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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-30-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00303

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00303


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LDO/CWOs pledge support to those who put forth eortWith more than 36 years of naval service, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Ret Facility Commanding Ocer, Capt. Larry Hill, is the areas most senior Limited Duty O cer, or more commonly known as Mustang. He takes nding his relief as seriously as he takes the meticu lous and timely repair of subma rines. Hill, along with more than 30 other Kings Bay Limited Duty and Chief Warrant Ocers representing TRF; Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay adminis tration; Submarine Group Ten; the Marine Corps Security Force Battal ion; Naval Submarine Support Center; Submarine Squadron Twenty and the Nuclear Region al Maintenance Department, Kings Bay Detachment wel comed more than 70 potential new additions to their respective wardrooms at the FY15 Kings Bay Annual Mustang Roundup LDO and CWO Recruiting Kicko at the Kings Bay Auditorium Tuesday, May 7. Male and female, NUC/Se curity, Chief/ird Class the diverse group of eager future LDO/CWO applicants all have at least one thing in common a continued desire to excel in the Navy as recognized experts in their respective elds. Battle-tested, board-approved is what these FY15 applicants are striving to achieve. All of the current LDO/CWOs in attendance at the brief pledged their full support for any Sailor will ing to put forth the eort. Lt. Cmdr. Dave Quinton, NSSC weapons officer, provided this guidance to the group. You are all proven performers and that commitment to your career is part of why you are here today, Quinton said. Your suc cess in this process is important to all of us in the Wardroom. We will answer your questions hon estly. We will give you construc Up Periscope Its Candy, Dairy Months ... make your choices Page 9 35th year Kings Bays celebration, Memorial Day ceremony Pages 4, 5 Summer fun Pools Dive-In Movie returns June 15 Page 8 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com NSB Kings Bay celebrates 35th anniversaryLimited Duty Ocers, Warrants welcome applicants USS Georgia navigates Souda Bay Your success in this process is important to all of us in the Wardroom. Lt. Cmdr. Dave Quinton Naval Submarine Support Center Kings Bay Prepare focus of meetingTown Hall session addresses disaster reaction, responseFleet and Family Support Cen ter hosted an Emergency Pre paredness Town Hall Meeting May 22 and the evening of May 23 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium. Representatives from around base spoke at the event provid ing information on how to help better prepare for potential evacuation orders, natural di sasters and other unforeseen cir cumstances. We know that servicemem bers hear this kind of informa tion all of the time, and sometimes it can seem redundant, said Debbie Lucas, director of the FFSC Kings Bay. But tak ing the time to prepare now will drastically improve your chanc es of not forgetting something and ensuring you bring the right items with you should an evacuation order come. Weve had evacuation or ders in the past, said Bud Lett, NSB security ocer and longMemorial Day Remembrance, Party in e Park highlightsOnce an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal for national emergencies, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is now home to the most powerful and strategic vessels ever produced for the U.S. Navy. e month of May marks the 35th an niversary of NSB Kings Bay. e celebra tion was highlighted by a Memorial Day Remembrance and 35th Anniversary cere mony May 23rd at the Submarine Veterans of World War II Pavilion, outside Trident Training Facility. I am proud to say that nowhere in the Navy is there a community that is more supportive of its base and of the Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who serve there, as well as their families, said Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., commanding o cer of NSB Kings Bay. Vice Adm. Al Konetzni (Ret.), for mer commodore, Submarine Squadron 16, and Rear Adm. John Jack Scorby, Command er, Navy Region Southeast were the guest speakers at the event. Our community takes pride in our his tory, said Konetzni. ere is no commu nity in the United States of America that has come together like this one. I want to thank this base and all of the service mem bers for what they do for the USA. e ceremo ny included a wreath laying in observance of Memorial Day, a 21 Gun Salute, and the singing of An chors Aweigh by the Camden County High School choir. is community does an absolutely tre ... nowhere in the Navy is there a community more supportive of its base ... Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Commanding officer, NSB Kings Bay

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 It is an unfortunate fact of the modern housing world that homes across the country are going into foreclosure every day. Many of those homes are rental properties, and in many cases the tenant is the last one to know about it. If you rent your home and have come home to a Notice of Sale on your front door, or if youve started receiving court documents in the mail about your home going into foreclosure, this article is for you. Luckily, there are steps you can take to make sure youre protected against your landlords foreclosure, and resources available to assist you and your family. How can I prevent this situation? ere are simple steps you can take to make sure the home youre about to rent is not going into fore closure. Having this information upfront is one of the things youll want to consider, along with location, price and whether theres plenty of running space for your pet hedge hog, when you determine which house to rent. e rst and easiest is to ask your landlord whether his home is in foreclosure. Its a simple step to take, but there is no guarantee that your landlord will be honest with you. Many homeowners will avoid giv ing out that information to their ten ants for fear that they (a) wont sign a lease or (b) will stop paying rent on a lease they already have. Still, it doesnt cost anything to ask, and its an easy early warning system for upcoming foreclosure is sues. If your landlord refuses to answer, or if you are still suspicious, you can always check your local newspapers. Foreclosure sales will be listed daily. e downside is that you have to check every listing regularly, and it will only list homes that are just about to be put up for sale. It still wont give you any notice that your landlord might be headed for trou ble down the road. e best way to nd out if fore closure proceedings have been led against your landlord is to call your local Clerk of Court. Foreclosure proceedings are public record, and you will be able to get all the infor mation you need from your local courthouse. Dierent states have dierent procedures for getting ac cess to those les, so make sure you give the courthouse a call. Too late, Ive already gotten the notice! If you start getting notications of a pending foreclosure in the mail or on your door, you will have to decide whether you want to terminate your lease early or stick around to the end. Many families want to avoid moving in the middle of a tour, but having a bank as a landlord can be a huge hassle. e bank probably wont care that your plumbing is broken or there are roaches in the home. ey may not x the heating, and they probably wont return your calls about the water heater. Many families decide that its bet ter to just nd a new place to live. Fortunately, the decision is yours to make. Ive decided I want to stay Until recently, a foreclosure nearly always meant that the tenants were about to be evicted. at all changed in 2009, when THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cultural, Diversity Fair June 7Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Cultural and Diversity Fair will be 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 7 at the tennis courts at the Fitness Complex. Navy Band Southeast Pride will play music. Cultural stage shows begin at noon. Taste e Nations Food Sampling opens at noon and is free while supplies last. Other at tractions include community awareness and Navy College booths, a grill and barbecue by the Kings Bay First Class and CPO Associa tion, plus appearences by the Bualo Soldiers, Deep Forst Native American Indians and St. Marys Submarine Museum. For participation or acess to this event, call (912) 573-3456.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will con duct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civil ians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more informa tion or to enroll your teen.Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 17. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program in formation, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who pur chase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, dia monds and the most popular brands of watch es that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits includ ing 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! Protecting yourself in foreclosure Legal Assistance How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatali ties associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and conse quences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous condi tions unless personnel conscien tiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be re ported, no matter how small, to pre vent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the En terprise Safety Applications Man agement System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in report ing a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety of ce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety Sailors looking to enhance their career by working outside their rate should consider becoming an Equal Opportunity Advisor, Navy leaders said May 22. Equal opportunity advisors play a vital role in the Navys ability to maintain operational readiness and accomplish its mission, said Senior Chief Sonar Technician Mark Vandervort, EOA detailer, Navy Per sonnel Command. According to MILPERSMAN 1306917, EOAs can stimulate a free-ow of communication at all levels within a chain of command, making them an invaluable asset to the Navy. Vandervort says EOAs are com mand climate experts who strength en a chain of command by keeping leadership aware of any equal op portunity related issues as well as procedures and practices that may aect the mission, readiness, wel fare and morale of Sailors. ose commands that can capi talize on their Sailors skill sets are those that perform the best, said Vandervort. As the command cli mate expert, it is the EOAs responsibility to assess the command cli mate and determine not only what is working right within a command, but also identify potential barri ers that may prohibit Sailors from achieving their full potential. Sailors in pay grades E-6 to E-9 may be eligible to apply for EOA duty after being interviewed by an EOA. To become an EOA, Sailors must earn the 9515 Equal Oppor tunity Advisor Navy Enlisted Clas sication by attending the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. e EOA course is intense but rewarding, Vandervort said. e training not only provides students with the tools required to be an EOA, but also provides them with a variety of tools that will allow them to grow as leaders. e 12-week EOA course provides training in gender communications and cultural awareness, socialization, conict management, complaints processing, interpersonal communications and many other topics. EOAs ensure Sailors are being treated fairly and with the dignity and respect with which all Sailors should expect to be treated. When utilized correctly, the EOA can be an integral member of the commands leadership team, said Vandervort. EOAs are assigned to major shore commands, nuclear aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships and train ing commands. A complete listing of eligibility requirements can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-917. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for EOA duty should request release to Special Programs by submitting a complet ed NAVPERS 1306/7 to their rating detailer prior to entering their nor mal detailing window. e required obligated service for an EOA tour is 36 months, and members selected are required to complete two full consecutive EOA tours, one sea and one shore. Special Program detailers assign Sailors to more than 20 special pro grams Navy-wide, including service on the USS Constitution or the USS Arizona Memorial, and assignment to the Blue Angels or the Navy Cer emonial Guard. MILPERSMAN 1306-900 contains a complete list of special programs available.Equal Opportunity advisors sought Personnel Command

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mendous job of support ing our military men and women and their families, not just on patriotic holidays or times of crisis, but every day of the year, Scorby said. at support is so vital that we couldnt do our job without you. Morale, Welfare and Recreation started the anniversary by hosting a Armed Forces Challenges Tournament and Armed Forces Kids Run, among other activities for service members and their fami lies to participate in. Crowds of people showed up for the Party in the Park May 22, where they enjoyed food booths, displays, activity tables and a fun zone for children. You notice we have the Marines, Navy and Coast Guard here all to gether celebrating the bases birthday and the community that we have, said Beth Morrison, the Liberty Program manager for Kings Bay MWR. ere are not many bases that have the variety that we do, and I think we are lucky to have it. is birth day bash lets us give back to the community. e highlight of the event was a live music performed by the up-and-coming country band, Scarletta Seeing everybody out there while we performed with smiles on their faces and having a good time was all that mattered, said Aubrey Collins, lead singer of the Scarletta We sup port the military as much as we can, and we wanted to give back to them as much as they give to us. at is what we aim for. e rst group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was com pleted in July. Construc tion of NSB Kings Bay was the largest peacetime construction program ever undertaken by the U.S. Navy. time Kings Bay resident. We understand that people simply dont want to leave. ey want to see if the storms course will change. Its hard for them to just drop everything and go. Its understand able. However, you have to think about the comfort and safety of you and your family. e most common rea son for an evacuation or der in this area is of course for hurricanes. e advantage to these storms is that they are easy to track and you can plan for its arrival in most cases. For those who are pre pared to go and leave early when the evacuation no tice is voluntary, the worst case is that they had an unplanned vacation for a few days. For those who wait until the last minute, and weve seen this hap pen every time, theyre stuck on the highway for hours with everyone else heading toward Folkston, said Bud. Among the noted emer gency preparation tips highlighted were: To know the local emergency warning sys tem, evacuation routes and the closest shelters. Have a family emer gency plan in writing and discuss it with children. e plan should include meeting places, an out of town contact and emer gency services contact information. Have a pre-assembled kit in the event of an evac uation order. Generally, when an evacuation order is given, the family will have 10 minutes to pack and leave. e kit should include important per sonal documents, medi cine and rst aid, and papers, clothes, water and food for three days For more information on how to prepare your family in the event of an emergency, visit www. ready.navy.mil, www. ready.gov, www.fema.gov and www.redcross.org. tive feedback. What we wont do, however, is write your package for you. His direction was con cise and echoed by the other ocers in attendance. For those who were un able to make the roundup due to operational commitments, but are still interested in working with an established LDO/ CWO on a FY15 application package, dont despair. Contact Lt. j.g. Doug Head, TRFs FY15 LDO/ CWO program coordinator, at (912) 573-9877 or by e-mail at douglas.head@ navy.mil. Mustang Prepare Congress passed the Protecting Tenants at Foreclo sure Act. If you dont have a lease, the new hom eowner is required to give you 90 days notice before you have to move out. If you do have a lease, the PTFA requires the new homeowner to stick to the terms of that lease, un less the new owner wants to move into the home as their primary residence. Even then, though, the new owner is required to give you 90 days notice before you are required to leave. In order to get the bene t of the PTFA, you should le a Notice of Tenancy in the court thats hearing the foreclosure case. is lets the judge know that there is someone living in the property. If you are wondering whether to pay rent to the bank or to your old land lord, you can also le a Motion to Deposit Rent into the Court Registry, which will let you pay rent to the court, who will then gure out where it goes. For assistance in drafting either one of these docu ments, you should make an appointment with your local Legal Assistance of ce. Ive decided I want to move e Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure act does not automatically give you the right to terminate your lease if the property is foreclosed. e good news is that most banks dont want to act as landlords. Some will even oer Cash for Keys programs that will pay you money in exchange for you moving out. e best way to get out of your lease if the home is being foreclosed is to talk to your landlord and the bank. If you do decide to move, the Navy is here to help. In 2008, the Department of the Navy began authoriz ing funded local moves for military members who are breaking their leases as a result of their landlords foreclosure. You will need to bring a copy of the No tice of Foreclosure and a Notice of Lease Termina tion to either your commands Sta Judge Advo cate or your local Legal Assistance oce. ey will be able to help you get the authorization you need. ats it! Being a tenant in a home thats being foreclosed can be a stressful and confus ing situation. If you nd yourself over your head, always feel free to make an appointment with your lo cal Legal Assistance oce.Legal35th THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Memorial Day Remembrance and 35th Anniversary Celebration May 22, 23, 2013, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5 Party in the Park Navy photos by MCCS Tony Casullo, MC2 Cory Rose and MC3 Ashley Hedrick

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 3, 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered June 5 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., June 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recom mends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 11. Registration is highly recommended, as class is lim ited to 20 seats. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 4, 11, 18 and 25. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. skills taught in classUnmanaged conflict has caused many hardships in the workplace and at home. It can cause people to suffer, missions to fail and families to separate. Conflict is inevitable. This work shop helps people manage conflict by examining their attitudes and behaviors when faced with conflicting situations, practic ing skills that prevent conflict from escalating and working with others to solve problems, allowing people to grow, mis sions to succeed and families to strengthen. This class is 10 to 11 a.m., June 5. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, June 12. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Couples Money Management workshop upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 3 to 7. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. program June 13The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provi sions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will pro vide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommend ed. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Career Assessment Workshop upcoming Did you know that the Department of Labor recognizes nearly 500 jobs which make up Americas current workforce? With so many options, it is no wonder people struggle to find satisfying work. Whether you are selecting a college major or training program, looking for your first job, or transition ing out of the military, career assessment tools can help you identify activities and settings that best match your inter ests, skills, and values. Career Assessment Workshop facilita tors guide participants through simple activities to sort and rank preferences, using card decks and workbooks, and use the results to provide career recom mendations which fit your pro file. Workshop size is limited. This workshop is 9:30 to 11:30 a.m June 5. Call 573-4513 to reg ister if you plan to attend.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Pirates Cove Galley menus

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Navy College information Menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, June 8. Trident Lakes is presenting another great time for you and your child! Registra tion begins at 11 a.m. with lunch at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of par ent and child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and fun. For the younger crowd, a 9 -hole course is laid out with cost of $20. Open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per per son, catch and release or $7 per person, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guard ian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mon day thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holi days. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp are June 10 to 14 and July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 573-8475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp ages 5 to 14 is June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Camp ers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. Mike Johnsons T-N-T Soccer Training Camp is June 3 to 7 for ages 13 to 17 and June 10 to 14 for ages 5 to 12, at Youth Sports Soc cer Complex. Cost is $85 for 5 to 6 age group mini camp and $109 for 7 to 17 age group CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Mr. Poppers Penguins May 30 and The Odd Life of Timothy Green May 31, Ramona & Beezus June 1 and 2, Judy Moody & the Not So Bummer Summer June 8 and 9, Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kinder garten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are avail able on a first-come, firstserve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/dual mili tary parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No out side food is authorized. Cost is based on total fam ily income. For more infor mation call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just about kids Liberty call Parent, child golf outing June 8 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Its National Candy Month and National Daily Month in June. My personal favorites are Reeses Peanut Butter Eggs for candy and ice cream for dairy. Chocolate and peanut butter really mix well. The prob lem with Reeses Peanut Butter Eggs is you only can find them at Easter time. So that just makes Easter so much better. Ice cream comes in many different flavors, and can be enjoyed by any age. Heres what some others had to say around Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.MA3 Joseph Robinson Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Houston No dairy because I will be on the toilet. Skittles for candy because they are easy to do trick shots off movie theater seats. MA2 Christina Gomez Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Baxley, Ga. Cheese, you can put it on anything. Ferrero Rocher, because I like how milk chocolatey the middle is. MA3 Cameron Murray Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Boston I have a love-hate with ice cream. Reeses Peanut Butter Cups, because I love them. John Herrin Retired Air Force Brunswick, Ga. Whip Cream, because it can go good with anything. Hershey bar, because they have the best chocolate. STSSA Robert Waldron NSB Building Managers Putnam, Conn. Ice cream, because it can cool you off on a hot day and prepare your body for a cold day. Bottle Caps, because candy that tastes like soda makes me feel like a kid. YN2 Curtis Nevils NSB Administration Beaumont, Texas There is nothing like nice cold ice cream on a hot day. Peanut M&Ms, because they are better than the regular ones. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose e USS Bown Submarine Museum awarded the parks annual scholarships to eight recipients in the Pearl Harbor submarine community with Sailors, family and friends in attendance, May 18. e ceremony was in honor of the 3,505 Sailors and 52 submarines lost in World War II and awarded by the Pacic Fleet Submarine Memorial Association in con junction with the Pearl Harbor Submarine Ocers Spouses Association. We are trying to help submariners and their families go back to school, said Jer ry Hofwolt, Executive Director of the USS Bown Submarine Museum and Park and retired Navy Captain. Hofwolt believes a function of the Bown Submarine Museum and Park is to help the community and these schol arships are crucial in furthering the edu cation of their recipients. e 28 year scholarship program is open to active duty submariners assigned to the Pearl Harbor area and to their fam ily members, whether active duty, retired or deceased. e program raised enough money to keep the scholarships going for some time. e program has given $25,000 to $30,000 a year. Since its inception, over $617,000 has been awarded to the sub marine ohana members or family to help fund their educational expenses. For scholarship eligibility, applicants should reside in Hawaii and attend an ac credited college, university or vocational school and have a good academic record. Potential recipients will be interviewed by a scholarship selection committee. In addition to the scholarships, the Bown Museum has an educational outreach program that oers history and the science of submarines presentations to schools.Museum helps students Navy Region Southeast participated in the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 May 23. e U.S. Fleet Forces Command/Commander, Navy Installations Command exercise tested the regions ability to track, prepare for and respond to hurricanes should they threaten southeastern fa cilities. In the Southeast Re gion, its not a matter of if a hurricane will strike, its a matter of when and where, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., com mander, Navy Region Southeast. Since last years HURREX, we have had ve named storms impact our region, so it is imperative that we train so we are ready when they strike. Each year, this exer cise gives us an excellent opportunity to test our skills through authentic, challenging scenarios that go a long way to ensure we are ready in the event of an actual hurricane. Over recent years, num berous major storms have aected regional installa tions. Joint Reserve Base New Orleans remembers the damage caused by Ka trina in 2005. Less than a year ago, Hurricane Sandy made landfall just west of Naval Station Guanta namo Bay before moving toward the northeast. During this years HUR REX scenario, the NRSE Crisis Action Team tracked two ctitious hurricanes, Kirk and Lay, from the Re gional Operations Center at Naval Air Station Jack sonville. Kirk crossed over NS Guantanamo Bay and eventually made landfall as a category two hur ricane near the GeorgiaSouth Carolina border, and Lay made landfall as a category four hurricane near NAS Pensacola. e CAT consists of nearly 50 personnel, each with specic roles rang ing from planning and logistics to family support services. In addition to the CAT, the region also de ploys a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT)/Damage Assess ment Team, led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command, which assess es damage after the storm, as well as an Emergency Family Assistance Center, which provides support to families. roughout HURREX, the teams coor dinated their eorts with local authorities and ci vilian agencies like they would in the event of a real hurricane. HURREX is essential training, said Scott Cross ley, NRSE regional emer gency manager. We get lots of tropical storms, but as often as we get landfall, we still see far too many casualties from people forgetting some of the les sons weve learned in the past. Weve learned that too many injuries occur, even with lesser storms, after the storm has passed because people are trying to drive through ooded roads or trying to repair storm damage. By doing these exercises, it helps reinforce the message that Region has hurricane drill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

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e Battle of Midway, fought near the Central Pa cic island of Midway, is considered the decisive bat tle of the war in the Pacic. Before this battle the Japanese were on the of fensive, capturing territory throughout Asia and the Pacic. By their attack, the Japanese had planned to capture Midway to use as an advance base, as well as to entrap and de stroy the U.S. Pacic Fleet. Because of communica tion intelligence successes, the U.S. Pacic Fleet sur prised the Japanese forces, sinking the four Japanese carriers, that had attacked Pearl Harbor only six months before, while only losing of one carrier. After Midway, the Americans and their Allies took the of fensive in the Pacic. On May 7 and 8, 1942, the rst carrier battle of the war took place in the Coral Sea. Each side had a carrier damaged, while the American lost the car rier USS Lexington and the Japanese lost the light carrier Shoho. Earlier on March 4, the designator AF began appearing in partially decoded Japanese messages. On March 13, American cryptanalysts both broke the Japanese Navys Gen eral-Purpose Code (JN 25) and identied AF as Midway Island. On April 16, Com mander in Chief, Combined Fleet, Adm. Isoruku Yamamoto, convinced the Imperial General Sta to agree to his Midway and Aleutians strategy for the summer. In Yamamotos view, the capture of Midway would allow Japan to pursue its Asian policies behind an impregnable eastern shield of defens es in the Central Pacic. When the U.S. Pacic Fleet responded to the landings on Midway, Japanese car rier and battleship task forces, waiting unseen to the west of the Midway strike Force, would fall upon and destroy the unsuspecting Americans. If successful, the plan would eectively elimi nate the U.S. Pacic Fleet for at least a year and pro vide a forward outpost from which ample warn ing of any future threat by the U.S. would come. Two days later, Lt. Colonel James Doolit tle and a small number of American air men from the Army Air Corps took o from USS Hornet in land-based bombers to attack the Japanese home islands. As a result of this at tack, which caused the Japanese to want to extend their rst line of defense as far east as possible, the Japanese advanced the date of their planned at tack on Midway. On May 5, Imperial General Head quarters issued Navy Order No. 18 directing Yamamoto to carry out the occupation of Midway Is land in cooperation with the Army. On May 19, the Ocer in Charge of Communications Intelligence processing at Pearl Harbor, Cmdr. Joseph J. Rochefort, and the intelligence ocer for the Pacic Fleet, Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton, identied Midway as the Japanese objective. ree days later, follow ing a radio deception operation, Melbourne com pletely conrmed that AF meant Midway. Ro chefort and Layton then discovered the date cipher used in Japanese message trac. is meant analysts could determine exactly when the attack would take place. After examin ing previously intercepted messages, they predict ed an attack on Midway on June 4. Adm. Chester Nimitz used this estimate to plan American counter measures. Task Force 16 under Rear Adm. Raymond Spruance, formed around Enterprise and Hornet, departed Pearl Harbor on May 28 to take up a posi tion northeast of Midway. Two days later, TF 17 under the command of Rear Adm. Frank Fletcher, formed around the quick ly repaired Yorktown, and sailed from Pearl to join TF 16 northeast of Midway. When TF 17 and TF 16 joined about 350 miles northeast of Midway June 2, the three American carriers, augmented by cruiser-launched oat planes, provided 234 air craft aoat, supported by 110 ghters, bombers, and patrol planes at Midway. On 3 June, American land-based aircraft from Midway located and at tacked Japanese trans ports about 600 miles west of Midway Island. Just after midnight on June 4, Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese main body, also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spot ted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, report ing Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles! At roughly 6:30 a.m., Aichi D3A Val carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N Kate torpedo planes, supported by numerous ghters Zekes, bombed Midway. Over the next two hours, Japanese Zekes on Com bat Air Patrol and antiair craft re from the Japa nese eet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD Dauntless and Vought SB2U Vindicator scout bombers from VMSB241, Navy Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 Marauder bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force Flying Fortresses likewise bombed the Japanese car rier force without success. Between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., Douglas TBD Dev astator torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japa nese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japa nese ghters and antiair craft re, they drew o en emy ghters, leaving the skies open for dive bomb ers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 Daunt lesses from Enterprise bombed and fatally dam aged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 Daunt lesses from Yorktown bombed and wrecked car rier Soryu. At 11 a.m., the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched Val dive bombers that tem porarily disabled Yorktown around noon. ree and a half hours later, Hiryus Kate torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yor ktowns abandonment. In return, Dauntlesses from Enterprise mor tally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 5 p.m.. e destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet be gan to retire westward. e next day, TF 16 un der command of Spruance pursued the Japanese eet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, dam aged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early that day. e last air attacks of the battle took place June 6 when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and dam aged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. Also June 6, Japanese submarine I-168 inter rupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suering from numerous torpedo hits, nally rolled over and sank at dawn June 7. anks to American in telligence, judicious air craft carrier tactics and more than a little luck, the Navy inicted a smashing defeat on the Japanese. Although the perfor mance of the three American carrier air groups would later be considered uneven, their pilots and crew had won the day through cour age, determination, and he roic sacrice. e Japanese lost the four large carriers that had attacked Pearl Harbor, while the Americans only lost one carrier. More importantly, the Japanese lost over one hundred trained pilots, who could not be re placed. In a larger strate gic sense, the Japanese of fensive in the Pacic was derailed and their plans to advance on New Caledonia, Fiji, and Samoa post poned. e balance of sea power in the Pacic shift ed from the Japan to an equity between America and Japan. Soon after the Battle of Midway the U.S. and its al lies would take the oen sive in the Pacic. Battle of Midway turned tide in Pacic War this is a real hazard. During an actual storm, NRSE personnel coordinate with Fleet Weather Center Norfolk to track potential hurricanes and tropical storms from the beginning stages of the weather system. We are blessed to have a very good working relationship with the Fleet Weather Center, Crossley said. We watch tropical weather year round, but as we approach the hurricane season, we re ally start watching closely. e public will start seeing hurricane alerts and warnings from the National Hurricane Center once a tropical storm is established, but for us, we have to see it as soon as it happens so we can get moving. A storm can pop up with little notice. Once a tropical storm is identied, its course and intensity are monitored. As it approaches an instal lation, the CAT decides what actions to take based on a variety of factors. e Navy classies storms in terms of Condi tions of Readiness, which indicate the proximity of a storm and the likelihood that it will hit a given instal lation. At the beginning of the hurricane season, each installation is set to COR ve. As storms approach, that condition changes at installatiosn based on when destructive winds are projected. Installations set COR four when onset of destructive force winds is within 72 hours, COR three at 48 hours, COR two at 24 hours and COR one at 12 hours.Drill 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Nearly 250 members of the Oklahoma National Guard are assisting with victim search and security last week in Moore, Okla., where a monster tornado left at least 51 dead, in cluding 20 children, au thorities said. e twister hit May 20 about 3:15 p.m. CDT, when children were still in two elementary schools in the Oklahoma City suburb. e tornado, pack ing winds of up to 200 mph, tore o the roof of Plaza Towers Elementary School and pulverized walls. Volunteers joined rst responders to help in rescuing children and sta from the devastation, the Associated Press reported. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin activated the air men and soldiers that same day. Among those responding was the 146th Air Sup port Operations Squadron from nearby Will Rogers Air National Guard Base in Oklahoma City. In a video interview, Air Force 2nd Lt. Gabriel Bird said the unit members carried thermal imaging gear to help locate those buried in rubble. Hopefully, well nd survivors, Bird said. Members also car ried basic medical supplies and multiband radios to communicate with ground and aircraft crews, Bird said. Were a pretty new unit, so we havent supported any state emer gencies, Bird said. But he noted that many squad ron members are veterans who have supported other disaster-recovery operations when assigned to other units. Killer tornado devastates Nat Guard, DoD lent support in Boston, tooDepartment of Defense ocials were in constant contact with state and federal agen cies during the Boston marathon bombing. ree died in the at tack, and more than 170 were wounded. Many service members had traveled to Boston to run in the iconic marathon State and federal law enforcement agencies provided quick response to the explosions that detonated near the Bos ton Marathon nish line. Some 460 members of the Massachusetts Na tional Guard were called up to help with the mara thon and ended up providing life-saving aid to those aected. Eventually more than 1,000 Massachusetts Guardsmen were called up for the state mission. Massachusetts ocials asked for and re ceived the services of a Navy explosive ordnance disposal team. Guards men remained on duty, helping until the crime scene was secured. Marines get new robot Marines from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacic trained to operate a rapid area sensitive-site recon naissance robot, the only robot of its kind in the Department of Defense, during an advanced technology demonstration program at the 3rd Marine Regiment headquarters at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, May 8. Representatives from the ATD program showed Marines that the RASR robot system consists of several integrated technologies. By providing this system to the Marines, they had the opportunity to receive additional operator input on the utility of the system. One of the newest pieces of technology the robot uses is called an Avalon. Located on the moving arm of the robot, the Avalon is a palm-sized sensor that can detect chemical or biological threats in an area. Users can observe where the RASR is going by look ing at a monitor connect ed to cameras mounted to the robots base and RASRs arm, where the Avalon is located. e RASR surveyed the test area and created a visual for the user to see everything in the test area. When the Marine decided the RASR needed to go back to the starting point, the robot automatically maneuvered itself using the map it created when it rst entered the test area. e robot returned back, without users manu ally controlling it. e RASR is a great piece of gear and will keep Marines safe from unnec essary danger, said Sgt. Byron Solano, the chemi cal, biological, radiologi cal and nuclear chief for Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment and a native of Reno, Nev. Its one of the most user friendly robots I have used in the Marine Corps.. During the training, Ma rines put the Avalon sys tem to the test. e Avalon shot a la ser chemical detector, a chemical vapor detector, a radiological detector, and a laser range nder for mapping of hazards with in areas of interest. e RASR is most advanced technology I have seen over the course of my career, said Gunnery Sgt. Eric Schleher, the chemi cal, biological, radiologi cal and nuclear chief for 3rd Marine Regiment and a native of Dunnellon, Fla. Glass test tubes were positioned on a table down the hall from where the operator controlled the RASR. He directed the RASR down the hall while moni toring all of its sensors to eectively lead the machine to the test tubes. Marines found them inside the room using the cameras on the RASR. ey correctly positioned the Avalon to begin ana lyzing what was inside the test tubes. Marines aimed the ro bots sensors onto the sub stance to be tested, like they were aiming ries. e Avalon shot a laser where Marines aimed on the test tube, and it told the user what kind of sub stance was inside. Opera tors also targeted a bottle of soap for analysis. e program identied the brand of soap, where it was made, who made it and which chemicals were inside. e RASR has the ability to identify the same information from the soap as many dierent substances found on the battleeld. Representatives said the robot takes on the risks human detection crews face in combat. Instead of sending a Marine into an area with potentially deadly radiation or biohazards, the RASR can inspect the area and sub stances to mark if the coast is clear or to stay away. e RASR robot may not wear the uniform, but for Marines in combat, the robot is just as much part of them. Japanese sailors lay wreath at USS Arizona memorial Japan Maritime SelfDefense Force ships, land ing ship tank JS Shimokita (LST 4002); destroyer JS Atago (DDG 177) and heli copter destroyer JS Hyuga (DDH 181) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, May 20 following a ve-day port visit. During the visit JMSDF sailors conducted wreathlaying ceremonies at the USS Arizona Memorial, National Cemetery of the Pacic, Makiki Cemetery and Ehime-Maru Memorial, and oered ship tours, while senior leaders conducted oce calls with local military coun terparts. ese opportunities to renew relationships with our JMSDF counterparts are always valuable and rewarding, said Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander of U.S. Pacic Fleet. e stop of the ships here and our frequent operations together are reective of the strong relationship be tween the U.S. Navy and JMSDF that is such an important underpinning of the U.S.-Japan alliance. Rear Adm. Hideki Yuasa, commander of Escort Flotilla 2, hosted a recep tion aboard Hyuga where the many high-ranking guests, in addition to Haney, included Adm. Samuel Locklear, commander of U.S. Pacic Command; Consul Gen eral Toyoei Shigeeda, and other senior U.S. and Japa nese commanders. Yuasa noted that the partnership between Japan and the U.S. is benecial to maintaining stability throughout the region. e Japanese, U.S. alli ance is vital to secure Ja pans peace and security, said Yuasa. Our alliance is also important for us to participate in multilateral security operations to ef fectively respond to global security challenges. All three JMSDF ships are en route to San Diego to participate in multilat eral exercise Dawn Blitz. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Look for big changes in special operations forces as they shape for whats ahead after a dozen years of intensive, high-oper ational-tempo missions focused predominantly on Afghanistan and Iraq. Commanders of the special operations com ponents laid out their plans for the future to members of the special operations community and the defense industry last week during the 2013 Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in Tampa, Fla. e Navy SEALs will undergo an amphibious evolution in reverse, re turning to their maritime roots, Navy Rear Adm. Sean A. Pybus, commander of Naval Special War fare Command, told the assembly. Army Special Forces will concentrate on rebuilding their regional expertise and relationships in parts of the world, Army Lt. Gen. Charles T. Cleveland, commander of U.S. Army Special Operations Com mand, reported. Air Force Special Operations Command will strive to to rebalance its port folio to provide broader support to geographic and theater special operations commanders, said Air Force Lt. Gen. Eric E. Fiel, the AFSOC commander. And Marine Corps Spe cial Forces Command, the newest of special op erations components, will work to institute a cultural shift that maximizes the myriad technologies de veloped during the past decade-plus of conict, Marine Corps Col. Mike Sweeney, the deputy MARSOC commander, told the group. Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, U.S. Special Operations Command commander, opened the conference telling partici pants to think of a future that extends beyond the high-prole missions her alded in bestsellers and across the big screen. The fact of the matter is that [counterterrorism] piece that we do better than anybody in the world is a small part of our portfolio, he said. e broader part of our portfo lio is about how we build partner capacity [and] how we link with our al lies and partners overseas so that we can help them take care of their problems so that we dont end up having to do [counterter rorism]. U.S. special operators will continue to take care of the bad guys and rescue the good guys better than anybody in the world, McRaven emphasized. But by helping partner nations build their own capacity, he said, they can take care of their own security problems [and] do the things that we now dont have to put U.S. forc es against. at is the value of U.S. special operations forces as we go forth in the fu ture, he added. at concept, encapsu lated in McRavens Spe cial Operations Forces 2020 vision, requires transition across the special operations service components. ose changes are well underway in the SEALs, which Pybus said are ex pected to reduce the number of theater platoons in Afghanistan by at least half by the years end. Our SEALs have been ghting two land wars for the last decade, and there is plenty of work back in the maritime environment, he said. at is playing out before our eyes. e drawdown in Af ghanistan will free up forces to better support the U.S. strategic pivot to ward Asia or demands in other parts of the world, he said, citing examples of the Mediterranean Sea, the Gulf of Guinea or the Persian Gulf. ere are plenty of things to do in support of our theater [special operations com manders] and all their re quirements, he said. e timing is right for most of the SEALs return to the water, Pybus said, noting that by the end of the decade, 90 percent of the worlds population will live in megacities on or near the coast. So it is the right time for one of the two maritime components of U.S. Socom to make sure that we are cov ering down on our obliga tion as a maritime special operations force. For the Green Berets, Cleveland emphasized the importance of shoring up gaps in regional exper tise due to the commands heavy focus on combat operations in the Middle East. We have these re gionally expert forces, but we surged to Iraq and Af ghanistan, and by neces sity, we sacriced over the past 12 years a knowledge and expertise that we need of the rest of the world, he said. ats not to say we dont have it, Cleveland added. But we dont have it in the density that we need. And that is the gap we are going to work to x. Meanwhile, Army Special Operations Command, like its sister special operations component commands, is striving to preserve strides made in Iraq and Afghanistan. We cannot lose what we have developed over the last 12 years, Cleveland said. I think we are taking steps to not do that. Sustained combat operations served as a forc ing function for special operators to work in syn chronization with not only conventional forces, but also interagency and nongovernmental organization partners, he said. e challenge, once combat operations are over, is to maintain those bonds for the future, Cleveland said. He shared an observation by a State Department ocial who suggested forming a league of extraordinary operators who maintain a connection, rather than forming one when a crisis erupts. We ought not wait un til we have to descend on a problem to create this connection, and are starting to work on that, Cleveland said. Regardless of where on the globe Army Special Forces operate, Cleve land said, two exquisite capabilities will remain paramount: surgical strike and special war fare. e country needs both of these capabilities, he said, emphasizing the need to continually evolve for complex challenges that will test the mettle of the future force. Fiel, commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, said he expects little letup in the years ahead for the com mands highest-demand capabilities: mobility, strike and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Tasked by McRaven to generate and sustain as much combat power as possible, Fiel said, he is working to re balance the commands portfolio to better serve all theater special operations commanders. Despite ying tactical missions every day in sup port of every geographic combatant commander and theater special operations commander, all want more, more, more capa bility, Fiel said. New hardware enter ing the inventory is a step in the right direction, he said. Another big advance is the new Air Force Spe cial Operations Warfare Center, stood up in Febru ary. Its mission includes executing special opera tions test, evaluation and lessons learned programs and developing doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures for AFSOC. Fiel shared Clevelands assessment of progress made in building more cohesive and interconnected teams across the special operations force commu nity. Socom and [special operations forces] is a team sport. It really is the only joint force in the Depart ment of Defense. Sometimes you are on oensive, sometimes you are on defense, and sometimes you are on special teams, he said. But we are the only force in the DOD that grows up together. Since its activation in 2006, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Com mand has hit the ground running with no pause in the pace of its operational missions. But looking ahead to a post-Afghani stan future, the command is preparing to transition from landlocked operations to future maritime missions around the world, Sweeney told the audience. In another change to come, Marsoc plans to make its battalions region ally focused to better sup port theater requirements. In posturing for that fu ture, Sweeney said, the Marines hope to nd bet ter ways to integrate the kinds of technologies inte grated into the battleeld in Afghanistan. If any thing, Marine special op erators are too heavy on technology, he said. When I see our teams and our Marines out there, and they have to have ve or six sets of equipment to access ve or six networks, that is problematic, he explained. We are now increasing the burden on the force from a load per spective. Ideally, Sweeney said, he would like to see one multitiered network that integrates these capabili ties. Another challenge, he said, is to change the cul ture to take full advantage of what technologies de liver. Sweeney likened the process of compiling mul tiple data streams to form one operational picture to the broadcast of a Mon day Night Football game. I, as a consumer, see one picture, and that is the picture I want to see, he said. He recognized, how ever, that someone behind the scenes has made deci sions, selecting views from 40 or more screens to de liver what the viewer sees. at type of talent is ex tremely dicult to build in the military, he said, em phasizing that its not a job that should be relegated to a junior ocer or a midlevel noncommissioned ocer. at is somebody who is well-educated, under stands the warghting functions, can quickly assimilate information, turn it into knowledge and present it to the commander, he said. It is very, very challenging to do. e problem, Sweeney said, is that the military, or at least the Marines, dont put emphasis into developing those capabilities or rewarding those who have them. From the Marine Corps perspective, if you are an innovator, if you are a visionary, if you are a sci ence-and-technology guy, you are probably not going to do well at the promotion board, he said. I think what we owe you [in indus try] and we owe ourselves is a culture and a mindset shift about how we go after capitalizing on the technology you provide and us ing that to our advantage to bring power to bear where it counts most. Special Ops evolving Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter met with senior U.S. and Af ghan ocials in Kabul recently to praise them for their eorts on the transition to Afghan-led security, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. Carter spoke with Bismillah Khan Mohammadi, the Afghan minister of defense, and Ghulam Mujtaba Pa tang, the Afghan minister of the in terior, at their respective ministries. Carter congratulated the minis ters on the progress made by Afghan forces as they move toward taking the lead for security throughout Af ghanistan, Little said. e deputy secretary and the ministers pledged to continue to work together on a number of im portant issues, including the sustained development of the Afghan national security forces, human capital development and a range of issues related to security transition, he added. e deputy secretary also praised both ocials for their dedication to improving the professionalism and capabilities of the Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police, Little said. In the morning, Carter met with Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commander of the Interna tional Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan, and other senior ISAF ocials. During that meeting the deputy secretary commended them for their eorts and reiterated the U.S. commitment to a secure and sover eign Afghanistan, Little said. Following his meeting with Dunford, Carter joined about 300 military and civilian personnel outside the ISAF headquarters building for a weekly memorial service honoring fallen coalition and Afghan personnel. e deputy secretary was on the third leg of a weeklong overseas trip, and his meetings in Afghani stan were intended to underline U.S. support for the ongoing develop ment of the Afghan security forces. Progress in Afghan transition cited Reserve Vice Adm. Rob in R. Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve and Commander, Navy Reserve Force, spoke with reservists about the changes facing the force during her visit to Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, May 18. Braun broke from her duties at the Pentagon to directly explain the evolv ing shape of the Navy Re serve. e changes to the reserve force in coming years are due to priority shifts in budget and poli cy. e majority of the billet reductions will be within Naval Expeditionary Combat Command. Braun also identied 540 new billets for reserv ists in the Navys recently established Surge Main tenance program, which seeks to supplement ship yard repair and ret fa cilities with skilled labor drawn from a pool of qual ied reserve component Sailors. Reserve opportunities are also anticipated aboard the Navys growing eet of littoral combat ships, with more than 600 billets coming online in the next several years.Changes ahead for smaller Navy Reserve

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13 During a Senate hearing in May on President Barack Obamas $9.5 billion military construction budget request for scal year 2014, Defense Department Comptroller Robert F. Hale said the severe and abrupt bud get cuts imposed by sequestration are devastating the U.S. armed forces. Hale and John Conger, acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installations and environment, testied on military construction and family housing before the Sen ate Appropriations subcommittee on military construction, veterans aairs and related agencies. e ocials described for the panel the impact of sequestration on military construction, facilities sustainment and restoration, and on the services in the current year. While sequestration and related problems do not aect most military construction projects, they are dev astating military readiness, Hale told the senators, adding, I just cant believe what were doing to the military right now. Summarizing the defense bud get as a whole, Hale said, Were requesting $526.6 billion in discre tionary budget authority. Its about the same as our 2013 request but about 8 percent higher than were executing right now in 2013 under sequestration. Beyond 2014, he said, If were able to carry out the presidents plan, we anticipate increases of about 2 percent a year, roughly enough to keep up with ination. e overall budget request repre sents the amount the president and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel be lieve is needed to support national security interests in a time of very complex challenges, Hale noted. Our request does not take into account a possible $52 billion re duction if sequester becomes an annual event, the comptroller said, but the president has submitted a budget with a balanced decit re duction plan of $1.8 trillion over 10 years, more than enough to meet the targets of the Budget Control Act. Hale added, We strongly hope that Congress will pass this plan or another plan that the president will sign, and then repeal sequestration. For scal 2014 the department is seeking $9.5 billion for military construction, an amount thats roughly equal to the presidents request of $9.6 bil lion in scal 2013, and $11 billion for family housing, he said. On the military construction side, DOD is seeking $3.3 billion for oper ational training facilities, as well as $0.9 billion for modernizing medical facilities, 17 dependent school proj ects and many others; and $1.5 bil lion for the family-housing program to provide quality, aordable hous ing for military families. In terms of sequestrations eects on military construction, the comp troller said, most accounts wont experience sequester-related cuts in 2013 because of special crediting provisions in the current law that apply when Congress enacts major cuts in an appropriation. e law says, Cuts are big enough, theres no further sequestration, Hale explained. But facilities sustain ment and restoration and modern ization projects already have been cut severely in scal 2013, Hale said, adding, Were essentially down to pretty much safety-of-life and -prop erty projects for the rest of the year. In his remarks to the panel, Conger underscored the negative eects of sequestration on facilities sus tainment and restoration accounts. Because operation and mainte nance dollars are more discretionary and thus more exible, he said, facilities sustainment was cut more deeply to make up the dierence. In FY we are deferring all but the most critical repairs. Were de ferring routine maintenance. Were holding o on major purchases and accepting risk by looking for building equipment to hold out longer, the deputy undersecretary added. Frankly, he said, we can accom modate this for a short period of time but facilities will break if we shortchange these accounts for multiple years. Building systems will begin to fail. e cost to repair broken systems is much higher than that to maintain them, just like changing the oil in your car prevents expensive auto repairs or system failures. Keep in mind, he added, that this car is actually a real-property port folio of more than 500,000 facilities and a plant-replacement value of more than $800 billion. If we dont invest in keeping it up, it will deteriorate and we will end up with a steady increase in failing or unus able facilities. Hale said the department is still researching specic impacts of se questration on military construc tion, but for those that so far are aected, mainly Navy and defensewide, we believe we can absorb most of the sequestration reductions with available savings. We dont intend to reduce the scope of any construc tion projects. At least [right] now we dont believe that will be necessary. e department also plans to mini mize the number of projects deferred or cancelled as a result of sequestra tion, Hale said, but we will have to do a larger-than-normal number of reprogrammings, which will add to our work load and also to yours. e proposed DOD budget was built on several guiding principles, Hale said, in particular the need to continue to serve as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. In that eort, he added, proposed initiatives range from health care and energy eciency to weapon terminations, and include a new round of base realign ment and closure, called BRAC. To cut long-term costs we need to consolidate infrastructure and reduce it. e only eective way to do that is for Congress to authorize a new round of base realignment and closure, so we asked for a round in 2015, the comptroller said. BRAC does save money Were saving $12 billion a year from the past BRAC rounds, he said, adding, I hate to think what Id be do ing right now as comptroller of the Department of Defense if, especially in this environment, I had to nd another $12 billion of savings in the scal budget. e department needs congres sional support, Hale said, so we can make further cuts in infrastructure in 2015 and hold down the dollars the American taxpayers have to give us to meet their national security needs. In addition to being good stewards of public funds, he added, We are seeking to strengthen our alignment to the presidents defense strategy that was announced last year. We also seek a ready force and try to put emphasis on people. But frankly, se questration is seriously undermin ing both of those goals. Budget cuts devastate readiness Nam Navy pilots remains returned A Navy pilot, missing from the Vietnam War, has been accounted for and will be buried with full military hon ors along with his crew, the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Oce announced recently. Navy Lt. Dennis W. Peterson of Huntington Park, Ca lif., was the pilot of a SH-3A helicopter that crashed in Ha Nam Province, North Vietnam. Peterson was accounted for on March 30, 2012. Also, aboard the aircraft was Ensign Donald P. Frye of Los Angeles, Calif.; Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Technicians William B. Jackson of Stockdale, Texas; and Donald P. McGrane of Waverly, Iowa. e crew will be buried, as a group, on May 2 at Arlington National Cemetery. On July 19, 1967, the four servicemen took o from the USS Hornet aboard an SH-3A Sea King helicopter, on a search and rescue mission looking for a downed pilot in Ha Nam Province, North Vietnam. During the mis sion, an enemy concealed 37mm gun position targeted the helicopter as it ew in. e helicopter was hit by the anti-aircraft gunre, causing the aircraft to lose control, catch re and crash, killing all four servicemen. In October 1982, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam repatriated ve boxes of remains to U.S. ocials. In 2009, the remains within the boxes were identied as Frye, Jackson, and McGrane. In 1993, a joint U.S./S.R.V. team, investigated a loss in Ha Nam Province. e team interviewed local villagers who identied possible burial sites linked to the loss. One local claimed to have buried two of the crewmen near the wreckage, but indicated that both graves had subsequently been exhumed. Between 1994 and 2000, three joint U.S./S.R.V. teams excavated the previous site and recovered human re mains and aircraft wreckage that correlated to the crews SH-3A helicopter. In 2000, U.S. personnel excavated the crash site recov ering additional remains.

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LDO/CWOs pledge support to those who put forth eortWith more than 36 years of naval service, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Ret Facility Commanding Ocer, Capt. Larry Hill, is the areas most senior Limited Duty Ocer, or more commonly known as Mustang. He takes nding his relief as seriously as he takes the meticulous and timely repair of submarines. Hill, along with more than 30 other Kings Bay Limited Duty and Chief Warrant Ocers representing TRF; Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay administration; Submarine Group Ten; the Marine Corps Security Force Battalion; Naval Submarine Support Center; Submarine Squadron Twenty and the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department, Kings Bay Detachment welcomed more than 70 potential new additions to their respective wardrooms at the FY15 Kings Bay Annual Mustang Roundup LDO and CWO Recruiting Kicko at the Kings Bay Auditorium Tuesday, May 7. Male and female, NUC/Security, Chief/ird Class the diverse group of eager future LDO/CWO applicants all have at least one thing in common a continued desire to excel in the Navy as recognized experts in their respective elds. Battle-tested, board-approved is what these FY15 applicants are striving to achieve. All of the current LDO/CWOs in attendance at the brief pledged their full support for any Sailor willing to put forth the eort. Lt. Cmdr. Dave Quinton, NSSC weapons officer, provided this guidance to the group. You are all proven performers and that commitment to your career is part of why you are here today, Quinton said. Your success in this process is important to all of us in the Wardroom. We will answer your questions honestly. We will give you construcUp Periscope Its Candy, Dairy Months ... make your choices Page 9 35th year Kings Bays celebration, Memorial Day ceremony Pages 4, 5 Summer fun Pools Dive-In Movie returns June 15 Page 8 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com NSB Kings Bay celebrates 35th anniversaryLimited Duty Ocers, Warrants welcome applicants USS Georgia navigates Souda Bay Your success in this process is important to all of us in the Wardroom. Lt. Cmdr. Dave Quinton Naval Submarine Support Center Kings Bay Prepare focus of meetingTown Hall session addresses disaster reaction, responseFleet and Family Support Center hosted an Emergency Preparedness Town Hall Meeting May 22 and the evening of May 23 at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium. Representatives from around base spoke at the event providing information on how to help better prepare for potential evacuation orders, natural disasters and other unforeseen circumstances. We know that servicemembers hear this kind of information all of the time, and sometimes it can seem redundant, said Debbie Lucas, director of the FFSC Kings Bay. But taking the time to prepare now will drastically improve your chances of not forgetting something and ensuring you bring the right items with you should an evacuation order come. Weve had evacuation orders in the past, said Bud Lett, NSB security ocer and longMemorial Day Remembrance, Party in e Park highlightsOnce an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal for national emergencies, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is now home to the most powerful and strategic vessels ever produced for the U.S. Navy. e month of May marks the 35th anniversary of NSB Kings Bay. e celebration was highlighted by a Memorial Day Remembrance and 35th Anniversary ceremony May 23rd at the Submarine Veterans of World War II Pavilion, outside Trident Training Facility. I am proud to say that nowhere in the Navy is there a community that is more supportive of its base and of the Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who serve there, as well as their families, said Capt. Harvey L. Guey Jr., commanding ocer of NSB Kings Bay. Vice Adm. Al Konetzni (Ret.), former commodore, Submarine Squadron 16, and Rear Adm. John Jack Scorby, Commander, Navy Region Southeast were the guest speakers at the event. Our community takes pride in our history, said Konetzni. ere is no community in the United States of America that has come together like this one. I want to thank this base and all of the service members for what they do for the USA. e ceremony included a wreath laying in observance of Memorial Day, a 21 Gun Salute, and the singing of An chors Aweigh by the Camden County High School choir. is community does an absolutely tre ... nowhere in the Navy is there a community more supportive of its base ... Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. Commanding officer, NSB Kings Bay

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 It is an unfortunate fact of the modern housing world that homes across the country are going into foreclosure every day. Many of those homes are rental properties, and in many cases the tenant is the last one to know about it. If you rent your home and have come home to a Notice of Sale on your front door, or if youve started receiving court documents in the mail about your home going into foreclosure, this article is for you. Luckily, there are steps you can take to make sure youre protected against your landlords foreclosure, and resources available to assist you and your family. How can I prevent this situation? ere are simple steps you can take to make sure the home youre about to rent is not going into foreclosure. Having this information upfront is one of the things youll want to consider, along with location, price and whether theres plenty of running space for your pet hedgehog, when you determine which house to rent. e rst and easiest is to ask your landlord whether his home is in foreclosure. Its a simple step to take, but there is no guarantee that your landlord will be honest with you. Many homeowners will avoid giving out that information to their tenants for fear that they (a) wont sign a lease or (b) will stop paying rent on a lease they already have. Still, it doesnt cost anything to ask, and its an easy early warning system for upcoming foreclosure issues. If your landlord refuses to answer, or if you are still suspicious, you can always check your local newspapers. Foreclosure sales will be listed daily. e downside is that you have to check every listing regularly, and it will only list homes that are just about to be put up for sale. It still wont give you any notice that your landlord might be headed for trouble down the road. e best way to nd out if foreclosure proceedings have been led against your landlord is to call your local Clerk of Court. Foreclosure proceedings are public record, and you will be able to get all the information you need from your local courthouse. Dierent states have dierent procedures for getting access to those les, so make sure you give the courthouse a call. Too late, Ive already gotten the notice! If you start getting notications of a pending foreclosure in the mail or on your door, you will have to decide whether you want to terminate your lease early or stick around to the end. Many families want to avoid moving in the middle of a tour, but having a bank as a landlord can be a huge hassle. e bank probably wont care that your plumbing is broken or there are roaches in the home. ey may not x the heating, and they probably wont return your calls about the water heater. Many families decide that its better to just nd a new place to live. Fortunately, the decision is yours to make. Ive decided I want to stay Until recently, a foreclosure nearly always meant that the tenants were about to be evicted. at all changed in 2009, when THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Cultural, Diversity Fair June 7Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Cultural and Diversity Fair will be 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., June 7 at the tennis courts at the Fitness Complex. Navy Band Southeast Pride will play music. Cultural stage shows begin at noon. Taste e Nations Food Sampling opens at noon and is free while supplies last. Other attractions include community awareness and Navy College booths, a grill and barbecue by the Kings Bay First Class and CPO Association, plus appearences by the Bualo Soldiers, Deep Forst Native American Indians and St. Marys Submarine Museum. For participation or acess to this event, call (912) 573-3456.Teen driver safety class June 21NSB Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will conduct a Teen Driver Improvement class June 21, the only class oered this summer. Its limited to 30 and open to dependents of active duty, reservists and retirees, as well as DOD civilians. Class is 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fluckey Hall, Bldg. 1063, Room 127. If your teen signs up but cannot attend call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need their license or permit and something to write with. is class does not fulll any State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill at (912) 573-2525 or Russ Prothero at (912) 573-0414 for more information or to enroll your teen.Bible School signup underwaye Command Religious Program of the Kings Bay Chapels Vacation Bible School runs June 24 to 28, from 9 a.m. to noon daily for kindergarden through fth grade students. e theme for this years Vacation Bible School is Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Registration is through June 17. Volunteers also are needed to help. To register, sign-up to volunteer or for more program information, call the Chapel 573-4501 or visit the chapel oce.Base lost & found has found itemsThere is lost and abandoned property, such as watches, rings and cell phones, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Security. If you have any information reference to any items, contact Detective Michael Palmer, Monday through Friday, at (912) 573-9343 or by e-mail, Michael.j.Palmer@Navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Navy Exchange has jewelry saleFrom June 5 to July 7, customers who purchase any jewelry or watch priced $399 or more and pay with a Military Star Card can take advantage of no interest, no down payment with no payments for six months. The Navy Exchange has a great selection of gold and silver jewelry, precious gemstones, diamonds and the most popular brands of watches that would be perfect for Fathers Day. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Now hear this! Protecting yourself in foreclosure Legal Assistance How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatalities associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and consequences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous conditions unless personnel conscientiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be reported, no matter how small, to prevent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in reporting a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety ofce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety Sailors looking to enhance their career by working outside their rate should consider becoming an Equal Opportunity Advisor, Navy leaders said May 22. Equal opportunity advisors play a vital role in the Navys ability to maintain operational readiness and accomplish its mission, said Senior Chief Sonar Technician Mark Vandervort, EOA detailer, Navy Personnel Command. According to MILPERSMAN 1306917, EOAs can stimulate a free-ow of communication at all levels within a chain of command, making them an invaluable asset to the Navy. Vandervort says EOAs are command climate experts who strengthen a chain of command by keeping leadership aware of any equal opportunity related issues as well as procedures and practices that may aect the mission, readiness, welfare and morale of Sailors. ose commands that can capitalize on their Sailors skill sets are those that perform the best, said Vandervort. As the command climate expert, it is the EOAs responsibility to assess the command climate and determine not only what is working right within a command, but also identify potential barriers that may prohibit Sailors from achieving their full potential. Sailors in pay grades E-6 to E-9 may be eligible to apply for EOA duty after being interviewed by an EOA. To become an EOA, Sailors must earn the 9515 Equal Opportunity Advisor Navy Enlisted Classication by attending the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. e EOA course is intense but rewarding, Vandervort said. e training not only provides students with the tools required to be an EOA, but also provides them with a variety of tools that will allow them to grow as leaders. e 12-week EOA course provides training in gender communications and cultural awareness, socialization, conict management, complaints processing, interpersonal communications and many other topics. EOAs ensure Sailors are being treated fairly and with the dignity and respect with which all Sailors should expect to be treated. When utilized correctly, the EOA can be an integral member of the commands leadership team, said Vandervort. EOAs are assigned to major shore commands, nuclear aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships and training commands. A complete listing of eligibility requirements can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-917. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for EOA duty should request release to Special Programs by submitting a completed NAVPERS 1306/7 to their rating detailer prior to entering their normal detailing window. e required obligated service for an EOA tour is 36 months, and members selected are required to complete two full consecutive EOA tours, one sea and one shore. Special Program detailers assign Sailors to more than 20 special programs Navy-wide, including service on the USS Constitution or the USS Arizona Memorial, and assignment to the Blue Angels or the Navy Ceremonial Guard. MILPERSMAN 1306-900 contains a complete list of special programs available.Equal Opportunity advisors sought Personnel Command

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mendous job of supporting our military men and women and their families, not just on patriotic holidays or times of crisis, but every day of the year, Scorby said. at support is so vital that we couldnt do our job without you. Morale, Welfare and Recreation started the anniversary by hosting a Armed Forces Challenges Tournament and Armed Forces Kids Run, among other activities for service members and their families to participate in. Crowds of people showed up for the Party in the Park May 22, where they enjoyed food booths, displays, activity tables and a fun zone for children. You notice we have the Marines, Navy and Coast Guard here all together celebrating the bases birthday and the community that we have, said Beth Morrison, the Liberty Program manager for Kings Bay MWR. ere are not many bases that have the variety that we do, and I think we are lucky to have it. is birthday bash lets us give back to the community. e highlight of the event was a live music performed by the up-and-coming country band, Scarletta Seeing everybody out there while we performed with smiles on their faces and having a good time was all that mattered, said Aubrey Collins, lead singer of the Scarletta We sup port the military as much as we can, and we wanted to give back to them as much as they give to us. at is what we aim for. e rst group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed in July. Construction of NSB Kings Bay was the largest peacetime construction program ever undertaken by the U.S. Navy. time Kings Bay resident. We understand that people simply dont want to leave. ey want to see if the storms course will change. Its hard for them to just drop everything and go. Its understandable. However, you have to think about the comfort and safety of you and your family. e most common reason for an evacuation order in this area is of course for hurricanes. e advantage to these storms is that they are easy to track and you can plan for its arrival in most cases. For those who are prepared to go and leave early when the evacuation notice is voluntary, the worst case is that they had an unplanned vacation for a few days. For those who wait until the last minute, and weve seen this happen every time, theyre stuck on the highway for hours with everyone else heading toward Folkston, said Bud. Among the noted emergency preparation tips highlighted were: To know the local emergency warning system, evacuation routes and the closest shelters. Have a family emergency plan in writing and discuss it with children. e plan should include meeting places, an out of town contact and emergency services contact information. Have a pre-assembled kit in the event of an evacuation order. Generally, when an evacuation order is given, the family will have 10 minutes to pack and leave. e kit should include important personal documents, medicine and rst aid, and papers, clothes, water and food for three days For more information on how to prepare your family in the event of an emergency, visit www. ready.navy.mil, www. ready.gov, www.fema.gov and www.redcross.org. tive feedback. What we wont do, however, is write your package for you. His direction was concise and echoed by the other ocers in attendance. For those who were unable to make the roundup due to operational commitments, but are still interested in working with an established LDO/ CWO on a FY15 application package, dont despair. Contact Lt. j.g. Doug Head, TRFs FY15 LDO/ CWO program coordinator, at (912) 573-9877 or by e-mail at douglas.head@ navy.mil. Mustang Prepare Congress passed the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act. If you dont have a lease, the new homeowner is required to give you 90 days notice before you have to move out. If you do have a lease, the PTFA requires the new homeowner to stick to the terms of that lease, unless the new owner wants to move into the home as their primary residence. Even then, though, the new owner is required to give you 90 days notice before you are required to leave. In order to get the benet of the PTFA, you should le a Notice of Tenancy in the court thats hearing the foreclosure case. is lets the judge know that there is someone living in the property. If you are wondering whether to pay rent to the bank or to your old landlord, you can also le a Motion to Deposit Rent into the Court Registry, which will let you pay rent to the court, who will then gure out where it goes. For assistance in drafting either one of these documents, you should make an appointment with your local Legal Assistance ofce. Ive decided I want to move e Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure act does not automatically give you the right to terminate your lease if the property is foreclosed. e good news is that most banks dont want to act as landlords. Some will even oer Cash for Keys programs that will pay you money in exchange for you moving out. e best way to get out of your lease if the home is being foreclosed is to talk to your landlord and the bank. If you do decide to move, the Navy is here to help. In 2008, the Department of the Navy began authorizing funded local moves for military members who are breaking their leases as a result of their landlords foreclosure. You will need to bring a copy of the Notice of Foreclosure and a Notice of Lease Termination to either your commands Sta Judge Advocate or your local Legal Assistance oce. ey will be able to help you get the authorization you need. ats it! Being a tenant in a home thats being foreclosed can be a stressful and confusing situation. If you nd yourself over your head, always feel free to make an appointment with your local Legal Assistance oce.Legal35th THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Memorial Day Remembrance and 35th Anniversary Celebration May 22, 23, 2013, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5 Party in the Park Navy photos by MCCS Tony Casullo, MC2 Cory Rose and MC3 Ashley Hedrick

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., June 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar June 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, June 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Mondays, June 3, 10, 17 and 24. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered June 5 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. June 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 11 a.m. to noon, June 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for June 10A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., June 10. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., June 11. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for June 18Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., June 18. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, June 4, 11, 18 and 25. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512. skills taught in classUnmanaged conflict has caused many hardships in the workplace and at home. It can cause people to suffer, missions to fail and families to separate. Conflict is inevitable. This workshop helps people manage conflict by examining their attitudes and behaviors when faced with conflicting situations, practic ing skills that prevent conflict from escalating and working with others to solve problems, allowing people to grow, missions to succeed and families to strengthen. This class is 10 to 11 a.m., June 5. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 17 to 21. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, June 12. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., June 24. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Couples Money Management workshop upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial com munication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 6 to 8 p.m. June 4. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 24 to 27. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 3 to 7. For more information and to register, call 573-4513. program June 13The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., June 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Financial planning for deployment June 19This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., June 19. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, June 19. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Career Assessment Workshop upcomingDid you know that the Department of Labor recognizes nearly 500 jobs which make up Americas current workforce? With so many options, it is no wonder people struggle to find satisfying work. Whether you are selecting a college major or training program, looking for your first job, or transitioning out of the military, career assessment tools can help you identify activities and settings that best match your inter ests, skills, and values. Career Assessment Workshop facilita tors guide participants through simple activities to sort and rank preferences, using card decks and workbooks, and use the results to provide career recommendations which fit your profile. Workshop size is limited. This workshop is 9:30 to 11:30 a.m June 5. Call 573-4513 to register if you plan to attend.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training require ments when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special con cerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of exper tise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Ombudsman Assembly Meeting June 24The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., June 24. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Pirates Cove Galley menus

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Navy College information Menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

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e Parent & Child Golf Tour nament is swinging your way Saturday, June 8. Trident Lakes is presenting another great time for you and your child! Registra tion begins at 11 a.m. with lunch at 11:30 a.m., then a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Format is 18 holes with a Best Ball of par ent and child. Cost is $30 per team including golf, lunch, door prizes and fun. For the younger crowd, a 9 -hole course is laid out with cost of $20. Open to all patrons, but space is limited so sign-up early at the Pro Shop Customer Service Counter or call (912) 573-8475. Dive-In Movies are back Saturday, June 15, the pool will open with free admission at 7 p.m. for your enjoyment. When it gets dark enough, the feature presentation The Croods (PG) will be shown. Bring your own floatation devices and lawn chairs. For more information, (912) 573-4564 or the pool at (912) 573-3001. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open to all 10 years old and older, 6 to 8 a.m. June 14 and 15 on the Back 9. Fishing is $5 per person, catch and release or $7 per person, catch and keep. Everyone 16 years old and older must have a Georgia fishing license and a NSB Kings Bay fishing permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the permits. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. All under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103 Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Youth Sports Summer Camps registration is 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thorugh Friday at the Youth Center, except holidays. Cash or credit cards are needed, no checks. e cost is dierent for each camp! Junior Golf Camp for ages 12 to 17 is at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Camp are June 10 to 14 and July 22 to 26, is $150 per camper and limited to 16 golfers per camp. is is a full day of camp, be prepared for full sun exposure, walking and lots of golf. Instruction on chipping, putting, driveing and situations. You must provide your own packed lunch. Sign up eary at (912) 573-8475. Johnsons Back To Basic Youth Basketball Camp ages 5 to 14 is June 17 to 21 at the Youth Center. Campers receive T-shirts. Cost is $40 for 5 to 7 age group and $50 for 8 to 14 age group. Mike Johnsons T-N-T Soccer Training Camp is June 3 to 7 for ages 13 to 17 and June 10 to 14 for ages 5 to 12, at Youth Sports Soccer Complex. Cost is $85 for 5 to 6 age group mini camp and $109 for 7 to 17 age group CCHSs Coach Moores Volleyball Camp is July 8 to 9 and July 10 to 11, with both camps for ages 8 to 16, at Youth Center. Cost is $50 per camper. For more information, call the Youth Sports Oce at (912) 573-8202 Free movies for kids Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., Mr. Poppers Penguins May 30 and The Odd Life of Timothy Green May 31, Ramona & Beezus June 1 and 2, Judy Moody & the Not So Bummer Summer June 8 and 9, Rise of the Guardians June 15 and 16, Puss in Boots June 22 and 23 and The Croods June 29 and 30. Also, June 15 is the Dive-In Movie at the Pool Complex with The Croods Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children in kinder garten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, firstserve basis. Call for spots. To have your child attend camp at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse, or student letter of enroll ment must be provided. Birth certificate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/dual mili tary parents must provide dependent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No out side food is authorized. Cost is based on total fam ily income. For more infor mation call (912) 573-2380.Time for sports camps Just about kids Liberty call Parent, child golf outing June 8 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Its National Candy Month and National Daily Month in June. My personal favorites are Reeses Peanut Butter Eggs for candy and ice cream for dairy. Chocolate and peanut butter really mix well. The problem with Reeses Peanut Butter Eggs is you only can find them at Easter time. So that just makes Easter so much better. Ice cream comes in many different flavors, and can be enjoyed by any age. Heres what some others had to say around Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.MA3 Joseph Robinson Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Houston No dairy because I will be on the toilet. Skittles for candy because they are easy to do trick shots off movie theater seats. MA2 Christina Gomez Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Baxley, Ga. Cheese, you can put it on anything. Ferrero Rocher, because I like how milk chocolatey the middle is. MA3 Cameron Murray Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Boston I have a love-hate with ice cream. Reeses Peanut Butter Cups, because I love them. John Herrin Retired Air Force Brunswick, Ga. Whip Cream, because it can go good with anything. Hershey bar, because they have the best chocolate. STSSA Robert Waldron NSB Building Managers Putnam, Conn. Ice cream, because it can cool you off on a hot day and prepare your body for a cold day. Bottle Caps, because candy that tastes like soda makes me feel like a kid. YN2 Curtis Nevils NSB Administration Beaumont, Texas There is nothing like nice cold ice cream on a hot day. Peanut M&Ms, because they are better than the regular ones. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose e USS Bown Submarine Museum awarded the parks annual scholarships to eight recipients in the Pearl Harbor submarine community with Sailors, family and friends in attendance, May 18. e ceremony was in honor of the 3,505 Sailors and 52 submarines lost in World War II and awarded by the Pacic Fleet Submarine Memorial Association in con junction with the Pearl Harbor Submarine Ocers Spouses Association. We are trying to help submariners and their families go back to school, said Jerry Hofwolt, Executive Director of the USS Bown Submarine Museum and Park and retired Navy Captain. Hofwolt believes a function of the Bown Submarine Museum and Park is to help the community and these scholarships are crucial in furthering the education of their recipients. e 28 year scholarship program is open to active duty submariners assigned to the Pearl Harbor area and to their family members, whether active duty, retired or deceased. e program raised enough money to keep the scholarships going for some time. e program has given $25,000 to $30,000 a year. Since its inception, over $617,000 has been awarded to the submarine ohana members or family to help fund their educational expenses. For scholarship eligibility, applicants should reside in Hawaii and attend an accredited college, university or vocational school and have a good academic record. Potential recipients will be interviewed by a scholarship selection committee. In addition to the scholarships, the Bown Museum has an educational outreach program that oers history and the science of submarines presentations to schools.Museum helps students Navy Region Southeast participated in the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 May 23. e U.S. Fleet Forces Command/Commander, Navy Installations Command exercise tested the regions ability to track, prepare for and respond to hurricanes should they threaten southeastern facilities. In the Southeast Region, its not a matter of if a hurricane will strike, its a matter of when and where, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Since last years HURREX, we have had ve named storms impact our region, so it is imperative that we train so we are ready when they strike. Each year, this exercise gives us an excellent opportunity to test our skills through authentic, challenging scenarios that go a long way to ensure we are ready in the event of an actual hurricane. Over recent years, numberous major storms have aected regional installations. Joint Reserve Base New Orleans remembers the damage caused by Katrina in 2005. Less than a year ago, Hurricane Sandy made landfall just west of Naval Station Guantanamo Bay before moving toward the northeast. During this years HURREX scenario, the NRSE Crisis Action Team tracked two ctitious hurricanes, Kirk and Lay, from the Regional Operations Center at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Kirk crossed over NS Guantanamo Bay and eventually made landfall as a category two hurricane near the GeorgiaSouth Carolina border, and Lay made landfall as a category four hurricane near NAS Pensacola. e CAT consists of nearly 50 personnel, each with specic roles ranging from planning and logistics to family support services. In addition to the CAT, the region also deploys a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT)/Damage Assessment Team, led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command, which assesses damage after the storm, as well as an Emergency Family Assistance Center, which provides support to families. roughout HURREX, the teams coordinated their eorts with local authorities and civilian agencies like they would in the event of a real hurricane. HURREX is essential training, said Scott Crossley, NRSE regional emergency manager. We get lots of tropical storms, but as often as we get landfall, we still see far too many casualties from people forgetting some of the lessons weve learned in the past. Weve learned that too many injuries occur, even with lesser storms, after the storm has passed because people are trying to drive through ooded roads or trying to repair storm damage. By doing these exercises, it helps reinforce the message that Region has hurricane drill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

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e Battle of Midway, fought near the Central Pa cic island of Midway, is considered the decisive bat tle of the war in the Pacic. Before this battle the Japanese were on the offensive, capturing territory throughout Asia and the Pacic. By their attack, the Japanese had planned to capture Midway to use as an advance base, as well as to entrap and destroy the U.S. Pacic Fleet. Because of communica tion intelligence successes, the U.S. Pacic Fleet sur prised the Japanese forces, sinking the four Japanese carriers, that had attacked Pearl Harbor only six months before, while only losing of one carrier. After Midway, the Americans and their Allies took the of fensive in the Pacic. On May 7 and 8, 1942, the rst carrier battle of the war took place in the Coral Sea. Each side had a carrier damaged, while the American lost the carrier USS Lexington and the Japanese lost the light carrier Shoho. Earlier on March 4, the designator AF began appearing in partially decoded Japanese messages. On March 13, American cryptanalysts both broke the Japanese Navys General-Purpose Code (JN 25) and identied AF as Midway Island. On April 16, Commander in Chief, Combined Fleet, Adm. Isoruku Yamamoto, convinced the Imperial General Sta to agree to his Midway and Aleutians strategy for the summer. In Yamamotos view, the capture of Midway would allow Japan to pursue its Asian policies behind an impregnable eastern shield of defenses in the Central Pacic. When the U.S. Pacic Fleet responded to the landings on Midway, Japanese carrier and battleship task forces, waiting unseen to the west of the Midway strike Force, would fall upon and destroy the unsuspecting Americans. If successful, the plan would eectively eliminate the U.S. Pacic Fleet for at least a year and provide a forward outpost from which ample warning of any future threat by the U.S. would come. Two days later, Lt. Colonel James Doolit tle and a small number of American airmen from the Army Air Corps took o from USS Hornet in land-based bombers to attack the Japanese home islands. As a result of this attack, which caused the Japanese to want to extend their rst line of defense as far east as possible, the Japanese advanced the date of their planned attack on Midway. On May 5, Imperial General Headquarters issued Navy Order No. 18 directing Yamamoto to carry out the occupation of Midway Island in cooperation with the Army. On May 19, the Ocer in Charge of Communications Intelligence processing at Pearl Harbor, Cmdr. Joseph J. Rochefort, and the intelligence ocer for the Pacic Fleet, Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton, identied Midway as the Japanese objective. ree days later, following a radio deception operation, Melbourne completely conrmed that AF meant Midway. Rochefort and Layton then discovered the date cipher used in Japanese message trac. is meant analysts could determine exactly when the attack would take place. After examining previously intercepted messages, they predicted an attack on Midway on June 4. Adm. Chester Nimitz used this estimate to plan American countermeasures. Task Force 16 under Rear Adm. Raymond Spruance, formed around Enterprise and Hornet, departed Pearl Harbor on May 28 to take up a position northeast of Midway. Two days later, TF 17 under the command of Rear Adm. Frank Fletcher, formed around the quickly repaired Yorktown, and sailed from Pearl to join TF 16 northeast of Midway. When TF 17 and TF 16 joined about 350 miles northeast of Midway June 2, the three American carriers, augmented by cruiser-launched oatplanes, provided 234 aircraft aoat, supported by 110 ghters, bombers, and patrol planes at Midway. On 3 June, American land-based aircraft from Midway located and attacked Japanese transports about 600 miles west of Midway Island. Just after midnight on June 4, Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese main body, also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles! At roughly 6:30 a.m., Aichi D3A Val carrier bombers and Nakajima B5N Kate torpedo planes, supported by numerous ghters Zekes, bombed Midway. Over the next two hours, Japanese Zekes on Combat Air Patrol and antiaircraft re from the Japanese eet annihilated the repeated attacks by the American aircraft from Marine Corps Douglas SBD Dauntless and Vought SB2U Vindicator scout bombers from VMSB241, Navy Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bombers from VT-8 detachment, and Army Air Force torpedo-carrying Martin B-26 Marauder bombers sent out to attack the Japanese carriers. Army Air Force Flying Fortresses likewise bombed the Japanese carrier force without success. Between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., Douglas TBD Devastator torpedo bombers from VT 3, VT-6, and VT-8 on the three American carriers attacked the Japanese carriers. Although nearly wiped out by the defending Japanese ghters and antiaircraft re, they drew o enemy ghters, leaving the skies open for dive bombers from Enterprise and Yorktown. VB-6 and VS-6 Daunt lesses from Enterprise bombed and fatally dam aged carriers Kaga and Akagi, while VB-3 Daunt lesses from Yorktown bombed and wrecked car rier Soryu. At 11 a.m., the one Japanese carrier that escaped destruction that morning, Hiryu, launched Val dive bombers that tem porarily disabled Yorktown around noon. ree and a half hours later, Hiryus Kate torpedo planes struck a second blow, forcing Yor ktowns abandonment. In return, Dauntlesses from Enterprise mortally damaged Hiryu in a strike around 5 p.m.. e destruction of the Carrier Strike Force compelled Yamamoto to abandon his Midway invasion plans, and the Japanese Fleet began to retire westward. e next day, TF 16 under command of Spruance pursued the Japanese eet westward, while work continued to salvage the damaged Yorktown. Both Akagi and Hiryu, damaged the previous day, were scuttled by Japanese destroyers early that day. e last air attacks of the battle took place June 6 when dive bombers from Enterprise and Hornet bombed and sank heavy cruiser Mikuma, and damaged destroyers Asashio and Arashio,as well as the cruiser Mogami. Also June 6, Japanese submarine I-168 interrupted the U.S. salvage operations, torpedoing Yorktown and torpedoing and sinking destroyer USS Hammann (DD412). Screening destroyers depth-charged I-168 but the Japanese submarine escaped destruction. Yorktown, suering from numerous torpedo hits, nally rolled over and sank at dawn June 7. anks to American intelligence, judicious aircraft carrier tactics and more than a little luck, the Navy inicted a smashing defeat on the Japanese. Although the perfor mance of the three American carrier air groups would later be considered uneven, their pilots and crew had won the day through cour age, determination, and he roic sacrice. e Japanese lost the four large carriers that had attacked Pearl Harbor, while the Americans only lost one carrier. More importantly, the Japanese lost over one hundred trained pilots, who could not be replaced. In a larger strategic sense, the Japanese offensive in the Pacic was derailed and their plans to advance on New Caledonia, Fiji, and Samoa postponed. e balance of sea p ower in the Pacic shifted from the Japan to an equity between America and Japan. Soon after the Battle of Midway the U.S. and its allies would take the oensive in the Pacic. Battle of Midway turned tide in Pacic War this is a real hazard. During an actual storm, NRSE personnel coordinate with Fleet Weather Center Norfolk to track potential hurricanes and tropical storms from the beginning stages of the weather system. We are blessed to have a very good working relationship with the Fleet Weather Center, Crossley said. We watch tropical weather year round, but as we approach the hurricane season, we really start watching closely. e public will start seeing hurricane alerts and warnings from the National Hurricane Center once a tropical storm is established, but for us, we have to see it as soon as it happens so we can get moving. A storm can pop up with little notice. Once a tropical storm is identied, its course and intensity are monitored. As it approaches an installation, the CAT decides what actions to take based on a variety of factors. e Navy classies storms in terms of Condi tions of Readiness, which indicate the proximity of a storm and the likelihood that it will hit a given instal lation. At the beginning of the hurricane season, each installation is set to COR ve. As storms approach, that condition changes at installatiosn based on when destructive winds are projected. Installations set COR four when onset of destructive force winds is within 72 hours, COR three at 48 hours, COR two at 24 hours and COR one at 12 hours.Drill 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Nearly 250 members of the Oklahoma National Guard are assisting with victim search and security last week in Moore, Okla., where a monster tornado left at least 51 dead, including 20 children, authorities said. e twister hit May 20 about 3:15 p.m. CDT, when children were still in two elementary schools in the Oklahoma City suburb. e tornado, packing winds of up to 200 mph, tore o the roof of Plaza Towers Elementary School and pulverized walls. Volunteers joined rst responders to help in rescuing children and sta from the devastation, the Associated Press reported. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin activated the airmen and soldiers that same day. Among those responding was the 146th Air Support Operations Squadron from nearby Will Rogers Air National Guard Base in Oklahoma City. In a video interview, Air Force 2nd Lt. Gabriel Bird said the unit members carried thermal imaging gear to help locate those buried in rubble. Hopefully, well nd survivors, Bird said. Members also carried basic medical supplies and multiband radios to communicate with ground and aircraft crews, Bird said. Were a pretty new unit, so we havent supported any state emergencies, Bird said. But he noted that many squadron members are veterans who have supported other disaster-recovery operations when assigned to other units. Killer tornado devastates Nat Guard, DoD lent support in Boston, tooDepartment of Defense ocials were in constant contact with state and federal agencies during the Boston marathon bombing. ree died in the attack, and more than 170 were wounded. Many service members had traveled to Boston to run in the iconic marathon State and federal law enforcement agencies provided quick response to the explosions that detonated near the Boston Marathon nish line. Some 460 members of the Massachusetts National Guard were called up to help with the marathon and ended up providing life-saving aid to those aected. Eventually more than 1,000 Massachusetts Guardsmen were called up for the state mission. Massachusetts ocials asked for and received the services of a Navy explosive ordnance disposal team. Guardsmen remained on duty, helping until the crime scene was secured. Marines get new robot Marines from U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Pacic trained to operate a rapid area sensitive-site reconnaissance robot, the only robot of its kind in the Department of Defense, during an advanced technology demonstration program at the 3rd Marine Regiment headquarters at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, May 8. Representatives from the ATD program showed Marines that the RASR robot system consists of several integrated technologies. By providing this system to the Marines, they had the opportunity to receive additional operator input on the utility of the system. One of the newest pieces of technology the robot uses is called an Avalon. Located on the moving arm of the robot, the Avalon is a palm-sized sensor that can detect chemical or biological threats in an area. Users can observe where the RASR is going by looking at a monitor connected to cameras mounted to the robots base and RASRs arm, where the Avalon is located. e RASR surveyed the test area and created a visual for the user to see everything in the test area. When the Marine decided the RASR needed to go back to the starting point, the robot automatically maneuvered itself using the map it created when it rst entered the test area. e robot returned back, without users manually controlling it. e RASR is a great piece of gear and will keep Marines safe from unnecessary danger, said Sgt. Byron Solano, the chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear chief for Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment and a native of Reno, Nev. Its one of the most user friendly robots I have used in the Marine Corps.. During the training, Marines put the Avalon system to the test. e Avalon shot a laser chemical detector, a chemical vapor detector, a radiological detector, and a laser range nder for mapping of hazards within areas of interest. e RASR is most advanced technology I have seen over the course of my career, said Gunnery Sgt. Eric Schleher, the chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear chief for 3rd Marine Regiment and a native of Dunnellon, Fla. Glass test tubes were positioned on a table down the hall from where the operator controlled the RASR. He directed the RASR down the hall while monitoring all of its sensors to eectively lead the machine to the test tubes. Marines found them inside the room using the cameras on the RASR. ey correctly positioned the Avalon to begin analyzing what was inside the test tubes. Marines aimed the robots sensors onto the substance to be tested, like they were aiming ries. e Avalon shot a laser where Marines aimed on the test tube, and it told the user what kind of substance was inside. Operators also targeted a bottle of soap for analysis. e program identied the brand of soap, where it was made, who made it and which chemicals were inside. e RASR has the ability to identify the same information from the soap as many dierent substances found on the battleeld. Representatives said the robot takes on the risks human detection crews face in combat. Instead of sending a Marine into an area with potentially deadly radiation or biohazards, the RASR can inspect the area and substances to mark if the coast is clear or to stay away. e RASR robot may not wear the uniform, but for Marines in combat, the robot is just as much part of them. Japanese sailors lay wreath at USS Arizona memorial Japan Maritime SelfDefense Force ships, landing ship tank JS Shimokita (LST 4002); destroyer JS Atago (DDG 177) and helicopter destroyer JS Hyuga (DDH 181) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, May 20 following a ve-day port visit. During the visit JMSDF sailors conducted wreathlaying ceremonies at the USS Arizona Memorial, National Cemetery of the Pacic, Makiki Cemetery and Ehime-Maru Memorial, and oered ship tours, while senior leaders conducted oce calls with local military counterparts. ese opportunities to renew relationships with our JMSDF counterparts are always valuable and rewarding, said Adm. Cecil D. Haney, commander of U.S. Pacic Fleet. e stop of the ships here and our frequent operations together are reective of the strong relationship between the U.S. Navy and JMSDF that is such an important underpinning of the U.S.-Japan alliance. Rear Adm. Hideki Yuasa, commander of Escort Flotilla 2, hosted a reception aboard Hyuga where the many high-ranking guests, in addition to Haney, included Adm. Samuel Locklear, commander of U.S. Pacic Command; Consul General Toyoei Shigeeda, and other senior U.S. and Japanese commanders. Yuasa noted that the partnership between Japan and the U.S. is benecial to maintaining stability throughout the region. e Japanese, U.S. alliance is vital to secure Japans peace and security, said Yuasa. Our alliance is also important for us to participate in multilateral security operations to effectively respond to global security challenges. All three JMSDF ships are en route to San Diego to participate in multilateral exercise Dawn Blitz. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Look for big changes in special operations forces as they shape for whats ahead after a dozen years of intensive, high-operational-tempo missions focused predominantly on Afghanistan and Iraq. Commanders of the special operations components laid out their plans for the future to members of the special operations community and the defense industry last week during the 2013 Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in Tampa, Fla. e Navy SEALs will undergo an amphibious evolution in reverse, returning to their maritime roots, Navy Rear Adm. Sean A. Pybus, commander of Naval Special Warfare Command, told the assembly. Army Special Forces will concentrate on rebuilding their regional expertise and relationships in parts of the world, Army Lt. Gen. Charles T. Cleveland, commander of U.S. Army Special Operations Command, reported. Air Force Special Operations Command will strive to to rebalance its portfolio to provide broader support to geographic and theater special operations commanders, said Air Force Lt. Gen. Eric E. Fiel, the AFSOC commander. And Marine Corps Special Forces Command, the newest of special operations components, will work to institute a cultural shift that maximizes the myriad technologies developed during the past decade-plus of conict, Marine Corps Col. Mike Sweeney, the deputy MARSOC commander, told the group. Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, U.S. Special Operations Command commander, opened the conference telling participants to think of a future that extends beyond the high-prole missions heralded in bestsellers and across the big screen. The fact of the matter is that [counterterrorism] piece that we do better than anybody in the world is a small part of our portfolio, he said. e broader part of our portfolio is about how we build partner capacity [and] how we link with our allies and partners overseas so that we can help them take care of their problems so that we dont end up having to do [counterterrorism]. U.S. special operators will continue to take care of the bad guys and rescue the good guys better than anybody in the world, McRaven emphasized. But by helping partner nations build their own capacity, he said, they can take care of their own security problems [and] do the things that we now dont have to put U.S. forces against. at is the value of U.S. special operations forces as we go forth in the future, he added. at concept, encapsulated in McRavens Special Operations Forces 2020 vision, requires transition across the special operations service components. ose changes are well underway in the SEALs, which Pybus said are expected to reduce the number of theater platoons in Afghanistan by at least half by the years end. Our SEALs have been ghting two land wars for the last decade, and there is plenty of work back in the maritime environment, he said. at is playing out before our eyes. e drawdown in Afghanistan will free up forces to better support the U.S. strategic pivot toward Asia or demands in other parts of the world, he said, citing examples of the Mediterranean Sea, the Gulf of Guinea or the Persian Gulf. ere are plenty of things to do in support of our theater [special operations commanders] and all their requirements, he said. e timing is right for most of the SEALs return to the water, Pybus said, noting that by the end of the decade, 90 percent of the worlds population will live in megacities on or near the coast. So it is the right time for one of the two maritime components of U.S. Socom to make sure that we are covering down on our obligation as a maritime special operations force. For the Green Berets, Cleveland emphasized the importance of shoring up gaps in regional expertise due to the commands heavy focus on combat operations in the Middle East. We have these regionally expert forces, but we surged to Iraq and Afghanistan, and by necessity, we sacriced over the past 12 years a knowledge and expertise that we need of the rest of the world, he said. ats not to say we dont have it, Cleveland added. But we dont have it in the density that we need. And that is the gap we are going to work to x. Meanwhile, Army Special Operations Command, like its sister special operations component commands, is striving to preserve strides made in Iraq and Afghanistan. We cannot lose what we have developed over the last 12 years, Cleveland said. I think we are taking steps to not do that. Sustained combat operations served as a forcing function for special operators to work in synchronization with not only conventional forces, but also interagency and nongovernmental organization partners, he said. e challenge, once combat operations are over, is to maintain those bonds for the future, Cleveland said. He shared an observation by a State Department ocial who suggested forming a league of extraordinary operators who maintain a connection, rather than forming one when a crisis erupts. We ought not wait until we have to descend on a problem to create this connection, and are starting to work on that, Cleveland said. Regardless of where on the globe Army Special Forces operate, Cleveland said, two exquisite capabilities will remain paramount: surgical strike and special warfare. e country needs both of these capabilities, he said, emphasizing the need to continually evolve for complex challenges that will test the mettle of the future force. Fiel, commander of Air Force Special Operations Command, said he expects little letup in the years ahead for the commands highest-demand capabilities: mobility, strike and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Tasked by McRaven to generate and sustain as much combat power as possible, Fiel said, he is working to rebalance the commands portfolio to better serve all theater special operations commanders. Despite ying tactical missions every day in support of every geographic combatant commander and theater special operations commander, all want more, more, more capability, Fiel said. New hardware entering the inventory is a step in the right direction, he said. Another big advance is the new Air Force Special Operations Warfare Center, stood up in February. Its mission includes executing special operations test, evaluation and lessons learned programs and developing doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures for AFSOC. Fiel shared Clevelands assessment of progress made in building more cohesive and interconnected teams across the special operations force community. Socom and [special operations forces] is a team sport. It really is the only joint force in the Department of Defense. Sometimes you are on oensive, sometimes you are on defense, and sometimes you are on special teams, he said. But we are the only force in the DOD that grows up together. Since its activation in 2006, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command has hit the ground running with no pause in the pace of its operational missions. But looking ahead to a post-Afghanistan future, the command is preparing to transition from landlocked operations to future maritime missions around the world, Sweeney told the audience. In another change to come, Marsoc plans to make its battalions regionally focused to better support theater requirements. In posturing for that future, Sweeney said, the Marines hope to nd better ways to integrate the kinds of technologies integrated into the battleeld in Afghanistan. If any thin g, Marine special operators are too heavy on technology, he said. When I see our teams and our Marines out there, and they have to have ve or six sets of equipment to access ve or six networks, that is problematic, he explained. We are now increasing the burden on the force from a load perspective. Ideally, Sweeney said, he would like to see one multitiered network that integrates these capabilities. Another challenge, he said, is to change the culture to take full advantage of what technologies deliver. Sweeney likened the process of compiling multiple data streams to form one operational picture to the broadcast of a Monday Night Football game. I, as a consumer, see one picture, and that is the picture I want to see, he said. He recognized, however, that someone behind the scenes has made decisions, selecting views from 40 or more screens to deliver what the viewer sees. at type of talent is extremely dicult to build in the military, he said, emphasizing that its not a job that should be relegated to a junior ocer or a midlevel noncommissioned ocer. at is somebody who is well-educated, understands the warghting functions, can quickly assimilate information, turn it into knowledge and present it to the commander, he said. It is very, very challenging to do. e problem, Sweeney said, is that the military, or at least the Marines, dont put emphasis into developing those capabilities or rewarding those who have them. From the Marine Corps perspective, if you are an innovator, if you are a visionary, if you are a sci ence-and-technology guy, you are probably not going to do well at the promotion board, he said. I think what we owe you [in indus try] and we owe ourselves is a culture and a mindset shift about how we go after capitalizing on the technology you provide and us ing that to our advantage to bring power to bear where it counts most. Special Ops evolving Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter met with senior U.S. and Afghan ocials in Kabul recently to praise them for their eorts on the transition to Afghan-led security, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. Carter spoke with Bismillah Khan Mohammadi, the Afghan minister of defense, and Ghulam Mujtaba Patang, the Afghan minister of the interior, at their respective ministries. Carter congratulated the ministers on the progress made by Afghan forces as they move toward taking the lead for security throughout Afghanistan, Little said. e deputy secretary and the ministers pledged to continue to work together on a number of important issues, including the sustained development of the Afghan national security forces, human capital development and a range of issues related to security transition, he added. e deputy secretary also praised both ocials for their dedication to improving the professionalism and capabilities of the Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police, Little said. In the morning, Carter met with Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commander of the International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces Afghanistan, and other senior ISAF ocials. During that meeting the deputy secretary commended them for their eorts and reiterated the U.S. commitment to a secure and sovereign Afghanistan, Little said. Following his meeting with Dunford, Carter joined about 300 military and civilian personnel outside the ISAF headquarters building for a weekly memorial service honoring fallen coalition and Afghan personnel. e deputy secretary was on the third leg of a weeklong overseas trip, and his meetings in Afghanistan were intended to underline U.S. support for the ongoing development of the Afghan security forces. Progress in Afghan transition cited Reserve Vice Adm. Robin R. Braun, Chief of Navy Reserve and Commander, Navy Reserve Force, spoke with reservists about the changes facing the force during her visit to Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, May 18. Braun broke from her duties at the Pentagon to directly explain the evolving shape of the Navy Reserve. e changes to the reserve force in coming years are due to priority shifts in budget and policy. e majority of the billet reductions will be within Naval Expeditionary Combat Command. Braun also identied 540 new billets for reservists in the Navys recently established Surge Maintenance program, which seeks to supplement shipyard repair and ret facilities with skilled labor drawn from a pool of qualied reserve component Sailors. Reserve opportunities are also anticipated aboard the Navys growing eet of littoral combat ships, with more than 600 billets coming online in the next several years.Changes ahead for smaller Navy Reserve

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13 During a Senate hearing in May on President Barack Obamas $9.5 billion military construction budget request for scal year 2014, Defense Department Comptroller Robert F. Hale said the severe and abrupt bud get cuts imposed by sequestration are devastating the U.S. armed forces. Hale and John Conger, acting deputy undersecretary of defense for installations and environment, testied on military construction and family housing before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on military construction, veterans aairs and related agencies. e ocials described for the panel the impact of sequestration on military construction, facilities sustainment and restoration, and on the services in the current year. While sequestration and related problems do not aect most military construction projects, they are devastating military readiness, Hale told the senators, adding, I just cant believe what were doing to the military right now. Summarizing the defense budget as a whole, Hale said, Were requesting $526.6 billion in discretionary budget authority. Its about the same as our 2013 request but about 8 percent higher than were executing right now in 2013 under sequestration. Beyond 2014, he said, If were able to carry out the presidents plan, we anticipate increases of about 2 percent a year, roughly enough to keep up with ination. e overall budget request represents the amount the president and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel believe is needed to support national security interests in a time of very complex challenges, Hale noted. Our request does not take into account a possible $52 billion reduction if sequester becomes an annual event, the comptroller said, but the president has submitted a budget with a balanced decit reduction plan of $1.8 trillion over 10 years, more than enough to meet the targets of the Budget Control Act. Hale added, We strongly hope that Congress will pass this plan or another plan that the president will sign, and then repeal sequestration. For scal 2014 the department is seeking $9.5 billion for military construction, an amount thats roughly equal to the presidents request of $9.6 billion in scal 2013, and $11 billion for family housing, he said. On the military construction side, DOD is seeking $3.3 billion for operational training facilities, as well as $0.9 billion for modernizing medical facilities, 17 dependent school projects and many others; and $1.5 billion for the family-housing program to provide quality, aordable housing for military families. In terms of sequestrations eects on military construction, the comptroller said, most accounts wont experience sequester-related cuts in 2013 because of special crediting provisions in the current law that apply when Congress enacts major cuts in an appropriation. e law says, Cuts are big enough, theres no further sequestration, Hale explained. But facilities sustain ment and restoration and modern ization projects already have been cut severely in scal 2013, Hale said, adding, Were essentially down to pretty much safety-of-life and -prop erty projects for the rest of the year. In his remarks to the panel, Conger underscored the negative eects of sequestration on facilities sustainment and restoration accounts. Because operation and maintenance dollars are more discretionary and thus more exible, he said, facilities sustainment was cut more deeply to make up the dierence. In FY we are deferring all but the most critical repairs. Were deferring routine maintenance. Were holding o on major purchases and accepting risk by looking for building equipment to hold out longer, the deputy undersecretary added. Frankly, he said, we can accommodate this for a short period of time but facilities will break if we shortchange these accounts for multiple years. Building systems will begin to fail. e cost to repair broken systems is much higher than that to maintain them, just like changing the oil in your car prevents expensive auto repairs or system failures. Keep in mind, he added, that this car is actually a real-property portfolio of more than 500,000 facilities and a plant-replacement value of more than $800 billion. If we dont invest in keeping it up, it will deteriorate and we will end up with a steady increase in failing or unusable facilities. Hale said the department is still researching specic impacts of sequestration on military construction, but for those that so far are aected, mainly Navy and defensewide, we believe we can absorb most of the sequestration reductions with available savings. We dont intend to reduce the scope of any construction projects. At least [right] now we dont believe that will be necessary. e department also plans to mini mize the number of projects deferred or cancelled as a result of sequestra tion, Hale said, but we will have to do a larger-than-normal number of reprogrammings, which will add to our work load and also to yours. e proposed DOD budget was built on several guiding principles, Hale said, in particular the need to continue to serve as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. In that eort, he added, proposed initiatives range from health care and energy eciency to weapon terminations, and include a new round of base realignment and closure, called BRAC. To cut long-term costs we need to consolidate infrastructure and reduce it. e only eective way to do that is for Congress to authorize a new round of base realignment and closure, so we asked for a round in 2015, the comptroller said. BRAC does save money Were saving $12 billion a year from the past BRAC rounds, he said, adding, I hate to think what Id be doing right now as comptroller of the Department of Defense if, especially in this environment, I had to nd another $12 billion of savings in the scal budget. e department needs congres sional support, Hale said, so we can make further cuts in infrastructure in 2015 and hold down the dollars the American taxpayers have to give us to meet their national security needs. In addition to being good stewards of public funds, he added, We are seeking to strengthen our alignment to the presidents defense strategy that was announced last year. We also seek a ready force and try to put emphasis on people. But frankly, sequestration is seriously undermining both of those goals. Budget cuts devastate readiness Nam Navy pilots remains returned A Navy pilot, missing from the Vietnam War, has been accounted for and will be buried with full military honors along with his crew, the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Oce announced recently. Navy Lt. Dennis W. Peterson of Huntington Park, Calif., was the pilot of a SH-3A helicopter that crashed in Ha Nam Province, North Vietnam. Peterson was accounted for on March 30, 2012. Also, aboard the aircraft was Ensign Donald P. Frye of Los Angeles, Calif.; Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Technicians William B. Jackson of Stockdale, Texas; and Donald P. McGrane of Waverly, Iowa. e crew will be buried, as a group, on May 2 at Arlington National Cemetery. On July 19, 1967, the four servicemen took o from the USS Hornet aboard an SH-3A Sea King helicopter, on a search and rescue mission looking for a downed pilot in Ha Nam Province, North Vietnam. During the mission, an enemy concealed 37mm gun position targeted the helicopter as it ew in. e helicopter was hit by the anti-aircraft gunre, causing the aircraft to lose control, catch re and crash, killing all four servicemen. In October 1982, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam repatriated ve boxes of remains to U.S. ocials. In 2009, the remains within the boxes were identied as Frye, Jackson, and McGrane. In 1993, a joint U.S./S.R.V. team, investigated a loss in Ha Nam Province. e team interviewed local villagers who identied possible burial sites linked to the loss. One local claimed to have buried two of the crewmen near the wreckage, but indicated that both graves had subsequently been exhumed. Between 1994 and 2000, three joint U.S./S.R.V. teams excavated the previous site and recovered human remains and aircraft wreckage that correlated to the crews SH-3A helicopter. In 2000, U.S. personnel excavated the crash site recovering additional remains.

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 30, 2013