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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-09-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00300

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00300


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Joint CIA, Navy 1972 operation recovered sunken lm capsulee Naval History and Heritage Commands National Mu seum of the United States Navy at the Washington Navy Yard hosted a special presentation by the Central Intelligence Agencys Historical Collections Division in its Museum Education Center. CIA his torian David Waltrop spoke about a recently declassied 1972 secret opera tion to recover a spy satellite lm capsule that fell 16,400 feet below the surface of the Pacic Ocean. It happened in 1971 and 1972 during a nine month period and this week is the 41st anniversary of the conclusion of that operation, Waltrop said. is is only the second underwater intelligence operation ever declassi ed by the CIA. e rst was called Project Azorian, a 1974 operation to re trieve a Soviet submarine that had sunk about 1,500 miles from the Waddan Islands in the Pacif ic Ocean. From an operational and intelligence perspective, this earlier mission is just as inter esting if not more so than Azo rian. It demonstrated our ability to retrieve a very small object of high intelligence value from the depth of 16,400 feet. At the time, it was the deepest underwater recovery ever attempted and showed that we could do this in 80 percent of the earths deep oceans. e story remained hidden from the public until last year when the CIA and the Nation al Reconnaissance Oce, the agency that controls our spy satellites, revealed that what they recovered was a piece of an American spy satellite code named Hexagon. e spy satellite took photos of denied areas areas of the earths geography that had in formation unavailable to the in telligence community through other means and returned the lm to the earth in one of four, 42-inch high and 56-inch di ameter, recovery vehicles called buckets. e buckets, containing 40,000 foot spools of lm, were ejected from the satellite and then returned to earth with the help of a parachute. Up Periscope National Hamburger Month is here! Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Volunteers Marines have situation in hand at cleanup Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com A lofty drive straight to the greenSUBASE celebration week taking shapeSecret mission declassied Trident Lakes golf outing raises more than $1,600 for Navy-Marine Reliefe day was a chance for some fun on the links and to help a good cause. Golfers around Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were able to participate in the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Societys annu al golf tournament April 26 at the Trident Lakes Golf Club. More than 80 people participated in the event, including the commanding ocer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Capt. Harvey Guey. e tournament raised mon ey with a portion of it going to the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society. Along with a round of golf, par ticipants were able to enjoy other fes tivities including a rae and a barbe cue lunch. This is probably the largest group for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society golf tournament since I have been here, said Kevin Doetch, Tri dent Lakes PGA golf professional. We had a big group this morning. is is a great thing for everybody. MM1 Edward Groover, the fundraiser coordi nator for the command, said the golf tournament is a part of the Navy-Marine This is probably the largest group for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society golf tournament since Ive been here. Kevin Doetch Trident Lakes Golf Club PGA golf pro Activities planned in conjunction with base 35th anniversary What could be better than a week-long celebration? Celebrate Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays 35th Anniver sary with Morale, Welfare and Recreation. e fun kicks o Friday, May 17, with Outdoor Adventure Center/Information, Tickets and Travel Open House and an Armed Forces Challeng es Tournament at Trident Lakes. On Saturday, May 18, the Armed Forces Kids Run at the Fitness Complex starts the week end with a great family friendly event. Plus, theres a trip to GTF Paintball for active duty person nel and Movie Under the Stars at the tennis courts for a fun eve ning with family and friends. Rack-N-Roll Lanes is throwing a big strike on Tuesday with a Dollar Day where all games and shoe rentals are only $1. Wednesday brings a Party in the Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Under the Pines. Live music by Scarletta is 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., plus there will be displays, booths, activity tables and a Fun Zone for the kids. Food will be available by local vendors in cluding Barberitos, Chick-l-a, Sonnys Bar-B-Q and Kings Bay Dominos Pizza. e week continues celebrat ing Friday, May 24, with a NEX & DeCA Carnival of Savings Weekend. And, nally, Saturday, May 25 is Navy Adventures Un leasheds Just Try-It-Athlon for kids and adults alike, starting at 9 a.m. at the Pool Complex. To complete the week-long party, MWR welcomes in the summer by opening of the Pool Complex with Summer Splash Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. For all details about events listed, visit MWR Kings Bay on facebook at www.facebook. com/mwrkingsbay or call MWR (912) 573-2538. Splash into summer with Navy Adventures Unleashed and MWR Fitness, and take part in the Just Try event, Saturday, May 25 and com memorate the 2013 Summer Pool Season. e goal for this two-person team, Just Try event is simply to Just Try swim/run May 25 Land use study brieng May 14Public invited to lunch meeting at NSB Conference CenterCamden County and sur rounding communities are in vited to hear briengs on the Joint Land Use Study, May 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Conference Center. e approval and com mencement of a JLUS by the Depart ment of Defense and the Oce of Economic Adjustment is evidence of the impor tance of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, said Sheila McNeill, partnership president. OEA has assisted communi ties over the past 20 years as they have sought to coordinate local civilian development with the activities of their local military installations. e JLUS oers technical and nancial resources to assist lo cal eorts to: Plan compatible civilian uses around local military facil ities and to carry out efforts to

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University of California, Los Angeless Operation Mend, Navy Medicine and Marine Corps leadership and sta came together to discuss shared initiatives in advancements in research and development, clinical infrastructure, and wounded warrior care at the De fense Health Headquarters, April 30. Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon general, and chief, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery; Gen. John Paxton, assistant commandant of the Marine Corps; his wife, Debbie Paxton, mental health advis er, Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment, Quantico, Va.; and Bonnie Amos, wife to Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, represented Navy Medicine and Ma rine Corpss top leadership during the event. ank you to the entire UCLA team and their partners on behalf of that young man or woman and their family for making a dierence in their life, said Nathan. We have an obligation to get these heroes and their families back to normalcy and the military cant do it alone. Were going to rely on the partnerships with the centers of excellence around the world that are already doing this kind of research. During his opening remarks, Nathan discussed the future of military medi cine and the importance of making advancements in medical research a reality for todays Sailors and Marines. We have to gure out how to go beyond transplant, beyond prosthet ics, and move to regenerative medi cine, said Nathan. We know that in the future we will have the ability to regenerate tissue, grow limbs and new tissue, grow spinal cords, vis a vis stem cell implantation, articial skin, ge netic manipulation, but as Mrs. Amos would say, More, more, more, faster, faster, we need to move the dot to today so that its not the 22nd century Sailor and Marine who benets from this but the 21st century Sailor and Marine. During the event, Shannon OKelley, UCLA Health Systems chief operating ocer, presented on Operation Mend and the importance of collaboration with the military to heal wounded warriors. We are here for our wounded war riors, said OKelley. At UCLA we have a vision statement that says, Healing human kind, one patient at a time. We are hoping we can collaborate to work that is currently undone and advance technologies to make a dierence. roughout the day, UCLA clini cians, researchers, engineers and business school faculty presented on such topics as Operation Mend, telemedicine, biological innovations, mental health and outreach programs, and business infrastructure. Our mission is to improve health and quality of life for military person nel and their families in a timely and ecient fashion, said Chia Soo, M.D., research director, UCLA Operation Mend, and vice chair for research, division of plastic and reconstructive surgery. We want to bring all of our resources at UCLA as well as our collaborative partners to help. After the presentations, Paxton dis cussed the critical needs of the Navy and Marine Corps team which in cludes amputee care, traumatic brain injury, genital/urinary reconstruction, and burn care. We make Marines, ght our na tions battles, and return better citi zens, Paxton said. We have a sacred All 40 Navy Lodges worldwide, in cluding the one onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, now oer free Wi-Fi to its guests. Guests can now access the free Wi-Fi in their rooms as well as the common areas within the Navy Lodge. We want our guests to have all the amenities they come to expect when theyre away from home, said Michael Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands Navy Lodge Program. By oering free Wi-Fi, guests will be able to keep in touch with loved ones back home or do work on the road much easi er. is is another great value Navy Lodge guests receive when they stay with us. Navy Lodges oer family suites and oversized guest rooms that fea ture a kitchenette complete with microwave and utensils, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Navy Lodges oer guests housekeeping service, vending machines, DVD rental service and laundry fa cilities as well as handicapped ac cessible rooms. Guests have in-room coee, breakfast in the lobby and newspa per as well as convenient on-base parking while staying at a Navy Lodge. Most Navy Lodges also ac cept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Having access to the Navy Lodge is so important for our military members on permanent change of station orders, said Rear Adm. Rob ert J. Bianchi (Ret.), Chief Execu tive Ocer, Navy Exchange Service Command. Navy Lodges are an important quality of life benet for our men and women in uniform. We are always looking for ways we can enhance our guests stay at one of our Navy Lodges. Oering free WiFi to our guests makes staying at a Navy Lodge an even greater value for our guests. To make a reservation at a Navy Lodge, call (800) 628-9466, 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go on line at www.navy-lodge.com. For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging.com. e Navy Exchange Service Command oversees 100 Navy Exchange facilities and nearly 300 stores world wide, 40 Navy Lodges, Ships Stores, the Uniform Program Management Oce, the Navy Clothing Textile and Research Facility and the Telecom munications Program Oce. NEXCOMs parent command is the Naval Supply Systems Com mand. NEXCOMs mission is to pro vide authorized customers quality goods and services at a savings and to support quality of life programs for active duty military, retirees, re servists and their families. NEXs and Navy Lodges operate primarily as a non-appropriated fund business instrumentality. NEX revenues generated are used to sup port Morale, Welfare, and Recre ation programs. In FY11, $2.7 billion in sales were generated with $42.8 million in divi dends provided to Navy MWR pro grams. In a communication to sta on May 1, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer proclaimed May 5 to 11 as Public Service Recognition Week, in honor of the more than 670 men and women who serve as civilian sta throughout the commands hospi tal the Navys fourth largest and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. I call upon all Naval Hospital Jacksonville sta to observe this week by acknowledging the impor tant contributions of our civil ser vice employees, Shaer stated. Our ability to care for our 57,000 enrolled patients depends in no small degree on the work by those who make up our civil service team. e theme for PSRW 2013 is Why I Serve. is performs as a reminder of how each government employee is important to the ability of NH Jacksonville its hospital and ve branch health clinics to achieve its mission: providing force health protection through readiness, op erational support, health promotion and quality family-centered care to all those entrusted to it. In her proclamation to the com mand, Shaer emphasized the com mitment of the civil service employ ees who work diligently alongside uniformed sta in every capacity, from healing patients as part of a Medical Home Port team to ensur ing the supplies needed to do so. e federal workforce provides much-needed continuity when our active duty sta change duty stations or deploy, Shaer said. Un fortunately, not many Americans get to see and experience all the great things our federal employees do to guarantee the United States govern ment remains unsurpassed. ank you, to each of our civilian sta, for your seless service to Naval Hospi tal Jacksonville and our nation. As eodore Roosevelt, who led the reform of the civil service system, stated, e government is us; we are the government, you and I. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for cancer, developing solu tions to address energy and climate crises, serving alongside warghters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. government is the best in the world. For more information on ways to celebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw.org. Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jack sonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient pop ulation 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.you tube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for email updates at nhjax connect@med.navy.mil. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. May 15 stand down mandatorySessions of safety stand down kicking o the 101 Days of Summer will be at 9 a.m. and at 1 p.m., May 15 in the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium. Attendance is mandato ry for all Kings Bay military personnel. Civilian personnel are strongly encouraged to attend. Guest speakers will be SA Mel Grin of NCIS speaking on Synthetic narcotics, Lt. Catherine Pace of Chapel on suicide prevention and Tim Wixson of Cape Fox on trac safety. Tenant commands are welcome to attend.Special Olympics to be May 16e Georgia Area 16 Summer Special Olym pics at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has been rescheduled for ursday, May 16, with opening ceremonies set for 10 a.m. at the ath letic complex. Volunteers need to muster at 7:30 a.m. at the track ineld. To volunteer, con tact EM1 Cody Guidry at 573-4818/2550 or email cody.j.guidry@navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawingKings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Associations month dinner meet ing is Tuesday, May 21 at Osprey Coves Mor gans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys, starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m. Guest speaker is Gary W. Belson, defense consultant provid ing assessments and training to the Federal Government and governments friendly to the U.S. Dinner is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret), at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net by May 17.Never Quit event May 19Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Chal lenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facilitate the red carpet awards at Jacksonville Beach, Fla., during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. Now hear this! Kings Bay health clinic salutes sta Branch Health Clinic Navy Lodge now has free Wi-Fi Navy Lodge Navy med, Marines share progress Navy Medicine 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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commitment to do right for those who put it all on the line. To our colleagues and partners at UCLA, thank you for bringing your tal ents here to work with the surgeon general, our part ners in Navy Medicine and to the entire Navy and Ma rine Corps team. We look forward to reconvening on this topic. UCLAs Operation Mend partners with the United States military to jointly heal the wounds of war by delivering leading-edge patient care, research and ed ucation, improving health, alleviating suering, and delivering acts of kindness. Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical per sonnel around the world who provide high qual ity health care to more than one million eligible bene ciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, pro viding critical mission sup port aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld.Progress Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 5 TRF at prep career day Air Force C-130 aircraft would then seize the buckets in mid-air near a recov ery site north of Hawaii. e rst and second buckets were re trieved successfully but the third buckets parachute snapped o and the bucket traveling at more than 400 feet per sec ond plunged into the ocean. After weeks of teams trying to nd out where the bucket may have found rest on the oor of the ocean, the search area was reduced to an eight-mile long, 1.5mile wide search zone. Using transponders, Fred N. Spiess (PhD), director of Marine Physical Laboratory Scripps and the crew onboard the USNS De Stieguer, located and photo graphed the upper housing of the bucket embedded in the sand Oct. 20, 1971. e CIA partnered with the Navy, who possessed the only vessel capable of op erating at the recovery depth needed, to plan and execute its recover. At the time the Navy was using three deep sea sub mersible Bathyscaphes, each named Trieste, Trieste II and Trieste II Deep Sea Vehicle 1 (DSV-1). e Navy proposed using the Trieste II (DSV-1) to help the CIA with the op eration. Over a period of eight months, deep submergence vehicle USS Trieste II (DSV-1) painstakingly searched for the missing bucket with assistance from its support ship USS White Sands (ARD 20) and support ship tug USS Apache (ATF 67). Everybody was thrilled, said Lee Mathers, a former Navy intelligence of cer, and Dr. Spiess was absolutely chued. ey had accomplished their mission. ey got the photograph, they knew where their target was, they put two more transponders in the water to mark the target and left the area absolutely convinced that they had met all criteria of their mission. An Integral Operating Unit (IOU) con sisting of sea-going tug USS Apache, WWII-era auxillary repair dock USS White Sands and Trieste II (DSV-1) ar rived in the search area a month later. All three ships were needed in order to conduct the dive. Trieste II (DSV-1) was housed in the USS White Sands which also supplied, repaired and equipped the bathyscaphe and USS Apache towed the repair dock. It was then that the problems started occurring. Our rst dive o Hawaii was in early November of 1971. We saw what our search area looked like and got down on the bottom. ere were no sonar contacts of consequence when we got there. We used up our battery and went back to the surface. What happened was the record ed positions of two of the [transponders] were reversed. So we were maneuvering some 2500 feet from where we should have been and in a vessel like Trieste II thats miles. After that, mechanical and weather problems pushed back the schedule, until Apr. 25 to 26 when they made a break through. We went back out again for another dive in April and we found a pile of junk on the bottom. But, it was encouraging because it was man made. It was a part of the satellite, we dont know what part, but there it was, said retired Navy Cmdr. Richard Taylor, one of three Trieste II pi lots during this operation. After nding more junk, they came upon what they thought was yet more pieces of the bucket, but it was much more. at was the lm pack, Taylor said. We didnt know that was what we were looking for, but we talked to the surface [operators] and they convinced us. Using a claw hook, the Trieste II managed to grab the lm pack and after wait ing for sediment to drain, they radioed in to the USS White Sands and started towards the surface. Everybody was excited, you could hear it in their voices, explained Taylor. We had found the object and we were starting to come back. On the way up, it starts breaking up, all the way up to the surface pieces are falling o it. When we got to the surface, the biggest piece I saw was about six feet of lm that a diver had in his hand. Everything else was gone; it was a cloud of dust. We were just devas tated. e lm, already punished by hitting the surface of the ocean, was not able to take the force of movement and it dis solved. ough the object disintegrated, there were two bright spots in the out come of the mission. We proved we were able to nd an object that size, about a big garbage can size, at 16,400 feet and we were able to go back there and, after overcoming some real problems, were able pick it up and bring it back to the surface, Taylor said. Taylor expressed his admiration for all the crew of the ships, that much like to day, dont have high visibility jobs. e Sailors are the ones I credit for this, the guys on the Apache and the White Sands, he said. ey are just Sail ors. ey are out there chipping paint, cleaning their bilges, making the engines run, washing dishes, doing all that sort of thing that Sailors do. ey dont get any credit for that, they dont get any of the glory. e guys that made this happen are those Sailors that were out there.Azorian A hundred years ago, then-Lt. Col. John A. Lejeune, the same Ma rine who would go on to become the 13th com mandant, formalize the Marine Corps colors, es tablish the Marine Corps birthday and found the Marine Corps League and the Marine Corps Institute founded the Marine Corps Association. Marine Corps ocers had a questionable repu tation at the time, and the organization began in 1913 as a group of ocers who met regularly to discuss improvements to the o cer corps, with the goal of establishing a periodical that would spread that dis cussion across the Corps. e Marine Corps Asso ciation, which celebrated its 100th birthday April 25, at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, is now open to active-duty or vet eran enlisted members and ocers from any service. Headquartered at Marine Corps Base Quantico, it has about 76,000 duespaying members and a sta of about 110, publish es both the Marine Corps Gazette and Leatherneck magazine, and has also established programs for recognizing and educat ing Marines. Our primary mission is to make sure our Marines continue to support the advancement of their leadership and then to reward them for the job theyre doing out there, said retired Sgt. Maj. Kevin Ben nett, MCAs area repre sentative for Quantico and the National Capital Area. e association has given awards for decades, but the establishment of a partnering foundation in 2009 has allowed it to expand several programs, including the Excellence Awards program. For example, the Com mand, Control, Commu nications and Comput ers Awards Dinner was April 18; the Ammo Tech Awards Dinner is coming up later this month, and the Ground Awards Din ner will be held in June. Meanwhile, the Chesty Puller Award goes to the top graduate of every boot camp company. In the last few years, the MCA has also started a program through which it funds libraries, usually based on the comman dants reading list, for units that need them, and it also organizes presenta tions by experts, and other learning opportunities, at the request of command ers through a program known as the Commanders Forum. All our programs have at their heart the element of commander mentor ship, said retired Maj. Gen. Ed Usher, the associ ations president and CEO. e core function of the MCA, though, remains the publication of its two monthly journals, in keep ing with Lejeunes original intent. e purpose of the as sociation was, in his mind, to foster an opportunity for robust discussion re garding the history and character of the Marine Corps, to provide a forum for open discussion on changes in military art and tactics, and by doing so, to inspire Marines as profes sional warriors to openly discuss our Corps and our operations, Usher said. e Gazette dates back to 1916, and Leatherneck back to 1917, although the latter did not fall under the MCA until the 1970s. Leatherneck started, in fact, as Marine Corps Base Quanticos base newspaper while Lejeune was the base commander. By and large, all the content in both magazines comes from our members and those who are inter ested in Marine Corps op erations, said Usher. e major dierence is that Leatherneck is geared toward telling the story of the Marine Corps, while the purpose of the Gazette is to talk military art and science and provide a fo rum for debate about ways to improve the Corps, Bennett explained. ere is something in the Gazette every month for the professional Ma rine, from the corporal NSCRS celebrates 100th

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 e second annual Informa tion, Tickets and Travel/Out door Adventures Center Open House 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, May 17. Inatables will be up and on-site, weather permit ting. Wet N Wild and Westgate resorts will be on-site for ques tions and promotions. OAC is oering 25 percent o all moon walk and slide rentals reserved at the event for anytime in May and June. ITT will have a grand prize drawing for a two-night stay at Westgate Resorts in Orlando, plus four tickets to Wet N Wild. e drawing will be at 2 p.m. on May 17 and you must be pres ent to win. Starting May 1, any purchase made at OAC/ITT will give you a chance to get an addi tional ticket for the grand prize drawing. For more information, call (912) 573-8103. Armed Forces Challenges Tournament At Trident Lakes Golf Club, Friday, May 17 with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Cost is $26 which includes lunch and special prizes. Format is Captains Choice with a twist. Commands may bring more than one foursome. Call ahead to save your spot at (912) 5738475 Armed Forces Kids Run At the Fitness Complex, the Run consists of a 1/2-mile race for 5 and 6 year olds, a 1-mile race for 7 and 8 year olds, and a 2-mile race for 9 and 10 year olds. All youths must register on-line at www.americaskids run.org, Select SUBASE Kings Bay from the drop down menu. The first 50 children to register will receive a T-shirt. For more information, call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, May 18 at dusk at Under the Pines Park and the tennis courts, see Marvel: The Avengers (PG-13). Free admission, bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Be aware that PG-13 rating is for mild violence. For more infor mation about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 Rack-N-Roll Lanes Tuesday, May 21 is Dollar Day, where all games and shoe rent als are $1. Call (912) 573-9492 for other offers. Party in the Park Wednesday, May 22, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Under the Pines. Live music by Scarletta from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., dis plays, booths, activity tables and a Fun Zone for the kids. e Fun Zone will cost $3 and will oer unlimited use of the bounce houses, rock wall, halo jump er, obstacle course and giant slide. Food will be available for purchase from local vendors including Barberitos, Chickl-a, Sonnys Bar-B-Q and Kings Bay Dominos Pizza. Navy Adventures Unleashed Just Try-It-Athlon is Saturday, May 25 for kids and adults at 9 a.m. at the Pool Complex. Each team of two will compete in a 100-meter inner tube swim, where each member will swim/ paddle 50 meters and run a 5K together. T-shirts for the rst 25 teams to register. Cost is $15 per two-member team. Medals for top nishers in womens, mens, mixed male & female and adult/ youth teams. Tennis shoes and proper swim attire required. Register at the Fitness Complex in advance. For more details, contact NAU oce at (912) 5739869. Summer Splash Open of the Pool Complex noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 25. Free admission for all. Food is avail able for purchase. Music, games and activities make this a great event for family and friends. e pool will stay open until 6 p.m. Trident Lakes Golf Clubs lakes shing Trident Lakes will be open for shing May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may sh the lake on the front 9 and Saturday, May 18 you may sh the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes shing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/ catch and release or $7 per per son/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and NSB Kings Bay Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the NSB Kings Bay permits. is is open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., with Mars Needs Moms May 11 and 12, Me gaminds May 18 and 19, Dr. Seuss: e Lorax May 23, Gnomeo and Juliet May 24, Aliens in the Attic May 25 and 26, Wreck-it Ralph May 27, Brave May 28, Monsters vs. Aliens May 29, Mr. Poppers Penguins May 30 and e Odd Life of Timothy Green May 31. Movie Under the Stars at the tennis courts at dusk May 18 is Marvel: e Avengers. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children kindergarten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirma tion of age. Single/dual mili tary must provide depen dent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more informa tion call (912) 573-2380.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call ITT/OAC Open House May 17 MWR Sports challenge you and start the summer with some thing fun. e event con sists of a 100-meter innertube swim and a 5K run. Each team member will be required to hop on an inner tube paddle them selves 50 meters and tag o to their partner, who will also paddle the dis tance. Upon transitioning to running shoes, the pair will then run a 5K together. Team entry fee is $15, which includes event shirts for the rst 25 teams and medals for top nishers. Participants may signup at the Kings Bay Fit ness Center for Womens, Mens, Mixed, Adult/Child or Youth categories. All participants must be able to swim. e rst heat starts at 9:30 a.m. e sign-up deadline is 1 p.m., Friday prior to the event. For more information contact NAU at (912) 5739869. ensure best uses. Engage the private sector to support best practices, and Partner with military departments as they seek civilian activities consis tent with their local mis sion. To date, JLUS has yielded many approaches to eect compatible civilian use near the Depart ments facilities, including land use plans for civilian growth around installations, zoning and land-use regulatory requirements to ensure consistent de velopment in the future, and enduring partner ships between the local installation and state and local governments. Chairman Barry King invites those interested in the development of Cam den County to attend this luncheon at 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, May 14 at the NSB Conference Center. Lunch is $15, to be paid at the door. Reservations must be made to thecam denpartnership@tds.net by Friday, May 10. Just TryStudy to the commandant, no matter what their [military occupational specialty], said retired Col. John Keenan, editor of the Ga zette. We get articles from Marines who think some thing could be better, and then you have those who, as part of their ocial du ties, want to get word out to other Marines. Many articles come in through the associations various writing contests, he added. Retired Col. Walt Ford, the associa tions publisher and the editor of Leatherneck, not ed that Gen. James Con way, when he was com mandant, once remarked that the best way to get a 15-minute audience with him was to publish an ar ticle in the Gazette. As for Leatherneck, Ford said he solicits sto ries from freelance writers based on historical events and current operations and exercises around the world. NMCRS

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 6, 13 and 20. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14 Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and trans fers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing refer ral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attend ing the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner Corps Relief Societys fund drive, which started April 1 and runs through April 30. Other ways NMCRS receives money is by allotments and donations. More than $1,600 was contributed to NMCRS during the golf tournament. e thing that makes it amazing is that we raise money from active-duty Sailors and Marines, to give it out to their fellow Sailors and Marines, said Brandie Fra zier, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief direc tor. e money we received will go into the coers of the Kings Bay active-duty fund drive. All of the money is used for things like interest-free loans and grants for college. Frazier said the goal of the drive is as much to raise awareness of NMCRS and its services as it is to raise money. We contact 100 percent of the ser vice members and make sure they know about the Navy Marine Corps Relief So ciety and where to turn in their time of need, Frazier said. If we get money out of it, that is a great thing, and we certainly do with fundraisers like this golf tournament. NMCRSs mission is to provide nan cial, educational and other assistance to Sailors, Marines and their families in need. In addition, the society provides services such as nancial assistance, budget-for-baby workshops, thrift shops and nursing services. Golf THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Welcome to Willies Dreamburger. Im Willie, your host. And how would you like your Dreamburger cooked? And what would you like on it? That was the spiel for this weeks question. Were well into May, which is known in some circles as National Hamburger Month. In trying to figure out how many hamburgers Americans eat, I found the aver age person eats three a week. So, 3 x 52 x 316 million = 493 trillion hamburgers a year! Yikes! As for my burger, make mine a double, medium rare, with double bacon, lettuce, tomato, grilled onion and horseradish cheese. And, hey, Ill have a garlic pickle on the side.Erick Roberson Exchange employee New Cumberland, Pa. Medium, with lettuce, American cheese, bacon, tomato, mayo, ketchup, mustard and cut in half. Pfc. Joe Fisher Security Force Battalion Seattle, Wash. Medium rare. Cooked on charcoal. With Creole seasoning and a little bit of Worcester sauce to give it a tangy and bold taste Sherita Love Navy Federal employee Charleston, S.C. Medium well, with ched dar cheese, bacon, mayo, ketchup and grilled onions. HN James Duncan Branch Health Clinic Durham, N.C. Medium, with lettuce, tomato, ketchup and mustard. Im kind of plain. Lance Cpl. Danny Recinos Security Force Battalion Elizabeth, N.Y A double, well cooked, with bacon, cheese any kind, surprise me bar becue sauce and curly fries on the side. MASN Jackie Forrest Security Force Battalion Cairo, Ga. Well done, all the way, with onion, tomato, lettuce, ketchup, mayo, American cheese, mustard and pick les. Thats about it. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Pentagon ocials followed up May 3 on Defense Sec retary Chuck Hagels earlier statement that the United States is looking at arming the Syrian opposition, saying it is important to rene options as the situation on the ground changes. In a meeting with reporters, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little stressed that the situation in Syria is extremely complicated, noting that the op position contains jihadists as well as a great number of moderate elements. is administration has been focused squarely on Syria for a long time, he said. e U.S. government has been using diplomatic and economic levers to try and get Syrian president Bashar Assad to step down, and Pentagon and U.S. Central Command ocials have High School Flash Back Leaders study Syria options THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of manag ing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble mak ing it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to regis ter call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC e 70th anniversary of a decisive victory for the predecessor of Coast Guard Cutter Spencer was recently observed. In the uncertain days of World War II, the Coast Guard-manned USS Spencer steamed along side convoy ships maintaining long lines of food, men and war machines destined for the front lines of Europe. ese ships faced a new, elusive enemy: U-boats. ese submarines harassed the Allies supply lines, attacking at night and vanishing just as quickly. e crew of Spencer lived under constant threat of attack. George Ellers was a 20mm-gun loader aboard Spencer during one such escort patrol in 1943. He recalls the gut-wrenching fear of those days. Often, the U-boats would travel in groups of up to ten, called wolf packs. ese wolf packs would follow the convoy, too deep to detect, and then strike in the early hours of the morning. e booming torpedoes shook men out of their racks in alarm. Most men slept in their lifejackets because of the frequency at which general quarters was sounded. On April 17, 1943, Spen cers sonarmen detected signs of a U-boat lurking amid the convoy. All hands sprung into action as general quarters sounded. Boots thundered across steel decks, shouts echoed through the air and the men of Spencer readied the powerful TNT-laden depth charges that were the only hope against this new enemy. A call came down from the bridge and the men laid down a square pattern of depth charges. Spencer had to steam at full speed ahead to avoid collateral damage from the very charges she laid. A thunderous boom snapped all eyes o the stern and the decks shud dered at the explosive force of the charge. Tension was high, though expectations were low, as this means of at tack rarely yielded results. Minutes passed when, without warning, came a shout that a submarine was breaking the surface o the port quarter. In a split second, every eye turned toward the port quarter in disbelief as the U-boat, with its decks awash and its conning tower crumpled from the depth charges, emerged from the sea. e air erupted into shouts as ready crews manned their three-inch guns. Out of the confusion, order quickly took over and the gunners trained their shots into the dull, hard metal of the deck. Spencer came around and faced the U-boat that was now dead ahead. As Ellers put it, once we knew the Spencer had de feated the German sub, we were mostly relievedthat it was them, and not us. Firing ceased as the wa ter came alive with strug gling survivors. Ellers recalls that when our crew saw German sur vivors oating in the water they did feel compassion for themwe picked up as many as we could. Cargo nets were thrown over the side and whiteknuckled sailors clutched onto them in desperation, ignoring their U-boats last moments. e U-boat creaked and groaned, then the bow, as though rendering a nal farewell salute, slid beneath the sea. e prisoners were tak en aboard and aorded food and blankets. ey were a pitiful bunch with their hair plastered across their faces and shivering from the cold. e prisoners were defeated, but remained jubilant they were still alive. is was the rst time many of the Spencer crew had seen their enemy in the esh and for many it was an uneasy feeling hav ing these Nazis so close. Ellers remembers the attitude of the Spencer crew towards the Ger man survivors on board was tolerable. We treated them with basic human dignity after all, they were young soldiers like us, ghting for their coun try. e German executive ocer of the U-175 was a very stern man he had to be sequestered from the crew and was interrogated by our interpreter. e crew took comfort knowing the enemy had been robbed of taking any more lives. e crew celebrated their victory over U-175 three days later when they transferred the prison ers to a base in Scotland, marking yet another con voy which they safely es corted across the Atlantic. Despite this triumphant moment Ellers recalls lit tle fanfare. I was not aware of the account of the Spencer sinking the U-175 in the newspapers. As far as be ing treated as heroes when we arrived back home it was 1943 and there were two wars going on we were just doing our duty for our country. Coast Guard caught, sank U-boat 70 years agobeen updating military options in case President Barack Obama needs them. Military options are part of the puz zle that is Syria, but only part, Little said. e U.S. en gagement in humanitarian operations in the nation, the diplomatic outreach to other nations in the region and economic sanctions against the government telegraph U.S. views of the conict. ose views are clear. Assad must go, he added. We hope that the Syrian people can determine their own future and that there is a responsible transition to a new Syria. e United States and allies also must also think of post-Assad Syria, Little said, noting that once Assad leaves power, American and international partners have to do what is best in a very unstable part of the world. e U.S. military is supporting the State Department in the humanitarian assistance mission to the people of Syria. U.S. military transport planes delivered packaged meals to countries bordering Syria for delivery to those in need inside the country. Other nonlethal aid being delivered to the opposition includes body armor and night-vision goggles. Were all clear-eyed about the challenges in this cri sis, and it may not end overnight, Little said. But if we can push this to a place where the violence is drawn down, there is an exit for Assad and there is a way to drive a political solution for the Syrian people them selves, that would be ideal. Syria

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SEALs honor WW II vet Sailors assigned to EastCoast Naval Special War fare units attended a fam ily celebration in honor of a Naval Combat Demoli tion-man April 12. e celebration was held to honor Alfred Mar tin Palacios heroic acts while storming the beach es of Normandy, France, on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Capt. Bob Smith, Com modore of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO, and a contingent of East-Coast based U.S. Navy SEALs (Sea, Air and Land) kicked o the observance by thanking Palacios for his service and all he had done to pave the way for NSW. at was followed by a retelling of Palacios acts at Normandy, which were recounted by Capt.(Ret.) Norm Olson, Commodore of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO from October 1977 to June 1980. Olson began, Pala cios enlisted in the Navy in 1943, volunteered for hazardous, prolonged and distant duty and was assigned to Training Base, Fort Peirce, Fla., where he trained and qualied as a member of Naval Combat Demolition Unit 131. Palacios was assigned to one of 21, nine-man units destined for Omaha Beach, said Olson. eir mission was to clear the landing beaches of obsta cles to open gaps for the landing force to success fully assault the beach. On the morning of June 6th 1944, Palacios Boat Team F was hit twice by artillery re on the approach to Beach Fox Red, killing six Combat Demo lition-men and wounding four others, Olson said. Palacio was among the four wounded men. With his elbow shat tered from machine gun re, Palacio managed to drag his Bangalore Torpe does, a ve-foot steel tube of explosives used to clear barbed-wire obstacles, across a football-sized beach to the shelter of the shoreline clis, Olson said. Once under the cov er of the clis he applied rst aid to his left arm and made a sling. He then made his way back to his Landing Craft Medium where he was wounded again while try ing to retrieve several 20 pound Hagersen Packs of explosives. is time he was hit in the back with shrapnel from an enemy artillery shell. Palacios then proceeded to maneuver back to the base of the shore line clis and propped himself up in a sitting po sition where he was given a rie from an Army GI. Still dazed and holding the rie as best he could with his good arm, Ger man soldiers began com ing over the dune line at the beach exit, Olson said. Seeing him point ing his rie at them, they raised their arms in sur render, and Palacios was credited with the captur ing of three to six German prisoners of war. Palacios was awarded the Purple Heart for his actions that day on the beach and his unit was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation, the only one awarded to Naval Forces during the Normandy invasion. Following D-Day, Pa lacios was evacuated to a eld hospital in England, where his left arm was amputated at the shoulder. Upon Palacios return to the United States, he was honorably discharged January 8, 1945, as a Car penters Mate 2nd Class. We are here to recog nize the heroic act of a teammate, Smith said. Any man that is going to get out of a landing craft injured, continue to car ry a Bangalore torpedo across the beach and then get injured again and go back and get the Hagers en Packs and bring them back and then capture six Germans is a frogman in my book. Smith presented Palacios with a ceremonial wooden paddle, a tradi tional symbolic farewell token that is presented to teammates. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen warned May 6 that further cuts in defense spending by European nations risk reducing the continents de fense and security to hot air, turning the alliance into what he called a global spectator rather than a real force on the world stage. e only way to avoid this is by hold ing the line on defense spending and to start reinvesting in security as soon as our economies recover, he told a meeting in Brussels of the European Parliaments Committee on Foreign Aairs. Rasmussen said European nations should not become absorbed by their own domestic issues, including sluggish economies that have contributed to defense cuts, and develop a truly global perspective to respond to crises further away from home. Having the right capabilities is impor tant, but it is not enough, he said. We must also have the political will to use them, to deal with security challenges on Europes doorstep, to help manage crises further away that might aect us here at home, and to better share the security burden with our North American allies. It was the latest in a series of warnings over the past several years by Rasmussen that fur ther cuts by European governments in de fense spending could put NATOs viability at risk. In 2011, Rasmus sen pointed out that European nations had cut their defense budgets by $45 bil lion the equivalent of Germanys entire annual defense budget while U.S contributions to NATO had increased from about half of total alliance spending to close to 75 percent. ose comments were followed by a warning from then-U.S. Defense Secre tary Robert M. Gates, who said NATO risked irrelevance and a dismal future if members were not seen as serious and capable partners in their own defense. Rasmussen said soft power alone really is no power at all. Without hard capabilities to back up its diplomacy, Europe will lack credibility and inuence, he added. It will risk being a global spectator, rather than the powerful global actor that it can be and should be. All four active services and ve of the six reserve components met or ex ceeded their numerical accession goals for scal year 2013 through March, Pentagon ocials re ported May 2. e end of March marked the scal years halfway point. Here are the active-force accessions for the rst six months of the scal year: Army: 33,857 acces sions, 101 percent of its goal of 33,520; Navy: 17,350 acces sions, 100 percent of its goal of 17,350; Marine Corps: 13,010 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 12,978; and Air Force: 13,989 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 13,989. e Army Reserve n ished March 1,501 acces sions short of its goal for the rst half of the scal year. Here are the reserve component accession numbers: Army National Guard: 26,100 accessions, 104 percent of its goal of 25,005; Army Reserve: 12,976 accessions, 90 percent of its goal of 14,477; Navy Reserve: 2,700 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 2,700; Marine Corps Reserve: 4,518 accessions, 101 per cent of its goal of 4,472; Air National Guard: 4,875 accessions, 100 per cent of its goal of 4,875; and Air Force Reserve: 3,685 accessions, 100 per cent of its goal of 3,685.Cuts rile NATO leader Military recruiters hit goals THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 A few months after the DDay invasion in June 1944, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower surveyed the Normandy beaches with his son. Youd never get away with this if you didnt have air su premacy, then 2nd Lt. John Eisenhower told his father. Without air supremacy, the elder Eisenhower replied, I wouldnt be here. e United States won air superiority in Europe by 1944 and the Pacic by the fall, won it in Korea in 1950 and hasnt lost control of the skies since. No American service mem bers on the ground have died from enemy air attacks since three were killed during the Korean War more than 60 years ago. Control of the air gives a mili tary power the opportunity to exploit height, reach and speed, enabling informed decisionmaking, the ability to strike free ly at a distance, and the ability to maneuver unconstrained by the limits of terrain or ocean, said Dr. Richard P. Hallion, former Air Force Historian and senior advisor for air and space issues with the Directorate for Securi ty, Counterintelligence and Spe cial Programs Oversight. I go back to David versus Goliath, said Hallion, author of Storm Over Iraq: Airpower in the Gulf War and Strike from the Sky: e History of Battleeld Attack. ere wasnt a manhood issue here demanding he engage in the close ght, where he could have lost. Instead, David hit him with an aerospace weapon a rock at a distance. In the airpow er era, that aerospace weapon is the airplane and missile of to day. When the North Koreans invaded the South in June 1950, they did so with overwhelm ing military ground forces, and initially, without encountering immediate air counter-attacks, Hallion said. Retired Marine Corps Col. Warren Wiedhahn experienced combat in Korea as a private rst class, both with and without close air support. During the initial days of the Korean War, there was no close air support, the North Korean juggernaut moved very rapidly with their tanks, artillery and infantry. ey annihilated ev erything in front of them until there was nothing left in Korea but the Pusan perimeter, Wiedhahn said. But by then, robust air power forces Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps assisted by British, Australian and South Korean airmen as well, were tak ing a heavy toll on North Korean attackers, Hallion said. During that period of time, the close air support was build ing up, Wiedhahn said. e ships were coming in. e Air Force was ying. Now, all of a sudden, we began to see air craft. After participating in the In chon Landing and helping to liberate Seoul, Wiedhahn also fought in the battle of the Cho sin Reservoir a few months later. United Nations forces chased the North Korean army to the southern tip of South Korea un til China sent more than 100,000 troops that surrounded about 30,000 U.N. troops. When we were up in the Cho sin Reservoir, and the Chinese decided to attack, we began to see air, mostly Navy and Marine Corps (Vought F4U) Corsairs o of the carriers, he said. ats how I really began to appreciate close air support. It (Control of the air) is absolutely, positively vital. After a 17-day battle in subzero temperatures, the Marines managed to withdraw to the coast, where they were evacu ated in December. Indeed, air power saved the Marines from annihilation as they made their way from the reservoir down to the coast, Hallion said. Five years after Wiedhahn retired as a colonel in 1982, he talked with four of the Chinese he fought against in the Chosin Reservoir during a visit to Bei jing as part of his Virginia-based Military Historical Tours organi zation. About 40 years later, the sights and sounds of American air craft were still engrained in their memories. One of the greatest things we feared was your airpower, the Chinese told Wiedhahn. ey said, they always moved at night and never moved when the weather was clear, because of their fear of our planes. Air superiority and supremacy are two of the ve conditions in the air warfare spectrum, along with air paralysis, air inferiority and air parity. ere is actually a huge dif ference between air superior ity and supremacy that can be especially costly in war, Hallion said. Air superiority is the absolute minimal condition we should ever be prepared to ght with, he said. Air superiority means that the enemy is still able to un dertake air action against you, but you are able to confound and defeat it. What we should really seek is what we had in the latter stages of World War II and what we had in the (Per sian) Gulf War, where we had air supremacy, indeed, we had air dominance. ats where you so thoroughly dominate your op ponent that they are instantly confronted with air attack, and they are unable to do anything about it. We had air supremacy, clear ly, in the rst Gulf War because in that war, the Iraqi air force was simply unable to intervene either against our coalition air forces or against coalition sur face forces. At the end of the Gulf War in 1991, by the second or third week, the Iraqi air force was eeing the country, and the air action there was primar ily intercepting aircraft trying to ee to Iran. ats what happens when you have air supremacy, and in the best of all circumstances, air dominance. You can then de vote 100 percent of your air ef fort to ensure that the people on the ground get the support they need to prosecute the ground war. Gen. Charles A. Horner, who commanded all U.S. and allied air assets during Opera tions Desert Shield and Desert Storm, credited the airpower dominance to the intelligence, preparation and training before the invasion. When did we get air supe riority? We had it before the war began because we had the means to get it the equip ment, intelligence, training, and the courage of the aircrews, Horner said. But do not get the idea that gaining control of the air was easy. It was not a macho, nosweat operation. What turned into a turkey shoot in late Janu ary and February started out as a bitter struggle; those rst few days were the hardest-fought, most-critical aspect of the entire war. Because the Air Force has had almost an unprecedented control of the skies for decades, it might be easy to forget how costly it was to achieve air supe riority, especially during World War II. In the European and Mediter ranean theaters alone, the U.S. lost 4,325 ghters and bombers before D-Day, with 17,000 killed and 21,000 wounded or POW in the ght for air superiority and didnt achieve theater-wide su premacy until the nal days of the war. More Airmen were killed in aerial missions over Europe than all the Marines who unfortunately died in the entire span of World War II, said re tired Gen. David Deptula, who was the Air Forces senior intelli gence community ocial when he was the Headquarters Air Force deputy chief of sta for in telligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Deptula was also the main attack planner during Operation Desert Storm in 1991 and a joint task commander for Operation Northern Watch in 1998-99. If you take a look at how many aircraft we lost in the Vietnam War, 2,781 Air Force and Navy combined, that was against a fth-rate power with only 206 ghter aircraft, Dep tula said. Why did that happen? Because, we were late in achiev ing air superiority. It took us some 30 years to apply the air superiority lesson, but we did it in the form of de veloping the F-15 (Eagle). But those F-15s rst ew in 1972, and now some of them are more than 30 years old. In 1979, I ew F-15s at Kadena Air Base, Japan. In 2008, my son was ying the exact same tail numbers I did, but it was 29 years later, and that was ve years ago. Today, we have a geriatric combat Air Force, and we badly need to recapitalize it in order to maintain the advantage of air supremacy in the future. Without control of the air, troops on the ground face many hardships and hazards, as the late Gen. Bruce K. Holloway, vice chief of sta during the Vietnam War, wrote in an article for Air University Press. For six decades, American troops havent had to experience what its like to lose mobility ex cept at night; to be cut o from supplies and reinforcements; to be constantly under the watch ful eye of enemy reconnaissance aircraft; to be always vulnerable to strang and bombing attacks; to see ones ghters and bomb ers burn on their handstands; and to be outnumbered, out gunned and outmaneuvered in the air, Holloway wrote in his article, Air Superiority in Tactical Air Warfare. However, there are some who arent convinced the Air Forces decades-long dominance of the air is a certainty, especially with recent cuts in weapons systems such as the F-22 Raptor, which Deptula calls the most capable aircraft ever built specically to achieve air superiority, and F-35 Lightning II. In 2009, then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates called for cap ping the original 722 Raptors to 187. ree years later, across-theboard defense spending cuts have put the F-35 at risk. ere are newer threats out there, quite frankly, that could defeat the aircraft that we cur rently have, Deptula said. ats why the Air Force works so hard to recapitalize those air craft by building F-22s and F-35s that can operate, using modern technology, to achieve air dominance by networking capabili ties with sensors that we never had in the past. Our challenge in the future is were not going to have time to do what we did in World War II, bring Americas industrial might to bear over the time necessary to create the kinds of aircraft to maintain our superiority advantage. It falls on Airmen of today, to articulate the air superiority lessons of the past and to make the Airmans voice in the defense of our nation heard. Todays Air men need to be unabashedly clear about the lessons of his tory in order to maintain our ca pabilities in the future. As vital as Eisenhower per ceived air superiority to suc cess on D-Day, some airpower experts wonder if the day will come when the U.S. wont have the control of the skies needed for a crucial confrontation with another military power. I think the greatest danger we face as a nation today is to as sume that air and space power is a God-given right to the United States of America, and we will always enjoy it, Hallion said. We see that sometimes, un fortunately, in our sister ser vices. ey have labored so long with perfect freedom of maneuver because of the American air power shield that weve put over their heads that I think many individuals fail to realize that it is perishable. Air dominance is like freedom itself. You have to constantly nurture it, care for it and invest in it to ensure that you will still have it. U.S. enjoying air superiority since 1944

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 13 is feature is part of the rough Airmens Eyes se ries on AF.mil. ese stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story. Forty years have passed since the United States ended its involvement in the Vietnam War, and40 years have passed since many of its sons who en gaged in the war and were captured by the enemy, were liberated and returned home. One of those liberated prisoners was retired Col. Will Gideon, former 437th Airlift Wing Supply Squad ron commander, who was a pilot with the 67th Tacti cal Fighter Squadron the day he was shot down and captured by the North Viet namese August 7, 1966. Gideon, a native of Ar lington, Va., ew 54 suc cessful missions into Viet nam before being shot down. We came into the mountains low that day, said Gideon, in regards to the aircraft formation. Af ter I released my bombs, I rolled the jet to its side and popped back up. It started like any other mission ... only, I had no idea it would be my last (mission as a pilot.) From within the cock pit of his jet, Gideon wit nessed a ery explosion in the atmosphere igniting from another F-105 direct ly in front of him. e aircrafts pilot safely ejected, but was captured by the deceptive enemy below. In a ash, black smoke lled the red sky and cloaked Gideons sight, blinding him nearly instantly. Bullets cut through the air, whizzing as they buzzed all around. Gideon remained calm, but could only hear the sound of his heart beating and ground re that was coming from North Viet namese soldiers, hidden within the foliage of the jungle below. I tried like hell to get out of there, said Gideon. is is when everything started happening really fast. And, going fast was on Gideons side. He was piloting an F-105, the Air Forces premiere jet ghter at the time, and it was able to reach supersonic speeds quickly. However, his distance to the ground was against him. According to Gideon, he knew he was in trouble when he felt a jarring explo sion, as well as the ratatatat of bullets bounc ing o his jet. Before he could evade the en emy attack, the aircraft began shaking and spiral ing downward uncontrollably. It was like someone grabbed the tail end of the plane and wouldnt let go, said Gideon. e jet was spinning out of control. It was all happening so fast, but I remember starting to see everything go grey and feeling numb. Accepting his fate, Gide on knew his plane was destined to crash into the Vietnamese mountainside. With every passing moment, more control was slipping through his ngers. Knowing he was also about to pass out, Gideon was losing control of more than his jet, but also himself. My life wasnt ashing before my eyes, said Gideon. My training was. I knew what I had to do to survive ... death wasnt an option that day. rough the disarray of being shot out of the sky, he thought back to his pi lot training at Nellis AFB, Nev., and managed to eject. From there, every thing went blank. Gideon awoke in dark ness, unclear of the amount of time that had passed or where he was. He was nowhere near the crash site. He was stripped of his clothes, in pain and locked inside a small, humid jail cell. e only light piercing the eroded room was coming from a barred window. I was out for nearly a week, said Gideon. When I nally woke up, my left leg was in a cast below the knee. I cant recall exactly when it was broken. My shoulder and head were swollen and I could barely move. Due to his memory loss, Gideon wasnt sure how or when he had incurred his injuries. However, it was common for Ameri can POW pilots to enter a detention camps hurt due to injuries sustained while ejecting from their aircraft. A total of 13 facilities in North Vietnam were used as detention camps for American POWs; ve camps were located in Hanoi and the rest were outside of the city. With the exception of the Ha L Prison, sarcastically named the Hanoi Hilton by American POWs, the ocial names of the 12 other Vietnamese camps were unknown. Gideons camp was like other countryside camps used by the enemy, the sound of the creek and wildlife echoed through the surrounding canopy of coconut palm and ba nana trees. e seem ingly peaceful Vietnamese swamplands were a smoke and mirrors to its reality. Rice paddies were being tended by North Vietnam ese civilians. It was a lonely place, undisturbed by the rest of the world. Although Gideon didnt know where he was, he would be a prisoner there for roughly six years, seven months and 13 days. e captors thought I was really screwed up mentally, said Gideon. I refused to wear the pris on rags they provided, I didnt touch my food and for the most part, I had no idea where I was. is be havior went on for weeks. A young Navy ocer from Florida, known sim ply as Lt. Browning, was Gideons cell mate when he arrived at the prison. Browning helped Gideon adjust to his new sur roundings by tending to his new friends injuries, explaining where Gideon was and even refusing to eat Gideons food por tions. Browning wouldnt eat my food even though I refused to touch it, and not because he wasnt hungry or afraid of being punished, Gideon said. He was starving and eas ily couldve eaten it, but he didnt want the captors to think I was eating. He wanted them to know how sick I was. He was just doing it because it was the right thing to do. e integrity displayed by his cell mate helped Gideon transition to his new, dire surroundings. One day, Gideon nally accepted a bowl of rice. Within minutes, the en tire bowl was gone. A rare humble display of hu manity was shown by the prison guard, who noticed Gideon quickly eat his rice and oered him a second bowl. However, the display of humanity was short lived. Gideon, like most Amer ican POWs at the time, was often isolated from the other prisoners dur ing questioning. Bound by his wrist with rope, he was viciously interrogat ed by North Vietnamese soldiers. But, he did not falter, nor did he break. With a body battered from the savage conditions and even after witnessing the pain, and broken bod ies, of his fellow service members; Gideon never reached his breaking point. Selling out my coun try wasnt an option, said Gideon, remaining true to his commitment as an Air man. ey knew I wasnt saying a word, other than what I was trained to say. American POWs were often forced to sign con fessions of guilt, write let ters to American politi cians or be manipulated in other ways, and used as an asset for the North Vietnamese military agenda. Some prisoners were given special treatment, or favors by their captors, by simply cooperating with them. Gideon refused any special treatment because he felt to accept anything from the enemy would place him in the enemys debt, a price he refused to pay. ere were times I started to become dis couraged, Gideon said, looking back on his tested resiliency as a POW. Ev ery year that passed, [away from family] I wondered what was happening back home. New prisoners would come in and say things like, theres no way well be here after the rst of next year and that year would pass. en another year passed and another and so on ... and eventu ally, many years passed. At times, that was very dis couraging. Although he could have easily succumbed to the despair, Gideon never gave up on his faith in the United States. Years passed, and his family waited patiently for his return. He knew they would be taken care of by the Air Force until that day ar rived. ere was no escap ing the prison, Gideon said. Even if there were, I couldnt leave those men behind. I wouldnt be able to live with myself knowing the punishment that would have been bestowed upon them. In the years Gideon was prisoner, only one prison break was attempted. e two Americans that at tempted the escape were caught within hours and subjected to even longer amounts of torture than they spent away from the prison. One of the men died from the excessive beating he received from the enemy. Gideon never gave up, through more than six years of prayer, exercising in his prison cell, believ ing in the United States promise to bring him home and being friends with his fellow American POWs, he kept hope alive. And although Compre hensive Airman Fitness didnt exist during the Vietnam War, Gideon and his fellow prisoners un knowingly used those pillars to survive. On March 4, 1973, Gideons prayers were answered. He was liberated and able to return home. Looking back, he holds no grudge against his captors, and his positive outlook on life has helped him move on from the turmoil that shackled him physi cally and mentally for the better part of a decade. Gideon went on to re tire from the Air Force as a colonel and spent his last years of active duty commanding the 437th AW Supply Squadron and Resource Management deputy commander at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C. Upon retirement, he remained in the local area and today lives a quiet life in Mount Pleasant, S.C. Even though he has moved on with his life and let go of the pains of yester day and rarely talks about his time as a POW, he will never forget the sacrices made and encourages ev eryone to remember the 1,655 still missing after the conicts in Southeast Asia more than 40 years ago. Life as POW a deadly trial for Vietnam pilots

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Joint CIA, Navy 1972 operation recovered sunken lm capsulee Naval History and Heritage Commands National Museum of the United States Navy at the Washington Navy Yard hosted a special presentation by the Central Intelligence Agencys Historical Collections Division in its Museum Education Center. CIA historian David Waltrop spoke about a recently declassied 1972 secret operation to recover a spy satellite lm capsule that fell 16,400 feet below the surface of the Pacic Ocean. It happened in 1971 and 1972 during a nine month period and this week is the 41st anniversary of the conclusion of that operation, Waltrop said. is is only the second underwater intelligence operation ever declassied by the CIA. e rst was called Project Azorian, a 1974 operation to retrieve a Soviet submarine that had sunk about 1,500 miles from the Waddan Islands in the Pacific Ocean. From an operational and intelligence perspective, this earlier mission is just as interesting if not more so than Azorian. It demonstrated our ability to retrieve a very small object of high intelligence value from the depth of 16,400 feet. At the time, it was the deepest underwater recovery ever attempted and showed that we could do this in 80 percent of the earths deep oceans. e story remained hidden from the public until last year when the CIA and the National Reconnaissance Oce, the agency that controls our spy satellites, revealed that what they recovered was a piece of an American spy satellite code named Hexagon. e spy satellite took photos of denied areas areas of the earths geography that had information unavailable to the intelligence community through other means and returned the lm to the earth in one of four, 42-inch high and 56-inch diameter, recovery vehicles called buckets. e buckets, containing 40,000 foot spools of lm, were ejected from the satellite and then returned to earth with the help of a parachute. Up Periscope National Hamburger Month is here! Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Volunteers Marines have situation in hand at cleanup Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com A lofty drive straight to the greenSUBASE celebration week taking shapeSecret mission declassied Trident Lakes golf outing raises more than $1,600 for Navy-Marine Reliefe day was a chance for some fun on the links and to help a good cause. Golfers around Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay were able to participate in the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Societys annual golf tournament April 26 at the Trident Lakes Golf Club. More than 80 people participated in the event, including the commanding ocer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Capt. Harvey Guey. e tournament raised money with a portion of it going to the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society. Along with a round of golf, participants were able to enjoy other festivities including a rae and a barbe cue lunch. This is probably the largest group for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society golf tournament since I have been here, said Kevin Doetch, Trident Lakes PGA golf professional. We had a big group this morning. is is a great thing for everybody. MM1 Edward Groover, the fundraiser coordi nator for the command, said the golf tournament is a part of the Navy-Marine This is probably the largest group for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society golf tournament since Ive been here. Kevin Doetch Trident Lakes Golf Club PGA golf pro Activities planned in conjunction with base 35th anniversary What could be better than a week-long celebration? Celebrate Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays 35th Anniversary with Morale, Welfare and Recreation. e fun kicks o Friday, May 17, with Outdoor Adventure Center/Information, Tickets and Travel Open House and an Armed Forces Challenges Tournament at Trident Lakes. On Saturday, May 18, the Armed Forces Kids Run at the Fitness Complex starts the weekend with a great family friendly event. Plus, theres a trip to GTF Paintball for active duty personnel and Movie Under the Stars at the tennis courts for a fun evening with family and friends. Rack-N-Roll Lanes is throwing a big strike on Tuesday with a Dollar Day where all games and shoe rentals are only $1. Wednesday brings a Party in the Park from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Under the Pines. Live music by Scarletta is 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., plus there will be displays, booths, activity tables and a Fun Zone for the kids. Food will be available by local vendors including Barberitos, Chick-l-a, Sonnys Bar-B-Q and Kings Bay Dominos Pizza. e week continues celebrating Friday, May 24, with a NEX & DeCA Carnival of Savings Weekend. And, nally, Saturday, May 25 is Navy Adventures Unleasheds Just Try-It-Athlon for kids and adults alike, starting at 9 a.m. at the Pool Complex. To complete the week-long party, MWR welcomes in the summer by opening of the Pool Complex with Summer Splash Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. For all details about events listed, visit MWR Kings Bay on facebook at www.facebook. com/mwrkingsbay or call MWR (912) 573-2538. Splash into summer with Navy Adventures Unleashed and MWR Fitness, and take part in the Just Try event, Saturday, May 25 and commemorate the 2013 Summer Pool Season. e goal for this two-person team, Just Try event is simply to Just Try swim/run May 25 Land use study brieng May 14Public invited to lunch meeting at NSB Conference CenterCamden County and surrounding communities are invited to hear briengs on the Joint Land Use Study, May 14 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Conference Center. e approval and commencement of a JLUS by the Department of Defense and the Oce of Economic Adjustment is evidence of the importance of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, said Sheila McNeill, partnership president. OEA has assisted communities over the past 20 years as they have sought to coordinate local civilian development with the activities of their local military installations. e JLUS oers technical and nancial resources to assist local eorts to: Plan compatible civilian uses around local military facilities and to carry out efforts to

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University of California, Los Angeless Operation Mend, Navy Medicine and Marine Corps leadership and sta came together to discuss shared initiatives in advancements in research and development, clinical infrastructure, and wounded warrior care at the Defense Health Headquarters, April 30. Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon general, and chief, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery; Gen. John Paxton, assistant commandant of the Marine Corps; his wife, Debbie Paxton, mental health adviser, Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment, Quantico, Va.; and Bonnie Amos, wife to Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps, represented Navy Medicine and Marine Corpss top leadership during the event. ank you to the entire UCLA team and their partners on behalf of that young man or woman and their family for making a dierence in their life, said Nathan. We have an obligation to get these heroes and their families back to normalcy and the military cant do it alone. Were going to rely on the partnerships with the centers of excellence around the world that are already doing this kind of research. During his opening remarks, Nathan discussed the future of military medicine and the importance of making advancements in medical research a reality for todays Sailors and Marines. We have to gure out how to go beyond transplant, beyond prosthetics, and move to regenerative medicine, said Nathan. We know that in the future we will have the ability to regenerate tissue, grow limbs and new tissue, grow spinal cords, vis a vis stem cell implantation, articial skin, genetic manipulation, but as Mrs. Amos would say, More, more, more, faster, faster, we need to move the dot to today so that its not the 22nd century Sailor and Marine who benets from this but the 21st century Sailor and Marine. During the event, Shannon OKelley, UCLA Health Systems chief operating ocer, presented on Operation Mend and the importance of collaboration with the military to heal wounded warriors. We are here for our wounded warriors, said OKelley. At UCLA we have a vision statement that says, Healing human kind, one patient at a time. We are hoping we can collaborate to work that is currently undone and advance technologies to make a dierence. roughout the day, UCLA clinicians, researchers, engineers and business school faculty presented on such topics as Operation Mend, telemedicine, biological innovations, mental health and outreach programs, and business infrastructure. Our mission is to improve health and quality of life for military personnel and their families in a timely and ecient fashion, said Chia Soo, M.D., research director, UCLA Operation Mend, and vice chair for research, division of plastic and reconstructive surgery. We want to bring all of our resources at UCLA as well as our collaborative partners to help. After the presentations, Paxton discussed the critical needs of the Navy and Marine Corps team which includes amputee care, traumatic brain injury, genital/urinary reconstruction, and burn care. We make Marines, ght our nations battles, and return better citizens, Paxton said. We have a sacred All 40 Navy Lodges worldwide, including the one onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, now oer free Wi-Fi to its guests. Guests can now access the free Wi-Fi in their rooms as well as the common areas within the Navy Lodge. We want our guests to have all the amenities they come to expect when theyre away from home, said Michael Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands Navy Lodge Program. By oering free Wi-Fi, guests will be able to keep in touch with loved ones back home or do work on the road much easier. is is another great value Navy Lodge guests receive when they stay with us. Navy Lodges oer family suites and oversized guest rooms that feature a kitchenette complete with microwave and utensils, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Navy Lodges oer guests housekeeping service, vending machines, DVD rental service and laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible rooms. Guests have in-room coee, breakfast in the lobby and newspaper as well as convenient on-base parking while staying at a Navy Lodge. Most Navy Lodges also accept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Having access to the Navy Lodge is so important for our military members on permanent change of station orders, said Rear Adm. Robert J. Bianchi (Ret.), Chief Executive Ocer, Navy Exchange Service Command. Navy Lodges are an important quality of life benet for our men and women in uniform. We are always looking for ways we can enhance our guests stay at one of our Navy Lodges. Oering free WiFi to our guests makes staying at a Navy Lodge an even greater value for our guests. To make a reservation at a Navy Lodge, call (800) 628-9466, 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go online at www.navy-lodge.com. For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging.com. e Navy Exchange Service Command oversees 100 Navy Exchange facilities and nearly 300 stores world wide, 40 Navy Lodges, Ships Stores, the Uniform Program Management Oce, the Navy Clothing Textile and Research Facility and the Telecom munications Program Oce. NEXCOMs parent command is the Naval Supply Systems Command. NEXCOMs mission is to provide authorized customers quality goods and services at a savings and to support quality of life programs for active duty military, retirees, reservists and their families. NEXs and Navy Lodges operate primarily as a non-appropriated fund business instrumentality. NEX revenues generated are used to support Morale, Welfare, and Recreation programs. In FY11, $2.7 billion in sales were generated with $42.8 million in dividends provided to Navy MWR programs. In a communication to sta on May 1, Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Ocer Capt. Gayle Shaer proclaimed May 5 to 11 as Public Service Recognition Week, in honor of the more than 670 men and women who serve as civilian sta throughout the commands hospital the Navys fourth largest and ve branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. I call upon all Naval Hospital Jacksonville sta to observe this week by acknowledging the important contributions of our civil service employees, Shaer stated. Our ability to care for our 57,000 enrolled patients depends in no small degree on the work by those who make up our civil service team. e theme for PSRW 2013 is Why I Serve. is performs as a reminder of how each government employee is important to the ability of NH Jacksonville its hospital and ve branch health clinics to achieve its mission: providing force health protection through readiness, operational support, health promotion and quality family-centered care to all those entrusted to it. In her proclamation to the command, Shaer emphasized the commitment of the civil service employees who work diligently alongside uniformed sta in every capacity, from healing patients as part of a Medical Home Port team to ensuring the supplies needed to do so. e federal workforce provides much-needed continuity when our active duty sta change duty stations or deploy, Shaer said. Unfortunately, not many Americans get to see and experience all the great things our federal employees do to guarantee the United States government remains unsurpassed. ank you, to each of our civilian sta, for your seless service to Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation. As eodore Roosevelt, who led the reform of the civil service system, stated, e government is us; we are the government, you and I. Today, almost 3 million strong, federal employees are researching cures for cancer, developing solutions to address energy and climate crises, serving alongside warghters and caring for the nations heroes. Each and every day, public service workers protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, ensuring that the U.S. government is the best in the world. For more information on ways to celebrate PSRW, visit www.psrw.org. Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. May 15 stand down mandatorySessions of safety stand down kicking o the 101 Days of Summer will be at 9 a.m. and at 1 p.m., May 15 in the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Auditorium. Attendance is mandato ry for all Kings Bay military personnel. Civilian personnel are strongly encouraged to attend. Guest speakers will be SA Mel Grin of NCIS speaking on Synthetic narcotics, Lt. Catherine Pace of Chapel on suicide prevention and Tim Wixson of Cape Fox on trac safety. Tenant commands are welcome to attend.Special Olympics to be May 16e Georgia Area 16 Summer Special Olympics at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay has been rescheduled for ursday, May 16, with opening ceremonies set for 10 a.m. at the athletic complex. Volunteers need to muster at 7:30 a.m. at the track ineld. To volunteer, con tact EM1 Cody Guidry at 573-4818/2550 or email cody.j.guidry@navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawingKings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Associations month dinner meeting is Tuesday, May 21 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys, starting with social hour at 5:30 p.m. Guest speaker is Gary W. Belson, defense consultant providing assessments and training to the Federal Government and governments friendly to the U.S. Dinner is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret), at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net by May 17.Never Quit event May 19Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facilitate the red carpet awards at Jacksonville Beach, Fla., during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. Now hear this! Kings Bay health clinic salutes sta Branch Health Clinic Navy Lodge now has free Wi-Fi Navy Lodge Navy med, Marines share progress Navy Medicine 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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commitment to do right for those who put it all on the line. To our colleagues and partners at UCLA, thank you for bringing your talents here to work with the surgeon general, our partners in Navy Medicine and to the entire Navy and Marine Corps team. We look forward to reconvening on this topic. UCLAs Operation Mend partners with the United States military to jointly heal the wounds of war by delivering leading-edge patient care, research and education, improving health, alleviating suering, and delivering acts of kindness. Medicine is a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million eligible beneciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld.Progress Pirates Cove Galley menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 5 TRF at prep career day Air Force C-130 aircraft would then seize the buckets in mid-air near a recovery site north of Hawaii. e rst and second buckets were retrieved successfully but the third buckets parachute snapped o and the bucket traveling at more than 400 feet per second plunged into the ocean. After weeks of teams trying to nd out where the bucket may have found rest on the oor of the ocean, the search area was reduced to an eight-mile long, 1.5mile wide search zone. Using transponders, Fred N. Spiess (PhD), director of Marine Physical Laboratory Scripps and the crew onboard the USNS De Stieguer, located and photographed the upper housing of the bucket embedded in the sand Oct. 20, 1971. e CIA partnered with the Navy, who possessed the only vessel capable of operating at the recovery depth needed, to plan and execute its recover. At the time the Navy was using three deep sea submersible Bathyscaphes, each named Trieste, Trieste II and Trieste II Deep Sea Vehicle 1 (DSV-1). e Navy proposed using the Trieste II (DSV-1) to help the CIA with the operation. Over a period of eight months, deep submergence vehicle USS Trieste II (DSV-1) painstakingly searched for the missing bucket with assistance from its support ship USS White Sands (ARD 20) and support ship tug USS Apache (ATF 67). Everybody was thrilled, said Lee Mathers, a former Navy intelligence ofcer, and Dr. Spiess was absolutely chued. ey had accomplished their mission. ey got the photograph, they knew where their target was, they put two more transponders in the water to mark the target and left the area absolutely convinced that they had met all criteria of their mission. An Integral Operating Unit (IOU) consisting of sea-going tug USS Apache, WWII-era auxillary repair dock USS White Sands and Trieste II (DSV-1) arrived in the search area a month later. All three ships were needed in order to conduct the dive. Trieste II (DSV-1) was housed in the USS White Sands which also supplied, repaired and equipped the bathyscaphe and USS Apache towed the repair dock. It was then that the problems started occurring. Our rst dive o Hawaii was in early November of 1971. We saw what our search area looked like and got down on the bottom. ere were no sonar contacts of consequence when we got there. We used up our battery and went back to the surface. What happened was the recorded positions of two of the [transponders] were reversed. So we were maneuvering some 2500 feet from where we should have been and in a vessel like Trieste II thats miles. After that, mechanical and weather problems pushed back the schedule, until Apr. 25 to 26 when they made a breakthrough. We went back out again for another dive in April and we found a pile of junk on the bottom. But, it was encouraging because it was man made. It was a part of the satellite, we dont know what part, but there it was, said retired Navy Cmdr. Richard Taylor, one of three Trieste II pilots during this operation. After nding more junk, they came upon what they thought was yet more pieces of the bucket, but it was much more. at was the lm pack, Taylor said. We didnt know that was what we were looking for, but we talked to the surface [operators] and they convinced us. Using a claw hook, the Trieste II managed to grab the lm pack and after waiting for sediment to drain, they radioed in to the USS White Sands and started towards the surface. Everybody was excited, you could hear it in their voices, explained Taylor. We had found the object and we were starting to come back. On the way up, it starts breaking up, all the way up to the surface pieces are falling o it. When we got to the surface, the biggest piece I saw was about six feet of lm that a diver had in his hand. Everything else was gone; it was a cloud of dust. We were just devastated. e lm, already punished by hitting the surface of the ocean, was not able to take the force of movement and it dissolved. ough the object disintegrated, there were two bright spots in the outcome of the mission. We proved we were able to nd an object that size, about a big garbage can size, at 16,400 feet and we were able to go back there and, after overcoming some real problems, were able pick it up and bring it back to the surface, Taylor said. Taylor expressed his admiration for all the crew of the ships, that much like today, dont have high visibility jobs. e Sailors are the ones I credit for this, the guys on the Apache and the White Sands, he said. ey are just Sailors. ey are out there chipping paint, cleaning their bilges, making the engines run, washing dishes, doing all that sort of thing that Sailors do. ey dont get any credit for that, they dont get any of the glory. e guys that made this happen are those Sailors that were out there.Azorian A hundred years ago, then-Lt. Col. John A. Lejeune, the same Marine who would go on to become the 13th commandant, formalize the Marine Corps colors, establish the Marine Corps birthday and found the Marine Corps League and the Marine Corps Institute founded the Marine Corps Association. Marine Corps ocers had a questionable repu tation at the time, and the organization began in 1913 as a group of ocers who met regularly to discuss improvements to the o cer corps, with the goal of establishing a periodical that would spread that dis cussion across the Corps. e Marine Corps Asso ciation, which celebrated its 100th birthday April 25, at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, is now open to active-duty or vet eran enlisted members and ocers from any service. Headquartered at Marine Corps Base Quantico, it has about 76,000 duespaying members and a sta of about 110, publishes both the Marine Corps Gazette and Leatherneck magazine, and has also established programs for recognizing and educating Marines. Our primary mission is to make sure our Marines continue to support the advancement of their leadership and then to reward them for the job theyre doing out there, said retired Sgt. Maj. Kevin Ben nett, MCAs area repre sentative for Quantico and the National Capital Area. e association has given awards for decades, but the establishment of a partnering foundation in 2009 has allowed it to expand several programs, including the Excellence Awards program. For example, the Command, Control, Communications and Computers Awards Dinner was April 18; the Ammo Tech Awards Dinner is coming up later this month, and the Ground Awards Dinner will be held in June. Meanwhile, the Chesty Puller Award goes to the top graduate of every boot camp company. In the last few years, the MCA has also started a program through which it funds libraries, usually based on the commandants reading list, for units that need them, and it also organizes presentations by experts, and other learning opportunities, at the request of commanders through a program known as the Commanders Forum. All our programs have at their heart the element of commander mentorship, said retired Maj. Gen. Ed Usher, the associations president and CEO. e core function of the MCA, though, remains the publication of its two monthly journals, in keeping with Lejeunes original intent. e purpose of the association was, in his mind, to foster an opportunity for robust discussion regarding the history and character of the Marine Corps, to provide a forum for open discussion on changes in military art and tactics, and by doing so, to inspire Marines as professional warriors to openly discuss our Corps and our operations, Usher said. e Gazette dates back to 1916, and Leatherneck back to 1917, although the latter did not fall under the MCA until the 1970s. Leatherneck started, in fact, as Marine Corps Base Quanticos base newspaper while Lejeune was the base commander. By and large, all the content in both magazines comes from our members and those who are interested in Marine Corps operations, said Usher. e major dierence is that Leatherneck is geared toward telling the story of the Marine Corps, while the purpose of the Gazette is to talk military art and science and provide a forum for debate about ways to improve the Corps, Bennett explained. ere is something in the Gazette every month for the professional Marine, from the corporal NSCRS celebrates 100th

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 e second annual Information, Tickets and Travel/Outdoor Adventures Center Open House 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, May 17. Inatables will be up and on-site, weather permitting. Wet N Wild and Westgate resorts will be on-site for questions and promotions. OAC is oering 25 percent o all moonwalk and slide rentals reserved at the event for anytime in May and June. ITT will have a grand prize drawing for a two-night stay at Westgate Resorts in Orlando, plus four tickets to Wet N Wild. e drawing will be at 2 p.m. on May 17 and you must be present to win. Starting May 1, any purchase made at OAC/ITT will give you a chance to get an additional ticket for the grand prize drawing. For more information, call (912) 573-8103. Armed Forces Challenges Tournament At Trident Lakes Golf Club, Friday, May 17 with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Cost is $26 which includes lunch and special prizes. Format is Captains Choice with a twist. Commands may bring more than one foursome. Call ahead to save your spot at (912) 5738475 Armed Forces Kids Run At the Fitness Complex, the Run consists of a 1/2-mile race for 5 and 6 year olds, a 1-mile race for 7 and 8 year olds, and a 2-mile race for 9 and 10 year olds. All youths must register on-line at www.americaskidsrun.org, Select SUBASE Kings Bay from the drop down menu. The first 50 children to register will receive a T-shirt. For more information, call the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, May 18 at dusk at Under the Pines Park and the tennis courts, see Marvel: The Avengers (PG-13). Free admission, bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Be aware that PG-13 rating is for mild violence. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564 Rack-N-Roll Lanes Tuesday, May 21 is Dollar Day, where all games and shoe rentals are $1. Call (912) 573-9492 for other offers. Party in the Park Wednesday, May 22, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Under the Pines. Live music by Scarletta from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., displays, booths, activity tables and a Fun Zone for the kids. e Fun Zone will cost $3 and will oer unlimited use of the bounce houses, rock wall, halo jumper, obstacle course and giant slide. Food will be available for purchase from local vendors including Barberitos, Chickl-a, Sonnys Bar-B-Q and Kings Bay Dominos Pizza. Navy Adventures Unleashed Just Try-It-Athlon is Saturday, May 25 for kids and adults at 9 a.m. at the Pool Complex. Each team of two will compete in a 100-meter inner tube swim, where each member will swim/ paddle 50 meters and run a 5K together. T-shirts for the rst 25 teams to register. Cost is $15 per two-member team. Medals for top nishers in womens, mens, mixed male & female and adult/ youth teams. Tennis shoes and proper swim attire required. Register at the Fitness Complex in advance. For more details, contact NAU oce at (912) 5739869. Summer Splash Open of the Pool Complex noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 25. Free admission for all. Food is available for purchase. Music, games and activities make this a great event for family and friends. e pool will stay open until 6 p.m. Trident Lakes Golf Clubs lakes shing Trident Lakes will be open for shing May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may sh the lake on the front 9 and Saturday, May 18 you may sh the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes shing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/ catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and NSB Kings Bay Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the NSB Kings Bay permits. is is open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m., with Mars Needs Moms May 11 and 12, Me gaminds May 18 and 19, Dr. Seuss: e Lorax May 23, Gnomeo and Juliet May 24, Aliens in the Attic May 25 and 26, Wreck-it Ralph May 27, Brave May 28, Monsters vs. Aliens May 29, Mr. Poppers Penguins May 30 and e Odd Life of Timothy Green May 31. Movie Under the Stars at the tennis courts at dusk May 18 is Marvel: e Avengers. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548. Summer Camp at the Youth Center Camp is for children kindergarten through age 12 and runs May 22 through Aug. 7. Spaces are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Call for spots. To have your child at the Youth Center, you must have your most recent Leave and Earnings Statement pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certificate must be available for confirma tion of age. Single/dual military must provide depen dent care form at time of registration and Individual Augmenteess must provide orders. Breakfast, morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack will be provided. No outside food is authorized. Cost is based on total family income. For more information call (912) 573-2380.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call ITT/OAC Open House May 17 MWR Sports challenge you and start the summer with something fun. e event consists of a 100-meter innertube swim and a 5K run. Each team member will be required to hop on an inner tube paddle themselves 50 meters and tag o to their partner, who will also paddle the distance. Upon transitioning to running shoes, the pair will then run a 5K together. Team entry fee is $15, which includes event shirts for the rst 25 teams and medals for top nishers. Participants may signup at the Kings Bay Fitness Center for Womens, Mens, Mixed, Adult/Child or Youth categories. All participants must be able to swim. e rst heat starts at 9:30 a.m. e sign-up deadline is 1 p.m., Friday prior to the event. For more information contact NAU at (912) 5739869. ensure best uses. Engage the private sector to support best practices, and Partner with military departments as they seek civilian activities consistent with their local mission. To date, JLUS has yielded many approaches to eect compatible civilian use near the Departments facilities, including land use plans for civilian growth around installations, zoning and land-use regulatory requirements to ensure consistent development in the future, and enduring partnerships between the local installation and state and local governments. Chairman Barry King invites those interested in the development of Camden County to attend this luncheon at 11:30 a.m., Tuesday, May 14 at the NSB Conference Center. Lunch is $15, to be paid at the door. Reservations must be made to thecamdenpartnership@tds.net by Friday, May 10. Just TryStudy to the commandant, no matter what their [military occupational specialty], said retired Col. John Keenan, editor of the Ga zette. We get articles from Marines who think something could be better, and then you have those who, as part of their ocial duties, want to get word out to other Marines. Many articles come in through the associations various writing contests, he added. Retired Col. Walt Ford, the associations publisher and the editor of Leatherneck, noted that Gen. James Conway, when he was commandant, once remarked that the best way to get a 15-minute audience with him was to publish an article in the Gazette. As for Leatherneck, Ford said he solicits stories from freelance writers based on historical events and current operations and exercises around the world. NMCRS

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 6, 13 and 20. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14 Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner Corps Relief Societys fund drive, which started April 1 and runs through April 30. Other ways NMCRS receives money is by allotments and donations. More than $1,600 was contributed to NMCRS during the golf tournament. e thing that makes it amazing is that we raise money from active-duty Sailors and Marines, to give it out to their fellow Sailors and Marines, said Brandie Frazier, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief director. e money we received will go into the coers of the Kings Bay active-duty fund drive. All of the money is used for things like interest-free loans and grants for college. Frazier said the goal of the drive is as much to raise awareness of NMCRS and its services as it is to raise money. We contact 100 percent of the service members and make sure they know about the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and where to turn in their time of need, Frazier said. If we get money out of it, that is a great thing, and we certainly do with fundraisers like this golf tournament. NMCRSs mission is to provide nancial, educational and other assistance to Sailors, Marines and their families in need. In addition, the society provides services such as nancial assistance, budget-for-baby workshops, thrift shops and nursing services. Golf THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Welcome to Willies Dreamburger. Im Willie, your host. And how would you like your Dreamburger cooked? And what would you like on it? That was the spiel for this weeks question. Were well into May, which is known in some circles as National Hamburger Month. In trying to figure out how many hamburgers Americans eat, I found the average person eats three a week. So, 3 x 52 x 316 million = 493 trillion hamburgers a year! Yikes! As for my burger, make mine a double, medium rare, with double bacon, lettuce, tomato, grilled onion and horseradish cheese. And, hey, Ill have a garlic pickle on the side.Erick Roberson Exchange employee New Cumberland, Pa. Medium, with lettuce, American cheese, bacon, tomato, mayo, ketchup, mustard and cut in half. Pfc. Joe Fisher Security Force Battalion Seattle, Wash. Medium rare. Cooked on charcoal. With Creole seasoning and a little bit of Worcester sauce to give it a tangy and bold taste. Sherita Love Navy Federal employee Charleston, S.C. Medium well, with ched dar cheese, bacon, mayo, ketchup and grilled onions. HN James Duncan Branch Health Clinic Durham, N.C. Medium, with lettuce, tomato, ketchup and mustard. Im kind of plain. Lance Cpl. Danny Recinos Security Force Battalion Elizabeth, N.Y. A double, well cooked, with bacon, cheese any kind, surprise me bar becue sauce and curly fries on the side. MASN Jackie Forrest Security Force Battalion Cairo, Ga. Well done, all the way, with onion, tomato, lettuce, ketchup, mayo, American cheese, mustard and pickles. Thats about it. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Pentagon ocials followed up May 3 on Defense Secretary Chuck Hagels earlier statement that the United States is looking at arming the Syrian opposition, saying it is important to rene options as the situation on the ground changes. In a meeting with reporters, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little stressed that the situation in Syria is extremely complicated, noting that the opposition contains jihadists as well as a great number of moderate elements. is administration has been focused squarely on Syria for a long time, he said. e U.S. government has been using diplomatic and economic levers to try and get Syrian president Bashar Assad to step down, and Pentagon and U.S. Central Command ocials have High School Flash Back Leaders study Syria options THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble mak ing it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to register call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC e 70th anniversary of a decisive victory for the predecessor of Coast Guard Cutter Spencer was recently observed. In the uncertain days of World War II, the Coast Guard-manned USS Spencer steamed alongside convoy ships maintaining long lines of food, men and war machines destined for the front lines of Europe. ese ships faced a new, elusive enemy: U-boats. ese submarines harassed the Allies supply lines, attacking at night and vanishing just as quickly. e crew of Spencer lived under constant threat of attack. George Ellers was a 20mm-gun loader aboard Spencer during one such escort patrol in 1943. He recalls the gut-wrenching fear of those days. Often, the U-boats would travel in groups of up to ten, called wolf packs. ese wolf packs would follow the convoy, too deep to detect, and then strike in the early hours of the morning. e booming torpedoes shook men out of their racks in alarm. Most men slept in their lifejackets because of the frequency at which general quarters was sounded. On April 17, 1943, Spencers sonarmen detected signs of a U-boat lurking amid the convoy. All hands sprung into action as general quarters sounded. Boots thundered across steel decks, shouts echoed through the air and the men of Spencer readied the powerful TNT-laden depth charges that were the only hope against this new enemy. A call came down from the bridge and the men laid down a square pattern of depth charges. Spencer had to steam at full speed ahead to avoid collateral damage from the very charges she laid. A thunderous boom snapped all eyes o the stern and the decks shuddered at the explosive force of the charge. Tension was high, though expectations were low, as this means of attack rarely yielded results. Minutes passed when, without warning, came a shout that a submarine was breaking the surface o the port quarter. In a split second, every eye turned toward the port quarter in disbelief as the U-boat, with its decks awash and its conning tower crumpled from the depth charges, emerged from the sea. e air erupted into shouts as ready crews manned their three-inch guns. Out of the confusion, order quickly took over and the gunners trained their shots into the dull, hard metal of the deck. Spencer came around and faced the U-boat that was now dead ahead. As Ellers put it, once we knew the Spencer had defeated the German sub, we were mostly relievedthat it was them, and not us. Firing ceased as the water came alive with struggling survivors. Ellers recalls that when our crew saw German survivors oating in the water they did feel compassion for themwe picked up as many as we could. Cargo nets were thrown over the side and whiteknuckled sailors clutched onto them in desperation, ignoring their U-boats last moments. e U-boat creaked and groaned, then the bow, as though rendering a nal farewell salute, slid beneath the sea. e prisoners were taken aboard and aorded food and blankets. ey were a pitiful bunch with their hair plastered across their faces and shivering from the cold. e prisoners were defeated, but remained jubilant they were still alive. is was the rst time many of the Spencer crew had seen their enemy in the esh and for many it was an uneasy feeling having these Nazis so close. Ellers remembers the attitude of the Spencer crew towards the German survivors on board was tolerable. We treated them with basic human dignity after all, they were young soldiers like us, ghting for their country. e German executive ocer of the U-175 was a very stern man he had to be sequestered from the crew and was interrogated by our interpreter. e crew took comfort knowing the enemy had been robbed of taking any more lives. e crew celebrated their victory over U-175 three days later when they transferred the prisoners to a base in Scotland, marking yet another convoy which they safely escorted across the Atlantic. Despite this triumphant moment Ellers recalls little fanfare. I was not aware of the account of the Spencer sinking the U-175 in the newspapers. As far as being treated as heroes when we arrived back home it was 1943 and there were two wars going on we were just doing our duty for our country. Coast Guard caught, sank U-boat 70 years agobeen updating military options in case President Barack Obama needs them. Military options are part of the puzzle that is Syria, but only part, Little said. e U.S. engagement in humanitarian operations in the nation, the diplomatic outreach to other nations in the region and economic sanctions against the government telegraph U.S. views of the conict. ose views are clear. Assad must go, he added. We hope that the Syrian people can determine their own future and that there is a responsible transition to a new Syria. e United States and allies also must also think of post-Assad Syria, Little said, noting that once Assad leaves power, American and international partners have to do what is best in a very unstable part of the world. e U.S. military is supporting the State Department in the humanitarian assistance mission to the people of Syria. U.S. military transport planes delivered packaged meals to countries bordering Syria for delivery to those in need inside the country. Other nonlethal aid being delivered to the opposition includes body armor and night-vision goggles. Were all clear-eyed about the challenges in this crisis, and it may not end overnight, Little said. But if we can push this to a place where the violence is drawn down, there is an exit for Assad and there is a way to drive a political solution for the Syrian people themselves, that would be ideal. Syria

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SEALs honor WW II vet Sailors assigned to EastCoast Naval Special Warfare units attended a family celebration in honor of a Naval Combat Demolition-man April 12. e celebration was held to honor Alfred Martin Palacios heroic acts while storming the beaches of Normandy, France, on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Capt. Bob Smith, Com modore of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO, and a contingent of East-Coast based U.S. Navy SEALs (Sea, Air and Land) kicked o the observance by thanking Palacios for his service and all he had done to pave the way for NSW. at was followed by a retelling of Palacios acts at Normandy, which were recounted by Capt.(Ret.) Norm Olson, Commodore of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO from October 1977 to June 1980. Olson began, Palacios enlisted in the Navy in 1943, volunteered for hazardous, prolonged and distant duty and was assigned to Training Base, Fort Peirce, Fla., where he trained and qualied as a member of Naval Combat Demolition Unit 131. Palacios was assigned to one of 21, nine-man units destined for Omaha Beach, said Olson. eir mission was to clear the landing beaches of obstacles to open gaps for the landing force to successfully assault the beach. On the morning of June 6th 1944, Palacios Boat Team F was hit twice by artillery re on the approach to Beach Fox Red, killing six Combat Demolition-men and wounding four others, Olson said. Palacio was among the four wounded men. With his elbow shattered from machine gun re, Palacio managed to drag his Bangalore Torpedoes, a ve-foot steel tube of explosives used to clear barbed-wire obstacles, across a football-sized beach to the shelter of the shoreline clis, Olson said. Once under the cover of the clis he applied rst aid to his left arm and made a sling. He then made his way back to his Landing Craft Medium where he was wounded again while trying to retrieve several 20 pound Hagersen Packs of explosives. is time he was hit in the back with shrapnel from an enemy artillery shell. Palacios then proceeded to maneuver back to the base of the shoreline clis and propped himself up in a sitting position where he was given a rie from an Army GI. Still dazed and holding the rie as best he could with his good arm, German soldiers began coming over the dune line at the beach exit, Olson said. Seeing him pointing his rie at them, they raised their arms in surrender, and Palacios was credited with the capturing of three to six German prisoners of war. Palacios was awarded the Purple Heart for his actions that day on the beach and his unit was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation, the only one awarded to Naval Forces during the Normandy invasion. Following D-Day, Palacios was evacuated to a eld hospital in England, where his left arm was amputated at the shoulder. Upon Palacios return to the United States, he was honorably discharged January 8, 1945, as a Carpenters Mate 2nd Class. We are here to recognize the heroic act of a teammate, Smith said. Any man that is going to get out of a landing craft injured, continue to carry a Bangalore torpedo across the beach and then get injured again and go back and get the Hagersen Packs and bring them back and then capture six Germans is a frogman in my book. Smith presented Palacios with a ceremonial wooden paddle, a traditional symbolic farewell token that is presented to teammates. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen warned May 6 that further cuts in defense spending by European nations risk reducing the continents defense and security to hot air, turning the alliance into what he called a global spectator rather than a real force on the world stage. e only way to avoid this is by holding the line on defense spending and to start reinvesting in security as soon as our economies recover, he told a meeting in Brussels of the European Parliaments Committee on Foreign Aairs. Rasmussen said European nations should not become absorbed by their own domestic issues, including sluggish economies that have contributed to defense cuts, and develop a truly global perspective to respond to crises further away from home. Having the right capabilities is important, but it is not enough, he said. We must also have the political will to use them, to deal with security challenges on Europes doorstep, to help manage crises further away that might aect us here at home, and to better share the security burden with our North American allies. It was the latest in a series of warnings over the past several years by Rasmussen that further cuts by European governments in defense spending could put NATOs viability at risk. In 2011, Rasmussen pointed out that European nations had cut their defense budgets by $45 billion the equivalent of Germanys entire annual defense budget while U.S contributions to NATO had increased from about half of total alliance spending to close to 75 percent. ose comments were followed by a warning from then-U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who said NATO risked irrelevance and a dismal future if members were not seen as serious and capable partners in their own defense. Rasmussen said soft power alone really is no power at all. Without hard capabilities to back up its diplomacy, Europe will lack credibility and inuence, he added. It will risk being a global spectator, rather than the powerful global actor that it can be and should be. All four active services and ve of the six reserve components met or exceeded their numerical accession goals for scal year 2013 through March, Pentagon ocials reported May 2. e end of March marked the scal years halfway point. Here are the active-force accessions for the rst six months of the scal year: Army: 33,857 accessions, 101 percent of its goal of 33,520; Navy: 17,350 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 17,350; Marine Corps: 13,010 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 12,978; and Air Force: 13,989 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 13,989. e Army Reserve nished March 1,501 accessions short of its goal for the rst half of the scal year. Here are the reserve component accession numbers: Army National Guard: 26,100 accessions, 104 percent of its goal of 25,005; Army Reserve: 12,976 accessions, 90 percent of its goal of 14,477; Navy Reserve: 2,700 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 2,700; Marine Corps Reserve: 4,518 accessions, 101 percent of its goal of 4,472; Air National Guard: 4,875 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 4,875; and Air Force Reserve: 3,685 accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 3,685.Cuts rile NATO leader Military recruiters hit goals THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 A few months after the DDay invasion in June 1944, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower surveyed the Normandy beaches with his son. Youd never get away with this if you didnt have air supremacy, then 2nd Lt. John Eisenhower told his father. Without air supremacy, the elder Eisenhower replied, I wouldnt be here. e United States won air superiority in Europe by 1944 and the Pacic by the fall, won it in Korea in 1950 and hasnt lost control of the skies since. No American service members on the ground have died from enemy air attacks since three were killed during the Korean War more than 60 years ago. Control of the air gives a military power the opportunity to exploit height, reach and speed, enabling informed decisionmaking, the ability to strike freely at a distance, and the ability to maneuver unconstrained by the limits of terrain or ocean, said Dr. Richard P. Hallion, former Air Force Historian and senior advisor for air and space issues with the Directorate for Security, Counterintelligence and Special Programs Oversight. I go back to David versus Goliath, said Hallion, author of Storm Over Iraq: Airpower in the Gulf War and Strike from the Sky: e History of Battleeld Attack. ere wasnt a manhood issue here demanding he engage in the close ght, where he could have lost. Instead, David hit him with an aerospace weapon a rock at a distance. In the airpower era, that aerospace weapon is the airplane and missile of today. When the North Koreans invaded the South in June 1950, they did so with overwhelming military ground forces, and initially, without encountering immediate air counter-attacks, Hallion said. Retired Marine Corps Col. Warren Wiedhahn experienced combat in Korea as a private rst class, both with and without close air support. During the initial days of the Korean War, there was no close air support, the North Korean juggernaut moved very rapidly with their tanks, artillery and infantry. ey annihilated everything in front of them until there was nothing left in Korea but the Pusan perimeter, Wiedhahn said. But by then, robust air power forces Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps assisted by British, Australian and South Korean airmen as well, were taking a heavy toll on North Korean attackers, Hallion said. During that period of time, the close air support was building up, Wiedhahn said. e ships were coming in. e Air Force was ying. Now, all of a sudden, we began to see aircraft. After participating in the Inchon Landing and helping to liberate Seoul, Wiedhahn also fought in the battle of the Chosin Reservoir a few months later. United Nations forces chased the North Korean army to the southern tip of South Korea until China sent more than 100,000 troops that surrounded about 30,000 U.N. troops. When we were up in the Chosin Reservoir, and the Chinese decided to attack, we began to see air, mostly Navy and Marine Corps (Vought F4U) Corsairs o of the carriers, he said. ats how I really began to appreciate close air support. It (Control of the air) is absolutely, positively vital. After a 17-day battle in subzero temperatures, the Marines managed to withdraw to the coast, where they were evacuated in December. Indeed, air power saved the Marines from annihilation as they made their way from the reservoir down to the coast, Hallion said. Five years after Wiedhahn retired as a colonel in 1982, he talked with four of the Chinese he fought against in the Chosin Reservoir during a visit to Beijing as part of his Virginia-based Military Historical Tours organization. About 40 years later, the sights and sounds of American aircraft were still engrained in their memories. One of the greatest things we feared was your airpower, the Chinese told Wiedhahn. ey said, they always moved at night and never moved when the weather was clear, because of their fear of our planes. Air superiority and supremacy are two of the ve conditions in the air warfare spectrum, along with air paralysis, air inferiority and air parity. ere is actually a huge difference between air superiority and supremacy that can be especially costly in war, Hallion said. Air superiority is the absolute minimal condition we should ever be prepared to ght with, he said. Air superiority means that the enemy is still able to undertake air action against you, but you are able to confound and defeat it. What we should really seek is what we had in the latter stages of World War II and what we had in the (Persian) Gulf War, where we had air supremacy, indeed, we had air dominance. ats where you so thoroughly dominate your opponent that they are instantly confronted with air attack, and they are unable to do anything about it. We had air supremacy, clearly, in the rst Gulf War because in that war, the Iraqi air force was simply unable to intervene either against our coalition air forces or against coalition surface forces. At the end of the Gulf War in 1991, by the second or third week, the Iraqi air force was eeing the country, and the air action there was primarily intercepting aircraft trying to ee to Iran. ats what happens when you have air supremacy, and in the best of all circumstances, air dominance. You can then devote 100 percent of your air effort to ensure that the people on the ground get the support they need to prosecute the ground war. Gen. Charles A. Horner, who commanded all U.S. and allied air assets during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, credited the airpower dominance to the intelligence, preparation and training before the invasion. When did we get air superiority? We had it before the war began because we had the means to get it the equipment, intelligence, training, and the courage of the aircrews, Horner said. But do not get the idea that gaining control of the air was easy. It was not a macho, nosweat operation. What turned into a turkey shoot in late January and February started out as a bitter struggle; those rst few days were the hardest-fought, most-critical aspect of the entire war. Because the Air Force has had almost an unprecedented control of the skies for decades, it might be easy to forget how costly it was to achieve air superiority, especially during World War II. In the European and Mediterranean theaters alone, the U.S. lost 4,325 ghters and bombers before D-Day, with 17,000 killed and 21,000 wounded or POW in the ght for air superiority and didnt achieve theater-wide supremacy until the nal days of the war. More Airmen were killed in aerial missions over Europe than all the Marines who unfortunately died in the entire span of World War II, said retired Gen. David Deptula, who was the Air Forces senior intelligence community ocial when he was the Headquarters Air Force deputy chief of sta for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Deptula was also the main attack planner during Operation Desert Storm in 1991 and a joint task commander for Operation Northern Watch in 1998-99. If you take a look at how many aircraft we lost in the Vietnam War, 2,781 Air Force and Navy combined, that was against a fth-rate power with only 206 ghter aircraft, Deptula said. Why did that happen? Because, we were late in achieving air superiority. It took us some 30 years to apply the air superiority lesson, but we did it in the form of developing the F-15 (Eagle). But those F-15s rst ew in 1972, and now some of them are more than 30 years old. In 1979, I ew F-15s at Kadena Air Base, Japan. In 2008, my son was ying the exact same tail numbers I did, but it was 29 years later, and that was ve years ago. Today, we have a geriatric combat Air Force, and we badly need to recapitalize it in order to maintain the advantage of air supremacy in the future. Without control of the air, troops on the ground face many hardships and hazards, as the late Gen. Bruce K. Holloway, vice chief of sta during the Vietnam War, wrote in an article for Air University Press. For six decades, American troops havent had to experience what its like to lose mobility except at night; to be cut o from supplies and reinforcements; to be constantly under the watchful eye of enemy reconnaissance aircraft; to be always vulnerable to strang and bombing attacks; to see ones ghters and bombers burn on their handstands; and to be outnumbered, outgunned and outmaneuvered in the air, Holloway wrote in his article, Air Superiority in Tactical Air Warfare. However, there are some who arent convinced the Air Forces decades-long dominance of the air is a certainty, especially with recent cuts in weapons systems such as the F-22 Raptor, which Deptula calls the most capable aircraft ever built specically to achieve air superiority, and F-35 Lightning II. In 2009, then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates called for capping the original 722 Raptors to 187. ree years later, across-theboard defense spending cuts have put the F-35 at risk. ere are newer threats out there, quite frankly, that could defeat the aircraft that we currently have, Deptula said. ats why the Air Force works so hard to recapitalize those aircraft by building F-22s and F-35s that can operate, using modern technology, to achieve air dominance by networking capabilities with sensors that we never had in the past. Our challenge in the future is were not going to have time to do what we did in World War II, bring Americas industrial might to bear over the time necessary to create the kinds of aircraft to maintain our superiority advanta ge. It falls on Airmen of today, to articulate the air superiority lessons of the past and to make the Airmans voice in the defense of our nation heard. Todays Airmen need to be unabashedly clear about the lessons of history in order to maintain our capabilities in the future. As vital as Eisenhower perceived air superiority to success on D-Day, some airpower experts wonder if the day will come when the U.S. wont have the control of the skies needed for a crucial confrontation with another military power. I think the greatest danger we face as a nation today is to assume that air and space power is a God-given right to the United States of America, and we will always enjoy it, Hallion said. We see that sometimes, unfortunately, in our sister services. ey have labored so long with perfect freedom of maneuver because of the American airpower shield that weve put over their heads that I think many individuals fail to realize that it is perishable. Air dominance is like freedom itself. You have to constantly nurture it, care for it and invest in it to ensure that you will still have it. U.S. enjoying air superiority since 1944

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013 13 is feature is part of the rough Airmens Eyes se ries on AF.mil. ese stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story. Forty years have passed since the United States ended its involvement in the Vietnam War, and40 years have passed since many of its sons who engaged in the war and were captured by the enemy, were liberated and returned home. One of those liberated prisoners was retired Col. Will Gideon, former 437th Airlift Wing Supply Squad ron commander, who was a pilot with the 67th Tacti cal Fighter Squadron the day he was shot down and captured by the North Viet namese August 7, 1966. Gideon, a native of Arlington, Va., ew 54 successful missions into Vietnam before being shot down. We came into the mountains low that day, said Gideon, in regards to the aircraft formation. After I released my bombs, I rolled the jet to its side and popped back up. It started like any other mission ... only, I had no idea it would be my last (mission as a pilot.) From within the cockpit of his jet, Gideon witnessed a ery explosion in the atmosphere igniting from another F-105 directly in front of him. e aircrafts pilot safely ejected, but was captured by the deceptive enemy below. In a ash, black smoke lled the red sky and cloaked Gideons sight, blinding him nearly instantly. Bullets cut through the air, whizzing as they buzzed all around. Gideon remained calm, but could only hear the sound of his heart beating and ground re that was coming from North Vietnamese soldiers, hidden within the foliage of the jungle below. I tried like hell to get out of there, said Gideon. is is when everything started happening really fast. And, going fast was on Gideons side. He was piloting an F-105, the Air Forces premiere jet ghter at the time, and it was able to reach supersonic speeds quickly. However, his distance to the ground was against him. According to Gideon, he knew he was in trouble when he felt a jarring explo sion, as well as the ratatatat of bullets bounc ing o his jet. Before he could evade the enemy attack, the aircraft began shaking and spiraling downward uncontrollably. It was like someone grabbed the tail end of the plane and wouldnt let go, said Gideon. e jet was spinning out of control. It was all happening so fast, but I remember starting to see everything go grey and feeling numb. Accepting his fate, Gideon knew his plane was destined to crash into the Vietnamese mountainside. With every passing moment, more control was slipping through his ngers. Knowing he was also about to pass out, Gideon was losing control of more than his jet, but also himself. My life wasnt ashing before my eyes, said Gideon. My training was. I knew what I had to do to survive ... death wasnt an option that day. rough the disarray of being shot out of the sky, he thought back to his pilot training at Nellis AFB, Nev., and managed to eject. From there, everything went blank. Gideon awoke in darkness, unclear of the amount of time that had passed or where he was. He was nowhere near the crash site. He was stripped of his clothes, in pain and locked inside a small, humid jail cell. e only light piercing the eroded room was coming from a barred window. I was out for nearly a week, said Gideon. When I nally woke up, my left leg was in a cast below the knee. I cant recall exactly when it was broken. My shoulder and head were swollen and I could barely move. Due to his memory loss, Gideon wasnt sure how or when he had incurred his injuries. However, it was common for American POW pilots to enter a detention camps hurt due to injuries sustained while ejecting from their aircraft. A total of 13 facilities in North Vietnam were used as detention camps for American POWs; ve camps were located in Hanoi and the rest were outside of the city. With the exception of the Ha L Prison, sarcastically named the Hanoi Hilton by American POWs, the ocial names of the 12 other Vietnamese camps were unknown. Gideons camp was like other countryside camps used by the enemy, the sound of the creek and wildlife echoed through the surrounding canopy of coconut palm and ba nana trees. e seem ingly peaceful Vietnamese swamplands were a smoke and mirrors to its reality. Rice paddies were being tended by North Vietnam ese civilians. It was a lonely place, undisturbed by the rest of the world. Although Gideon didnt know where he was, he would be a prisoner there for roughly six years, seven months and 13 days. e captors thought I was really screwed up mentally, said Gideon. I refused to wear the prison rags they provided, I didnt touch my food and for the most part, I had no idea where I was. is behavior went on for weeks. A young Navy ocer from Florida, known simply as Lt. Browning, was Gideons cell mate when he arrived at the prison. Browning helped Gideon adjust to his new surroundings by tending to his new friends injuries, explaining where Gideon was and even refusing to eat Gideons food portions. Browning wouldnt eat my food even though I refused to touch it, and not because he wasnt hungry or afraid of being punished, Gideon said. He was starving and easily couldve eaten it, but he didnt want the captors to think I was eating. He wanted them to know how sick I was. He was just doing it because it was the right thing to do. e integrity displayed by his cell mate helped Gideon transition to his new, dire surroundings. One day, Gideon nally accepted a bowl of rice. Within minutes, the entire bowl was gone. A rare humble display of humanity was shown by the prison guard, who noticed Gideon quickly eat his rice and oered him a second bowl. However, the display of humanity was short lived. Gideon, like most American POWs at the time, was often isolated from the other prisoners during questioning. Bound by his wrist with rope, he was viciously interrogated by North Vietnamese soldiers. But, he did not falter, nor did he break. With a body battered from the savage conditions and even after witnessing the pain, and broken bodies, of his fellow service members; Gideon never reached his breaking point. Selling out my country wasnt an option, said Gideon, remaining true to his commitment as an Airman. ey knew I wasnt saying a word, other than what I was trained to say. American POWs were often forced to sign confessions of guilt, write letters to American politicians or be manipulated in other ways, and used as an asset for the North Vietnamese military agenda. Some prisoners were given special treatment, or favors by their captors, by simply cooperating with them. Gideon refused any special treatment because he felt to accept anything from the enemy would place him in the enemys debt, a price he refused to pay. ere were times I started to become discouraged, Gideon said, looking back on his tested resiliency as a POW. Every year that passed, [away from family] I wondered what was happening back home. New prisoners would come in and say things like, theres no way well be here after the rst of next year and that year would pass. en another year passed and another and so on ... and eventually, many years passed. At times, that was very discouraging. Although he could have easily succumbed to the despair, Gideon never gave up on his faith in the United States. Years passed, and his family waited patiently for his return. He knew they would be taken care of by the Air Force until that day arrived. ere was no escaping the prison, Gideon said. Even if there were, I couldnt leave those men behind. I wouldnt be able to live with myself knowing the punishment th at would have been bestowed upon them. In the years Gideon was prisoner, only one prison break was attempted. e two Americans that attempted the escape were caught within hours and subjected to even longer amounts of torture than they spent away from the prison. One of the men died from the excessive beating he received from the enemy. Gideon never gave up, through more than six years of prayer, exercising in his prison cell, believing in the United States promise to bring him home and being friends with his fellow American POWs, he kept hope alive. And although Comprehensive Airman Fitness didnt exist during the Vietnam War, Gideon and his fellow prisoners unknowingly used those pillars to survive. On March 4, 1973, Gideons prayers were answered. He was liberated and able to return home. Looking back, he holds no grudge against his captors, and his positive outlook on life has helped him move on from the turmoil that shackled him physically and mentally for the better part of a decade. Gideon went on to retire from the Air Force as a colonel and spent his last years of active duty commanding the 437th AW Supply Squadron and Resource Management deputy commander at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C. Upon retirement, he remained in the local area and today lives a quiet life in Mount Pleasant, S.C. Even though he has moved on with his life and let go of the pains of yesterday and rarely talks about his time as a POW, he will never forget the sacrices made and encourages everyone to remember the 1,655 still missing after the conicts in Southeast Asia more than 40 years ago. Life as POW a deadly trial for Vietnam pilots

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 9, 2013