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The Kings Bay periscope ( 06-06-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00304

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00304


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Squadron 16 holds command changeCapt. Stephen Gillespie relieved by Capt. John CarterCommander, Submarine Squadron 16 held a change-ofcommand ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, May 31. Capt. John Carter relieved Capt. Stephen Gillespie as the commodore of one of the Navys most decorated submarine squadrons. On the third of August 2011, I assumed command of Sub marine Squadron Sixteen, Gil lespie said. Given our SSGN mission capability to carry up to 66 Naval Special Warfare op erators, during my rst month, I visited the Naval Special War fare unit that had lost so many of their close friends and ship mates. I witnessed rsthand their communitys dedication to the mission with an unwaver ing passion and commitment to care for those families of the fallen and never miss a beat with re spect to ensuring that those who would do our country harm, will not succeed. I left that visit with a renewed passion to ensure our SSGNs would support the nations ob jectives and that our Sailors would be treated as well as I had witnessed with the NSW com munity, Gillespie continued. Gillespie, a native of Jackson ville, Fla., also said the work of the Squadron is not done de spite the eorts the team made under his leadership. Our submariners, regardless of gender, are formidable and performing at the top of their game. e competition is erce and the aperture is open wide for our schools top young peo ple. is is a good thing! he said. [e Squadron is] a top-notch group of professionals. I am very proud of them and as American tax payers; we are getting a bar gain for our money. Among the major accomplishments of the Squadron under Gillespies leadership include spearheading the Women in Submarines initiative for the entire Submarine Force, the successful deployments and oversight of USS Florida (SSGN 728) and USS Georgia (SSBN 729) on nine separate Up Periscope Find out what people are doing this summer Page 9 Sub vets Norfolk has its annual memorial service Page 3 Midway Navy remembers one of its finest moments Pages 6, 11 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Olympian onslaught USS Florida departing Souda harbor NOAA: probability high for one major storm on this coast It may feel like Superstorm Sandy happened just yesterday, but this weekend already marks the rst day of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season. e National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasts were in for an aboveaverage season, which means there is an extremely high prob ability of at least one major hur ricane making landfall in the Gulf Coast and East Coast. As with any hurricane season, the Coast Guard is working closely with local, state and fed eral partners to prepare so it can respond to this years storms as one team. However, the preparations cannot stop with the Coast Guard. You are the rst line of defense to make sure you and your family stays safe during a hurricane, especially for those who reside along the coast. e best time to prepare for hurricanes is now, at the begin ning of hurricane season. Last years Superstorm Sandy was an example of how being prepared could be a matter of life or death. People survived without power for weeks be cause they were equipped with generators, battery-operated radios and supplies of food. Many coastal residents were safe because they listened to ocials and were prepared to evacuate on a moments notice. Good preparation was the key to lives being spared. However, many others did not fare as well and the historic storm claimed more than 100 lives. e nations ongoing recov ery from Superstorm Sandy is a strong reminder that everyone needs to be ready for the next big storm. Here are three things you can do to prepare: Build a kit. Be ready for power outages and stock up on emergency supplies of food, water, medications, batteries and other supplies that will last up to 72 hours. Consider making a kit you can take with you on a moments notice if you need to evacuate. Make a plan Have a conver sation with your family about how you will contact one another if separated, where to go if evacuated and what you will do with your pets. Stay informed. Listen to your National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather radio and local news to follow weather conditions. Sign up for emergency alerts from your workplace, schools and community ocials to stay informed. Know your homes vulnerability to ooding, and take the time to learn about ood insurance. When you learn that a hurri cane is imminently approaching your area, take these steps: Protect your home. Cover your windows with plywood, turn off propane tanks and bring outdoor objects inside. Find out how to keep food safe. Fill the bathtub and other larger con tainers with water for sanitary purposes, such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Listen to local ocials. If told to evacuate, do so immediately. You should consider evacuating if you live in a mobile home, high-rise building or near bod ies of water. Community orga nizations like the American Red Cross will often set up shelters for evacuees. Hunker down in a safe room. If you dont evacuate, locate the safest areas in your home or nd a storm shelter in your commu nity. Stay indoors and away from windows. Active hurricane season gets underway Command damage control teams use skills, strength in series of exercisesStraining muscles. Fast thinking. Some serious grunting. And water ying everywhere. is year, 10 teams from Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay kicked-o the 19th Damage Control Olympics held at the Fireghter Trainer Trident Training Facil ity, May 31. e 1st place team and recipients of the Brass Nozzle Trophy are Atomic Salty Buf faloes, of the USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) Gold crew Engineering Department. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Team Bravo was runner-up, and the USS Geor gia (SSGN 729) Blue crew A-gang team third.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 Nominations are currently being sought from the Navys Chief Petty Ocer community for the Inaugural Bob Feller Act of Valor award. Established by the Bob Feller Act of Valor Foundation, the prestigious award is named in honor of Major League Baseball pitcher, National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee, and Navy veteran Bob Feller. is unique award is intended to recognize a representative from three critical areas of Fellers life: his baseball career, his service as a Navy Chief Petty Ocer and his enshrine ment in the Hall of Fame. As such, the award will be presented to one Major League Baseball player, one Navy Chief Petty Ocer and one member of the Hall of Fame on Vet erans Day, Nov. 11, 2013, at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is important to recognize Bob Fellers unselsh devotion to our nation and Navy, said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. He made the personal choice to give up money and fame for the service of others and placed himself in harms way with his shipmates during a time of war. e Chief Petty Ocer selected for the Bob Feller Act of Valor Award will embody these same traits. In recognition of Fellers signi cant accomplishment in attaining the rank of Chief Petty Ocer, nomi nees must be an E-7 Chief Petty Of cer, active or reserve, must be out standing military professionals and must embody the Navys core values of honor, courage and commitment. Feller enlisted in the Navy short ly after the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was with the Cleveland In dians, becoming the rst American professional athlete to enlist. He served on the battleship USS Alabama (BB-60), and while doing so, the ship fought in both World War II theaters and earned eight battle stars. Feller was released from active duty achieving the rank of Chief Pet ty Ocer and is the only Chief Petty Ocer in the Hall of Fame. Nominations must be submitted to the Navy Oce of Community Outreach by June 17. For more information on eligibil ity requirements and the selection process, see NAVADMIN 138/13. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cultural, Diversity Fair June 7Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Cultural and Diversity Fair will be 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 7 at the tennis courts at the Fitness Complex. Navy Band Southeast Pride will play music. Cultural stage shows begin at noon. Taste e Nations Food Sampling opens at noon and is free while supplies last. Other at tractions include community awareness and Navy College booths, a grill and barbecue by the Kings Bay First Class and CPO Associa tion, plus appearences by the Bualo Soldiers, Deep Forst Native American Indians and St. Marys Submarine Museum. For participation or acess to this event, call (912) 573-3456.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will con duct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civil ians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more informa tion or to enroll your teen.Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 17. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program in formation, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, dia monds and the most popular brands of watch es that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits includ ing 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! As Permanent Change of Station season is almost here, Navy Person nel Command ocials remind lead ership of the importance of com mand sponsorship, May 29. Command Sponsor and Indoc trination Programs are designed to help Sailors and their families adapt into new working and living envi ronments, to minimize the anxiety associated with a PCS move and aord Sailors and their families the greatest opportunity for a success ful and productive tour at their new assignment, said NPC Force Master Chief Leland E. Moore. Upon receiving PCS orders, Sailors and their families are assigned a sponsor through the Command Sponsor and Indoctrination Pro grams. Sponsorship is an important component of a Sailors PCS move and helps prepare them for a pro ductive, successful tour of duty. Sponsors are volunteers who as sist new arrivals before PCS and after reporting aboard as the Sailor gets familiar with the new command and duty station. Sponsors help with check-in pro cedures and ensure Sailors and their families are familiar with local med ical and dental treatment facilities and are enrolled in TRICARE. Sponsors can also check housing availability before a member arrives and set up arrangements for tempo rary lodging if needed. In cases of overseas assignment, they may also provide Sailors with information regarding local cus toms. Command master chiefs oversee the sponsorship program and en sure Sailors get Navy Pride and Professionalism training within 30 days of their arrival or within three drill weekends for reservists. It is imperative that sponsorship continues until a Sailor is fully aware of their responsibilities, local poli cies, programs and services avail able through their new command. Sponsors should be enthusiastic, willing to help people, and have a positive attitude toward the Navy, command, and local community. ey should be familiar with the command and its location or home port, knowledgeable about available resources, and familiar with appli cable command procedures and in structions. Anyone wishing to become a sponsor should talk to their command sponsor coordinator and read OPNAVINST 1740.3C on the NPC Web site at www.npc.navy.mil.Navy leaders promote sponsorship Personnel Command Nominations sought for Feller award Community Outreach e Department of Veterans Af fairs, Disabled American Veterans and the American Legion May 21 announced a new partnership to help in reducing the compensation claims backlog for veterans. e eort, called the Fully Devel oped Claims Community of Practice, is a key part of VAs overall transforma tion plan to end the backlog in 2015 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy, VA ocials said. VA can process fully developed claims in half the time it takes for a traditionally led claim, ocials noted. VA prides itself on our ongoing partnership with organizations that represent veterans throughout the claims process, said Undersecre tary for Benets Allison A. Hickey. A fully developed claim is the most eective way to ensure a veterans claim never reaches the backlog and is the basis for this new initiative be tween VA and what we expect will be an ever-increasing number of veter an service organizations and others who represent veterans at various points of the claims process. e new initiative takes a com mon-sense approach to working smarter to better serve injured and ill veterans, said Barry Jesinoski, Washington Headquarters executive direc tor for Disabled American Veterans. DAV is pleased to be working with the VA to help improve the disability compensation system, Jesinoski added. e American Legion has been working with VA since December on its fully developed claims process, said James E. Koutz, the American Legions national commander. Teams of our experts have al ready gone to VA regional oces in Denver, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and other cities to help identify best practices for [fully developed claims], and to further train our own service ocers, Koutz said. Claims are considered to be fully developed when veterans submit all available supporting evidence, such as private treatment records and notice of federal treatment re cords, to VA at the time they rst le a formal claim and certify they have no more evidence to submit. is is the information that VA needs to make a determination on a disabil ity claim, VA ocials said. e fully developed claims pro gram supports the sharing of best practices across veteran service or ganizations that help thousands of veterans each year with their com pensation claims, to identify up front all evidence necessary to support a veterans claim, ocials explained. Veterans then certify that they have no additional evidence to submit, and VA can process the claim in half the time it takes for a traditionally led claim, they added. Veteran service organizations have long played an integral role in submitting veterans claims, of ten with representatives working within VA regional oces. VA has consulted with them throughout the development and implementation of its plan to end the backlog in 2015 to ensure best practices and their unique insights were incorporated, ocials said. e American Legion and DAV are the rst to step forward to work with VA on the program, ocials added, and that program has led to a much more ecient process. is is the latest eort in support of the plan to reduce the backlog. Last month, VA announced an ini tiative to expedite compensation claims decisions for veterans who have waited one year or longer. On April 19, VA began prioritizing claims decisions for veterans who have been waiting the longest by providing provisional decisions that allow eligible veterans to begin collecting compensation benets quickly. With a provisional decision, a veteran has a year to submit addi tional information to support a claim before the decision becomes nal. On May 15, VA ocials an nounced that the department is mandating overtime for claims pro cessors in its 56 regional benets of ces through the end of scal year 2013 to help eliminate the backlog, with continued emphasis on highpriority claims for homeless veter ans and those claiming nancial hardship, the terminally ill, former prisoners of war, Medal of Honor recipients and veterans ling fully developed claims. As of May 17, the paperless claims processing system known as the Vet erans Benets Management System, or VBMS, has been deployed to 46 out of 56 regional oce locations, and about 18 percent of VAs current claim inventory is in an electronic format, ocials said. Claims for Wounded Warriors separating from the military for medical reasons will continue to be handled separately and on a priority basis with the DOD through the Inte grated Disability Evaluation System, ocials said. On average, wounded warriors separating through IDES currently receive VA compensation benets in two months following their separation from service.VA, vets work to cut claims backlog Veterans Aairs

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e annual Submarine Veterans of World War II Memorial Service was conducted May 23 at the Submarine Learning Facility Naval Station Nor folk. Hosted by SUBLRNFAC, the event is each year prior to Memorial Day. In past years the servic es honored the 52 subma rines and the gallant Sail ors lost during World War II, and the losses of the USS resher (SSN 593), April 10, 1963, and the USS Scorpion (SSN 589), May 22, 1968. But since the World War II, submarine veter ans were rolled into the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. during the 2012 national convention, this years ceremony also honored all submarines and submariners lost dur ing the forces 113-year history. Cmdr. Stan Stewart, Jr., SUBLRNFAC command ing ocer, welcomed the more than 100 veterans, active duty Sailors, spous es, and visitors. Welcome to Subma rine Learning Facility, and thank you all for be ing here to remember and honor the veterans of the submarine force, Stewart said. is is a great op portunity to reect and re member those who came before us. Also, to honor them, so we just dont re member them today, but we remember them in all that we do. Every time I put my uniform on, I remember. Every time I hug my wife or children, I re member. I remember they forged the path to secure the freedoms we enjoy. eir sacrices established the standard for honor, commitment and courage. Our duty is to continue their legacy the highest honor we can give them. So it is my great pleasure, and I am genuinely humbled to oer the crew of Submarine Learn ing Facility Norfolks grati tude to our veterans and their families this Memorial Day weekend. He then introduced the guest speaker, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Com mander, Submarine Forc es. Submarine veterans, fellow submariners, shipmates and families, it is an honor for me to be here with you today, Connor said. I know that this cer emony is incredibly im portant to all of you, and I want you to know that it is humbling to speak to a group of American he roes such as yourselves. We always look forward to celebrating the exploits, the traditions, the profes sionalism, and the hero ism of our veterans. Words cannot convey how much we, in todays submarine force, admire and appre ciate what you have done, and how much we owe to you for our successes. Let me take this opportunity to welcome you all to the cornerstone of our Navy, Norfolk, Virginia. e submarine force is a family business and all of you here today are a part of that family. Many of you are very familiar with our history. You lived part of it, and through the SUB VETS, you preserve it for future generations. I am proud to stand here today as part of the worlds best submarine force. ose of us who are still serving on active duty honor you. But more importantly, we look to you for inspiration and example. We look to you to hear and learn from your experiences. Our contact with the past is important to todays success. I want to thank again for the honor of allowing me to speak to you all to day. But most of all, I want to give my most sincere thank you to all the sub marine veterans who have served this great country. God bless you all. During the ceremony, retired Navy Capt. Horatio Lincoln, former com manding ocer of the USS Narwhal (SSN 671), an nounced the USS Scorpi on would become the 15th submarine to be inducted into the Submarine Hall of Fame. Selection is merited by the submarines contribu tion to national security, and selection is conduct ed by the Hampton Roads Chapter of the USSVI or ganization. Built by the Electric Boat Division, General Dynam ics Corp., Groton, Conn., USS Scorpion (SSN-589) was commissioned on July 29, 1960. It was a Skipjack Class nuclear submarine and the sixth Navy ship to carry the name of Scor pion. Following type train ing out of her homeport in Norfolk, Va., the sub marine got underway on February 15, 1968 for a Mediterranean Sea de ployment. It operated with the U.S. Sixth Fleet into May, and then headed west for home. On May 21 its position was reported to be about 50 miles south of the Azores. Six days later, it was re ported overdue at Norfolk. A search was initiated, but on June 5, Scorpion and her crew were declared presumed lost. Its name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on June 30. Many thanks for your hospitality and camaraderie in extending the invitation to participate in todays important re membrance event, said Lincoln. I consider the opportunity to stand in ranks with you today as a great privilege in honor ing USS Scorpion and her gallant crew, Cold War warriors and silent heroes who remain at sea faith fully standing the watch, forever remaining in our hearts. I thank you for keeping the memories of our shipmates and the history of the Submarine Force shining brightly as vibrant elements in our Navys culture. We stand on the shoulders of our submarine force predecessors, honoring their legacy and the value of our nations silent service. So I consider it tting and proper today to cel ebrate the legacy of USS Scorpion and her crew, we honor their service by pausing today to give thanks and to remember. Today, we also want to acknowledge the true treasures of our Navys submarine force, our people. I remain steadfast in my belief that all of the eye-watering technology today brings substantial warghting capabilities to the Submarine Force and our Navy to carry out the critical mission of protect ing our country. But that technology is worthless without our incredible Sailors. ank you Admiral Connor, the leadership team of the Submarine Learning Center, subma rine Veteran colleagues and shipmates for allowing me the privilege to join you today. WWII sub vets in Norfolk roughout this years hurricane season, youll be updated on the latest hurricane forecasts and provided with more tips to keep you safe. But in the meantime, take these simple steps to prepare for a busy hurri cane season. Join in following the Coast Guards motto, Semper Paratus Always Ready!Hurricane THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 DC Olympics Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Trident Training Facilitys Navy photos by MC2 Cory Rose and MC3 Ashley Hedrick MM2 Jacob Stevens competes in the IA Low Crawl.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 5 e ballistic-missile submarine USS Alabama (SSBN 731) saw command of its Gold Crew pass from Cmdr. Kevin Schultz to Cmdr. Brody Frailey on May 24 during a ceremony at the Naval Undersea Mu seum in Keyport, Wash. Suce to say, Ive been blessed with a great crew, said Schultz, who had commanded Alabamas Gold Crew since April 2011. Im proud of my crew for always conduct ing themselves as profes sional submariners with honesty, integrity, and a desire to do whats best for the command. During his command tenure, Schultz guided the Gold Crew through three strategic deterrent patrols, including a 108-day patrol which ended in April 2013. I hope you will remem ber that every member of this crew is important to our mission, Schultz said, and everything we do on a day-to-day basis, includ ing the professionalism in how we conduct tradi tional ceremonies like this change of command, con tribute to the credibility and reliability of our strategic deterrence. I encourage you to continue to do your du ties with the utmost pro fessionalism and pride in defending your families, defending our freedom, and defending the American way of life. Schultzs next assignment will be on the Navy sta as the Branch Head for Nuclear Policy (OP NAV N514). Frailey, a native of La Mesa, Calif., returns for his third tour of duty in Bangor after two years as Current Operations Fleet Manage ment Director for Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet/ Commander Naval Forces Europe/Commander Naval Forces Africa. Previously, Frailey per formed department head tours aboard USS Ne vada (SSBN 733) and USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) and served as Blue Crew executive ocer of USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) from 2008-2010. He also spent time aboard Ala bama prior to his rst tour as a weapons ocer. I have observed you all up close over the past month and studied your admirable exploits from afar during your most re cent 108-day patrol, Frai ley said. I am impressed with your eorts, and I am proud to be given the op portunity to go to sea with you as your captain. Alabama is one of eight Ohio-class Trident ballistic missile submarines stationed at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nations strategic deter rent forces. e event is a friendly, but intense, competition between various commands that emphasizes the im portance of Damage Con trol skills, strengthening bonds, promoting esprit de corps and is just plain fun. A lot of commands dont have interaction with each other in their day-to-day routines, so this is a time for us to get together, have a little fun through sport and see where our high and low points are, said Trident Training Facility Code 26, Damage Control Leading Chief Petty Ocer Chief Machinist Mate James Culbertson. e ten events include Nozzleman Sniper, In jured Man Relay, Rapid Response Rodeo, Blind Man Tug-O-War, Repair Team Water Sports, Sub mersible Pump Relay, Bucket Brigade, IA Low Crawl, Emergency Medical Assist Team Action Hero Patch Up and DC PT. All ten events tested teamwork, physical agility and aggression, and most in volved plenty of water. Events like the IA low crawl pit a four-man team inside a mud puddle on their bellies racing against the clock, involving physical strength and endur ance. Other events re quired quick thinking and a level head. Each event from the DC Olympics rely on a team eort to come out on top. e No. 1 thing to take away from this event is team building, said Tri dent Training Facility Code 26, Damage Control Instructor Chief Machinist Mate Travis Scott. You are working with your team to accomplish your goals. e 19th DC Olympics has come to an end. But teams will have a year to practice for next year. DC mission periods, two 130-plus-day Major Maintenance Periods, the completion of the rst Atlantic SSGN Dry Deck Shel ter/SEAL Delivery Vehicle, Naval Special Warfare Full Mission prole and a Navy Unit Commendation for strike perfor mance during Operation Odyssey Dawn. Gillespies next assignment will be at Submarine Group 10 in Kings Bay as the Deputy Commander and Chief-of-Sta. Carter, a 1986 physics and mathemat ics graduate of Carnegie Mellon Univer sity, said he can think of no greater honor or privilege than to serve as commander of Squadron Sixteen. What a remarkable and amazing time to serve. Nothing sharpens ones focus and wits quite like the prospect of actual combat. e better prepared we are for combat, the more likely we are to pre vent it, said Carter, quoting Vice Admiral Mark Fox, then Commander, Fifth Fleet. ose poignant words provide perspec tive and exemplify Submarine Squadron Sixteens mindset on mission readiness. CSS16 manages the multi-mission ca pabilities of USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Florida (SSGN 728), the two Ohioclass guided-missile submarines (SSGN) homeported in Kings Bay, as well as pro viding support to the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) before, dur ing and after refueling and overhaul periods at Norfolk, Va., Naval Shipyard. COC Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group Ten speaks during the change of command. USS Alabama has change of command When the crew of the motor vessel Marine Elec tric was caught in a winter storm in the early hours of Feb. 12, 1983, their 605foot ship capsized, tossing 34 crewmembers into the 39-degree waters east of Chincoteague, Va. e Marine Electric ra dioed a mayday and soon a helicopter crew from Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., was airborne. When the crew arrived on scene they lowered a rescue basket to a survivor; hypothermic and ex hausted, they did not have the strength to climb in. After several attempts, the helicopter crew was forced to move on to the next survivor. ey too were unable to climb into the basket under their own strength. It was a painful site for these life savers. By days end, even with the assistance of an additional Navy helicopter, only three of the 34 crew members survived. An investigation was conducted in this tragic loss of life and a congres sional hearing convened. On Oct. 30, 1984, Congress acted on the hearings ndings and directed the Coast Guard to establish a helicopter rescue swimming program for the pur pose of training selected Coast Guard personnel in rescue swimming skills. e aviation survival man rating, already iden tied with sea survival, would become even more demanding due to the physical requirements of performing the duties of a rescue swimmer. In addition, no other service allowed females in similar programs at the time. After much consider able thought, the Coast Guard decided any physi cal tness standards would be both mission specic and gender blind; meaning women who possessed the strength and stamina were as eligible as men to become rescue swimmers. It was an historic mo ment for the Coast Guard. Fast forward to today and Chief Petty Ocer Karen Voorhees is now part of this history. Voorhees is the rst woman to ad vance to chief petty o cer in the rate of aviation survival technician since women were integrated into Coast Guard active duty service in 1973. In 1976 we had the rst female graduate from aviation survivalman school, said Capt. Joe Kimball, commanding ocer of Air Station Miami. In 1986 we had the rst female graduate from a navy rescue swim mer school. Twenty-seven years later we have the rst aviation survival tech nician promoted to the rank of chief petty ocer,. As of this morning, avia tion survival technician was the last rate, of all the currently active rates in the Coast Guard, that had never had a female to the rank of chief petty ocer. is milestone was put into perspective by Voor hees herself who spoke about raising young wom en who are smarter and stronger. I think that if we treat ed our girls with the same respect and initiative that we treat boys and expect them to live up to the standards we set them in stead of lowering the stan dards for the girls to meet, I think we will do much better and I think we will have a lot more females in the military, in aviation, just running the world, said Voorhees during an interview May 15, 2013.Female milestone for Coast Guard

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Active duty, retired service members and civilians observed the heroism of World War II veterans at the 71st Anniversary Battle of Midway commemoration aboard the USS Midway Museum in San Diego, June 1. e Battle of Midway took place June 4 to 7, 1942, where U.S. Navy carrier strike forces prevented the Japa nese from capturing control of Midway Island in the Pa cic. e victory proved to be a pivotal point of World War II and is an important marker in naval heritage. History has shown that the Battle of Midway was absolutely the turning point in the war in the Pacic and probably the entire war of World War II, said Vice Adm. omas H. Copeman III, commander, Naval Sur face Forces, commander Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. It was the end of the Japanese oensive six months into the war. During the ceremony, 13 surviving veterans, along with family and friends of those who gave the ultimate sacrice during the Battle of Midway, were honored by current military personnel and civilians, for their ex traordinary service 71 years ago. e event is to honor the veterans of Midway, said Copeman. Its to make sure that the memory of the Bat tle of Midway and the heritage of what it stands for is not lost upon the younger generation of Sailors. e commemoration included a special video presen tation that was voiced by World War II veterans involved in the historic battle. e video gives us an idea where our veterans are coming from, said Damage Controlman 1st Class Mike Minotti. We got to see the veterans perspective of what happened, and it ties us closer to our heritage. e observance also included several speakers. Re tired Marine Corps ocer Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman, who also served during World War II, gave the keynote speech. If every Sailor gets a chance to interact with these vet erans, they need to, Minotti said. It instills a sense of pride and makes the Sailor proud. Mount Suribachi revisited As the rain trickled down on a cloudy day, Marines trudged along a muddy path on an island where decades before so many had made the ulti mate sacrice. Approximately 120 Marines and sailors vis ited the island of Iwo Jima, which was renamed Iwo To in 2007, during a professional military educa tion tour May 17. e event provided an opportunity for the Marines and Sailors of Marine Wing Communications Squadron 18, Marine Air Control Group 18, 1st Ma rine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force, to see, experience and evaluate the incredible challenges Japanese and American troops endured during the Battle of Iwo Jima as part of the Pacic campaign of World War II. ere is a lot of history on this island that not ev eryone is aware of, said Sta Sgt. Jason L. Day, a wire chief with MWCS18. If they look at this ground from the perspec tive of someone during that battle, it will be easier for the Marines to under stand and truly respect our Corps history. Shortly following their arrival on the island, the Marines and sailors hiked up Mount Suribachi, the ground made famous by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthals photograph of ve Marines and a Navy corpsman rais ing the American ag atop the mountain in 1945. Suribachi was one of the strongest defensive positions occupied by the Imperial Japanese Army, said Sta Sgt. Patrick G. Kawano, a motor trans port chief with MWCS-18. e defenders were able to survive multiple days of naval bombardment and aerial bombings before attempting to repel the Marines. at puts into perspective how dicult it was for the Marines ght ing on the island. Upon reaching the prec ipice of Suribachi, the visi tors reected on the sacri ces made by warriors on both sides during the his toric battle. To demonstrate the connection to their fallen comrades, Marines and Sailors left memorabilia such as dog tags and rank insignias on monuments at the mountains peak. e unit also held an awards and re-enlistment ceremony atop Suribachi. It was my distinct pleasure in recognizing Ma rines and Sailors for their hard work at a place like this, said Lt. Col. Bret A. Bolding, the commanding ocer of MWCS-18. Its the embodiment of leadership and what the Marine Corps is all about. e Marines also took time to pause at the shore line of the island to discuss and envision the events that transpired in the fate ful battle. When you think about what the Marines before us did, what they sacriced here in the battle, it opens your eyes to the conditions then, said Kawano. Its important not to forget who came before us and not to forget where we come from. For many of the Marines and Sailors visiting the is land, this was the rst and possibly last time they will be able to visit Iwo To, ac cording to Day. Being able to come here is always good for Marines and Sailors, said Day. It allows them to further their professional education and maintain a tangible connection to Marine Corps history. Midways 71st anniversary ceremony held 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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After more than ve years of service, one of the Air Forces mobile marketing assets, the F-22 Raptorthemed chopper, retired and moved to its new home in the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Designed by the Orange County Choppers, the chop per is now on display in the museums gift shop. It is one of the rst artifacts seen by the 1.2 million visitors who visit the museum annually, said Jeery Underwood, NMUSAF historian. Future plans call for its display on a raised platform that will allow visitors to view its unique features more easily. During its service, the chopper reached millions through appearances on the reality television show American Chopper and the Military Channel, and by be ing displayed over 1,000 Air Force recruiting events. e 150-horse power chopper sports an F-22 Raptor custom theme complete with F-22 shaped mirrors, rims, seat, exhaust and an aircraft themed paint scheme. It was ocially retired in 2010, and has been on dis play in the AFRS Headquarters lobby until being donat ed to the Air Force museum last month. Korean War veterans attended a ceremony at Yangju, South Korea to mark the 60th anniversary of the Nevada Outposts Battle,v May 28. U.S. and South Korean veterans participated in the ceremony at the Republic of Korea Armys 25th Infantry Division Headquarters. Maj. Gen. Bernard S. Champoux, the prospec tive Eighth Army com manding general, thanked the veterans for laying the foundation for South Ko reas future success. Named after the Nevada cities of Vegas, Reno, Car son and Elko, the United Nations Command out posts were located along the primary invasion route into Seoul. e outpost battles oc curred during armistice negotiations when United Nations Command and Communist negotiators were attempting to estab lish a demilitarized zone two kilometers north and south of the current line of contact. e ghting focused on seizing and maintaining the string of outposts to ensure that friendly forces held key defensible terrain when the armistice came into eect, Champoux said. e 5th Marines, the 25th Infantry Division, and Turkish forces from the United Nations Command were vastly out numbered by Communist forces during the battle. Communist Chinese forces attempted to use their overwhelming nu meric advantage in human wave attacks to seize new terrain before the ar mistice was signed. During the brutal battle on the unforgiving ter rain with its unpredictable weather, the combatants rained artillery on each other. e United Na tions ground forces red more than 117,000 artil lery rounds and called in air support 67 times. e Communist Chinese red 67,000 rounds of artillery. As the men that are with us today know, they engaged in small scale, of ten company-sized battles that engulfed these out posts along the main line of resistance, Champoux said. ey were every bit as intense and demand ing as any in the history of warfare. American Soldiers and Marines and their Turk ish allies held the outposts until given a withdrawal order from the United Nations Command. Today, the outposts are just north the Military Demarcation Line that di vides the two Koreas. One of the more storied participants in the out posts battle was a Mon golian mare purchased by a U.S. Marine lieutenant from a South Korean boy for $250 and used by 5th Marines during the battle. Named Reckless after the platoons recoilless ries, the little warhorse became a legend of the battle. e little horse carried more than 9,000 pounds of ammunition over 35 miles of dangerous mountain ter rain. Reckless also carried wounded Marines down the mountain and was wounded twice during the battle. According to U.S. Marines in the battle, the lit tle mare provided a great boost of morale every time she made back up the mountain. After retiring in 1960, Reckless spent her reminding days on Marine Corps Base Camp Pend leton, Calif., where she is buried in a place of honor today. Champoux thanked the Republic of Korea Armys 25th Infantry Division for hosting the inaugural ceremony on the 60th anniversary of the outposts battle. Champoux said he has a special connection to the outposts battle be cause he commanded the Schoeld Barracks, Ha waii-based 25th Infantry Division. I had the honor of com manding the U.S. 25th In fantry Division for over two years, one year as the last U.S. division in Iraq, he said. Although the two 25th Divisions are from two separate armies, they are forever connected by this alliance, forever con nected by this land. During the Korean War, Champouxs father served as a U.S. Army company commander in the 65th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Di vision, who fought outpost battles in a dierent sec tor. Champoux called the Korean War veterans no ble, seless and patriotic. We salute you and all our Korean War veterans, he said. ose of us who serve here today are honored to walk in your foot steps and to uphold your remarkable legacy of ser vice. Korea is a free and prosperous nation today because of people like you who answered the call of duty. Army reunion in Korea Air Force chopper put in retirement THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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Everybody should take some kind of vacation, whether you go somewhere special with family or just stay around the house, now known as a stay cation. A break from work and constantly being on the move is what people need to do to relax. I will be taking leave to go on a cruise with my family.Being in the Navy and going on vacation on a ship could seem strange, but at least I dont have to wear a uniform or work. Heres what some others will be doing this summer.MA3 Nathaniel Mora Marine Corps Security Force Battalion San Diego I will be taking my wife to the Bahamas for our honeymoon. MM2 Nicholas Gay USS Wyoming Gold Norfolk, Va. I will be going home to visit family. MA3 Jonathan Garcia Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Lodi, N.J. I will be buying a house in Puerto Rico. Tracy Collins Valdosta State Albuquerque, N.M. I will be going to Virginia to visit my boy friend ... My Boo Boo. MA3 Brian Quiles Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Tampa, Fla. I will be going to Tampa to visit family. MA3 Nathaniel Bennett Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Prattville, Ala. I will be taking leave to get married and have a child. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose Commander, Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emer gency Family Assistance Center exercise on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville May 30. e exercise, designed to test the re gions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Fam ily Support Center representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, as well as installation and training ocers and emergency management personnel from all three bases. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suered ex tensive ooding as the simulated storm passed. Region has disaster drill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 9

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., June 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recom mends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 11. Registration is highly recommended, as class is lim ited to 20 seats. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Money Management for Couples upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 11, 18 and 25. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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Early in World War II, the Japanese employing six aircraft carriers at one time, as they did in the attack on Oahu on Dec. 7, 1941, proved a radical undertaking. e six car riers whose planes had attacked Oahu outnumbered the U.S. Navys at tops two-to-one. On June 4 1942, at the Battle of Midway, the U.S. had three carriers, USS Enterprise, USS Hornet and USS Yorktown. Tactic that dierent be tween the carriers was a key to the battle. Enterprise and Hor net, in Task Force 16, launched their respective attack groups employing a deferred departure plan, which sent o the ght ers rst, then the scoutbombers, then the tor pedo planes. All loitered about the ship until the entire group was airborne before setting out for the enemy en masse. As the Japanese steamed at the extreme range of their ghter and torpedo planes fuel capacities, this left no margin for error. Hornets ghters launched rst and wasted much of their fuel over the ship while the rest of the strike slowly got airborne, one aircraft at a time. None of the ghters ever returned to the ship, or sighted the enemy. Enterprises ghters at tached themselves to the Hornets torpedo planes, the ill-fated VT-8, while Enterprises torpedo planes went unescorted. Yorktown, however, operated dierently. Its attack group, less VB-5 which Rear Adm. Frank Fletcher, commander, Task Force 17, retained on board as a reserve strike and search group, launched according to a running rendez vous, the dive bombers taking o rst, followed by the torpedo planes, with the higher speed ghter escort launching last. VT-3, VB-3 and VF-3 proceeded directly toward the target immediately after launch, with the tor pedo squadron at low altitude, the dive bombers high, and the ghters clos ing in from behind. e group then merged together well along its base course, with all ele ments arriving over the enemy eet simultaneously. Yorktowns air group was the only one of the three to attack as a group. eir providential arrival simultaneously with that of Enterprises VB-6 and VS-6 spelled the doom of Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu.Carrier tactics provided key at Midway battle Torpedo Squadron 8 paid a heavy priceIn the Battle of Midway, there were many Sailors who were immediately recognized for their actions. e dive bombers whose payloads were deliv ered on target and sank the Japanese carriers were among the rst to be noted as heroes of this monu mental victory. But there were some who may not have been recognized because they failed to ac complish their primary mission to deliver their tor pedoes and sink as many ships in the Japanese eet as possible. is was the fate of Torpedo Squadron 8. On the morning of June 4, 1942, the relatively young pilots of VT 8 boarded their aircraft with the daunting task of being one of the rst squadrons to launch against the imposing Japanese force. When they left the ight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), these THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 11

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, June 8. Trident Lakes is presenting another great time for you and your child! Registra tion begins at 11 a.m. with lunch at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of par ent and child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and fun. For the younger crowd, a 9 -hole course is laid out with cost of $20. Open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Flag Day Golf Tournament It will be Friday, June 14 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. The cost is $26 and includes lunch, green fees and cart. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. with shotgun start at 1 p.m. The new format is an individual format where you add 72 to your handi cap and play as far as you can until you reach that number. Once there plant your flag. The winner will be the person who gets the furthest on the course. Reserve your spot today at (912) 5738475. Happy Fathers Day from RackN-Roll Lanes All fathers bowl free on from 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, June 16 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. is does not include shoe rent al. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon day thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holi days. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp are June 10 to 14 and July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 573-8475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp ages 5 to 14 is June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Camp ers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. Mike Johnsons T-N-T Soccer Training Camp is June 10 to 14 for ages 5 to 12, at Youth Sports Soccer Complex. Cost is $85 for 5 to 6 age group mini camp and $109 for 7 to 17 age group CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Judy Moody & the Not So Bummer Summer June 8 and 9, Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and bever ages are available for pur chase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open view ing. For the latest informa tion on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kinder garten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are avail able on a first-come, firstserve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/dual mili tary parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No out side food is authorized. Cost is based on total fam ily income. For more infor mation call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just about kids Liberty call Parent, child golf outing June 8 MWR Sports 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 13 brave pilots had no idea what this mission would bring them. is would be their rst real test in battle. As they closed in on the enemy carriers, they came under intense re from Japanese ghter aircraft. e older, slower Ameri can aircraft werent able to get away from the fast er, more agile, Japanese planes. Before Torpedo Squadron 8 were able to make a hit on the enemy eet, 29 of them would be killed in action. Many would think that these men failed in their mission. While it was true they didnt sink any of the Japanese ships, they did manage to occupy their defense forces long enough and were able to draw them far enough away from their own eet, to allow the next ight of dive bombers to y in relatively unimpeded and score direct hits on ev ery one of their targets, including the Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu, almost ensuring immediate victory for the Americans. e only survivor of Tor pedo Squadron 8 was En sign George H. Gay, who was wounded in action during the mission. Gay gave an oral history of what happened that day and why the men of Torpedo Squadron 8 were heroes. Well, Torpedo 8 had a dicult problem, we had old planes and we were new in the organization. We had a dual job of not only training a squadron of boot ensigns, of which I was one, we also had to ght the war at the same time, and when we nally got up to the Battle of Midway it was the rst time I had ever carried a torpedo on an aircraft and it was the rst time that I had ever taken a torpedo o of a ship None of the other ensigns in the squadron had either. I didnt get much sleep the night of June the 3rd, the stories of the battle were coming in, midnight torpedo attack by the PBYs and all kinds of things, and we were a little bit nervous, kind of, like before a football game. We knew that the Japs were trying to come in and take something away from us and we also knew that we were at a disadvantage because we had old air craft and could not climb the altitude with the dive bombers or ghters and we expected to be on our own. (In ight the next morning, Lt. Cmdr. John C. Waldron ew) as straight to the Japanese Fleet as if he had a string tied to them. We thought that morning, at least I did when I saw the Japanese carriers, that one was on re and another had a re onboard. I thought there was a battle in progress and we were late. I was a little bit impatient that we didnt get right on in there. When it nally turned out that we got close enough in that we could make a contact report and de scribe what we could see, the Zeros jumped on us and it was too late. ey turned out against us in full strength and I gured that there was about 35 of them. Its been a very general opinion that the anti-aircraft re shot our boys down and thats not true. I dont think that any of our planes were dam aged, even touched by anti-aircraft re. e ght ers, the Zeros, shot down everyone of them, and by the time that we got into where the anti-aircraft re began to get hot, the ghters all left us. I was the only one close enough to get any real hot anti-air craft re. Yet, I dont think it even touched me. I went right through it, right over the ship. I think we made a couple of grave mistakes. In the rst place, if wed only had one ghter with us, I think our troubles would have been much less. We picked up on the way in a cruiser plane, a Japanese scout from one of their cruisers, and it fell in behind us and tracked us. I know that gave away our position, course, and speed. We changed after he left but then I know that they knew we were com ing. If wed had one ghter to go back and knock that guy down, catch him be fore he could have gotten that report o, I believe that the Japanese would have been fooled. Also, we went in to a scouting line out there when we were still trying to nd them and didnt. e skipper put us into a long scouting line, which I thought was a mistake at the time. I didnt ever question Waldron. He had his reason for it, and I knew that he expected to nd them. When he gave the join up signal, we joined up immediately. I was only afraid that in the scouting line in those old planes, that we would be caught by the Zeros and it would be much worse. As it turned out, it didnt make a whole lot of dier ence anyway. As we joined up quickly and got organized to make our attack, the Zeros got in after us. I remember that the rst one that came down got us over to the left. Lt. Cmdr. Waldron, who was on his air phone, asked Dobbs if that was a Zero or if it was one of our planes. I didnt know whether Dobbs answered him or not, but I came out on the air and told him that it was a TBD. He also called Stanhope Ring from John E. One, answer and we re ceived no answer from the air groups. I dont know if they even heard us or not, but I have always had a feeling that they did hear us. I think that was one of the things that caused them to turn north as I think the squadron deserves quite a bit of credit for the work that they did. His radioman killed, Gay suered several hand and leg wounds from Japanese anti-aircraft re as he started his torpedo run against a large Japa nese carrier. He managed to score a hit, however, and to clear the Japanese ship before crashing into the ocean squarely in the midst of the disorganized enemy eet. Gay survived the ensuing action tread ing water and avoided enemy capture by hiding under his otation de vice while Japanese ships sailed past. He lasted more than 30 hours in the water until he was nally rescued by a PBY. He had a ringside seat at the Battle of Mid way. While oating in the water he had the satisfac tion of seeing three Japa nese carriers explode and sink and also saw the re treat of the enemy from the fury of our air attack. Personally, I was just lucky. Ive never under stood why I was the only one that came back, but it turned out that way. I want to be sure that the men that didnt come back get the credit for the work that they did. ey followed Waldron without batting an eye. I dont feel like a lot of people have felt that we made mistakes and that Waldron got us into trou ble. I dont feel that way at all. I know that if I had it all to do over again, even knowing that the odds were going to be like they were, knowing him like I knew him, Id follow him again through exactly the same thing because I trust ed him very well. We did things that he wanted us to do not because he was our boss, but because we felt that if we did the things he wanted us to do, then it was the right thing to do. e Zeros that day just caught us o balance. We were at a disadvantage all the way. presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devic es and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per person, catch and release or $7 per person, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guard ian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive spe cial code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promo tions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512. program June 13The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provi sions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will pro vide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommend ed. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Navy College information FFSC MWR Torpedo 8

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 It was June 6, 1944, when Al lied forces began the largest am phibious invasion of all time D-Day. On the anniversary of D-Day, Compass would like to share the story of Motor Machinists Mate 1st Class Cliord W. Lewis, a crewman aboard the Coast Guard-manned LCI(L)-94. As part of Flotilla 10, LCI(L)-94 was an amphibious assault unit that landed Allied troops during the invasions of Sicily, Salerno, Normandy and the Pacic e atre. Below are excerpts of a diary kept by Lewis describing what it was like before, during and after the bloody assault at Normandy, June 6, 1944. 28, May [1944]: At 0115 hrs. we were awak ened by a bomb exploding close by. More explosions followed immediately, which shook the ship. I was dressed and half-way up the ladder when the alarm sounded. Jerry had sneaked in close behind our own planes returning from raids on France, thus fooling the radar. When I emerged on deck and began getting my gun ready, the sky was lled with tracers and searchlights. Ships out-board of us got underway, but we re mained at the dock. We werent allowed to re for fear of reveal ing our position. e ack-ack batteries in Portland were ring right over our heads and many shells exploded about us on the ship and dock. e noise was deafening and shrapnel careen ing about furiously. Buncik, MoMM3/C, who was stationed in the steering room had his head protruding from the hatch, when a 20mm slug or large piece of shrapnel pierced his helmet and cut a crease In his head. Our Pharmacist Mate gave him prompt attention and he was soon taken to a hospital for treatment. e night ghters soon were in action and the raiders chased o. A JU-88 was caught in the lights and came in, in a wide arc losing altitude rapidly. He was soon lost to sight, but no doubt he went down. A 20mm slug dropped thru the top deck and Into the ocers shower. No one was hurt how ever. e All Clear sounded at 0245, but warning was given to be on the look out for delayed action & buttery bombs. Took an hour for my nerves to calm down so I could get to sleep. About 8 men in the otilla were wounded. Had an alert at 1830. No action however. 30, May [1944]: About 11 assault transports moored in harbor including U.S.S. [Samuel] Chase, [Joseph T]. Dickman, [Charles] Carrol & Bayeld. LCVPs in and out all day with ammo & army sup plies. British small boats were also picking up U.S. material. 31, May [1944]: Muster after colors. Mr. Mead gave us orders as to: no one to leave or board ship without an escort, no liberty, no conversing with base personnel or personnel of other ships. Strictest security from here on in. We were issued more gas clothing, also a cartridge belt and water canteens. 3, June [1944]: Troops are on board. We have 29th Division infantry, M.P.s (traf c directors) a medics. Navy LCI next to us has First Division men. Many rumors oating around as to place & time. Pool gotten to gether as to D-Day. (10 shillings) 5, June [1944]: Still waiting patiently al though we know much already as to where we are to land, etc. At about 1700 we got under way. Skipper called us all into the crews quarters and had a long diagram or photograph of the beach on the mess table. All pill boxes, machine guns, mines, entanglements & other obstacles. Our beach is to be Red Dog, close to Easy Green. He said we could expect plenty of mines & that subs & E-Boats would be active. New weapons were ex pected and 1950 enemy planes were available for use against us. He wished us the best of luck and then Mr. Mead checked over all our names for correct serial numbers & beneciaries. 6, June (D-Day) [1944]: Coming on watch at 0400, we wore our full gear: impregnated suit, socks, gloves & shoes, life jackets, helmets, cartridge belts, with canteens of water and sheath knife. Gas masks, eye shields & vesicants. At 0715 we were called to General Quarters. While at gun I no ticed hundreds of ships & crafts all about us. Spitres & P-48s were constantly ying back and forth over the area. We gradually left the main body of ships behind us as we proceed ed toward shore. A few LCVPs were returning and some LCTs were returning loaded evidently not getting a chance to beach. Smoke hovered over the beach and a number of ships could be seen to be burning furiously. Tracer shells began skipping out over the water towards us. ey exploded very close & shrapnel clattered against the ship. At 0745 we were called to man our beaching stations. I made a dash for the engine room hatch and could feel and hear shrapnel & machine gun bullets careening by. I took my place at the throttles beside Sorensen. Hass stood by the clutches. We crunched on the beach at 0747 amid loud ex plosions which made the ship shudder. We disembarked our troops and started out when the Skipper noticed we had fouled an LCVP with a line and started back in to assist them. At that moment 3 shells burst into the pilot house and exploded killing 3 of my shipmates and wound ing two including an ocer. Couldnt do any more for the LCVP so we cut the line and started o the beach again after the pilot house was cleared and hand steering put into opera tion. We had been on the beach 50 minutes and were now hightailing it out minus the port ramp which had to be cut away. A Life photographer came aboard our ship from the beach and was soaking wet. He came into the Engine room to get dry. I was relieved and went top side to cool o and assist. e temp had been 120 in the E.R. and it made it twice as hot with all the clothes we had to wear on. Went topside on the boat deck just aft of the pilot house. e Pharm. Mates were work ing over a couple of shapeless hulks lying in wire baskets and covered with blankets. It was a horrible sight with blood & esh splattered over everything. DeNunzio had both legs blown o & part of his stomach, but was still living. I helped the doc give him plasma, but it was hopeless. He died 15 min. later. Buncik was decapitated and occupied only half a stretcher. Burton was still intact but was killed by the concussion. An thony had shrapnel in the feet & legs and was in great pain. He was given morphine and him and Mr. Mead, who was shocked and had shrapnel In his back, were put aboard the C.G. Trans port Chase. e bodies were lat er put aboard an LST and were later burled on the beach. Most of our lighting & power from the pilot house had been shot away and we went about for some time with great diculty. e [LCI(L)] 85 was near a trans port with troops still aboard and was listing badly. She nally got her troops o before she sunk. We were called alongside a transport and took on Navy re lief crews for LCMs. We had the ship pretty well cleaned up by now. We laid a couple miles o the beach and LCMs came alongside to change crews. e battleships Texas & Arkan sas and 3 cruisers including the Augusta and 14 destroyers inces santly shelled the beach. Many craft were careening crazily about, some burning, some with huge holes ripped in their sides. Of the 9 LCIs that beached on Red Dog 4 were still usable. Night time found Jerry over us. Bombs were dropped & some mines. 7, June [1944]: Laid around as mother ship for LCMs. Warships keep up shelling and beaches were quieting down. Armored equip ment was being put ashore; now mostly on Rhinos. 8,9 & 10, June [1944]: An average of 5 raids a night. Much ak was sent up and planes were hit. Bombs & shrap nel fell. Went out 0200 hrs. to look for ammunition barges and numerous mines were known to be in the vicinity. First real raid wasnt until 0330. Dive bombers attacked and two bombs screamed and exploded near a petrol barge anchored only 50 yards o our port quarter. Raids continued until broad daylight or after 6. Shrapnel & 50 cal. slugs were picked up on deck. 12, June [1944]: Not many air alerts in early hours of morning. Our bombers continually ying back & forth. Exploding bombs & demolitions heard most of the time. Night of June 11th we were called to rescue of an LST which struck a mine just outside the transport area. By the time we arrived all survivors were picked up by other LCIs & 83 footers. In the afternoon of June 12th about six of us went ashore in a Higgins boat. e beach was a turmoil of activity and was strewn with twisted wreckage of landing craft and vehicles. e dust was very thick. We looked over the numerous pill boxes & gun emplacements which were made of thick con crete and dug Into the side of the hills which dominated the beaches. Pill boxes left intact were being used as command posts & comm centers. We walked to the top of the hill being careful not to fall in some bodys foxhole and turned to look out over the vast panorama of ships. Ships of all shapes, sizes and descriptions as far as the eye could see. We had a Coast Guard photographer with us taking colored movies and he was well pleased with the material at hand. On top of the hill poppies grew. Everywhere could be seen the pretty red owers and at once I recalled the poem we had always read In school on Memo rial Day; In Flanders Field e Poppies Grow. German prison ers were digging graves for our many dead nearby and I thought of my three shipmates who were laid to rest there. Inside a large fenced in enclosure were many German prisoners. ey were sitting about on the ground in a semi circle as an army Sgt. read o their names. Most of them were Czechs, Poles, French & Russians and most were either real young or old. Another enclosure contained ocers and as I watched they frisked 8 new ones being brought in. A truck came up with 6 French civilian snipers under heavy guard. We walked on down a small dusty road and into the nearby village of Les Moulins. Only a few houses and a church which had been hit by shells and mor tars. We walked into the church yard where an old bent over French was replacing the dis turbed tombs and monuments. We talked to the caretaker un til the smell of embalming uid got too much for us. We stopped at a small cafe where an old man with his arm in a sling and a young boy were clearing up the debris. We caught a ride In a jeep, but were stopped by an M.P. who said that Naval personnel were restricted from going beyond the beach and that our blue helmets & clothing were a perfect target for snipers who were still active in the area. We took the long road back to the beach and were con stantly warned of land mines. Once again on the beach we made our way to where our sis ter ships the 91, 92 & 93 lay bro ken, twisted & charred by re. Seeing them made us realize even more how lucky we were. Tanks, trucks & equipment were constantly coming ashore and bulldozers were grinding here and there assisting wher ever needed. Our time was nearly up so we started back to where we were supposed to meet our boat. Our boat was late and we had to wade some distance into the surf to reach It. ere was only two air raids that night, but a person is so tense expecting raids any minute, that sleep is almost out of the question. End; 26, July [1944]: Went ashore in evening with Qullien, Cuss and Davis. Rode LCVP and transferred to a duck. Hit Dog Red Beach. Walked up road toward St. Laurent. Visit grave yard. Saw Buncik, DeNunzio and Burtons graves. Nos. A-4-71, A-9-174, 6-1-12. Its xed up nice and the little white crosses are lined up neatly In 2 directions. A ag pole, a mast from some ship is in the center and owers are planted around It. (some Colonel paid the French $5 to bring the owers.) Many more graves being dug. e graveyard is about a mile from the beach and overlooks a pleasant green valley.Coast Guardsmans diary account of D-Day

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013



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Squadron 16 holds command changeCapt. Stephen Gillespie relieved by Capt. John CarterCommander, Submarine Squadron 16 held a change-ofcommand ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, May 31. Capt. John Carter relieved Capt. Stephen Gillespie as the commodore of one of the Navys most decorated submarine squadrons. On the third of August 2011, I assumed command of Submarine Squadron Sixteen, Gillespie said. Given our SSGN mission capability to carry up to 66 Naval Special Warfare operators, during my rst month, I visited the Naval Special Warfare unit that had lost so many of their close friends and shipmates. I witnessed rsthand their communitys dedication to the mission with an unwavering passion and commitment to care for those families of the fallen and never miss a beat with respect to ensuring that those who would do our country harm, will not succeed. I left that visit with a renewed passion to ensure our SSGNs would support the nations objectives and that our Sailors would be treated as well as I had witnessed with the NSW community, Gillespie continued. Gillespie, a native of Jacksonville, Fla., also said the work of the Squadron is not done despite the eorts the team made under his leadership. Our submariners, regardless of gender, are formidable and performing at the top of their game. e competition is erce and the aperture is open wide for our schools top young people. is is a good thing! he said. [e Squadron is] a top-notch group of professionals. I am very proud of them and as American tax payers; we are getting a bargain for our money. Among the major accomplishments of the Squadron under Gillespies leadership include spearheading the Women in Submarines initiative for the entire Submarine Force, the successful deployments and oversight of USS Florida (SSGN 728) and USS Georgia (SSBN 729) on nine separate Up Periscope Find out what people are doing this summer Page 9 Sub vets Norfolk has its annual memorial service Page 3 Midway Navy remembers one of its finest moments Pages 6, 11 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Olympian onslaught USS Florida departing Souda harbor NOAA: probability high for one major storm on this coast It may feel like Superstorm Sandy happened just yesterday, but this weekend already marks the rst day of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season. e National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasts were in for an aboveaverage season, which means there is an extremely high probability of at least one major hurricane making landfall in the Gulf Coast and East Coast. As with any hurricane season, the Coast Guard is working closely with local, state and federal partners to prepare so it can respond to this years storms as one team. However, the preparations cannot stop with the Coast Guard. You are the rst line of defense to make sure you and your family stays safe during a hurricane, especially for those who reside along the coast. e best time to prepare for hurricanes is now, at the beginning of hurricane season. Last years Superstorm Sandy was an example of how being prepared could be a matter of life or death. People survived without power for weeks because they were equipped with generators, battery-operated radios and supplies of food. Many coastal residents were safe because they listened to ocials and were prepared to evacuate on a moments notice. Good preparation was the key to lives being spared. However, many others did not fare as well and the historic storm claimed more than 100 lives. e nations ongoing recovery from Superstorm Sandy is a strong reminder that everyone needs to be ready for the next big storm. Here are three things you can do to prepare: Build a kit. Be ready for power outages and stock up on emergency supplies of food, water, medications, batteries and other supplies that will last up to 72 hours. Consider making a kit you can take with you on a moments notice if you need to evacuate. Make a plan Have a conversation with your family about how you will contact one another if separated, where to go if evacuated and what you will do with your pets. Stay informed. Listen to your National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather radio and local news to follow weather conditions. Sign up for emergency alerts from your workplace, schools and community ocials to stay informed. Know your homes vulnerability to ooding, and take the time to learn about ood insurance. When you learn that a hurricane is imminently approaching your area, take these steps: Protect your home. Cover your windows with plywood, turn off propane tanks and bring outdoor objects inside. Find out how to keep food safe. Fill the bathtub and other larger containers with water for sanitary purposes, such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Listen to local ocials. If told to evacuate, do so immediately. You should consider evacuating if you live in a mobile home, high-rise building or near bodies of water. Community organizations like the American Red Cross will often set up shelters for evacuees. Hunker down in a safe room. If you dont evacuate, locate the safest areas in your home or nd a storm shelter in your community. Stay indoors and away from windows. Active hurricane season gets underway Command damage control teams use skills, strength in series of exercisesStraining muscles. Fast thinking. Some serious grunting. And water ying everywhere. is year, 10 teams from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay kicked-o the 19th Damage Control Olympics held at the Fireghter Trainer Trident Training Facility, May 31. e 1st place team and recipients of the Brass Nozzle Trophy are Atomic Salty Buffaloes, of the USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) Gold crew Engineering Department. Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Team Bravo was runner-up, and the USS Georgia (SSGN 729) Blue crew A-gang team third.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 Nominations are currently being sought from the Navys Chief Petty Ocer community for the Inaugural Bob Feller Act of Valor award. Established by the Bob Feller Act of Valor Foundation, the prestigious award is named in honor of Major League Baseball pitcher, National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee, and Navy veteran Bob Feller. is unique award is intended to recognize a representative from three critical areas of Fellers life: his baseball career, his service as a Navy Chief Petty Ocer and his enshrinement in the Hall of Fame. As such, the award will be presented to one Major League Baseball player, one Navy Chief Petty Ocer and one member of the Hall of Fame on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2013, at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is important to recognize Bob Fellers unselsh devotion to our nation and Navy, said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. He made the personal choice to give up money and fame for the service of others and placed himself in harms way with his shipmates during a time of war. e Chief Petty Ocer selected for the Bob Feller Act of Valor Award will embody these same traits. In recognition of Fellers signicant accomplishment in attaining the rank of Chief Petty Ocer, nominees must be an E-7 Chief Petty Ofcer, active or reserve, must be outstanding military professionals and must embody the Navys core values of honor, courage and commitment. Feller enlisted in the Navy shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was with the Cleveland Indians, becoming the rst American professional athlete to enlist. He served on the battleship USS Alabama (BB-60), and while doing so, the ship fought in both World War II theaters and earned eight battle stars. Feller was released from active duty achieving the rank of Chief Petty Ocer and is the only Chief Petty Ocer in the Hall of Fame. Nominations must be submitted to the Navy Oce of Community Outreach by June 17. For more information on eligibility requirements and the selection process, see NAVADMIN 138/13. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cultural, Diversity Fair June 7Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Cultural and Diversity Fair will be 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 7 at the tennis courts at the Fitness Complex. Navy Band Southeast Pride will play music. Cultural stage shows begin at noon. Taste e Nations Food Sampling opens at noon and is free while supplies last. Other attractions include community awareness and Navy College booths, a grill and barbecue by the Kings Bay First Class and CPO Association, plus appearences by the Bualo Soldiers, Deep Forst Native American Indians and St. Marys Submarine Museum. For participation or acess to this event, call (912) 573-3456.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will conduct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civilians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more information or to enroll your teen.Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 17. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program information, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! As Permanent Change of Station season is almost here, Navy Personnel Command ocials remind leadership of the importance of command sponsorship, May 29. Command Sponsor and Indoctrination Programs are designed to help Sailors and their families adapt into new working and living environments, to minimize the anxiety associated with a PCS move and aord Sailors and their families the greatest opportunity for a successful and productive tour at their new assignment, said NPC Force Master Chief Leland E. Moore. Upon receiving PCS orders, Sailors and their families are assigned a sponsor through the Command Sponsor and Indoctrination Programs. Sponsorship is an important component of a Sailors PCS move and helps prepare them for a productive, successful tour of duty. Sponsors are volunteers who assist new arrivals before PCS and after reporting aboard as the Sailor gets familiar with the new command and duty station. Sponsors help with check-in procedures and ensure Sailors and their families are familiar with local medical and dental treatment facilities and are enrolled in TRICARE. Sponsors can also check housing availability before a member arrives and set up arrangements for temporary lodging if needed. In cases of overseas assignment, they may also provide Sailors with information regarding local customs. Command master chiefs oversee the sponsorship program and ensure Sailors get Navy Pride and Professionalism training within 30 days of their arrival or within three drill weekends for reservists. It is imperative that sponsorship continues until a Sailor is fully aware of their responsibilities, local policies, programs and services available through their new command. Sponsors should be enthusiastic, willing to help people, and have a positive attitude toward the Navy, command, and local community. ey should be familiar with the command and its location or homeport, knowledgeable about available resources, and familiar with applicable command procedures and instructions. Anyone wishing to become a sponsor should talk to their command sponsor coordinator and read OPNAVINST 1740.3C on the NPC Web site at www.npc.navy.mil.Navy leaders promote sponsorship Personnel Command Nominations sought for Feller award Community Outreach e Department of Veterans Affairs, Disabled American Veterans and the American Legion May 21 announced a new partnership to help in reducing the compensation claims backlog for veterans. e eort, called the Fully Devel oped Claims Community of Practice, is a key part of VAs overall transforma tion plan to end the backlog in 2015 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy, VA ocials said. VA can process fully developed claims in half the time it takes for a traditionally led claim, ocials noted. VA prides itself on our ongoing partnership with organizations that represent veterans throughout the claims process, said Undersecretary for Benets Allison A. Hickey. A fully developed claim is the most eective way to ensure a veterans claim never reaches the backlog and is the basis for this new initiative between VA and what we expect will be an ever-increasing number of veteran service organizations and others who represent veterans at various points of the claims process. e new initiative takes a com mon-sense approach to working smarter to better serve injured and ill veterans, said Barry Jesinoski, Washington Headquarters executive direc tor for Disabled American Veterans. DAV is pleased to be working with the VA to help improve the disability compensation system, Jesinoski added. e American Legion has been working with VA since December on its fully developed claims process, said James E. Koutz, the American Legions national commander. Teams of our experts have already gone to VA regional oces in Denver, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and other cities to help identify best practices for [fully developed claims], and to further train our own service ocers, Koutz said. Claims are considered to be fully developed when veterans submit all available supporting evidence, such as private treatment records and notice of federal treatment records, to VA at the time they rst le a formal claim and certify they have no more evidence to submit. is is the information that VA needs to make a determination on a disability claim, VA ocials said. e fully developed claims program supports the sharing of best practices across veteran service organizations that help thousands of veterans each year with their compensation claims, to identify up front all evidence necessary to support a veterans claim, ocials explained. Veterans then certify that they have no additional evidence to submit, and VA can process the claim in half the time it takes for a traditionally led claim, they added. Veteran service organizations have long played an integral role in submitting veterans claims, often with representatives working within VA regional oces. VA has consulted with them throughout the development and implementation of its plan to end the backlog in 2015 to ensure best practices and their unique insights were incorporated, ocials said. e American Legion and DAV are the rst to step forward to work with VA on the program, ocials added, and that program has led to a much more ecient process. is is the latest eort in support of the plan to reduce the backlog. Last month, VA announced an initiative to expedite compensation claims decisions for veterans who have waited one year or longer. On April 19, VA began prioritizing claims decisions for veterans who have been waiting the longest by providing provisional decisions that allow eligible veterans to begin collecting compensation benets quickly. With a provisional decision, a veteran has a year to submit addi tional information to support a claim before the decision becomes nal. On May 15, VA ocials announced that the department is mandating overtime for claims processors in its 56 regional benets ofces through the end of scal year 2013 to help eliminate the backlog, with continued emphasis on highpriority claims for homeless veterans and those claiming nancial hardship, the terminally ill, former prisoners of war, Medal of Honor recipients and veterans ling fully developed claims. As of May 17, the paperless claims processing system known as the Veterans Benets Management System, or VBMS, has been deployed to 46 out of 56 regional oce locations, and about 18 percent of VAs current claim inventory is in an electronic format, ocials said. Claims for Wounded Warriors separating from the military for medical reasons will continue to be handled separately and on a priority basis with the DOD through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System, ocials said. On average, wounded warriors separating through IDES currently receive VA compensation benets in two months following their separation from service.VA, vets work to cut claims backlog Veterans Aairs

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e annual Submarine Veterans of World War II Memorial Service was conducted May 23 at the Submarine Learning Facility Naval Station Norfolk. Hosted by SUBLRNFAC, the event is each year prior to Memorial Day. In past years the services honored the 52 submarines and the gallant Sailors lost during World War II, and the losses of the USS resher (SSN 593), April 10, 1963, and the USS Scorpion (SSN 589), May 22, 1968. But since the World War II, submarine veterans were rolled into the United States Submarine Veterans, Inc. during the 2012 national convention, this years ceremony also honored all submarines and submariners lost during the forces 113-year history. Cmdr. Stan Stewart, Jr., SUBLRNFAC commanding ocer, welcomed the more than 100 veterans, active duty Sailors, spouses, and visitors. Welcome to Submarine Learning Facility, and thank you all for being here to remember and honor the veterans of the submarine force, Stewart said. is is a great opportunity to reect and remember those who came before us. Also, to honor them, so we just dont remember them today, but we remember them in all that we do. Every time I put my uniform on, I remember. Every time I hug my wife or children, I remember. I remember they forged the path to secure the freedoms we enjoy. eir sacrices established the standard for honor, commitment and courage. Our duty is to continue their legacy the highest honor we can give them. So it is my great pleasure, and I am genuinely humbled to oer the crew of Submarine Learning Facility Norfolks gratitude to our veterans and their families this Memorial Day weekend. He then introduced the guest speaker, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces. Submarine veterans, fellow submariners, shipmates and families, it is an honor for me to be here with you today, Connor said. I know that this ceremony is incredibly important to all of you, and I want you to know that it is humbling to speak to a group of American heroes such as yourselves. We always look forward to celebrating the exploits, the traditions, the professionalism, and the heroism of our veterans. Words cannot convey how much we, in todays submarine force, admire and appreciate what you have done, and how much we owe to you for our successes. Let me take this opportunity to welcome you all to the cornerstone of our Navy, Norfolk, Virginia. e submarine force is a family business and all of you here today are a part of that family. Many of you are very familiar with our history. You lived part of it, and through the SUBVETS, you preserve it for future generations. I am proud to stand here today as part of the worlds best submarine force. ose of us who are still serving on active duty honor you. But more importantly, we look to you for inspiration and example. We look to you to hear and learn from your experiences. Our contact with the past is important to todays success. I want to thank again for the honor of allowing me to speak to you all today. But most of all, I want to give my most sincere thank you to all the submarine veterans who have served this great country. God bless you all. During the ceremony, retired Navy Capt. Horatio Lincoln, former commanding ocer of the USS Narwhal (SSN 671), announced the USS Scorpion would become the 15th submarine to be inducted into the Submarine Hall of Fame. Selection is merited by the submarines contribution to national security, and selection is conducted by the Hampton Roads Chapter of the USSVI organization. Built by the Electric Boat Division, General Dynamics Corp., Groton, Conn., USS Scorpion (SSN-589) was commissioned on July 29, 1960. It was a Skipjack Class nuclear submarine and the sixth Navy ship to carry the name of Scorpion. Following type training out of her homeport in Norfolk, Va., the submarine got underway on February 15, 1968 for a Mediterranean Sea deployment. It operated with the U.S. Sixth Fleet into May, and then headed west for home. On May 21 its position was reported to be about 50 miles south of the Azores. Six days later, it was reported overdue at Norfolk. A search was initiated, but on June 5, Scorpion and her crew were declared presumed lost. Its name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on June 30. Many thanks for your hospitality and camaraderie in extending the invitation to participate in todays important remembrance event, said Lincoln. I consider the opportunity to stand in ranks with you today as a great privilege in honoring USS Scorpion and her gallant crew, Cold War warriors and silent heroes who remain at sea faithfully standing the watch, forever remaining in our hearts. I thank you for keeping the memories of our shipmates and the history of the Submarine Force shining brightly as vibrant elements in our Navys culture. We stand on the shoulders of our submarine force predecessors, honoring their legacy and the value of our nations silent service. So I consider it tting and proper today to celebrate the legacy of USS Scorpion and her crew, we honor their service by pausing today to give thanks and to remember. Today, we also want to acknowledge the true treasures of our Navys submarine force, our people. I remain steadfast in my belief that all of the eye-watering technology today brings substantial warghting capabilities to the Submarine Force and our Navy to carry out the critical mission of protecting our country. But that technology is worthless without our incredible Sailors. ank you Admiral Connor, the leadership team of the Submarine Learning Center, submarine Veteran colleagues and shipmates for allowing me the privilege to join you today. WWII sub vets in Norfolk roughout this years hurricane season, youll be updated on the latest hurricane forecasts and provided with more tips to keep you safe. But in the meantime, take these simple steps to prepare for a busy hurricane season. Join in following the Coast Guards motto, Semper Paratus Always Ready!Hurricane THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 DC Olympics Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Trident Training Facilitys Navy photos by MC2 Cory Rose and MC3 Ashley Hedrick MM2 Jacob Stevens competes in the IA Low Crawl.

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 5 e ballistic-missile submarine USS Alabama (SSBN 731) saw command of its Gold Crew pass from Cmdr. Kevin Schultz to Cmdr. Brody Frailey on May 24 during a ceremony at the Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport, Wash. Suce to say, Ive been blessed with a great crew, said Schultz, who had commanded Alabamas Gold Crew since April 2011. Im proud of my crew for always conducting themselves as professional submariners with honesty, integrity, and a desire to do whats best for the command. During his command tenure, Schultz guided the Gold Crew through three strategic deterrent patrols, including a 108-day patrol which ended in April 2013. I hope you will remember that every member of this crew is important to our mission, Schultz said, and everything we do on a day-to-day basis, including the professionalism in how we conduct traditional ceremonies like this change of command, contribute to the credibility and reliability of our strategic deterrence. I encourage you to continue to do your duties with the utmost professionalism and pride in defending your families, defending our freedom, and defending the American way of life. Schultzs next assignment will be on the Navy sta as the Branch Head for Nuclear Policy (OPNAV N514). Frailey, a native of La Mesa, Calif., returns for his third tour of duty in Bangor after two years as Current Operations Fleet Manage ment Director for Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet/ Commander Naval Forces Europe/Commander Naval Forces Africa. Previously, Frailey performed department head tours aboard USS Nevada (SSBN 733) and USS Henry M. Jackson (SSBN 730) and served as Blue Crew executive ocer of USS Louisiana (SSBN 743) from 2008-2010. He also spent time aboard Alabama prior to his rst tour as a weapons ocer. I have observed you all up close over the past month and studied your admirable exploits from afar during your most recent 108-day patrol, Frailey said. I am impressed with your eorts, and I am proud to be given the opportunity to go to sea with you as your captain. Alabama is one of eight Ohio-class Trident ballistic missile submarines stationed at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nations strategic deterrent forces. e event is a friendly, but intense, competition between various commands that emphasizes the importance of Damage Control skills, strengthening bonds, promoting esprit de corps and is just plain fun. A lot of commands dont have interaction with each other in their day-to-day routines, so this is a time for us to get together, have a little fun through sport and see where our high and low points are, said Trident Training Facility Code 26, Damage Control Leading Chief Petty Ocer Chief Machinist Mate James Culbertson. e ten events include Nozzleman Sniper, Injured Man Relay, Rapid Response Rodeo, Blind Man Tug-O-War, Repair Team Water Sports, Submersible Pump Relay, Bucket Brigade, IA Low Crawl, Emergency Medical Assist Team Action Hero Patch Up and DC PT. All ten events tested teamwork, physical agility and aggression, and most involved plenty of water. Events like the IA low crawl pit a four-man team inside a mud puddle on their bellies racing against the clock, involving physical strength and endurance. Other events required quick thinking and a level head. Each event from the DC Olympics rely on a team eort to come out on top. e No. 1 thing to take away from this event is team building, said Trident Training Facility Code 26, Damage Control Instructor Chief Machinist Mate Travis Scott. You are working with your team to accomplish your goals. e 19th DC Olympics has come to an end. But teams will have a year to practice for next year. DC mission periods, two 130-plus-day Major Maintenance Periods, the completion of the rst Atlantic SSGN Dry Deck Shelter/SEAL Delivery Vehicle, Naval Special Warfare Full Mission prole and a Navy Unit Commendation for strike performance during Operation Odyssey Dawn. Gillespies next assignment will be at Submarine Group 10 in Kings Bay as the Deputy Commander and Chief-of-Sta. Carter, a 1986 physics and mathematics graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, said he can think of no greater honor or privilege than to serve as commander of Squadron Sixteen. What a remarkable and amazing time to serve. Nothing sharpens ones focus and wits quite like the prospect of actual combat. e better prepared we are for combat, the more likely we are to prevent it, said Carter, quoting Vice Admiral Mark Fox, then Commander, Fifth Fleet. ose poignant words provide perspective and exemplify Submarine Squadron Sixteens mindset on mission readiness. CSS16 manages the multi-mission capabilities of USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Florida (SSGN 728), the two Ohioclass guided-missile submarines (SSGN) homeported in Kings Bay, as well as providing support to the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines (SSBN) before, during and after refueling and overhaul periods at Norfolk, Va., Naval Shipyard. COC Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group Ten speaks during the change of command. USS Alabama has change of command When the crew of the motor vessel Marine Electric was caught in a winter storm in the early hours of Feb. 12, 1983, their 605foot ship capsized, tossing 34 crewmembers into the 39-degree waters east of Chincoteague, Va. e Marine Electric radioed a mayday and soon a helicopter crew from Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., was airborne. When the crew arrived on scene they lowered a rescue basket to a survivor; hypothermic and exhausted, they did not have the strength to climb in. After several attempts, the helicopter crew was forced to move on to the next survivor. ey too were unable to climb into the basket under their own strength. It was a painful site for these lifesavers. By days end, even with the assistance of an additional Navy helicopter, only three of the 34 crewmembers survived. An investigation was conducted in this tragic loss of life and a congressional hearing convened. On Oct. 30, 1984, Congress acted on the hearings ndings and directed the Coast Guard to establish a helicopter rescue swimming program for the purpose of training selected Coast Guard personnel in rescue swimming skills. e aviation survivalman rating, already identied with sea survival, would become even more demanding due to the physical requirements of performing the duties of a rescue swimmer. In addition, no other service allowed females in similar programs at the time. After much considerable thought, the Coast Guard decided any physical tness standards would be both mission specic and gender blind; meaning women who possessed the strength and stamina were as eligible as men to become rescue swimmers. It was an historic moment for the Coast Guard. Fast forward to today and Chief Petty Ocer Karen Voorhees is now part of this history. Voorhees is the rst woman to advance to chief petty ocer in the rate of aviation survival technician since women were integrated into Coast Guard active duty service in 1973. In 1976 we had the rst female graduate from aviation survivalman school, said Capt. Joe Kimball, commanding ocer of Air Station Miami. In 1986 we had the rst female graduate from a navy rescue swimmer school. Twenty-seven years later we have the rst aviation survival technician promoted to the rank of chief petty ocer,. As of this morning, aviation survival technician was the last rate, of all the currently active rates in the Coast Guard, that had never had a female to the rank of chief petty ocer. is milestone was put into perspective by Voorhees herself who spoke about raising young women who are smarter and stronger. I think that if we treated our girls with the same respect and initiative that we treat boys and expect them to live up to the standards we set them instead of lowering the standards for the girls to meet, I think we will do much better and I think we will have a lot more females in the military, in aviation, just running the world, said Voorhees during an interview May 15, 2013.Female milestone for Coast Guard

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Active duty, retired service members and civilians observed the heroism of World War II veterans at the 71st Anniversary Battle of Midway commemoration aboard the USS Midway Museum in San Diego, June 1. e Battle of Midway took place June 4 to 7, 1942, where U.S. Navy carrier strike forces prevented the Japanese from capturing control of Midway Island in the Pacic. e victory proved to be a pivotal point of World War II and is an important marker in naval heritage. History has shown that the Battle of Midway was absolutely the turning point in the war in the Pacic and probably the entire war of World War II, said Vice Adm. omas H. Copeman III, commander, Naval Surface Forces, commander Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacic Fleet. It was the end of the Japanese oensive six months into the war. During the ceremony, 13 surviving veterans, along with family and friends of those who gave the ultimate sacrice during the Battle of Midway, were honored by current military personnel and civilians, for their extraordinary service 71 years ago. e event is to honor the veterans of Midway, said Copeman. Its to make sure that the memory of the Battle of Midway and the heritage of what it stands for is not lost upon the younger generation of Sailors. e commemoration included a special video presentation that was voiced by World War II veterans involved in the historic battle. e video gives us an idea where our veterans are coming from, said Damage Controlman 1st Class Mike Minotti. We got to see the veterans perspective of what happened, and it ties us closer to our heritage. e observance also included several speakers. Retired Marine Corps ocer Lt. Col. Jerry Coleman, who also served during World War II, gave the keynote speech. If every Sailor gets a chance to interact with these veterans, they need to, Minotti said. It instills a sense of pride and makes the Sailor proud. Mount Suribachi revisited As the rain trickled down on a cloudy day, Marines trudged along a muddy path on an island where decades before so many had made the ultimate sacrice. Approximately 120 Marines and sailors visited the island of Iwo Jima, which was renamed Iwo To in 2007, during a professional military education tour May 17. e event provided an opportunity for the Marines and Sailors of Marine Wing Communications Squadron 18, Marine Air Control Group 18, 1st Ma rine Aircraft Wing, III Marine Expeditionary Force, to see, experience and evaluate the incredible challenges Japanese and American troops endured during the Battle of Iwo Jima as part of the Pacic campaign of World War II. ere is a lot of history on this island that not everyone is aware of, said Sta Sgt. Jason L. Day, a wire chief with MWCS18. If they look at this ground from the perspective of someone during that battle, it will be easier for the Marines to understand and truly respect our Corps history. Shortly following their arrival on the island, the Marines and sailors hiked up Mount Suribachi, the ground made famous by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthals photograph of ve Marines and a Navy corpsman rais ing the American ag atop the mountain in 1945. Suribachi was one of the strongest defensive positions occupied by the Imperial Japanese Army, said Sta Sgt. Patrick G. Kawano, a motor transport chief with MWCS-18. e defenders were able to survive multiple days of naval bombardment and aerial bombings before attempting to repel the Marines. at puts into perspective how dicult it was for the Marines ghting on the island. Upon reaching the precipice of Suribachi, the visitors reected on the sacrices made by warriors on both sides during the historic battle. To demonstrate the connection to their fallen comrades, Marines and Sailors left memorabilia such as dog tags and rank insignias on monuments at the mountains peak. e unit also held an awards and re-enlistment ceremony atop Suribachi. It was my distinct pleasure in recognizing Marines and Sailors for their hard work at a place like this, said Lt. Col. Bret A. Bolding, the commanding ocer of MWCS-18. Its the embodiment of leadership and what the Marine Corps is all about. e Marines also took time to pause at the shoreline of the island to discuss and envision the events that transpired in the fateful battle. When you think about what the Marines before us did, what they sacriced here in the battle, it opens your eyes to the conditions then, said Kawano. Its important not to forget who came before us and not to forget where we come from. For many of the Marines and Sailors visiting the island, this was the rst and possibly last time they will be able to visit Iwo To, according to Day. Being able to come here is always good for Marines and Sailors, said Day. It allows them to further their professional education and maintain a tangible connection to Marine Corps history. Midways 71st anniversary ceremony held 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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After more than ve years of service, one of the Air Forces mobile marketing assets, the F-22 Raptorthemed chopper, retired and moved to its new home in the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Designed by the Orange County Choppers, the chopper is now on display in the museums gift shop. It is one of the rst artifacts seen by the 1.2 million visitors who visit the museum annually, said Jeery Underwood, NMUSAF historian. Future plans call for its display on a raised platform that will allow visitors to view its unique features more easily. During its service, the chopper reached millions through appearances on the reality television show American Chopper and the Military Channel, and by being displayed over 1,000 Air Force recruiting events. e 150-horse power chopper sports an F-22 Raptor custom theme complete with F-22 shaped mirrors, rims, seat, exhaust and an aircraft themed paint scheme. It was ocially retired in 2010, and has been on display in the AFRS Headquarters lobby until being donated to the Air Force museum last month. Korean War veterans attended a ceremony at Yangju, South Korea to mark the 60th anniversary of the Nevada Outposts Battle,v May 28. U.S. and South Korean veterans participated in the ceremony at the Republic of Korea Armys 25th Infantry Division Headquarters. Maj. Gen. Bernard S. Champoux, the prospective Eighth Army commanding general, thanked the veterans for laying the foundation for South Koreas future success. Named after the Nevada cities of Vegas, Reno, Carson and Elko, the United Nations Command outposts were located along the primary invasion route into Seoul. e outpost battles occurred during armistice negotiations when United Nations Command and Communist negotiators were attempting to establish a demilitarized zone two kilometers north and south of the current line of contact. e ghting focused on seizing and maintaining the string of outposts to ensure that friendly forces held key defensible terrain when the armistice came into eect, Champoux said. e 5th Marines, the 25th Infantry Division, and Turkish forces from the United Nations Command were vastly outnumbered by Communist forces during the battle. Communist Chinese forces attempted to use their overwhelming numeric advantage in human wave attacks to seize new terrain before the armistice was signed. During the brutal battle on the unforgiving terrain with its unpredictable weather, the combatants rained artillery on each other. e United Nations ground forces red more than 117,000 artillery rounds and called in air support 67 times. e Communist Chinese red 67,000 rounds of artillery. As the men that are with us today know, they engaged in small scale, often company-sized battles that engulfed these outposts along the main line of resistance, Champoux said. ey were every bit as intense and demanding as any in the history of warfare. American Soldiers and Marines and their Turkish allies held the outposts until given a withdrawal order from the United Nations Command. Today, the outposts are just north the Military Demarcation Line that divides the two Koreas. One of the more storied participants in the outposts battle was a Mongolian mare purchased by a U.S. Marine lieutenant from a South Korean boy for $250 and used by 5th Marines during the battle. Named Reckless after the platoons recoilless ries, the little warhorse became a legend of the battle. e little horse carried more than 9,000 pounds of ammunition over 35 miles of dangerous mountain terrain. Reckless also carried wounded Marines down the mountain and was wounded twice during the battle. According to U.S. Marines in the battle, the little mare provided a great boost of morale every time she made back up the mountain. After retiring in 1960, Reckless spent her reminding days on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., where she is buried in a place of honor today. Champoux thanked the Republic of Korea Armys 25th Infantry Division for hosting the inaugural ceremony on the 60th anniversary of the outposts battle. Champoux said he has a special connection to the outposts battle because he commanded the Schoeld Barracks, Hawaii-based 25th Infantry Division. I had the honor of commanding the U.S. 25th Infantry Division for over two years, one year as the last U.S. division in Iraq, he said. Although the two 25th Divisions are from two separate armies, they are forever connected by this alliance, forever connected by this land. During the Korean War, Champouxs father served as a U.S. Army company commander in the 65th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division, who fought outpost battles in a dierent sector. Champoux called the Korean War veterans noble, seless and patriotic. We salute you and all our Korean War veterans, he said. ose of us who serve here today are honored to walk in your footsteps and to uphold your remarkable legacy of service. Korea is a free and prosperous nation today because of people like you who answered the call of duty. Army reunion in Korea Air Force chopper put in retirement THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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Everybody should take some kind of vacation, whether you go somewhere special with family or just stay around the house, now known as a stay cation. A break from work and constantly being on the move is what people need to do to relax. I will be taking leave to go on a cruise with my family.Being in the Navy and going on vacation on a ship could seem strange, but at least I dont have to wear a uniform or work. Heres what some others will be doing this summer.MA3 Nathaniel Mora Marine Corps Security Force Battalion San Diego I will be taking my wife to the Bahamas for our honeymoon. MM2 Nicholas Gay USS Wyoming Gold Norfolk, Va. I will be going home to visit family. MA3 Jonathan Garcia Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Lodi, N.J. I will be buying a house in Puerto Rico. Tracy Collins Valdosta State Albuquerque, N.M. I will be going to Virginia to visit my boyfriend ... My Boo Boo. MA3 Brian Quiles Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Tampa, Fla. I will be going to Tampa to visit family. MA3 Nathaniel Bennett Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Prattville, Ala. I will be taking leave to get married and have a child. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose Commander, Navy Region Southeast Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emergency Family Assistance Center exercise on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville May 30. e exercise, designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, as well as installation and training ocers and emergency management personnel from all three bases. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to landfall and each base suered extensive ooding as the simulated storm passed. Region has disaster drill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 9

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., June 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 11. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Money Management for Couples upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the trainFleet & Family Support Center workshops 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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Early in World War II, the Japanese employing six aircraft carriers at one time, as they did in the attack on Oahu on Dec. 7, 1941, proved a radical undertaking. e six carriers whose planes had attacked Oahu outnumbered the U.S. Navys attops two-to-one. On June 4 1942, at the Battle of Midway, the U.S. had three carriers, USS Enterprise, USS Hornet and USS Yorktown. Tactic that dierent between the carriers was a key to the battle. Enterprise and Hornet, in Task Force 16, launched their respective attack groups employing a deferred departure plan, which sent o the ghters rst, then the scoutbombers, then the torpedo planes. All loitered about the ship until the entire group was airborne before setting out for the enemy en masse. As the Japanese steamed at the extreme range of their ghter and torpedo planes fuel capacities, this left no margin for error. Hornets ghters launched rst and wasted much of their fuel over the ship while the rest of the strike slowly got airborne, one aircraft at a time. None of the ghters ever returned to the ship, or sighted the enemy. Enterprises ghters attached themselves to the Hornets torpedo planes, the ill-fated VT-8, while Enterprises torpedo planes went unescorted. Yorktown, however, operated dierently. Its attack group, less VB-5 which Rear Adm. Frank Fletcher, commander, Task Force 17, retained on board as a reserve strike and search group, launched according to a running rendezvous, the dive bombers taking o rst, followed by the torpedo planes, with the higher speed ghter escort launching last. VT-3, VB-3 and VF-3 proceeded directly toward the target immediately after launch, with the torpedo squadron at low altitude, the dive bombers high, and the ghters closing in from behind. e group then merged together well along its base course, with all elements arriving over the enemy eet simultaneously. Yorktowns air group was the only one of the three to attack as a group. eir providential arrival simultaneously with that of Enterprises VB-6 and VS-6 spelled the doom of Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu.Carrier tactics provided key at Midway battle Torpedo Squadron 8 paid a heavy priceIn the Battle of Midway, there were many Sailors who were immediately recognized for their actions. e dive bombers whose payloads were delivered on target and sank the Japanese carriers were among the rst to be noted as heroes of this monumental victory. But there were some who may not have been recognized because they failed to accomplish their primary mission to deliver their torpedoes and sink as many ships in the Japanese eet as possible. is was the fate of Torpedo Squadron 8. On the morning of June 4, 1942, the relatively young pilots of VT 8 boarded their aircraft with the daunting task of being one of the rst squadrons to launch against the imposing Japanese force. When they left the ight deck of USS Hornet (CV-8), these THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 11

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, June 8. Trident Lakes is presenting another great time for you and your child! Registra tion begins at 11 a.m. with lunch at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of par ent and child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and fun. For the younger crowd, a 9 -hole course is laid out with cost of $20. Open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Flag Day Golf Tournament It will be Friday, June 14 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. The cost is $26 and includes lunch, green fees and cart. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. with shotgun start at 1 p.m. The new format is an individual format where you add 72 to your handicap and play as far as you can until you reach that number. Once there plant your flag. The winner will be the person who gets the furthest on the course. Reserve your spot today at (912) 5738475. Happy Fathers Day from RackN-Roll Lanes All fathers bowl free on from 1 to 7 p.m., Sunday, June 16 at Rack-N-Roll Lanes. is does not include shoe rent al. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp are June 10 to 14 and July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 573-8475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp ages 5 to 14 is June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. Mike Johnsons T-N-T Soccer Training Camp is June 10 to 14 for ages 5 to 12, at Youth Sports Soccer Complex. Cost is $85 for 5 to 6 age group mini camp and $109 for 7 to 17 age group CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Judy Moody & the Not So Bummer Summer June 8 and 9, Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open view ing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kinder garten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, firstserve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/dual mili tary parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No out side food is authorized. Cost is based on total fam ily income. For more infor mation call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just about kids Liberty call Parent, child golf outing June 8 MWR Sports 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 13 brave pilots had no idea what this mission would bring them. is would be their rst real test in battle. As they closed in on the enemy carriers, they came under intense re from Japanese ghter aircraft. e older, slower American aircraft werent able to get away from the faster, more agile, Japanese planes. Before Torpedo Squadron 8 were able to make a hit on the enemy eet, 29 of them would be killed in action. Many would think that these men failed in their mission. While it was true they didnt sink any of the Japanese ships, they did manage to occupy their defense forces long enough and were able to draw them far enough away from their own eet, to allow the next ight of dive bombers to y in relatively unimpeded and score direct hits on every one of their targets, including the Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu, almost ensuring immediate victory for the Americans. e only survivor of Torpedo Squadron 8 was Ensign George H. Gay, who was wounded in action during the mission. Gay gave an oral history of what happened that day and why the men of Torpedo Squadron 8 were heroes. Well, Torpedo 8 had a dicult problem, we had old planes and we were new in the organization. We had a dual job of not only training a squadron of boot ensigns, of which I was one, we also had to ght the war at the same time, and when we nally got up to the Battle of Midway it was the rst time I had ever carried a torpedo on an aircraft and it was the rst time that I had ever taken a torpedo o of a ship None of the other ensigns in the squadron had either. I didnt get much sleep the night of June the 3rd, the stories of the battle were coming in, midnight torpedo attack by the PBYs and all kinds of things, and we were a little bit nervous, kind of, like before a football game. We knew that the Japs were trying to come in and take something away from us and we also knew that we were at a disadvantage because we had old aircraft and could not climb the altitude with the dive bombers or ghters and we expected to be on our own. (In ight the next morning, Lt. Cmdr. John C. Waldron ew) as straight to the Japanese Fleet as if he had a string tied to them. We thought that morning, at least I did when I saw the Japanese carriers, that one was on re and another had a re onboard. I thought there was a battle in progress and we were late. I was a little bit impatient that we didnt get right on in there. When it nally turned out that we got close enough in that we could make a contact report and describe what we could see, the Zeros jumped on us and it was too late. ey turned out against us in full strength and I gured that there was about 35 of them. Its been a very general opinion that the anti-aircraft re shot our boys down and thats not true. I dont think that any of our planes were damaged, even touched by anti-aircraft re. e ghters, the Zeros, shot down everyone of them, and by the time that we got into where the anti-aircraft re began to get hot, the ghters all left us. I was the only one close enough to get any real hot anti-aircraft re. Yet, I dont think it even touched me. I went right through it, right over the ship. I think we made a couple of grave mistakes. In the rst place, if wed only had one ghter with us, I think our troubles would have been much less. We picked up on the way in a cruiser plane, a Japanese scout from one of their cruisers, and it fell in behind us and tracked us. I know that gave away our position, course, and speed. We changed after he left but then I know that they knew we were coming. If wed had one ghter to go back and knock that guy down, catch him before he could have gotten that report o, I believe that the Japanese would have been fooled. Also, we went in to a scouting line out there when we were still trying to nd them and didnt. e skipper put us into a long scouting line, which I thought was a mistake at the time. I didnt ever question Waldron. He had his reason for it, and I knew that he expected to nd them. When he gave the join up signal, we joined up immediately. I was only afraid that in the scouting line in those old planes, that we would be caught by the Zeros and it would be much worse. As it turned out, it didnt make a whole lot of dierence anyway. As we joined up quickly and got organized to make our attack, the Zeros got in after us. I remember that the rst one that came down got us over to the left. Lt. Cmdr. Waldron, who was on his air phone, asked Dobbs if that was a Zero or if it was one of our planes. I didnt know whether Dobbs answered him or not, but I came out on the air and told him that it was a TBD. He also called Stanhope Ring from John E. One, answer and we received no answer from the air groups. I dont know if they even heard us or not, but I have always had a feeling that they did hear us. I think that was one of the things that caused them to turn north as I think the squadron deserves quite a bit of credit for the work that they did. His radioman killed, Gay suered several hand and leg wounds from Japanese anti-aircraft re as he started his torpedo run against a large Japanese carrier. He managed to score a hit, however, and to clear the Japanese ship before crashing into the ocean squarely in the midst of the disorganized enemy eet. Gay survived the ensuing action treading water and avoided enemy capture by hiding under his otation device while Japanese ships sailed past. He lasted more than 30 hours in the water until he was nally rescued by a PBY. He had a ringside seat at the Battle of Midway. While oating in the water he had the satisfaction of seeing three Japanese carriers explode and sink and also saw the retreat of the enemy from the fury of our air attack. Personally, I was just lucky. Ive never under stood why I was the only one that came back, but it turned out that way. I want to be sure that the men that didnt come back get the credit for the work that they did. ey followed Waldron without batting an eye. I dont feel like a lot of people have felt that we made mistakes and that Waldron got us into trou ble. I dont feel that way at all. I know that if I had it all to do over again, even knowing that the odds were going to be like they were, knowing him like I knew him, Id follow him again through exactly the same thing because I trust ed him very well. We did things that he wanted us to do not because he was our boss, but because we felt that if we did the things he wanted us to do, then it was the right thing to do. e Zeros that day just caught us o balance. We were at a disadvantage all the way. presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per person, catch and release or $7 per person, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promo tions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512. program June 13The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Navy College information FFSC MWR Torpedo 8

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013 It was June 6, 1944, when Allied forces began the largest amphibious invasion of all time D-Day. On the anniversary of D-Day, Compass would like to share the story of Motor Machinists Mate 1st Class Cliord W. Lewis, a crewman aboard the Coast Guard-manned LCI(L)-94. As part of Flotilla 10, LCI(L)-94 was an amphibious assault unit that landed Allied troops during the invasions of Sicily, Salerno, Normandy and the Pacic eatre. Below are excerpts of a diary kept by Lewis describing what it was like before, during and after the bloody assault at Normandy, June 6, 1944. 28, May [1944]: At 0115 hrs. we were awakened by a bomb exploding close by. More explosions followed immediately, which shook the ship. I was dressed and half-way up the ladder when the alarm sounded. Jerry had sneaked in close behind our own planes returning from raids on France, thus fooling the radar. When I emerged on deck and began getting my gun ready, the sky was lled with tracers and searchlights. Ships out-board of us got underway, but we remained at the dock. We werent allowed to re for fear of revealing our position. e ack-ack batteries in Portland were ring right over our heads and many shells exploded about us on the ship and dock. e noise was deafening and shrapnel careen ing about furiously. Buncik, MoMM3/C, who was stationed in the steering room had his head protruding from the hatch, when a 20mm slug or large piece of shrapnel pierced his helmet and cut a crease In his head. Our Pharmacist Mate gave him prompt attention and he was soon taken to a hospital for treatment. e night ghters soon were in action and the raiders chased o. A JU-88 was caught in the lights and came in, in a wide arc losing altitude rapidly. He was soon lost to sight, but no doubt he went down. A 20mm slug dropped thru the top deck and Into the ocers shower. No one was hurt however. e All Clear sounded at 0245, but warning was given to be on the look out for delayed action & buttery bombs. Took an hour for my nerves to calm down so I could get to sleep. About 8 men in the otilla were wounded. Had an alert at 1830. No action however. 30, May [1944]: About 11 assault transports moored in harbor including U.S.S. [Samuel] Chase, [Joseph T]. Dickman, [Charles] Carrol & Bayeld. LCVPs in and out all day with ammo & army supplies. British small boats were also picking up U.S. material. 31, May [1944]: Muster after colors. Mr. Mead gave us orders as to: no one to leave or board ship without an escort, no liberty, no conversing with base personnel or personnel of other ships. Strictest security from here on in. We were issued more gas clothing, also a cartridge belt and water canteens. 3, June [1944]: Troops are on board. We have 29th Division infantry, M.P.s (traf c directors) a medics. Navy LCI next to us has First Division men. Many rumors oating around as to place & time. Pool gotten to gether as to D-Day. (10 shillings) 5, June [1944]: Still waiting patiently although we know much already as to where we are to land, etc. At about 1700 we got underway. Skipper called us all into the crews quarters and had a long diagram or photograph of the beach on the mess table. All pill boxes, machine guns, mines, entanglements & other obstacles. Our beach is to be Red Dog, close to Easy Green. He said we could expect plenty of mines & that subs & E-Boats would be active. New weapons were expected and 1950 enemy planes were available for use against us. He wished us the best of luck and then Mr. Mead checked over all our names for correct serial numbers & beneciaries. 6, June (D-Day) [1944]: Coming on watch at 0400, we wore our full gear: impregnated suit, socks, gloves & shoes, life jackets, helmets, cartridge belts, with canteens of water and sheath knife. Gas masks, eye shields & vesicants. At 0715 we were called to General Quarters. While at gun I noticed hundreds of ships & crafts all about us. Spitres & P-48s were constantly ying back and forth over the area. We gradually left the main body of ships behind us as we proceed ed toward shore. A few LCVPs were returning and some LCTs were returning loaded evidently not getting a chance to beach. Smoke hovered over the beach and a number of ships could be seen to be burning furiously. Tracer shells began skipping out over the water towards us. ey exploded very close & shrapnel clattered against the ship. At 0745 we were called to man our beaching stations. I made a dash for the engine room hatch and could feel and hear shrapnel & machine gun bullets careening by. I took my place at the throttles beside Sorensen. Hass stood by the clutches. We crunched on the beach at 0747 amid loud explosions which made the ship shudder. We disembarked our troops and started out when the Skipper noticed we had fouled an LCVP with a line and started back in to assist them. At that moment 3 shells burst into the pilot house and exploded killing 3 of my shipmates and wounding two including an ocer. Couldnt do any more for the LCVP so we cut the line and started o the beach again after the pilot house was cleared and hand steering put into operation. We had been on the beach 50 minutes and were now hightailing it out minus the port ramp which had to be cut away. A Life photographer came aboard our ship from the beach and was soaking wet. He came into the Engine room to get dry. I was relieved and went top side to cool o and assist. e temp had been 120 in the E.R. and it made it twice as hot with all the clothes we had to wear on. Went topside on the boat deck just aft of the pilot house. e Pharm. Mates were working over a couple of shapeless hulks lying in wire baskets and covered with blankets. It was a horrible sight with blood & esh splattered over everything. DeNunzio had both legs blown o & part of his stomach, but was still living. I helped the doc give him plasma, but it was hopeless. He died 15 min. later. Buncik was decapitated and occupied only half a stretcher. Burton was still intact but was killed by the concussion. Anthony had shrapnel in the feet & legs and was in great pain. He was given morphine and him and Mr. Mead, who was shocked and had shrapnel In his back, were put aboard the C.G. Transport Chase. e bodies were later put aboard an LST and were later burled on the beach. Most of our lighting & power from the pilot house had been shot away and we went about for some time with great diculty. e [LCI(L)] 85 was near a transport with troops still aboard and was listing badly. She nally got her troops o before she sunk. We were called alongside a transport and took on Navy relief crews for LCMs. We had the ship pretty well cleaned up by now. We laid a couple miles o the beach and LCMs came alongside to change crews. e battleships Texas & Arkan sas and 3 cruisers including the Augusta and 14 destroyers inces santly shelled the beach. Many craft were careening crazily about, some burning, some with huge holes ripped in their sides. Of the 9 LCIs that beached on Red Dog 4 were still usable. Night time found Jerry over us. Bombs were dropped & some mines. 7, June [1944]: Laid around as mother ship for LCMs. Warships keep up shelling and beaches were quieting down. Armored equipment was being put ashore; now mostly on Rhinos. 8,9 & 10, June [1944]: An average of 5 raids a night. Much ak was sent up and planes were hit. Bombs & shrapnel fell. Went out 0200 hrs. to look for ammunition barges and numerous mines were known to be in the vicinity. First real raid wasnt until 0330. Dive bombers attacked and two bombs screamed and exploded near a petrol barge anchored only 50 yards o our port quarter. Raids continued until broad daylight or after 6. Shrapnel & 50 cal. slugs were picked up on deck. 12, June [1944]: Not many air alerts in early hours of morning. Our bombers continually ying back & forth. Exploding bombs & demolitions heard most of the time. Night of June 11th we were called to rescue of an LST which struck a mine just outside the transport area. By the time we arrived all survivors were picked up by other LCIs & 83 footers. In the afternoon of June 12th about six of us went ashore in a Higgins boat. e beach was a turmoil of activity and was strewn with twisted wreckage of landing craft and vehicles. e dust was very thick. We looked over the numerous pill boxes & gun emplacements which were made of thick concrete and dug Into the side of the hills which dominated the beaches. Pill boxes left intact were being used as command posts & comm centers. We walked to the top of the hill being careful not to fall in some bodys foxhole and turned to look out over the vast panorama of ships. Ships of all shapes, sizes and descriptions as far as the eye could see. We had a Coast Guard photographer with us taking colored movies and he was well pleased with the material at hand. On top of the hill poppies grew. Everywhere could be seen the pretty red owers and at once I recalled the poem we had always read In school on Memorial Day; In Flanders Field e Poppies Grow. German prisoners were digging graves for our many dead nearby and I thought of my three shipmates who were laid to rest there. Inside a large fenced in enclosure were many German prisoners. ey were sitting about on the ground in a semi circle as an army Sgt. read o their names. Most of them were Czechs, Poles, French & Russians and most were either real young or old. Another enclosure contained ocers and as I watched they frisked 8 new ones being brought in. A truck came up with 6 French civilian snipers under heavy guard. We walked on down a small dusty road and into the nearby village of Les Moulins. Only a few houses and a church which had been hit by shells and mortars. We walked into the church yard where an old bent over French was replacing the disturbed tombs and monuments. We talked to the caretaker until the smell of embalming uid got too much for us. We stopped at a small cafe where an old man with his arm in a sling and a young boy were clearing up the debris. We caught a ride In a jeep, but were stopped by an M.P. who said that Naval personnel were restricted from going beyond the beach and that our blue helmets & clothing were a perfect target for snipers who were still active in the area. We took the long road back to the beach and were cons tantly warned of land mines. Once again on the beach we made our way to where our sister ships the 91, 92 & 93 lay broken, twisted & charred by re. Seeing them made us realize even more how lucky we were. Tanks, trucks & equipment were constantly coming ashore and bulldozers were grinding here and there assisting wherever needed. Our time was nearly up so we started back to where we were supposed to meet our boat. Our boat was late and we had to wade some distance into the surf to reach It. ere was only two air raids that night, but a person is so tense expecting raids any minute, that sleep is almost out of the question. End; 26, July [1944]: Went ashore in evening with Qullien, Cuss and Davis. Rode LCVP and transferred to a duck. Hit Dog Red Beach. Walked up road toward St. Laurent. Visit grave yard. Saw Buncik, DeNunzio and Burtons graves. Nos. A-4-71, A-9-174, 6-1-12. Its xed up nice and the little white crosses are lined up neatly In 2 directions. A ag pole, a mast from some ship is in the center and owers are planted around It. (some Colonel paid the French $5 to bring the owers.) Many more graves being dug. e graveyard is about a mile from the beach and overlooks a pleasant green valley.Coast Guardsmans diary account of D-Day

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, June 6, 2013