registration table. For more program information, call the Chapel 573-4501 or to stop by the Chapel oce. Vehicle decals to endPersonal ID cards more ecient As of July 1, the Navy will no longer issue or use vehicle decals for base access, including Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Vehicle decals were used to ensure vehicles on Navy installations complied with state requirements for vehicle registration and insurance. State programs have become more ecient, eliminating one of the main reasons for decals. After Sept. 11, 2001, security at all Department of Defense instal lations requires 100 percent identification checks of driv ers at the installation gates, said Lt. Cmdr. Gregory Ver linde, Security Ocer for Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay. Subase Kings Bay has conducted 100 percent identication card checks for all personnel accessing the installation since Sept 2008. e use of vehicle decals is redundant since identication card checks are arguably more eective verify ing the authority of an individual entering the base. Vehicle decals are a force protection vulnerability. ey are easily counterfeited, moved from one car to another, or found in used-car parking lots. Other issues that helped change this policy were the expense and administrative burden of the program. Elimination of the vehicle decal requirement will not eliminate the requirement for an individual to properly register and ensure their vehicle. All vehicles on Navy Instal lations must continue to be li censed, registered and insured in accordance with state and local laws, Verlinde said. In addition, all Navy Installations will conduct random anti-terrorism checks. We will be conducting authorized administrative checks, similar to the way security departments conduct DUI checks. With this, we will be verifying the identication and to ensure the vehicle has a valid license, registration, and insurance. For frequent visitors to installations requiring decals, the current decal may be left on the vehicle until the expiration date. Otherwise, it is recommended that the decal be removed. Up Periscope Your favorite toy when you were a kid Page 9 NSB hoops Intramural action hits high gear Page 5 Souda Two Kings Bay SSGNs make port visits Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Stirring up tranquility Task Force set up, comprehensive plan due by January 2014Commander, Naval Submarine Forces in Norfolk established a ag ocer-led task force in May to focus on eectively integrating enlisted women Sailors on board multiple submarine platforms. Vice Adm. Michael Connor stood up the task force to specically look at best integration practices for SSBNs, SSGNs, and Virginia-class SSNs. Commander of Submarine Group Two, Rear Adm. Kenneth Perry is leading the task force. e group is charged with developing a comprehensive Plan of Actions and Milestones by January 2014. is POAM will mirror the previous deliberate process used to successfully integrate female ocers by including feasibility studies, potential courses of action and candidate timelines. Pending the results, a detailed implementation plan will be presented to the Chief of Naval Operations by March 2015. Female ocers have been successfully integrated on board OHIO-Class SSBNs and SSGNs, and will be integrated onboard VIRGINIA-Class SSNs in scal year 2015. e Navy is working with industry to design the Ohio replacement SSBN to support both ocers and enlisted mixed-gender crews. en-commander of Submarine Group 10, Rear Adm. Barry Bruner, announced the Department of the Navys plan to allow women to serve on submarines, during a press conference at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, April 29, 2010. With the Ohio-class ballistic submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) providing the backdrop, Bruner formally announced the Navys policy change to various regional and local electronic and print outlets on the submarine bases waterfront. On Dec. 5, 2012, Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), became one of the rst female unrestricted line ofcers to qualify in submarines, receiving her submarine Dolphins during a ceremony at NSB Kings Bay. Navy eyes plans for enlisted females on subs Vacation Bible School signup extended

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 e American Red Cross has reopened its oce onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e oce will be staed entirely by volunteers and is on the rst oor of the Flucky Hall at 1063 USS Tennessee Ave. Its focus is to better assist service members and their families and to develop volunteer programs that enhance the base environment. e Red Cross regularly provides assistance to troops overseas who have emergencies back home, such as a death in the family or a family member having a serious medical issue. Having an oce on base will enable the Red Cross to assist troops faster and more eectively. Volunteers can engage in programs that assist hospital personnel and patients; make follow up calls to military families who have used the Red Cross emergency message service to ensure their needs have been met; act as a community referral source for families in need; dispatch volunteers out to re scenes when house res or other disasters occur; serve as a point of contact for commands; and provide briengs about Red Cross services to deploying and returning service members and their families. Oce hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through ursday. Anyone interested in volunteering or learning more about Red Cross services can call Susan Van Dyke at (912) 573-3939 or Kathie Perkins at (912) 265-1695. Hurricane season began June 1. For 120 years, the American Red Cross has been providing relief for disaster victims in the path of devastating hurricanes. e rst Red Cross organized hurricane response eort occurred in August 1893, when the Red Cross came to the aid of a community in the Sea Islands o the coast of South Carolina. At that time, the Sea Islands were a largely African American population, known for their farms that produced the long silky Sea Island cotton. Without the aid of modern warning systems, the islanders had little notice and no time to prepare when the storm shifted course and struck overnight. e Sea Islands Hurricane delivered a destructive blow to southern communities and coastlines, leaving approximately 2,000 people dead and 20,000 to 30,000 people homeless. Damage was estimated at about $1 million with the storm washing crops, livestock, homes and hundreds of victims out to sea. According to the NOAA Web site, a Category 3 storm made landfall on August 27 near Savannah, Ga. Pieced together from the few existing me teorological records, the storm surge was approximately 16 feet, causing massive damage along the coastline, destroying most of the barrier islands structures, and ruining the crops that were nearing harvest. e hurricane then moved through Beaufort and Charleston, S.C. continuing its destructive path. With so much devastation inland, it was initially thought that no one survived on the barrier islands; but as news ltered in, the extent of the damage and plight of the surviving inhabitants became clear. Government ocials requested the Red Cross inspect and provide whatever aid they could. Clara Barton, founder of the Red Cross and organization leader at that time, was concerned that the Red Cross could not provide ample resources to help survivors because of the overwhelming size of the relief eort, but the 72-year-old Barton was not one to turn away pleas for help. With limited funds, the Red Cross helped storm victims recover and re build their lives. Barton decided food was the most important priority and from meager Red Cross rations, sup plied each family a peck of corn and a pound of bacon per week. From the beginning it had been evident this would be a prolonged work, for it was necessary to provide for the people until their next crop could be harvested, nearly a year later, as noted in Clara Barton: Professional Angel by Elizabeth Brown Pryor, published in 1987. In addition to food, for nearly a year, the Red Cross administered medical aid, tools, seeds, and housing materials along with a planting rehabilitation project that helped sustain the islanders. Barton stayed in the Sea Islands until the summer of 1894 and the remaining Red Cross sta left just before the cotton harvest in early autumn. When the relief eort was over, elds of Sea Island cotton had been reestablished and homes, schools and churches rebuilt. With another above average hurricane season predicted, it is important we take a minute to learn from our history and prepare for the storm season ahead. Learn more about Red Cross history. www.redcross.org contributed to this report. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Life, Health meeting June 18Per the instruction SUBASE 1700_6D, a fo rum to voice any quality of life or health and wellness issues onboard the base will be held at 6 p.m., June 18 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel Fellowship hall. Note that attendance is required for elding any issues, complaints, suggestions or needs at this forum. is is your opportunity to share what needs to be addressed. ere is a survey and e-mail that are being established for your input anony mously and that will be sent out separately.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will conduct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civilians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more information or to enroll your teen.MOAA dinner meeting June 18e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ofcers of America Associations monthly dinner meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., June 18 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill. Guest speaker will be Antoinette Toni Caruso. Cost for dinner is $20. RSVP by June 14 with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren.crouch@tds.net.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Kings Bay Red Cross oce reopens Red Cross Burial at sea is a means of nal disposition of remains that is performed on United States Navy vessels. e committal ceremony is performed while the ship is deployed. erefore, family members are not allowed to be present. e commanding ocer of the ship assigned to perform the ceremony will notify the family of the date, time and longitude and latitude once the committal service has been completed. Active duty, retired Sailors and their dependents are entitled to burial at sea. Anyone desiring this honor should indicate that preference in writing and have the next-of-kin or executor of the estate contact Navy Mortuary Aairs at the following address to coordinate arrangements: Burial-at-Sea Coordinator Naval Hospital Branch Medical Clinic P.O. Box 280148 Mayport, FL 32288-0148 Phone: (904) 270-4285 Web site: www.public.navy.mil/ bupers-npc/support/casualty/mortuary/Pages/BurialAtSea.aspx) If the preference for burial-at-sea was not in writing by the retired member, the person authorized to direct disposition may authorize burial-at-sea. e following documents must be submitted to the commanding ocer of the Navy or Coast Guard vessel/aircraft that will conduct the ceremony: Copy Civil Death Certificate Certicate of Cremation or transit permit issued by the appropriate civil authority Signed request/authorization for committal from the primary next-of-kin or PADD Copy of DD-214 and marriage certicate e authorization should include the decedents full name, grade, SSN and/or serial number, branch of service, dates of service and retirement, date of death, religious service desired and where remains are committed. Sea burial available to Sailors, family With the high cost of the summer vacation season here, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau leaders remind Sailors to be wary of predatory lending practices. Holly Petraeus, assistant director of the CFPB Oce of Service Member Aairs, said the number of service members aected by predatory lending acts is hard to measure. It can be embarrassing to go and tell somebody that you got ripped o, Petraeus said. Its so common for Sailors to walk into [a nancial counselor] with signicant nancial problems that unfortunately have gotten really severe by the time they walk in and ask to see a counselor. Predatory loans are usually small, short-term arrangements designed to bridge cash-strapped borrowers until their next paycheck. However, they are expensive, high-interest loans that often cost $10 to $44 dollars per week per $100 dollars borrowed, plus fees. If a loan is not paid at the original payment due date and rolled-over multiple times, it can lead to a situation where most Sailors cannot pay o the loan. Financial diculties can threaten a service members security clearance and career. Addressing nancial issues openly can work to a Sailors advantage. Service members may appeal to predatory lenders because they have a guaranteed source of income. e Military Lending Act caps payday loans, auto title loans, and tax refund anticipation loans to military on active duty and their dependents at an annual rate of 36 percent, Petraeus said. at sounds high, I know, but the average payday loan is actually about 390 percent. e Military Lending Act denes payday loans as loans of closed-end credit, 91 days or less, and less than $2,000 dollars. It denes auto title loans as loans of closed-end credit that are 181 days or less. e problem is that some folks have just changed the denition of their product enough to get outside of that law, Petraeus said. So youll see some sites online advertising that type of loan that will say right on there, were not subject to the Military Lending Act because our loan is for more than 90 days. Sailors experiencing nancial challenges should notify their chain of command and work with their command nancial specialist to develop a budget and explore additional options such as military relief societies, eligibility for interest rate reductions and other relief.Beware danger of predatory lenders Military Lending Act

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During their two-days of informal talks in Rancho Mirage, Calif., that concluded June 8, President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jingpin agreed that North Korea must denuclearize, and that the United States and China will work together to resolve cybersecurity and other issues, National Security Advisor Tom Donilon told reporters in Palm Springs, Calif.. Id say at the outset that the President had very good discussions in an informal atmosphere, uniquely informal atmosphere, with President Xi over the last two days, Donilon told reporters. e discussions were positive and constructive, wide-ranging and quite successful in achieving the goals that we set forth for this meeting. A specic goal of the talks, Donilon said, was to build a personal relationship between the President and President Xi, and have an opportunity not under the pressure of being on the margins of another multilateral meeting to really sit down and explore the contours of the U.S.-China relationship. During dinner on June 7, Obama and Xi had a lengthy discussion about North Korea, Donilon said. China, he added, has taken a number of steps in recent months to send a clear message to North Korea, including through enhanced enforcement of sanctions and through public statements by the senior leadership in China. Obama and Xi agreed that North Korea has to denuclearize; that neither country will accept North Korea as a nuclear-armed state; and that we would work together to deepen U.S.-China cooperation and dialogue to achieve denuclearization, Donilon said. Obama also emphasized to President Xi that the United States will take any steps that we need to take to defend ourselves and our allies from the threat that North Korea presents, he added. e two sides stressed the importance of continuing to apply pressure both to halt North Koreas ability to proliferate and to make clear that its continued pursuit of nuclear weapons is incompatible with its economic development goals, Donilon said. e discussions on this issue, I believe, will allow us to continue to move ahead and work in a careful way in terms of our cooperation to work together to achieve our ends. e bottom line, Donilon said, is I think we had quite a bit of alignment on the Korean issue North Korean issue, and absolute agreement that we would continue to work together on concrete steps in order to achieve the joint goals that the United States and China have with respect to the North Korean nuclear program. Yesterday morning, Obama and Xi discussed economic issues, during which cybersecurity and other cyber issues were an important topic, Donilon said. e United States and China, he said, have a half-a-trillion-dollar-ayear trade relationship. Obviously, given the importance of our economic ties, the President made clear the threat posed to our economic and national security by cyber-enabled economic espionage, Donilon said. And I want to be clear on exactly what were talking about here. What were talking about here are efforts by entities in China to, through cyber attacks, engage in the theft of public and private property intellectual property and other property in the United States. And that is the focus here, which is why it was in the economic discussion this morning. And again, we had a detailed discussion on this, he continued. e President underscored that resolving this issue is really key to the future of U.S.China economic relations. He asked President Xi to continue to look seriously at the problem that weve raised here. e Chinese have agreed to look at this, Donilon said, noting that Obama and Xi have provided guidance to the new cyber working group thats been established as part of the U.S.-China strategic economic dialogue. e cyber working group will engage in a dialogue on the rules and norms of behavior in cyberspace that will explore condence-building measures, Donilon said. And we instructed the teams to report back on their discussions to the leaders. Obama and Xi also discussed military-tomilitary relationships between the United States and China, Donilon said. Its the military-tomilitary relationship that lags behind our political and our economic relationship, Donilon said. is was acknowledged on the Chinese side, and we actually have some momentum behind increasing and deepening these relationships as we go forward here, as we try to build a comprehensive and positive relationship with China. Returning to the two presidents discussion about North Korea, Donilon said, e important point here is full agreement on the goals that is denuclearization; full agreement that in fact the Security Council resolutions which put pressure on North Korea need to be enforced, and full agreement that we will work together to look at steps that need to be taken in order to achieve the goal. If North Korea continues to pursue a nuclear weapons program, that would allow it to become a proliferator, which would present a threat to the United States and which would allow them to really up-end, if you will, security in Northeast Asia, Donilon said. A recognized nuclear weapon state in Pyongyang, weapons program in Pyongyang would of course have profound implications in the rest of Northeast Asia, and these are obviously results that the Chinese dont want to see, Donilon added. eyre results the United States doesnt want to see. So I think what you have essentially underway here is a shared threat analysis and a shared analysis as to what the implications and impact would be of North Korea pursuing a nuclear weapons program. Obama, Chinese leader talk North Korea THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 e Flag Day Golf Tournament is Friday, June 14 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. e cost is $26 and includes lunch, green fees and cart. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. with shotgun start at 1 p.m. e new format is an individual format where you add 72 to your handicap and play as far as you can until you reach that number. Once there plant your ag. e winner will be the person who gets the furthest on the course. Reserve your spot today at (912) 573-8475. Happy Fathers Day from Rack-N-Roll Lanes All fathers bowl free on from 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, June 16 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. is does not include shoe rental. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per person, catch and release or $7 per per son, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Preregister at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guard ian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Trident Lakes Punch Card Blow-Out Starting Friday, June 14 and running through to Sunday, June 30, Trident Lakes Golf course is offering Punch Cards for discounted prices on golf. For Military E1 to E5, 12 plays (18 holes) for $120, Military E6 and up, 12 play (18 holes) $145 and all others 12 plays (18 holes) for $170. Green fees only! You can save even more when you buy your cart too, just add $110 to your purchase. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Magnolias of Kings Bay Beautiful and spacious rooms are available to make your next event perfect. Its never too early to plan your event, wedding or holiday party, so stop by and check it out. Someone is always ready to assist you with your special occasion. Book before Aug. 1, and receive $50 off your room rental just by mentioning Magnolias 50 off. Call (912) 573-4559. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp is July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 5738475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp For ages 5 to 14 its June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Youth Fall Soccer League Registration is 9:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m., July 1 to 26, Monday through Friday except holidays from at the Youth Center, for children 3 to 15 who will not turn 16 prior to Aug. 1 and must be 3 before Aug. 1. Cost is $60 for active duty, and reservists. Military retiree families, DoD civilians and contractors cost is $65. Cost does include uniform. Late registration will be taken if openings are available, with an additional late fee of $5. Coaches and officials needed. For more information contact Youth Sports at (912) 573-8202. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kindergarten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for spon sor and spouse, or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confir mation of age. Single/dual military parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just for kids Liberty call Flag Day golf outing June 14 MWR Sports Media coverage focused on violence and other challenges in Afghanistan loses sight of the larger picture of progress and promising developments, Air Force Gen. Philip M. Breedlove said after returning from his rst trip there as supreme allied commander for Europe. Breedlove noted in his From the Cockpit blog posted May 24 on the U.S. European Command Web site how impressed he was with the commitment and professionalism of both the International Security Assistance Force and the Afghan troops he met. e work they do and the sacrices they make every day are astonishing, he said. Given the challenges in Afghanistan, the progress that ISAF and their Afghan partners continue to make is monumental. Unfortunately, that progress isnt widely reected in much of the media coverage of Afghanistan, he said. Coverage that concentrates on the negatives, gives an incomplete depiction of events on the ground, making it easy to miss the forest for the trees, he said. It is understandable that some who focus on these incidents can come away uncertain whether the eorts and sacrices made over the past 12 years have been worthwhile, he said. To these people, I would suggest they take a step back and take a look at the larger picture before making a judgment about the current and future state of aairs in Afghani stan. Breed love recognized major changes more than a decade ago, when the Afghan peoples lives were dictated by the Taliban government and the country served as a breeding ground for international terrorism. Today, the Taliban remains a threat, but it continues to be degraded thanks to the relentless pressure put on them by the Afghan security forces, Breedlove said. is capability ensures that Afghanistan is no longer a haven for terrorists. ISAF has played a denitive role in changing that, he recognized. By battling extremist organizations, it created the space and time for Afghan national security forces to grow and take on the ght. It has helped the Afghan government to crawl out from Taliban control and stand freely on its own two feet, Breedlove said. Today, Afghanistan is being progressively built, secured and maintained by the Afghan people, he said. NATO and ISAF have served as a scaolding of sorts, which has enabled Afghans to rebuild their structures, he said. But as those structures near completion, the scaffolding is being carefully removed, leaving the nished product to stand freely. Big milestones are ahead as Afghan security forces prepare in the coming weeks to take the security lead across the country. ey currently plan, lead, and implement over 87 percent of security missions throughout Afghanistan, providing security for nearly 90 percent of the population, Breedlove noted. Breedlove said other fundamental changes that have taken place across Afghanistan in the last 10 years, but are not often reected in front-page news: education, health care, transportation and communication improvements, a GDP growing at 7 percent a year, among them. While noting progress, the general recognized stumbling blocks along the way and said more work will be needed in the coming months. But Afghanistan is worth the cost, Breedlove said, echoing NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. e United States and NATO have an enduring commitment to Afghanistan, and recognize that the security of their nations is inextricably linked to the stability of other regions, he said. But their enduring commitment in Afghanistan, he added, also is based on the sweat and sacrices ISAF and Afghan national security forces have given the people of Afghanistan. e general said the Afghan people have the opportunity to build on progress already made and to secure their future. It is now within their grasp and soon will be fully in their hands, Breedlove said. He emphasized, however, that the completion of the ISAF mission at the end of 2014 wont signal an end to the NATO and international commitment to Afghans security. Resolute Support, NATOs post-2014 mission in Afghanistan, will focus on the training, advising and assisting of Afghan security forces. Of course there will be more challenges, but our support for Afghan security remains steadfast and will remain so through 2014 and beyond, Breedlove said. Big picture overshadowed

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 Weather forecasts upgraded e Navy has adopted a new global weather forecasting model with the support of the Oce of Naval Research to the Naval Research Laboratory, ocials, May 30. e Naval Global Environmental Model became fully operational this spring, and today serves as a cutting-edge prediction system for Navy planners who depend on reliable weather forecasts. When a global weather model for the Navy gets replaced, that is huge news, said Dr. Ronald Ferek, ONR program ocer. e previous forecasting model had been in use for over 20 years. e Navys Fleet Numerical and Meteorology and Oceanography Center, which provides meteorological data to U.S. forces, switched over to NAVGEM in March. It is being used to provide detailed, accurate global forecasts up to10 days out. e system could inform Navy operations for years to come. It is particularly important as U.S. eet presence increases throughout the Asia-Pacic region, known for intense weather events like typhoons. Accurate forecasts are critical for naval commanders who need allweather capability to avoid damaging high winds and seas. is includes to plan and conduct military operations, execute timely evacuations of vulnerable assets, and plan humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, which the Navy has supported over the years. NAVGEM is one of the most sophisticated computer models in the world. It will give Navy leaders, quite literally, a clearer picture of what the weather is going to be like across the globe as they deploy the eet. e new system runs at a higher resolution than the previous global model, said Ferek. With NAVGEM, the Navy can get better, more detailed forecases. More skill than in the past. NRL Marine Meteorology Division Superintentant Dr. Simon Chang said the particular algorithm developed with ONR funding allows very ecient computation, making it feasible for NAVGEM to run at much higher resolution, on smaller operational computers. e path to better forecasts is not easy, and requires years of research, testing and development. It was tough to make weather computations signicantly more ecient, Ferek said. But the principal investigators at NRL said We need to do this, and I could see it was going to be really useful. NAVGEM was supported by PEO C4I-Program Executive Oce Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence for advanced development, and ultimately deployment. e development team was honored recently with the Navys prestigious 2012 Acquisition Excellence Award for its NAVGEM work. More remains to be done, however. While NAVGEM gives military leaders better global data, the Navy also needs forecast models that can provide localized high-res weather analysis. With ONR support, NRL and academic partners have developed the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System-Tropical Cyclone, which looks at the detailed meteorological process of dangerous tropical storms, and gives accurate predictions of a storms intensity one-tove days out. e COAMPS-TC eort will work in conjunction with NAVGEM to provide accurate long-term and short-term forecasts for Navy leaders. ink of it as your weather news on television, Ferek said. e long-term forecasts use the equivalent of the global model. e next-day forecasts rely on more detailed, or mesoscale, models like COAMPS-TC. ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps technological advantage. rough its aliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institu tions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, com prising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 17 and 24. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Money Management for Couples upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops While Permanent Change of Station moves are a part of mil itary life, they can take a toll not only on the service member but their families as well. e impact on children is quite often overlooked as we sometimes think they are too young to understand, their lives will have minimal impact or they are resilient enough to handle it. Military moves do impact children. Some children may be excited about moving to a new place while others may be sad about leaving their friends and their familiar environment. Whether the feeling of moving is a positive or negative, we need to include the children as active participants in the relocation process. Below are a few tips on how to include the children in this process. Take the time to sit down and talk with your children about the move and tell them that the military is sending you to a new duty station. The more informed they are, the quicker they will adjust to the new situation. They will have time to let their friends know that they will be moving and it will be a good time to share contact information so they will be able to keep in touch. Inform the children about the moving process. Let them know that there will be people coming to the house to pack up their belongings to move to the new location. is will be a great time for the kids to gure out the things in their rooms they want to keep, throw away or donate. Also, let them pick the comfort items they would like to take with them as they travel. Research the new loca tion and surrounding areas. Children always love a new adventure, so why not make the PCS one? As a fam ily, research what attractions, such as museums, parks or theme parks, are nearby. is would be the perfect time to get in contact with the Morale, Welfare, and Recreation at the new duty station to see the different deals and activities they have to oer. Make a plan and do it once youve settled in. When you get to the new duty station and the new house, let your kids have input on how to decorate or arrange their room. is will keep them busy and give a sense of accomplishment that theyve helped with the move. Also, make sure they learn the new phone number and address as soon as you get there. By following a few of these basic relocating tips, you can help alleviate any uncertainties your child may have with the move. ey can turn the experience of relocating into a positive one and begin their new adventure. Here are other resources to help: Military Youth on the Move apps.militaryonesource.mil/ myom: This Web site is for all school aged children and their parents. Information is divided into age appropriate sections of Kids (age 6 to 8), Preteens (age 9 to 12), Teenagers (13 to 17), and Parents. Information is written on a level that each age can easily read and understand. MYOM is an easy-touse Web site with good basic information covering a range of topics that are very relevant to military families. Smooth Move Plus: Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS website, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing referral oce and relocation services. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it aects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. If you would like any more information or resources regarding relocation, contact the Relocation Assistance Program at the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 5734513. Moving can be stressful for children

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Navy triathletes made history June 1, when both the mens and womens teams took home gold medals at the Armed Forces Triathlon Championship at Naval Base Ventura County Point Mugu. e mens team repeated last years gold medal victory, but this was the rst time the womens team nished in rst place, coach Jim Felty said. Weve never won! he said. Weve never been above third! is is a deep, deep team. e Armed Forces Triathlon Championship consists of a 1,500-meter (approximately one-mile) ocean swim, 40-kilometer (24.8-mile) draft-legal bike ride, and 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) run. Teams from the Navy, Air Force, Army and Marine Corps compete for points; a team made up of members of the Canadian armed forces participates but does not compete for points. e Air Force mens and womens teams both came in a close second this year, with only two points separating the womens teams and one point separating the mens. Individual gold medals went to Army Capt. Nicholas Sterghos of Fort Hood, Texas, who nished with a time of one hour, 49 minutes, 21 seconds, and to Air Force Lt. Samantha Morrison, who nished in two hours, seven minutes. Morrison graduated three days before competing from the U.S. Air Force Academy, and is preparing to report to her rst duty station, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in North Carolina. Its been a good week, she said. In the mens competition, Air Force Major James Bales of Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi took the silver medal, and Navy Lt. omas Brown, who works in explosive ordnance disposal at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, took the bronze. is was the rst time in 16 months Bales had competed in a triathlon. He won the mens race at Point Mugu in both 2010 and 2011, but missed last year because of the birth of his son, Joshua. Family takes priority, he said, adding that he was more than pleased with a second-place nish after taking so much time o. Brown, together with the fourth-place mens nisher, Lt. j.g. Derek Oskutis of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 in San Diego, had led the race throughout the swim and the bike ride. But Oskutis developed a cramp in the fth mile of the run. Derek and I know each other and have raced a number of years together, Brown said. We planned to work together in this race, and it went well. We had a big gap right away. Hes a better runner than I am nine out of 10 races, but this time he got a cramp in the fth mile. But I was glad to see the team pull together. Im glad to have been a part of it. In the womens race, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Colleen OConnor of Naval Air Station North Island garnered silver with a time of 2:10:37. Lt. Rachel Beckmann, a chemical engineer at the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center in Washington, D.C., brought home the bronze medal for the Navy. OConnor, who has competed several times at Point Mugu, eyed the conditions before the race started at 9 a.m. and was optimistic. Warmed by a late-week heat wave, the ocean temperature was 62 degrees, compared to the low 50s of previous years. ank goodness! OConnor said. Its been 53 degrees in the past, and thats miserable. Its something Capt. Kenneth Corigliano of MacDill Air Force Base in Florida knows all about. Saturday was his seventh triathlon at Point Mugu. Its always rough because the water is so cold, he said. Your body is still cold on the bike and then it heats up on the run. Its a thermoregulation nightmare. With the recent heat wave, the athletes were anticipating an extremely hot run and were prepared to drink more water and electrolytes, but the marine layer still hadnt burned o by the noontime awards ceremony. Conditions were great, said Marine Corps Major Casey McKinney of Camp Pendleton. e wind didnt pick up either. Unlike in past years, there were no cases of hypothermia. In fact, only two competitors didnt nish the race, one because of a broken bicycle crankshaft, the other because of a bike that was damaged in a collision; the other cyclist involved continued on with a nasty road rash. e triathletes who had competed at Point Mugu before also noticed another change: e Admirals Cup, a sprint triathlon for the public traditionally held before the Armed Forces event, didnt take place due to funding issues. Many Admirals Cup participants would stay on after nishing their race to watch some of the best athletes in the sport. at really added to the ambiance, Felty said, adding that as a coach, he liked having the built-in cheering section. Event organizers noticed the dierence as well. Its a lot less chaotic, said Kevin Ludwig of NBVCs Morale, Welfare and Recreation. But the smaller crowd didnt take away from the inspiration and excitement generated by the event not for Capt. Larry Vasquez, commanding ocer of the base. Its always inspiring to see the dedication of these athletes. Dedication not only to their country but also to their sport, he said. And talk about leading a healthy lifestyle. is is the epitome of that. Navy triathletes sweep Armed Forces titles THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho The first childhood toy I can remember having was my Roy Rogers Chuck Wagon. It was way cool. But my favorite toys were Airfix 1:72 scale figures that came about 50 to a box. I had World War I Doughboys and Germans with spiked helmets, French and British troops. There were World War II Germans, GIs, Marines, Soviets, Japanese, Afrika Corps, British in shorts and I had scale model tanks and vehicles to go with them. Id build hill-top fortifications on the high ground of a pillow or mountain-top forts on chairs. There were cowboys, cav alry, Native Americans, Robin Hood and even Tarzan. I must have had over a thousand of these things at one time. I still have about a dozen left. One day I heard my grand mother tell my mom how nice it was that I played quietly by myself. I didnt know what she meant until later in life.MA3 Rodney Clevenger Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Mansfield, Ohio My Ninja Turtles. I grew up with that on TV. That was my thing. MA3 Christopher Edmunds MCSFBn Salt Lake City Toy guns. I had plenty, little six shooters with caps. EM2 Brandon Tucker Trident Refit Facility McComb, Miss. A water gun. I had a Super Soaker with a back pack tank. MT1 Bran Stark USS Maryland Withee, Wisc. My Megatron, a toy gun from Transformers. He was a bad guy and powerful. Tara Scott Family member Appomattox, Va. Probably my Sitn Spin. They still make those. Karen Reasoner Exchange employee Indianapolis A Pez dispenser. My favorites were Walt Disney characters. Twelve members of the Naval Hospital Pensacola Chief Petty Ocers Association went to the home of 94-year-old Charles Chuck Wheeler, retired chief and Battle of Midway veteran, to help with the everyday tasks he is no longer able to complete, May 29. A 28-year veteran, Wheeler served as an aviation ordinanceman aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise CV-6 from May 1941 to Feb 1944. During that time, the Enterprise participated in numerous engagements against the Japanese Navy including the Battle of Midway, the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands and various other air-sea engagements during the Guadalcanal Campaign. I dont have the words to express my gratitude in relations to what you all are doing for me, Wheeler said. Any little thing helps me tremendously. I used to be able to mow the lawn, pick up blown down limbs and leaves and maintain the place. Once a Chief, Always a Chief has signicant meaning to the U.S. Navy eternal brotherhood of chief petty ocers. When the NHP CPOA was approached about the opportunity to assist Wheeler, they embraced it whole heartedly. As soon as this was presented to the chiefs, no one in the association hesitated for a second, said Chief Hospital Corpsman Chi Patrick. [Helping] is what we do. When a fellow chief needs help, we just do it. At Wheelers home, the chiefs split up into groups to accomplish several tasks such as mowing the lawn, removing a section Midway chief gets helpers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 e Kings Bay Community Water System is owned and operated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Georgia for all SUBASE activities. To report leaks or concerns with your water: For Family Housing Areas: 882-1211 or 882-2653 For SUBASE Immediate Needs Call SCADA: 573-2724. Routine work orders by Building Managers: 573-2300. e Kings Bay Water Source ree 900 foot deep artesian wells from the Upper Floridan Aquifer located on the Naval Submarine Base (SUBASE) Kings Bay provide our water. ey are housed in secure buildings to protect them from outside sources that could contaminate our water supply. A Source Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) completed in May 2003 by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division indicates our wells are at low risk for contamination. e plan also explains procedures for protecting our water supply. In the USA drinking water can come from a number of sources including rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. Groundwater from conned aquifers such as the Upper Floridan is considered to be among the best water available to consumers. As water moves over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Our testing does not show this to be a problem with our water supplies. Testing to Keep You Safe: e water we provide is tested constantly; each year more than 14,000 tests are run to ensure safe, high quality potable water for our customers. is report provides you with the information you need to know about the sources of SUBASE drinking water, what is in it and how it compares to regulatory agency standards. All plant operators and lab tech nicians hold state certication. e Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requires all water systems to provide their customers with an annual water quality report. e tests reported here are from January 1 through December 31, 2012 except for a few tests as noted in this report that are not done annually. Your Kings Bay Water Department is committed to providing you with clean and safe water. We are pleased to report again this year our water meets the standards of the SDWA without any exceptions. How We Produce Water e Kings Bay Water System provides treated water 24 hours every day. Water is treated to remove contaminants by membrane ltration, aeration, chlorination and uoridation. Water testing is performed throughout the system on a variety of schedules ranging from daily to annually and other intervals, depending on the test. An inspection conducted by Georgia Environmental Protection Division in April 2013 found no problems. Ensuring Safe Water To insure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Bottled water is regulated by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration and must provide the same protection for public health as public water supplies. Drinking water and bottled water may reasonably be expected to contain small amounts of some contaminants. e presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health eects can be obtained at: EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 Or on-line at www.epa.gov/ safewater. Water Conservation: USING WATER EFFICIENTLY Water conservation is always a good idea. A good way to think of it is using water eciently. Its a gift that we can give ourselves that provides for the future. is takes added importance because of continuing drought conditions in Georgia. e past few years have been quite dry and these conditions appear to be continuing. Coastal Georgia has an additional set of issues besides drought due to increased demand for water in this area. High withdrawal rates in some areas have resulted in saltwater intrusion into water resources used along the coast. is is already causing restrictions on growth and greater regulation of groundwater supplies along the coast which SUBASE is subject to just as local communities are. SUBASE is complying with Presidential Executive orders mandating reductions for water usage at all facilities. e goal is to reduce usage by 2% per year through 2025. We have exceeded this ambitious goal, but the help of every person at SUBASE is needed to continue to meet it. ere are many simple ways to be efcient in use of water in daily activities. Lets use them and reap the benets. One good information source for water savings at home is: http://www.conservewatergeorgia.net/ An additional benet when we conserve water is the energy savings that nearly always accompanies it When you nd a new way to be water ecient, SHARE it with your neighbors and coworkers. Working together we can all benet from these eorts. Vulnerability to Contaminants Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. People with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing chemotherapy, with organ transplants, with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants may be at risk from infection. ese people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and microbial contaminants are available from: e Safe Drinking Water Hotline: (800) 426-4791 or on-line at www.epa.gov/ safewater. Drought Conditions in Georgia Because of the low rainfall in the State of Georgia, EPD has declared Level One Drought Rules to be in eect that require done from midnight to 10:00 AM and from 4:00 pm to midnight three days a week based on the odd/even schedule in which odd numbered addresses may water on Tuesdays, ursdays & Sundays while even number address may water on Mondays, Wednesdays & Saturdays. ere is no watering on Fridays. ere is an exception for newly landscaped areas for 30 days after installation. ghting or other public health & safety purposes. For more information on watering see the following web site: http:// www.gaepd.org/Documents/outdoor water.html NEW WATER TREATMENT PLANT: e Kings Bay Public Works Dept. teamed up with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command to upgrade our Water Treatment Plant to a state of the art treatment plant that alleviates trihalomethanes (THMs) of concern in the water chlorination process. With two successful years of operation completed in 2012 we continue with excellent results in reducing THMs as shown in the table below. Denitions of Terms and Abbreviations in this Report: Action Level (AL): e concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): e highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as a close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): e level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): reasonable goals for drinking water quality. Exceeding SMCLs may adversely aect odor or appearance, but there is no known risk to human health. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): e highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. ere is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbiological contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): e level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reect the benets of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. N/A : Not Applicable. N/D : Not Detected, e contaminant was not detected ppb or g/l: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (g/l) (Note that one ppb is equivalent to one second in 32 years) ppm or mg/l: parts per million or milligram per liter (mg/l) (Note that one ppm is equivalent to one second in 12 days) pCi/l: picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. Potential Contaminants Microbial contaminants, [None Detected] such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. Data are given in Table 5. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runo, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. ere were only low levels of a few naturally-occurring ones out of all tests run. See Tables 1, 3 and 4. ere were none that exceeded the MCL. Pesticides and herbicides which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runo, and residential uses. None Detected at SUBASE. See Table 2. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runo and septic systems. Only byproducts of water disinfection as shown in Table 2 were found. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the results of oil and gas production and mining activities. ere were none detected. See Table 6.Kings Bay Community Water System 2012 Community Condence Report TABLE 1 Inorganic Contaminants DetectedParameterUnits Sample Date MCL / [SMCL] MCLG Highest Level Detected Range of Detections Violation (Yes / No) Possible source of Contaminants Bariumppb20122,000N/A< 10< 10No Barium, Copper & Fluoride: Erosion of natural deposits; Fluoride is an additive that promotes strong teeth. Chlorine is an additive used to control microbes. Copperppb20121,5001,3003.5 4.4 No Chlorineppm2012 4 [ 2 ] N/A3.50.3 3.5No Fluorideppm2012441.110.24 1.11NoResults of Testing Table 2: Detected Organic ContaminantsParameter Units Sample Date MCLMCLG Kings Bay Results1Range of Detections Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination TTHMs1 ppb 2012 80N/A48.2 (4QRA)46.3 52.7No1, 2By-product of drinking water chlorination Total HAA5s1 ppb 2012 60N/A7.8 (4QRA)7.6 8.7No1, 21. Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5s) is the sum of detected concentrations of individual byproducts. They form because chlorine used for disinfection also reacts with low concentrations of organic materials present in the raw water. The data are evaluated by averaging the current quarter result with the previous three quarters to obtain a Four Quarter Running Average (4QRA). A violation occurs when the 4QRA exceeds the MCL. With the new Kings Bay Water Plant, the levels have dropped well below the MCL. 2. Trihalomethane Health Effects: Some individuals who drink water containing Trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys or central nervous systems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. As can be seen in the table, our results are much lower than the applicable standard.Table 3: Unregulated Inorganic Monitoring ResultsParameter Units Sample Date SMCLMCLG Kings Bay Results Range of Detections Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Erosion of natural deposits Sodium ppm 2012N/AN/A13.51N/A No Sulfate ppm 2012250N/A35.9 N/A No 1. Based on this value Kings Bays water has 8 mg of sodium per 8 oz. serving. This is provided for individuals on sodium restricted diets. This is value is much less than the values seen in previous years past due to the membrane filtration process used in the new water plant.Table 4: Lead and Copper (Tap Water) Monitoring ResultsParameter Units Sample Date Action LevelMCLG90th Percentile No. of Sites Exceeding AL (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Lead (ppb) ppm 8/11 15 0 2.5 0 of 10 Copper (ppb) ppm 8/111300130048 0 of 10 Because our results have been acceptable in previous testing 2011 was the first time we have had to test for lead and copper since 2008. The 2011 results are better than seen previously and in part attributed to the new water plant. USEPA and Georgia EPD have asked that we inform you about the health effects of lead as outlined below. Health Effects of Lead If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Kings Bay Community Water System is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 or at http:// www.epa.gov.safewater/lead. Table 5: Bacteriological Monitoring ResultsBiological Parameter(Presence or absence of bacteria in sample)Units Sample Date MCLMCLG Kings Bay Results Violation (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Total Coliform (Number of Detections) 2012 0 0 0 No Naturally present in the environment Fecal Coliform 2012 0 0 0 No Warm blooded animals 1. Thirty sample points routinely tested at Kings Bay. Ten points are sampled each month with a total of 124 regular and special tests in 2012. Table 6: Radionuclides TableParameter Units Sample Date MCLMCLG Kings Bay Results Range of Detections Violations (Yes/No) Likely Source of Contamination Alpha Emitters pCi/l 2004 15 0 <2 N/A No Erosion of natural deposits Radium 226 pCi/l 2004 5 0 <1 N/A No Radium 228 pCi/l 2004 5 0 <1 N/A No pCi/l: = picoCuries per liter is a measure of the amount of radioactivity in a sample. For copies of this report or for more information on it, please contact Mr. Scott Bassett, Kings Bays Public Aairs Oce, at (912) 573-4714.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11 President Barack Obama spoke May 23 on U.S. counterterrorism policy and looked at how the United States can defend itself from terrorism, yet remain true to core beliefs. e presidents speech at the National Defense University on Fort Lesley J. McNair took a broad view of counterterrorism efforts. Obama reviewed what has taken place since September 11, 2001, and how the counterterrorism effort has changed. In 2001, Al-Qaida was the threat. It was that organization, led by Osama bin Laden, that planned and executed the attacks that killed 3,000 people on 9/11. Now the core of alQaida in Afghanistan and Pakistan is on a path to defeat, the president said. e United States has relentlessly pursued alQaidas senior leadership and the threat of a 9/11-scale attack is greatly reduced, he said. At the same time the threat has morphed. AlQaida aliates notably those located in North Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula remain threats to the American homeland. reats have grown following the unrest in the Arab world, although those are mostly local or regionally based. Finally, there is a threat from homegrown extremists like those who are alleged to be responsible for the bombing in Boston. Attacks like those from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, like those against our embassy in Benghazi and like those in Boston represent the future of the threats we face from terrorism, the president said. We must recognize, however, that the threat has shifted and evolved from the one that came to our shores on 9/11, he said. With a decade of experience to draw from, now is the time to ask ourselves hard questions about the nature of todays threats, and how we should confront them. Since 9/11, the United States has spent well over a trillion dollars on war. Our service members and their families have sacriced far more on our behalf, he said. Nearly 7,000 Americans have made the ultimate sacrice. Many more have left a part of themselves on the battleeld, or brought the shadows of battle back home. From our use of drones to the detention of terrorist suspects, the decisions we are making will dene the type of nation, and world, that we leave to our children. No one can promise the total defeat of terror. ere will always be people misguided enough to resort to attacks on society, the president said. What we can do, what we must do, is dismantle networks that pose a direct danger, and make it less likely for new groups to gain a foothold, all while maintaining the freedoms and ideals that we defend, Obama said. To dene that strategy, we must make decisions based not on fear, but hard-earned wisdom. e threats do not arise in a vacu um, the president said. There is the be lief in many parts of the world that Islam is in conict with the United States and the West, and that violence against Western targets is justied in pursuit of a larger cause. Of course, this ideology is based on a lie, for the United States is not at war with Islam; and this ideology is rejected by the vast majority of Muslims, who are the most frequent victims of terrorist acts, Obama said. e ideology persists, however, and all parts of the U.S. government must work to counter it, he said. e United States must continue to defeat al-Qaida and its associated forces, the president said. In Afghanistan, U.S. forces will follow the NATO plan and continue training Afghan security forces up to the end of NATO combat operations there at the end of next year, Obama said. Beyond Afghanistan, we must dene our eort not as a boundless global war on terror, but rather as a series of persistent, targeted eorts to dismantle specic networks of violent extremists that threaten America, he said. Most of these will be done in partnership with other nations, he said, specically mentioning Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. e United States will continue to cooperate with other nations and share counterterrorism intelligence with these nations, he emphasized, butwill not be afraid to work alone when the situation calls for it. Al-Qaida looks for ungoverned areas to set up and plan, he noted. In some of these places the state has only the most tenuous reach into the territory, Obama said. In other cases, the state lacks the capacity or will to take action. In cases when using American troops in these places isnt possible and lethal action is needed, he said, e United States has taken lethal, targeted action against al-Qaida and its associated forces, including with remotely piloted aircraft commonly referred to as drones. e technology raises profound questions about targeting, civilian casualties and the risks of creating new enemies, he said, but Obama maintained the strikes strikes have been eective and are legal nationally and internationally. Simply put, these strikes have saved lives, he said. Beyond Afghanistan, the United States only targets al-Qaida and its associated forces, the president said. America does not make strikes when we have the ability to capture individual terrorists. Our preference is always to detain, interrogate, and prosecute them, Obama said. America cannot take strikes wherever we choose. Our actions are bound by consultations with partners, and respect for state sovereignty. America does not take strikes to punish individuals. We act against terrorists who pose a continuing and imminent threat to the American people, and when there are no other governments capable of eectively addressing the threat. And before any strike is taken, there must be near-certainty that no civilians will be killed or injured, the highest standard we can set. e president insists on strong oversight of all lethal action. After I took oce, my administration began brieng all strikes outside of Iraq and Afghanistan to the appropriate committees of Congress, he said. Let me repeat that, not only did Congress authorize the use of force, it is briefed on every strike that America takes. e use of force must be part of a larger discussion about a comprehensive counter-terrorism strategy, he said, adding that. force alone cannot make America safe. We cannot use force ev erywhere that a radical ide ology takes root; and in the absence of a strategy that reduces the well-spring of extremism, a perpetual war, through drones or Special Forces or troop deployments, will prove selfdefeating, and alter our country in troubling ways, the president said. Navy College information President delineates counterterrorism policy

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 From their rst appearance in mid-World War I, the Royal Navys K-class submarines were perhaps the most badly-conceived and ill-starred submersibles ever built by any nation. In both their original conguration and in the several derivatives that followed, the K-boats compiled an almost unbroken record of disaster and death, unredeemed by even a single instance of combat eectiveness. Spawned by a awed tactical concept, implemented with immature and dangerous technologies and kept at sea by the Admiraltys stubborn refusal to admit the most obvious deciencies, the K-class left in their wake a fascinating, even humorous, tale of operational and technical folly for which the query, What were they thinking? has seldom been more appropriate. At the outbreak of World War I, the Royal Navy could eld only 64 submarines, and of these, only 17 had more than coastal capabilities. With so much of the pre-war naval budget consumed by the dreadnought race, submarine construction had indeed lagged in the years 1910 to 1914, and need to catch up with the Germans became an immediate priority when war came in August 1914. Several of the Admiraltys senior futurists, among them Commodore Roger Keyes, Inspector Captain of Submarines, envisioned a line abreast of high-speed submarines working with the cruiser screen ahead of the main battle force, and thus positioned to submerge and attack an on-coming enemy battle line even before the latter could engage its British counterpart. is scheme would require a submarine capable of 21 knots surfaced, even under typically adverse North Sea conditions. In June 1915, four submarines were assigned for construction, two each, to Vickers and the Portsmouth Dockyard, and the ill-fated K-class was born. By every measure of the time, they were prodigious submarines. At 339-feet long and displacing 1,800 tons surfaced, 2,600 tons submerged, they were larger than a contemporary destroyer. Powered on the surface by two oil-red boilers and a pair of steam turbines, which developed 10,500 horsepower and also charged lead-acid batteries, they were tted with four electric motors to drive twin shafts while submerged. Adm. Jackie Fisher had also insisted on an auxiliary diesel engine, and it was to prove a lifesaver on many occasions. e K-class could make nine knots underwater, with a submerged endurance of approximately 80 nautical miles at two knots, and a maximum design depth of 150 feet. e ships were originally armed with 10 18-inch torpedo tubes: four in the bow, four mounted transversely amidships and two above water in trainable mounts for surface attacks. ere were also two four-inch deck guns and a three-incher on the superstructure. However, the most distinctive features of the Kclass derived directly from their steam power plants. Aft of the Control Room and the Beam Torpedo Rooms were located successively the Boiler, Turbine and Motor Rooms. Above the boilers were six large hull openings two funnel uptakes and four air intakes, all closed by motor-operated valves. Each of the air intakes was 37 inches in diameter. e ve-foot high funnels themselves protruded from a substantial superstructure aft of the conning tower and were tilted downward by electric motors and stowed in the superstructure prior to submerging. To dive the submarine, the boilers had to be shut down, the funnels retracted, and all the valves tightly seated to seal the Boiler Room while blowing ballast and converting over to electric drive. e residual heat was so erce that the boiler spaces were totally uninhabitable during submergence, and had to be abandoned. All the hatches, valves, hull penetrations, intakes, and uptakes necessitated by this Rube Goldberg arrangement led one experienced submariner to sum up the K-class boats with one pithy phrase: Too many holes! e handling characteristics of the class, both on the surface and underwater, compounded their difculties. Above water, the boats were insuciently buoyant forward, and tended to plow into oncoming waves, shipping tons of water over the conning tower. e large, at foredeck then tended to force the bow even deeper, as if the boat were teetering on the brink of a dive. Although the entire class was later tted with a bulbous, freeooding prow known as a swan bow, they were seldom able to operate at speed with the Battle Fleet in the North Sea except under the most favorable weather conditions. Both the forward deck gun and the superstructure torpedo tubes were unworkable and later removed. Even worse, the ships were easily, and regularly, pooped by following seas. eir overall wetness caused regular inundations of the Boiler Room through the funnels, extinguishing the res and leaving the boats wallowing in the waves. With self-compensating fuel tanks open from below, seawater contamination of the fuel oil was also common, especially in rough weather, and caused frequent losses of power. K-class handling was even more precarious in a dive. Because of their great length and weight, once they started down, they were hard to stop. Loss of depth control was common, and nosing into the bottom was a regular occurrence. Even if all went well in preparing the ship for diving, shutting down the steam plant, sealing the hull and ballasting down, the K-class submarines could rarely submerge in less than ve minutes, and attempting to accelerate the process only invited dangerous mishaps, like ooding or Boiler Room res. Despite their enormous size, habitability aboard the K-class boats was relatively poor. Although the ocers had fairly capacious accommodations, and even a small bathtub, the crews quarters were cramped and poorly ventilated. Lingering heat from the boilers kept the interior at a stiing temperature, and the humidity was oppressive. To make matters worse, the Admiralty, in perpetuating the myth that the K-class submarines were self-contained, independent warships, required the crew to live aboard, even in port. ese wretched living conditions, coupled with a growing reputation for crew lethality, made the Kclass unpopular boats to serve in, and morale was a recurring problem. e Admiralty authorized ten more K-class submarines in 1915 and then another seven the next year for a total of 21. Virtually all of these were ordered even before the earliest of the rst batch, K3, was commissioned at the Vickers yard in August 1916. K3s sea trials had been memorable. During speed runs, her Boiler and Turbine Rooms became so hot that the hatches had to be left open, and a head sea cracked the conning tower windows. en, in January 1917, on one of her rst war patrols from the Grand Fleets main operating base at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, she shipped a beam sea and took so much water down the funnels that her Boiler Room nearly lled up. e second of the class to be completed, K13, began her career with a tragic accident. On Jan. 29, 1917, during what was supposed to be the nal test dive of her acceptance trials in Gareloch, one or more of the 37-inch Boiler Room ventilators failed to close, and the entire submarine abaft the midships Torpedo Room ooded. Emergency procedures were unavailing, and K13 settled to the bottom in 60 feet of water, with 49 survivors trapped forward and 31 dead aft. A tortuous 50-hour rescue operation, in which the bow of the submarine was lifted to the surface and an escape hole cut through the pressure hull, succeeded in extricating the living. e ensuing inquiry resulted in All 13 K-boats with sea trials in the rst half of 1917 had serious problems. K14 sprang a leak at anchor in the Gareloch, ooded its batteries, and nearly asphyxiated the crew with chlorine gas. It h ad to be towed in. K7 earned the distinction of being the only Kclass submarine ever to re in anger when she attacked the German U-95 on June 16, 1917. Firing ve torpedoes, she scored one hitand that was a dud. After a short surface chase, with K7 gaining, U-95 submerged and escaped. e K-boats sailed south of Rosyth, where they joined the Fifth Battle Squadron and the Second Battle Cruiser Squadron under Vice Adm. Hugh Evan-omas. In the early evening of Jan. 31, Evanomas, in the cruiser HMS Courageous, led his forces down the Firth of Forth in a long, single lineahead. After Courageous came the 13th Submarine Flotilla K11, K17, K14, K12, and K22 (formerly K13) all following their Commodore, Cmdr. Edward Leir, in the otilla leader HMS Ithuriel. Several miles behind them were the battle cruisers Australia, New Zealand, Indomitable and Inexible, and then the 12th Submarine Flotilla: the light cruiser HMS Fearless, with Capt. Charles Little, Commodore, K4, K3, K6, and K7. e initial speed of advance was 16 knots, but Evan-omas had ordered his forces to increase speed to 22 knots when they passed May Island, which lay just at the entrance to the Forth estuary. e night was clear and the seas relatively calm, but the moon had not yet come up, and each of the K-boats was essentially steering on the shrouded stern light of the vessel ahead. At approximately 7 p.m., Courageous passed May Island and increased speed, just as a low-lying bank of mist settled over the sea. Almost simultaneously, Evan-omas force unexpectedly encountered a small otilla of minesweeping trawlers crossing their path. As K14 maneuvered to avoid them, her helm jammed, and she veered out of line to port and slowed. Meanwhile, K22, having lost sight of her next ahead, K12, had also straggled to port o the intended track, and when K14 managed to regain steering and turned back to starboard, K22 plowed into her at 19 knots, nearly tearing o her bow. us began a chain reaction of misadventures that was later dubbed the Battle of May Island. With both K22 and K14 now dead in the water, and the latter nearly in extremis, out of the mist loomed the battle cruisers, with Australia in the van. e rst three succeeded in avoiding the crippled submarines, but Inexible, last in line, struck K22 a glancing blow and tore down her side making 18 knots, removing all her external tankage. Surprisingly, both submarines survived, and K22 even made it back to port the next day under her own power. By 10 p.m., Commodore Leir on Ithuriel had received word of the initial collision, and turned back with K11, K17 and K12 in train to render assistance. Leir blundered right across the bows of the oncoming 12th Submarine Flotilla, with Fearless in the lead, and the latter rammed full speed into K17, just forward of the conning tower. Fearless lost 20 feet of her bow, and K17 sank within eight minutes. In the resulting confusion, K6 collided with K4, nearly cutting her in half. K4 sank almost immediately, but not before K7 ran over her in turn. ese events left the confused remnant of both submarine squadrons stationary in the path of the battleships and their destroyers at the end of the column. Destroyers killed many K17 survivors in the water. At dawn when the mist had lifted, the losses in the Battle of May Island were revealed: K4 and K17 sunk; Fearless, K14, and K22 badly damaged; and over 100 men drowned. In June 1918, the Admiralty ordered six more, intended to be numbered K23 through K28. e Admiralty had decided to follow up on a post-retirement suggestion of Lord Fisher, who proposed arming large submarines with 12-inch guns to create a class of submarine dreadnoughts that would be more eective against surface ships than boats armed with torpedoes alone. e Director of Naval Construction produced a design in 1916 for a class of four such boats, which were laid down on the keels of K18, K19, K20, and K21, all just starting construction. Each carried a single 12-inch gun in a large casing forward of the conning tower that could be red from periscope depth with the muzzle protruding from the water. ough fty rounds of ammunition were carried for the gun, it could only be reloaded on the surface. On one occasion M1s hydraulically-operated tampion what was supposed to seal the barrel allowed water to leak in ahead of the shell. When the gun was red, the projectile tore o the muzzle, which ew away with the wire winding of the barrel trailing behind, like a giant y-cast. M1 was only readied for action in June 1918 and was sent to the Mediterranean, where she never red a shot in anger. M2 and M3 were commissioned in 1919 and 1920, respectively, but M4 was cancelled on the stocks at wars end. By the time World War I ground to a halt in November 1918, and particularly in the aftermath of the Battle of May Island, the reputation of the Kclass had sunk so low that the Royal Navy was having diculty nding submariners all volunteers willing to serve in them. Consequently, the Naval Society issued a lengthy treatise minimizing their many deciencies and defending their performance in the war. Even after the Armistice, the K-class submarines continued their erratic behavior, and several more nearly foundered. On Jan. 20 1921, K5 disappeared with all hands during eet exercises 120 miles westsouthwest of the Scilly Islands, probably the victim of a loss of control in a dive. Except for an oil slick and some wood fragments, It was never found. Only six months later, K15 sank at her pier in Portsmouth, and although raised, did not return to service and was eventually scrapped. en on Nov. 12 1925, M1 disappeared while on a routine training exercise only 15 miles south of Start Point on the southeast coast of England. Its whereabouts remained a mystery for the 10 days it took the Swedish freighter Vidar to arrive at Kiel and report striking a submerged object precisely where M1 had gone missing. Paint scrapings on Vidars hull revealed that the submerged object had indeed been the lost submarine. After this tragedy, the Royal Navy disbanded the 1st Submarine Flotilla, and all of the remaining K-boats, save K26, were disposed of. K26 spent most of the rest of her days in the Mediterranean, but she too went to the breakers in 1931, as troublesome as her sisters to the very end. is left only M2 and M3 originally K19 and K20 to carry on the fateful tradition. After the loss British K-class: Worst submarines in history

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13 Naval Support Activity Mid-South ocially welcomed into service the Navys rst solar-powered electric car charging station with a ribbon cutting ceremony, May 29. NSA Mid-South Executive Ocer Cmdr. Brad Meeks thanked the combined Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Commander, Navy Installations Command team that brought the station online, and he said the new photovoltaic carports were a sign of how the base was evolving to face new challenges. Naval Support Activity Mid-South is leading the way, said Meeks. is is the rst solar power charging station in the Navy, and I want to thank our NAVFAC public works team for seeing this project through. eir eorts have ensured NSA Mid-Souths role in building a clean, sustainable future for our Navy and our nation. e carport will enable NSA Mid-South to recharge its current eet of 17 electric vehicles with renewable electricity in approximately four hours, while reducing demand on the commercial power grid. In addition to charging vehicles connected through either 110V or 220V plugs, the carport will also provide excess electricity to the local power grid, further reducing the bases electricity costs. e 150-foot-long panel structure tilts automatically to track the sun and includes several safety features to protect against high wind or lightning strikes. Public Works Department Mid-South will monitor the carports production via a Web-based system and will rely on the base operations support contractor to maintain the individual solar arrays and components over its expected 25-year lifespan. NSA Mid-Souths carport is part of an ongoing $10-million CNIC project to install seven sites with E85 alternative-fuel stations, nine sites with solar carports and ve sites with stand-alone electric vehicle charging stations at Navy installations in the U.S. Construction began in March 2013, and was completed in late April. Since then, the carport has successfully generated enough electricity to power more than 60 typical homes for a day. Local energy eciency eorts like this help the Navy achieve energy efciency goals required by presidential executive orders, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. Navy opens solar carportof M1, the gun on M2 was removed and its housing converted into an airplane hangar to carry a collapsible Parnall Peto seaplane, which could be catapulted from the forecastle for scouting in advance of the eet. Similarly, in 1927, M3 was converted into a large submersible minelayer, with capacity for over a hundred mines. e Navy used both boats in the late 1920s and early 1930s for a variety of operational experiments, but on Jan. 26, 1932, M2 disappeared o Portland Bill with 60 men aboard. When her wreck was found on the bottom a week later, both the hangar door and the conning tower hatch were open, suggesting that the ship had ooded in the act of surfacing and attempting to launch the aircraft as quickly as possible. M3 escaped the Kclass nemesis, and she was scrapped that same year, thus bringing our sorry tale to a close. Of the 22 Kand Mclass boats ultimately commissioned, only one saw combat. But seven, nearly a third, were lost to accidents, half with all hands. Edward C. Whitman, Ph.D. is the Naval Science Advisor at the Center for Security Strategies and Operations at Techmatics, and is a former Senior Editor of Undersea Warfare magazine.Worst Wikileaks trial underwayof an old fence and digging up fence posts. Were just doing some yard work and simple home beautication for a retired chief, Chief Hospital Corpsman Chris McKenzie said. e fact that he, as a chief, paved the way for who I am today, blows my mind. To think what [veterans] went through so that we could have the luxury that we have today makes me feel really honored to be here. About halfway through the morning, Wheeler came outside to talk with this new generation of chiefs. Im excited, I really am, said McKenzie. When I talked to him, he came alive talking about his battle experiences and some of the things he went through. It is one thing to read a history book, but when you can talk to living history, its just a phenomenal thing for me. Its been a truly great experience. After several sea stories reminiscing of old times and a few shared laughs, Wheeler returned inside and the chiefs resumed their work. Chief Logistics Specialist Brian Gareld appreciated Wheelers service to the country. Its priceless, Gareld said. ats one of the types of services that can never be repaid. We can only stay committed to make sure we meet the mission all the time like [veterans] did back in that time. We will always be in debt for that service. With the prosecution accusing Army Pfc. Bradley Manning of causing immeasurable harm to national security and Mannings attorney portraying the soldier as young and nave, but goodintentioned, Mannings courtmartial in what has become known as the WikiLeaks case be gan at Fort Meade, Md., June 4. Manning, 25 is charged with committing various crimes, including aiding the enemy, by leaking classied information to the WikiLeaks Web site while assigned to Iraq as an intelligence analyst in 2009 and 2010. If convicted, Manning could be sentenced to life in prison. In his opening statement, Army Capt. Joe Morrow, the prosecutor, called the leaks the biggest ever in U.S. history, involving hundreds of thousands of classied documents, and that they provided potentially actionable information for targeting U.S. forces. David Coombs, Mannings attorney, said in his opening statement that Manning was selective about the documents he released and was hoping to make the world a better place by doing so. e judge, Army Col. Denise Lind, asked Manning if he wanted to reconsider trial by a military judge alone, herself, rather than by jury, which is termed a panel by the military. Manning declined. In the afternoon, the prosecutor called the rst witness, Army Sgt. 1st Class omas Smith, who was the senior enlisted Criminal Investigative Division agent at the time. He and another case agent, Tony Graham, were the rst to investigate the the sensitive compartmented information facility where Manning worked in Iraq. Chief

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