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The Kings Bay periscope ( 05-02-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00299

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00299


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May 9 dinner names Sailor, Marine, Coast Guardian of Year e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will have its signature event of the year, the 2013 Camden-Kings Bay Coun cil Annual Sea Services Awards Banquet, ursday, May 9. e banquet will be at the Kings Bay Conference Center on the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, with cocktails and conver sation at 6 p.m., followed by din ner and awards presentations. e special guest and speak er for the evening is Vice Adm. Mike Connor, commander, Sub marine Forces. A native of Weymouth, Mass., Connor graduated from Bowdoin College in 1980. He is a Ma han Scholar and distinguished graduate of the Naval War Col lege with a Master of Arts in Na tional Security Aairs and Stra tegic Studies. Following completion of his initial nuclear power and sub marine training, he served in USS Ulysses S. Grant (SSBN 631), USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720), USS Providence (SSN 719), and USS Augusta (SSN 710). Connor commanded USS Seawolf (SSN 21) from 1997 to 2000. He served as commander, Submarine Squadron Eight from March 2003 through July 2004. From June 2008 until April 2010, he served as commander, Submarine Group Seven, Task Force 54/74 Yokosuka, Japan. Connors shore assignments include service at the Navy Op erational Intelligence Center; ag secretary for the Command er, Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; prospective command ing ocer instructor for U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He has served on the Joint Sta, on the sta of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy; and, as director, Submarine Warfare Division (N87); director, Naval Warfare Integration Group (N00X); and, assistant deputy chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Systems (N9B) on the OPNAV sta. He assumed his current du ties as commander, Submarine Forces in September 2012. But the real stars of the show are the Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardian of the Year who will be honored that evening. e cost to attend is $25 per person. All attendees must RSVP and pay in advance; no payments will be taken at the door for this event. e deadline for reservations is Friday, May 3.Mail the names of all attendees in your group, along with your check in the proper amount, made pay able to Camden-Kings Bay Navy League, to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S, St. Marys, Ga., 31558 or e-mail Aston at teacher1@tds.net e council is still accepting donationsof cash, gift cards, gift certicates or goods and ser vices to go toward gifts and door prizes for all of the honorees. Donations should be sent to Aston at the above address. Up Periscope We predict who will win the NBA title Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Stir fried Pirates Cove Galley serves up feast Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com CMC Command Challenge May 22Educators visit Kings Bays Trident Ret Athletic jamboree set in conjunction with Kings Bay 35th anniversary celebrationIn honor the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 35th Celebration, all commands and tenant commands are invited to par ticipate in the 2013 Command Master Chief Command Challenge, starting at 9 a.m., Wednesday, May 22. Teams must consist of 15 members and must have an event point of contact for each of the three events. Ready, Set, Catch requires seven members in a team effort to launch and catch a series of water balloons, using a three-person slingshot. Full Steam Ahead, a four member paddleboat relay, and Roll With It, a four-person relay team, required to run and hand off a tire. e CMC Command Challenge is open to add commands and tenant commands, regardless of size. e goal is maximize individual partici pation, as competitions will run simulta neously. e top two teams will move on to the Tug of War Challenge, to take place during the intermission of the concert event. Overall winner will earn the title CMC Command Challenge Champions. Command themes, colors and spirit are encouraged, as this is sure to be a fun lled event. Round up your command, get your rosters together and its game on! In addition volunteer opportunities to assist with timing and scoring are avail able. Team guidelines: Each team must have POCs, theme, color or other representation of team spirit and unity Be organized. Rosters of who will par ticipate in what events are needed. If an ocial calls your command to compete, and you cannot eld a team, you will for feit your event. Teams are representing their com mands. Unsportsmanlike conduct will not be tolerated. Captains Cup points will be awarded. Schools stress STEM classes to prepare future workforce Trident Ret Facility Com manding Ocer Capt. Lawrence Hill and his command hosted nearly 40 educators from 20 southeast Georgia school systems to share the need to increase Science, Technology, En gineering and Math. e event was co-hosted by e Camden Partnership and President Sheila McNeill, in an eort to develop a series of brieng and tour opportunities for Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base. e Partnership is working towards its goal to advocate, support and strengthen military missions and improve the qual ity of life for our military members by enhancing military and community partnerships. Hill briefed the group on the his tory, size and scope of the command. He discussed TRFs role in maintaining submarines for the safety of the crews that serve and the defense deterrent these submarines and crew provide. Most of the educators serve in a similar capacity as Rachel Baldwin and Jacqueline Hart in their work-based learning coor dinator roles at Camden County High School. Baldwin shared with the group how students at Camden High had been able to follow a trade and industrial curriculum and co-op their senior year of high school. rough meeting specic testing and application criteria, they were able to then apply and be accepted into the TRF apprentice program. Some of the students she and TRF Student Trainee Coordinator Georgianna Anderson have served since 1995 are nearly 35 years old, with younger students graduating from Camden High in 2011 and selected for appren ticeship. It is rewarding to hear from former students when they assist TRFs mission in Diego Garcia and at Kings Bay, as well as the pride they share when they reach Dempsey back from China tripJCS chair seeking to strengthen alliancese chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta returned April 27 from a week in Northeast Asia that he spent exploring possi bilities in China and seeking to strengthen allied capabilities against a sustained threat of nu clear attack from North Korea. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told American Forces Press Ser vice that now is the right time, with the right capabilities in place, to seek to establish a collaborative, trilateral ballistic missile defense ar chitecture incorporating U.S., Japanese and South Korean military assets. Dempsey visited both na tions and spoke to his counter parts about establishing such an arrangement, he said. e chairman acknowledged there is a degree of political friction between Japan and South Ko rea, some of it stemming from events in World War II. What he proposes, he added, is that the senior military ocers of all three countries advise their political leaders to integrate air and missile defense systems. All three nations should be mature enough to set aside their dierences, Dempsey said, and focus on the common, pro longed threat of ballistic mis siles from Pyongyang and North Koreas young leader Kim Jong Un, the third member of his family to rule the reclusive na tion since his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, took power in 1948. e elder Kim invaded South Korea in 1950, and North Korea has since been isolated and an tagonistic to the United States, South Korea and Japan. Turning to his visit to China the chairman said initial visits primarily set the tone for further engagement. He has said re peatedly this week that his mes sage to both China and allies in the region is that, as the United States and China pursue the new relationship President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to in principle, it has to be forged in the context of Americas longstanding and other important relationships in the region. As a rising China becomes more central to the world stage, he added, he sees that respon Navy League to honor Kings Bays best

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 e Seaman-to-Admiral commis sioning program, which provides an opportunity for qualied Sailors to receive college educations and Navy commissions, is soliciting applications for scal year 2014, as announced in NAVADMIN 102/13, April 23. e deadline for submitting ap plication packages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 pro gram and the amazing Sailors who receive their commissions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command. STA-21 ocer candidates and their families benet from the educational opportunity aorded them at our nations premier uni versities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allowances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an invest ment in Sailors as it shapes our of cer corps of the future. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 deadline date. Early submission is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illeg ible documents. e deadline for submission of additional documen tation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA21 applicants must attend the Naval Science Institute course at Ocer Training Command, Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college studies at an NROTC-ali ated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eight-week course of intense ocer preparation and indoctrination. Course enrollment is timed to allow college entrance during summer or fall semes ters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate compared to what I could do as an ocer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by joining the ocer ranks, said Ocer Candidate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapo lis. I thought becoming an ocer would maximize my qualities and my potential and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attending the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. is has been a great learning experience for me, Page said. I havent been out in the eet yet but STA-21 and NSI has been a great place to gather information from those in my class that came from the eet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and re ceived a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the eet as an ocer. Both Page and Electronics Technician 3rd Class and Ocer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 ocer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, Smith said. You get your college education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attending North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Ocer on a ship or subma rine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. e STA-21 program benets Sail ors as well as the Navy. e average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which as sists in the process of selecting the most qualied Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on average older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity di rectly reected in the more than 90 percent completion rate STA-21 pro gram candidates boast. Many Sail ors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates nish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic program, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, as sistant operations ocer and head of this years STA-21/NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six curriculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to provide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also establish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students ad just from life in the eet to life at a University. In the STA-21 program, as it is in many competitive selec tion processes, it is often a candi dates extra eorts which can result in selection. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October 2013. Questions concerning this pro gram should be directed to com mand career counselors or to the NSTC Ocer Development direc torate at (850) 452-9563. Headquartered on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., Mewbourne and NSTC oversees 98 percent of ini tial ocer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. is includes the Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps at more than 160 colleges and universities, Ocer Training Command on Naval Sta tion Newport, R.I., Recruit Training Command and the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawinge Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Qualied students can participate in a quarterly drawing for awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500, for a total of $5,500 per quarter. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school, may enter. Eligible students include de pendent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services.Never Quit event May 19Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Chal lenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facilitate the red carpet awards at Jacksonville Beach, Fla., during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. Now hear this! Ocer program wants candidates Seaman-to-Admiral Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., com mander, Navy Region Southeast, presented ve Navy Meritorious Ci vilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources Program during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 17. e ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR special ists from region headquarters to major commands on board installa tions throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mis sion would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment oppor tunity, workers compensation, and stang and classication for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approxi mately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Com mands, such as Naval Facilities En gineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. e new Navy-wide model will position HR specialists at each major command, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. e decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Aairs with the goal of de livering more streamlined and cus tomer-focused support. Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, said the transi tion comes with distinct benets. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to fo cus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several dif ferent commands at the same time, she said. is focus provides the opportunity for better customer ser vice through specic, command-fo cused HR servicing and better part nerships with customers. e new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logistical challenges. It re quired extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of les and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby ex pressed his appreciation for each of the program members eorts throughout the process. is was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your ev eryday workload, Scorby said. While decentralization is a ma jor transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian em ployees should not expect to see many changes in the way they re ceive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery mod el. ere may be a change in the HR professional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new ser vicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new sys tem will be provided from NAS Jack sonville, but HR professionals will be responsive to phone calls and emails and are available to meet via video teleconference, she added.SE human resources decentralized Southeast Region HR Individuals may only compete for one team Space permitting, commands may enter more than one team, by sections, divisions or battalions. POCs are responsible for getting their team to the events on time, briefed and fully prepared. Show time is 8:45 a.m. e Fitness Center parking lot will be secured. Plan accordingly. Team rosters due by close of business, Friday, May 17, to pre pare brackets. Rosters with POCs may be emailed to michele.gilbert@navy.mil or dropped o at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Administration Oce in Building 1039. For more information, contact Navy Adventures Unleashed at 5739869CMC

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Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate suc cessfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your chil dren? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their chil dren. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 6, 13 and Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner 20. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other When the Chief of Naval Operations testied April 25 before the Senate Armed Services Com mittee on the Department of the Navy budget request for scal year 2014, he emphasized the re alities of sequestration restraints on the budget presented to congress earlier last month. Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert de livered a statement that outlined the budget strategy. He noted the aspects sequestration has played on the Navys budget planning, stressing that budget shortfalls were sure to carry over into scal 2014. is setback would reduce the Navy surge capacity of fully mission-capable carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups through scal year 2014. Taken together, our O&M and investment shortfalls leave us a $9 billion carryover challenge for FY2014, Greenert said. He added however, continu ing sequestration would grow the carryover challenge from $9 billion to $23 billion. When looking at the 2014 bud get, Greenert gave a view of what the Navy can expect for the in vestment of research and development in new technology. With over $44 billion being invested in ships, submarines, manned and unmanned aircraft, weap ons, cyber, among other pro curement items and programs to include the delivery of 300 ships by 2019, Greenert expects much greater interoperability and ex ibility. He expressed his commit ment to grow manpower by 4,600 Sailors, stating these new Sailors would, reduce our manning gaps at sea, enhance the Navys cyber capabilities, and improve our wa terfront training. Greenert details priorities for Navys budget THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Mongolian Barbecue

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 5 milestones like purchasing their rst home, Baldwin said, stressing the opportu nities the program has provided to Camden students. e group toured the electronics, optical and mechanical shops. Darren Harper, Kingsland economic develop ment director, and Leslie Hamrick, president of the Camden Chamber of Comemrce, accompanied the group as members of the chambers Workforce Development Committee. Harper said it was help ful to see the specialized work that TRF performs to support maintenance and the refurbishing of equip ment to other military en tities. e shops shared data that showed the cost sav ings to the Department of Defense and taxpay ers that has resulted from their skill and ability to rebuild, refurbish and re t expensive equipment, hardware and electronic circuitry, as well as net work and database support that must meet mili tary ready standards. at the industrial and technical applications relate to the skill base and ex pertise needed to diversify and grow a more industrial workforce in Camden County, Harper said. Carra Goodman, workbased learning coordinator in Clinch County, said she had never thought about life on a submarine and how it was a self-contained unit that required the occupants to reuse, and lter their air, water and waste while at sea. e fact that the sub marine shoots missiles was really all I considered the submarine had to do, Goodman said, as she watched the many tasks Hill described regarding life on submarines. Hill discussed the rela tive, sustained comfort levels that top-working equipment necessitates for the submariner. Several educators remarked that their knowledge of subma rines was limited to what they had seen in the movie, Hunt for Red October. To expand educators exposure to the intricate, industrial applications that are detailed is what is needed to relate STEM opportunities to students planning their future. e Camden Partner ships chairman of forums and tours, Barrett King, also accompanied the group, anticipating that similar events will occur through the collaboration of the partnership and Baldwin. King expressed thanks that Hill recognizes the need to host educators and community stake holders to become more informed about TRFs mission. With a local civilian workforce at TRF averag ing around 1,000, we want educators to be able to re late opportunities to the rising workforce as well as community leaders to link skill sets to growth oppor tunities that could diver sify Camdens economic base, he said. A luncheon followed the tour coordinated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson. Jeerson encouraged educators serving military students to partner with their respective SLO to form alliances with their local military installation. is need was emphasized by McNeill, lun cheon speaker, who en couraged advocacy. McNeill related how the communitys advocacy for the submarine force and the conversion of the four boats from SSBN to SSGN had expanded capability to the mission of the submarine force. at allowed Camden County to welcome the USS Florida and the USS Georgia to Kings Bay. She encouraged educators to advocate for the training needed to prepare the emerging workforce to have the science, technology, engineering and math skills needed for the mili tary and to grow southeast Georgias regional eco nomic development. Saturday, April 13th marked yet another spring season of the Kings Bay Youth Sports soccer and t-ball programs began Sat urday, April 13. More than one thou sand adults and children showed up to mark open ing day for both the Youth Sports Soccer Complex and the Youth T-Ball Fields, located in base housing. e Youth Sports Soc cer Complex, next to the track, consists of eight soc cer elds for players from ages three to 15. e complex also has a playground and a concessions stand for various refreshments. e t-ball elds, lo cated behind the Kings Bay Youth Center in base housing, consists of two ball elds, a playground and a small concession stand. Between these two spring sports, 450 players learn from more than 100 volunteer coaches, cov ering the various aspects of the game, along with values of sportsmanship, teamwork, and respecting peers. Past Youth Sports players are now working alongside these coaches as Youth Sports teen o cials, to teach a new gen eration of players about the principles of build ing teamwork and about always putting your best foot forward. In addition to the Youth Sports soccer, t-ball and basketball programs, a va riety of sports camps for youth players is oered. Among this sum mers various camps will be former Jackson ville Universitys Mens Soccer Coach Mike John son returning with T-N-T Soccer Training Camp, Johnsons Back to Basics Basketball Camp and Camden County High Schools Coach Moores Volleyball Camp. If you would like to know more about the Kings Bay Youth Sports Program or any of the camps, call 5738202. Spring sports underway St. Marys Middle School adopted USS Rhode Island runners USS George Bancroft reunion TRF sibility likely playing out rst in two areas. One is on these territo rial issues, Dempsey said, referring to disputes China has with other countries in the region over islands in both the East China Sea and South China Sea. e idea of great power and great responsibility would mean, to them, that they shouldnt try to resolve those territorial issues co ercively, just because they happen to be a hundred times bigger than some of their neighbors. A second area where Chinese power holds great potential inuence, he said, is in the future of the Pacic region. e third objective, developing a mutual code of behavior, could begin with a discussion of theoretical encounters, Dempsey suggested. Maybe through a series of vignettes, we would no tionally discuss a vignette where [U.S. and Chinese forces] encounter each other in the air, at sea, or the more dicult one, ... cyber, the chairman said. But we have to work toward it.Dempsey

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and trans fers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing refer ral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attend ing the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of manag ing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble mak ing it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to regis ter call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. FFSC Pirates Cove Galley menus

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e U.S. intelligence community assesses with varying degrees of con dence that the Syrian regime has used chemi cal weapons, specically the nerve-agent sarin, on a small scale in that violence-torn nation, De fense Secretary Chuck Hagel said April 25. On the last evening of his ve-nation trip to the Middle East as defense secretary, Hagel told re porters traveling with him that the White House de livered a letter on the topic this morning to several members of Congress. e intelligence community has been assessing information for some time on this issue, and the deci sion to reach this conclu sion was made within the past 24 hours, the secre tary said. I have been in close contact with senior ocials in Washington since then to discuss this serious matter. Hagel said the United States cant conrm the weapons origin, but we do believe that any use of chemical weapons in Syria would very likely have originated with the [Bashar] Assad regime. e White House letter, signed by Miguel Rodri guez, director of the Oce of Legislative Aairs, on President Barack Obamas behalf, responded to an April 24 inquiry by unidentied members of Con gress. They asked, Has the Assad regime, or Syr ian elements associated with or sup ported by the Assad re gime used chemical weapons in Syria since the current conict began in March 2011? In response, the let ter said, our intelligence committee does assess with varying degrees of condence that the Syrian regime has used chemi cal weapons on a small scale in Syria, specially the chemical agent sarin. is assessment is based in part on physiological samples. e letter said the chain of custody is not clear, so its not clear how the ex posure occurred or under what conditions. We need to know the full story and get it right, Hagel told reporters. us far, according to the letter, we believe that the Assad regime main tains custody of these weapons and has dem onstrated a willingness to escalate its horric use of violence against the Syr ian people. e Obama administration will remain in close consultation with you and the Congress on these mat ters, the letter continued. In the interim, the ad ministration is prepared for all contingencies so that we can respond ap propriately to any conrmed use of chemical weapons, consistent with our national interests. As the letter states, Hagel said, the president has made it clear that the use of chemical weapons or the transfer of such weap ons to terrorist groups would be unacceptable. e United States has an obligation to fully inves tigate, including with key partners and allies and through the United Na tions, evidence of chemi cal weapons use in Syria, the secretary added. Hagel traveled to Isra el, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, and the military and government leaders of each country have ex pressed concern about the deteriorating situation in Syria, he observed. is subject, Syria, and in particular chemi cal weapons, is just part of a larger challenge in the Middle East, Hagel said. It is so vitally impor tant for our United States interests, as well as for our allies, that we work to stabilize and secure these [Middle East] countries, the secretary concluded, because if this region of the world essentially gets itself into a situation where its ungovernable and out of control, then this will be an astoundingly huge problem for all of the world. Marines and Sailors from the 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion and Com bat Logistics Regiment 35 participated in a jungle environmental survival training class instructed by Philippine reconnais sance Marines, April 10 during exercise Balikatan 2013. e training helped the Marines better under stand jungle warfare tac tics and further strength ened the relationship between the two forces. is was a good oppor tunity to share the infor mation we have and the tactics we use to survive in the jungle, said Philip pine Marine Sgt. Bimbo Busico, a JEST instructor and intelligence analyst with the Philippines Force Reconnaissance Battalion. It wasnt only about training, but also about the camaraderie amongst the forces. We are always sharing our tactics and techniques. e bilateral training led by the Philippine Marines showcased the strong re lationship between the Philippines and U.S., ac cording to U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Iain A. Orr, an engineer equipment me chanic with CLR-35. As treaty allies, the Armed Forces of the Phil ippines and U.S. military have a long-standing friendship that has con tributed to regional secu rity, stability and is deeply rooted in cooperation. It was nice to be able to learn some dierent ways to survive in a jungle en vironment, said Orr. If I ever need to survive or live in the jungle, I would try my best to think back to this training and apply it to the best of my ability. e JEST was an im portant factor in achiev ing one of the goals of BK 13 which is to increase interoperability and enhance military-to-military relations and combined combat capabilities. We also taught them about the psychological aspect on how to survive in the jungle because no matter how well trained you are you may not know the things that will aect your mind, Busico said. Your skills will be useless if you do not have prioriti zation. I enjoyed this training and I was able to take in a lot of new techniques on how to catch food, gather water and make a shel ter, said Orr. I may not have thought of ever doing some of those techniques. Balikatan is an annual Philippine-U.S. bilateral exercise. Humanitar ian assistance and training activities enable the Philippine and American service members to build lasting relationships, train together and provide as sistance in communities where the need is the greatest.Marines train in jungleSarin use suspected THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 7

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The National Basketball Association playoffs have begun, with 16 teams from the Eastern and Western Divisions in the hunt for the title. Last season, the Miami Heat beat the Oklahoma City Thunder four games to one for the crown. Both teams are in the hunt again and are favorites in Las Vegas, with Miami holding the bookies edge to win it all. My experts at Pirates Cove Galley agreed, making Miami a 3-to-2 favorite to go all the way. Ill make in 4-to-2, Heat.CS2 Phillip Smith Pirates Cove Galley St. Louis OKC (Oklahoma City). theyve got the best lineup. Theyre young and Kevin Durant is the MVP. MTSA Jason Gale Trident Training Facility Queen Creek, Ariz. Miami. (Dwyane) Wade, (Chris) Bosh and (LeBron) James, if they stay healthy, nobody will be came to come close to them. CS2 Joseph Chandler Unaccompanied Housing Caldwell, Ohio Ill take the (Oklahoma City) Thunder. The Durant(Since injured Russell) Westbrook combo is unstoppable. CS3 Marcus Branch Pirates Cove Galley Brooklyn, N.Y. Im going with the Brooklyn Nets, because Im from Brooklyn. MM2 Chris Bishop Pirates Cove Galley Jacksonville, Fla I think Miami is going to repeat. The gap between the talent of Miami and the rest of the teams is just too great MTSN Tyler Platt Trident Training Facility Taylors, S.C Miami. The Big Three are a close-knit trio. There shouldnt be a single team that can keep up with them. And, they have one of the best coaching staffs. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Trident Refit honorees Trio remembered Coast Guard Patrol Forc es Southwest Asia held a ceremony at Naval Support Activity Bahrain April 24 in remembrance of the ninth anniversary of the at tack on patrol coastal ship USS Firebolt (PC 10). Saturday, April 24, 2004, Firebolt was attacked near Iraqs oil terminals while conducting maritime se curity operations in the Northern Arabian Gulf. e attack claimed the lives of three servicemembers Navy Boatswains Mate 1st Class Michael Pernaselli, Signalman 2nd Class Christopher Watts and Coast Guard Damage Controlman 3rd Class Na than Bruckenthal. ese three are now immortalized at a memo rial on NSA Bahrain, in the courtyard outside the U.S. Coast Guard oce, where the ceremony was held. Naval Mobile Construc tion Battalion 133 built the memorial. Speakers at the ceremony included Deputy Com mander, U.S. 5th Fleet, U.S. Naval Forces Central Com mand, Rear Adm. Kevin Scott; Commodore, Com mander, Task Force 55, Capt. Stephen Evans; and Commodore, U.S. Coast Guard Patrol Forces South west Asia, Capt. Paul Flynn. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 On May 4 1942, the Battle of the Coral Sea opened as Task Force 17 under Rear Adm. Frank Jack Fletcher attacked the Japanese Tulagi Invasion Force, led by Rear Adm. Shima Kiyohide at Tulagi. Elements of the Japanese 3d Kure Special Landing Force had gone ashore there, as well as on neighboring Gavutu, to establish defenses between April 29 and May 2. Dauntlesses and Devas tators (VB 5, VS 5, VT 5), supported by Wildcats (VF 42) from Yorktown (CV-5) carried out three strikes against the Japanese ships. ey sank the destroyer Kikuzuki, the minesweeper Tama Maru and the auxiliary minesweepers Wa 1 and Wa 2 and dam aged the destroyer Yuzuki, the minelayer Okinoshima, the transport Azuma san Maru, and cargo ship Kozui Maru. Lt. John J. Jo Jo Pow ers of VB 5 participated in all three strikes, receiving credit for one direct hit, two close-misses and a persistent low-level straf ing attack. e Yorktown Air Group suered two Wildcats and one Devastator lost, due to navigational errors and fuel exhaustion. e destroyer Hammann (DD-412) rescued the two downed Wildcat pilots from Guadalcanal, but the destroyer Perkins (DD-377), however, sent to retrieve the downed Devastator crew south of the island, did not locate the missing men. e pilot and his radio man though, ultimately reached the New Hebrides in a schooner with a Chi nese crew. at same day, Japanese transports sailed from Rabaul, bound for Port Moresby to carry out Op eration Mo. e Battle of the Coral Sea resumed next day as Fletchers force turned north to engage the Japa nese Carrier Strike Force. at day, Japanese land attack planes carrying tor pedoes (4th Kokutai) or bombs (Genzan Kokutai) attacked the Support Group detached to inter cept the Port Moresby In vasion Force; the destroy er Farragut (DD-348) was damaged by friendly re while engaged in repelling the air attack. Later, mistaken for the Japanese Port Moresby Invasion Force, Rear Adm. John G. Craces ships were bombed by USAAF B-26s that straddle the Australian heavy cruiser HMAS Australia and near-missed the heavy cruiser Chicago (CA-29) and the destroyer Perkins. Meanwhile, Dauntless es and Devastators (VB 2, VB 5, VS 2, VS 5, VT 2, VT 5) from Yorktown and Lex ington (CV-2) attacked the Japanese Close Support Force and sank the small carrier Shoho in Coral Sea, o Misima Island. During the action o Misima, Lt. Jo Jo Pow ers and Lt. (j.g.) William E. Hall, USNR (VS 2) skillfully and determinedly pressed home their attacks. at night, Powers (VB 5s gun nery ocer), lecturing his squadron on point of aim and diving technique, advocated a low-level release point to ensure ac curacy, a philosophy he had demonstrated in the attack on Shoho. Elsewhere that day, mistaken at the outset for a carrier and a cruiser, however, the oiler Neo sho (AO-23) and destroyer Sims (DD-409), detached and operating independently from the U.S. car rier force, came under at tack by Japanese planes, although the enemy rec ognizes the mistake in time to avoid expending torpedoes. Neosho was damaged by bombs and a crashing dive bomber, and Sims was sunk. On board the crippled Neosho, CWT Oscar V. Peterson, although badly wounded, risks his life to close bulkhead stop valves, receiving severe burns. In the waning daylight, the Japanese attempt to nd TF-17 ran afoul of bad weather. Some of their carrier bombers actually entered the landing pat tern for Yorktown, but are driven o by antiaircraft re and ghters. e operational losses of Japanese planes in the unsuccessful mission to nd the Americans, how ever, lessen the number of eective aircraft they can employ the next day. e Battle of the Coral Sea concluded on May 8 after a Dauntless pilot (VS 2) from Lexington sighted the Japanese Carrier Strike Force formed around the large carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku. As VB 5s pilots quit the ready room on board Yor ktown to man their planes, Lt. Powers exhorted his squadronmates. Remember the folks back home are counting on us, he said. I am go ing to get a hit if I have to lay it [his bomb] on their ight deck. Dauntlesses from Lex ington and Yorktown damage Shokaku and force her retirement. Lt. Powers scored a direct hit on Shokaku, press ing home his attack to a perilously low altitude of 200 feet but failing to re cover from his dive. For his heroism on that day, as well as on the pre vious day and on May 4, Powers was awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously. At the same time, Japa nese carrier bombers and attack planes hit TF 17. e comparatively few ghters on hand compelled the continuation of the use of Dauntlesses as a stop-gap anti-torpedo plane patrol. In the valiant eort, Trident Lakes Golf Clubs lakes will be open for shing May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may sh the lake on the front 9 and Saturday, May 18 you may sh the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes shing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per per son/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing Li cense and NSB Kings Bay Fish ing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the NSB Kings Bay permits. is is open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest infor mation on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Trident Lakes shing soon Navy College information May 1942: Coral Sea set stage for Midway

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Lt. Hall (VS 2), whose performance of duty the previous day as a dive bomber pilot had elicited favorable notice, dis tinguished himself as a ghter pilot in attacking the Japanese planes pressing home their assault on his ship. Although Hall was badly wounded, he brought his damaged Dauntless, and his radioman, back to Lexington having participated in the destruction of at least three torpedo planes, bravery and skill recognized later with the Medal of Honor. Japanese dive bombers and torpedo planes, however, penetrated the screen ing aircraft and ships and damaged carriers Lexington with bombs and torpedoes and Yorktown with bombs. On board Yorktown, Lt. Milton E. Rick etts, a classmate of Jo Jo Powers and a plankowner who had served on the car rier since it was commissioned in 1937, was in charge of an engineering repair party and was mortally wounded when a bomb passed through and exploded just beneath his compartment, killing, stun ning or wounding all of his men. Ricketts, despite his wounds, opened the valve on a nearby re plug, partially led out the hose, and directed water into the burning compartment before he died. For his extraordinary heroism, he is awarded the Medal of Honor, posthu mously. Lexington, further damaged when gasoline vapors are ignited, triggering massive explosions, was later abandoned when res blazed out of control. She was then scuttled by the destroyer Phelps (DD-360). e Japanese canceled Operation Mo in the wake of the Battle of the Coral Sea. In the wake of the battle, the oiler Neo sho, damaged and adrift since 7 May and deemed beyond salvage, was scuttled by torpedoes and gunre of the destroyer Henley (DD-391), which rescued the sur vivors from Neosho and Sims. Among those men is the badly injured CWT Peterson, who died of his wounds. For his extraordinary heroism and dis tinguished gallantry on board Neosho during her ordeal on May 7, Peterson was awarded the Medal of Honor, posthu mously. at same day, the submarine S-42 (SS-153) torpedoed the Japanese mine layer Okinoshima, damaged by Yorktown Air Group planes at Tulagi on May 4, west of Buka Island, Solomons. e submarine S-44 (SS-155), sister ship of S-42, torpedoed and sank the Japanese repair ship Shoei Maru on May 12, 15 miles southwest of Cape St. George, and survived counterattacks by her vic tims escort. Shoei Maru had been en route to try and salvage the damaged minelayer Okinoshima. e attempt to save Okinoshima, damaged the previous day by S-42, by transport Kinryu Maru and destroyer Mochizuki, failed, and the doomed minelayer sank, essentially the last ship casualty of the Battle of the Coral Sea. e Battle of the Coral Sea was the rst engagement in modern naval history in which opposing warships did not ex change a shot and all damage was inict ed by carrier aircraft. In halting the Japanese push south ward and blunting the seaborne thrust toward Port Moresby, Coral Sea proved a strategic victory. American carrier aircrews prove their mettle, and deprive the Japanese of three carriers, Shokaku, Zuikaku, and Shoho, earmarked for the planned Midway Op eration. e Japanese failure to take Port Moresby by sea forces them to adopt an overland strategy that ultimately proved disastrous. Although the enemy believes her to have been sunk, Yorktown was made sea worthy and given an air group to enable her to join Enterprise (CV-6) and Hornet (CV-8), deployed to surprise a Japanese carrier task force at Midway. Coral Sea e Navy joins our nation in celebrating the contributions of generations of patriots during Asian American and Pacic Is lander Heritage Month throughout May. e Navy announced April 29 this years national theme is Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion. Asians and Pacic Islanders of various nationalities and an cestry have been serving in our Navy since the early 19th cen tury. Asians and Pacic Island ers have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every as pect of American life, including Senator Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaiis rst Congressman and the rst Japanese American to serve in Congress. Having enlisted in the US Army at age 17 and serving dur ing the Second World War, Sena tor Inouye was a great champion of all the armed forces through out his career. He received the Medal of Honor for his extraor dinary heroism and indomitable leadership during an engagement in World War II. On Dec. 17, 2012 Senator Inouye passed away, leaving behind a noted legacy of leadership and a drive to enhance inclusion in our Armed Forces and across our country. In 2013, Sailors of Asian and Pacic Islander heritage com prise 6.5 percent of our active duty Naval force. More than 20,000 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employees identify as Asian American or Pacic Islander, including 10 ag ocers, nine members of the Senior Executive Service, and 176 master chief petty o cers. Asian Americans and Pa cic Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and histori cal roots. Directed by Congress in 1978 and established by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/ Pacic American Heritage Week was rst observed the week of May 4, 1979. Navy observes Asian American, Pacic Islander Heritage Month 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Information Dominance will become a rec ognized warfare area on par with other traditional warfare areas and is be coming one of our most powerful assets, said Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Chief Engineer Rear Adm. James Rodman during a panel discussion on information and non-kinetic warfare and the growing cyber se curity threat. We need to look at the warfare arena dierently, Rodman said. We need to know what arrows we have in our quiver and then de ne those non-kinetic ele ments so that we can treat them in a more level set environment. SPAWAR Commander Rear Adm. Patrick Brady echoed Rodman dur ing his follow on keynote address discussing the importance of technical authority in information warfare during the 35th Annual C4ISR Symposium April 23 to 25 in San Diego. e value of a unied technical authority is that it helps us identify secu rity gaps in our networks, Brady said. It creates bet ter situational awareness, more resilient information technology architectures and standardized plat forms so that we can gain a better understanding of the impact of cyber vul nerabilities on our critical warghting systems. To support this cyber imperative and achieve power in an information warfare arena, a greater level of information shar ing will be required. As in the civilian world, the Navy continues to operate in a highly inter active environment regarding global networks, interconnected applications and services. To help combat the emerging cyber threat, the Department of the Navy routinely interacts with the other services, govern ment agencies, allied and coalition partners, com mercial organizations and universities to combat the security challenges faced in the world of networks, the cloud and cyberspace. is is cyber warfare in the information age, a form of non-kinetic warfare on a virtual global battleeld that will change warfare as we know it. It is low-in tensity warfare that is often systemic in nature, such as a hacker setting loose a vi rus on a network system. ough it may not cause an immediate and direct impact to loss of life, it can still wreak havoc on the lives of individuals and or ganizations that encounter it, including the De partment of Defense. SPAWAR Systems Center Pacic Commanding O cer, Capt. Joseph Beel reit erated by stating that warf ighting is about eects. Whether there is a kinetic or non-kinetic eect to achieve, in the long run it is cheaper, less risky and better to use a non-kinetic eect, Beel said. Information warfare is really where you bring in the potential for non-kinetic eects. at kind of non-kinetic impact makes information warfare the ideal warght ing arena. When the United States went into Iraq in the 90s, if we wanted to take down the enemys air trac con trol and defense systems, we could bomb them, which we did very eec tively, Beel said. e dif ference today is that ev erything is so networked. With Information Warfare, the capability may ex ist to take them down by introducing a virus into some sort of cyber attack scenario, without risking bombers or sending peo ple ashore for battle. e DOD makes more than one billion Internet connections daily and passes 40 terabytes of data. DOD networks are scanned and probed by cyber adversaries on aver age six million times per day, so identifying weak links and potential attacks can be a challenge. Many lessons have been learned over the years about the value of infor mation sharing. Rodman said had DOD been able to connect the dots more quickly prior to 9/11, some of the events might have been prevented. ere is a tremendous need to make the avail ability of information seamless so that the warf ighter can access it more quickly, Rodman said. To achieve that level of power, we need to nd a better way of sharing in formation. e rapid elasticity of the cloud makes it a se ductive choice; however, there is the potential for loss of privacy and an in creased risk to security should information get into the wrong hands. Whereas in the past a threat was isolated to a sin gle server system, a cloudbased environment makes it easier to compromise everyone, and all types of data hosted at a particular location are vulnerable on the back end of a breach. e Navy frequently adapts commercial software for operational purposes; however, in doing so there is the potential for hackers to compromise systems, which could then threaten national security. Technical authoritys focus on standardization and variance reduction makes it easier to certify systems and reduce the training burden on opera tors so they can focus on cyber warghting, Brady said. SPAWARs techni cal authority initiative is instrumental to the Navys cyber posture and to our warghting eectiveness in a non-kinetic environ ment. It puts SPAWAR in the lead to develop archi tectures and systems with built in defense in depth attributes. ough it can be chal lenging to identify or classify the typical cyber threat, most run the gamut from non-professional to nation-state sponsored hackers; sometimes it is an internal threat of lax se curity choices on the part of the IT user. Whether malicious or unintentional, the threat is never static and the com plexity of todays systems and networks presents sig nicant security challenges for the Navys producers and consumers of IT. As the Navys Information Dominance systems command, SPAWAR designs, develops and deploys advanced communications and information capabili ties for the warghter. With more than 8,900 acquisition professionals located around the world and close to the eet, the organization is at the forefront of research, engineering and support services that provide vital decision superiority for the warghter. SPAWAR leaders speak to growing cyber threat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 13

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May 9 dinner names Sailor, Marine, Coast Guardian of Year e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will have its signature event of the year, the 2013 Camden-Kings Bay Council Annual Sea Services Awards Banquet, ursday, May 9. e banquet will be at the Kings Bay Conference Center on the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, with cocktails and conversation at 6 p.m., followed by dinner and awards presentations. e special guest and speaker for the evening is Vice Adm. Mike Connor, commander, Submarine Forces. A native of Weymouth, Mass., Connor graduated from Bowdoin College in 1980. He is a Mahan Scholar and distinguished graduate of the Naval War College with a Master of Arts in National Security Aairs and Strategic Studies. Following completion of his initial nuclear power and submarine training, he served in USS Ulysses S. Grant (SSBN 631), USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720), USS Providence (SSN 719), and USS Augusta (SSN 710). Connor commanded USS Seawolf (SSN 21) from 1997 to 2000. He served as commander, Submarine Squadron Eight from March 2003 through July 2004. From June 2008 until April 2010, he served as commander, Submarine Group Seven, Task Force 54/74 Yokosuka, Japan. Connors shore assignments include service at the Navy Operational Intelligence Center; ag secretary for the Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet; prospective command ing ocer instructor for U.S. Atlantic Fleet. He has served on the Joint Sta, on the sta of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy; and, as director, Submarine Warfare Division (N87); director, Naval Warfare Integration Group (N00X); and, assistant deputy chief of Naval Operations for Warfare Systems (N9B) on the OPNAV sta. He assumed his current duties as commander, Submarine Forces in September 2012. But the real stars of the show are the Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardian of the Year who will be honored that evening. e cost to attend is $25 per person. All attendees must RSVP and pay in advance; no payments will be taken at the door for this event. e deadline for reservations is Friday, May 3.Mail the names of all attendees in your group, along with your check in the proper amount, made payable to Camden-Kings Bay Navy League, to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S, St. Marys, Ga., 31558 or e-mail Aston at teacher1@tds.net e council is still accepting donationsof cash, gift cards, gift certicates or goods and ser vices to go toward gifts and door prizes for all of the honorees. Donations should be sent to Aston at the above address. Up Periscope We predict who will win the NBA title Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Stir fried Pirates Cove Galley serves up feast Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com CMC Command Challenge May 22Educators visit Kings Bays Trident Ret Athletic jamboree set in conjunction with Kings Bay 35th anniversary celebrationIn honor the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay 35th Celebration, all commands and tenant commands are invited to participate in the 2013 Command Master Chief Command Challenge, starting at 9 a.m., Wednesday, May 22. Teams must consist of 15 members and must have an event point of contact for each of the three events. Ready, Set, Catch requires seven members in a team effort to launch and catch a series of water balloons, using a three-person slingshot. Full Steam Ahead, a four member paddleboat relay, and Roll With It, a four-person relay team, required to run and hand off a tire. e CMC Command Challenge is open to add commands and tenant commands, regardless of size. e goal is maximize individual participation, as competitions will run simultaneously. e top two teams will move on to the Tug of War Challenge, to take place during the intermission of the concert event. Overall winner will earn the title CMC Command Challenge Champions. Command themes, colors and spirit are encouraged, as this is sure to be a fun lled event. Round up your command, get your rosters together and its game on! In addition volunteer opportunities to assist with timing and scoring are available. Team guidelines: Each team must have POCs, theme, color or other representation of team spirit and unity Be organized. Rosters of who will participate in what events are needed. If an ocial calls your command to compete, and you cannot eld a team, you will forfeit your event. Teams are representing their commands. Unsportsmanlike conduct will not be tolerated. Captains Cup points will be awarded. Schools stress STEM classes to prepare future workforce Trident Ret Facility Commanding Ocer Capt. Lawrence Hill and his command hosted nearly 40 educators from 20 southeast Georgia school systems to share the need to increase Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. e event was co-hosted by e Camden Partnership and President Sheila McNeill, in an eort to develop a series of brieng and tour opportunities for Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base. e Partnership is working towards its goal to advocate, support and strengthen military missions and improve the quality of life for our military members by enhancing military and community partnerships. Hill briefed the group on the history, size and scope of the command. He discussed TRFs role in maintaining submarines for the safety of the crews that serve and the defense deterrent these submarines and crew provide. Most of the educators serve in a similar capacity as Rachel Baldwin and Jacqueline Hart in their work-based learning coordinator roles at Camden County High School. Baldwin shared with the group how students at Camden High had been able to follow a trade and industrial curriculum and co-op their senior year of high school. rough meeting specic testing and application criteria, they were able to then apply and be accepted into the TRF apprentice program. Some of the students she and TRF Student Trainee Coordinator Georgianna Anderson have served since 1995 are nearly 35 years old, with younger students graduating from Camden High in 2011 and selected for apprenticeship. It is rewarding to hear from former students when they assist TRFs mission in Diego Garcia and at Kings Bay, as well as the pride they share when they reach Dempsey back from China tripJCS chair seeking to strengthen alliancese chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta returned April 27 from a week in Northeast Asia that he spent exploring possibilities in China and seeking to strengthen allied capabilities against a sustained threat of nuclear attack from North Korea. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told American Forces Press Service that now is the right time, with the right capabilities in place, to seek to establish a collaborative, trilateral ballistic missile defense architecture incorporating U.S., Japanese and South Korean military assets. Dempsey visited both nations and spoke to his counterparts about establishing such an arrangement, he said. e chairman acknowledged there is a degree of political friction between Japan and South Korea, some of it stemming from events in World War II. What he proposes, he added, is that the senior military ocers of all three countries advise their political leaders to integrate air and missile defense systems. All three nations should be mature enough to set aside their dierences, Dempsey said, and focus on the common, prolonged threat of ballistic missiles from Pyongyang and North Koreas young leader Kim Jong Un, the third member of his family to rule the reclusive nation since his grandfather, Kim Il Sung, took power in 1948. e elder Kim invaded South Korea in 1950, and North Korea has since been isolated and antagonistic to the United States, South Korea and Japan. Turning to his visit to China the chairman said initial visits primarily set the tone for further engagement. He has said repeatedly this week that his message to both China and allies in the region is that, as the United States and China pursue the new relationship President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to in principle, it has to be forged in the context of Americas longstanding and other important relationships in the region. As a rising China becomes more central to the world stage, he added, he sees that responNavy League to honor Kings Bays best

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 e Seaman-to-Admiral commissioning program, which provides an opportunity for qualied Sailors to receive college educations and Navy commissions, is soliciting applications for scal year 2014, as announced in NAVADMIN 102/13, April 23. e deadline for submitting application packages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 program and the amazing Sailors who receive their commissions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command. STA-21 ocer candidates and their families benet from the educational opportunity aorded them at our nations premier universities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allowances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an investment in Sailors as it shapes our ofcer corps of the future. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 deadline date. Early submission is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illegible documents. e deadline for submission of additional documentation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA21 applicants must attend the Naval Science Institute course at Ocer Training Command, Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college studies at an NROTC-aliated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eight-week course of intense ocer preparation and indoctrination. Course enrollment is timed to allow college entrance during summer or fall semesters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate compared to what I could do as an ocer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by joining the ocer ranks, said Ocer Candidate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapolis. I thought becoming an ocer would maximize my qualities and my potential and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attending the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. is has been a great learning experience for me, Page said. I havent been out in the eet yet but STA-21 and NSI has been a great place to gather information from those in my class that came from the eet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and received a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the eet as an ocer. Both Page and Electronics Technician 3rd Class and Ocer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 ocer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, Smith said. You get your college education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attending North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Ocer on a ship or submarine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. e STA-21 program benets Sailors as well as the Navy. e average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which assists in the process of selecting the most qualied Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on average older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity directly reected in the more than 90 percent completion rate STA-21 program candidates boast. Many Sailors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates nish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic program, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, assistant operations ocer and head of this years STA-21/NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six curriculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to provide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also establish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students adjust from life in the eet to life at a University. In the STA-21 program, as it is in many competitive selection processes, it is often a candidates extra eorts which can result in selection. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October 2013. Questions concerning this program should be directed to command career counselors or to the NSTC Ocer Development directorate at (850) 452-9563. Headquartered on Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., Mewbourne and NSTC oversees 98 percent of initial ocer and enlisted accessions training for the Navy. is includes the Naval Reserve Ocers Training Corps at more than 160 colleges and universities, Ocer Training Command on Naval Station Newport, R.I., Recruit Training Command and the Navys only boot camp, at Great Lakes, Ill. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawinge Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Qualied students can participate in a quarterly drawing for awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500, for a total of $5,500 per quarter. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school, may enter. Eligible students include de pendent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services.Never Quit event May 19Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facilitate the red carpet awards at Jacksonville Beach, Fla., during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. Now hear this! Ocer program wants candidates Seaman-to-Admiral Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, presented ve Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources Program during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 17. e ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquarters to major commands on board installations throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mission would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and stang and classication for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approximately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. e new Navy-wide model will position HR specialists at each major command, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. e decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Aairs with the goal of delivering more streamlined and customer-focused support. Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, said the transition comes with distinct benets. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different commands at the same time, she said. is focus provides the opportunity for better customer service through specic, command-focused HR servicing and better partnerships with customers. e new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logistical challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of les and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members eorts throughout the process. is was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your ev eryday workload, Scorby said. While decentralization is a major transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery mod el. ere may be a change in the HR professional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new ser vicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR professionals will be responsive to phone calls and emails and are available to meet via video teleconference, she added.SE human resources decentralized Southeast Region HR Individuals may only compete for one team Space permitting, commands may enter more than one team, by sections, divisions or battalions. POCs are responsible for getting their team to the events on time, briefed and fully prepared. Show time is 8:45 a.m. e Fitness Center parking lot will be secured. Plan accordingly. Team rosters due by close of business, Friday, May 17, to prepare brackets. Rosters with POCs may be emailed to michele.gilbert@navy.mil or dropped o at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Administration Oce in Building 1039. For more information, contact Navy Adventures Unleashed at 5739869CMC

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Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate suc cessfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, May 6, 13 and Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner 20. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six partici pants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other When the Chief of Naval Operations testied April 25 before the Senate Armed Services Committee on the Department of the Navy budget request for scal year 2014, he emphasized the realities of sequestration restraints on the budget presented to congress earlier last month. Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert delivered a statement that outlined the budget strategy. He noted the aspects sequestration has played on the Navys budget planning, stressing that budget shortfalls were sure to carry over into scal 2014. is setback would reduce the Navy surge capacity of fully mission-capable carrier strike groups and amphibious ready groups through scal year 2014. Taken together, our O&M and investment shortfalls leave us a $9 billion carryover challenge for FY2014, Greenert said. He added however, continuing sequestration would grow the carryover challenge from $9 billion to $23 billion. When looking at the 2014 budget, Greenert gave a view of what the Navy can expect for the investment of research and development in new technology. With over $44 billion being invested in ships, submarines, manned and unmanned aircraft, weapons, cyber, among other procurement items and programs to include the delivery of 300 ships by 2019, Greenert expects much greater interoperability and exibility. He expressed his commitment to grow manpower by 4,600 Sailors, stating these new Sailors would, reduce our manning gaps at sea, enhance the Navys cyber capabilities, and improve our waterfront training. Greenert details priorities for Navys budget THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Mongolian Barbecue

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 5 milestones like purchasing their rst home, Baldwin said, stressing the opportu nities the program has provided to Camden students. e group toured the electronics, optical and mechanical shops. Darren Harper, Kingsland economic development director, and Leslie Hamrick, president of the Camden Chamber of Comemrce, accompanied the group as members of the chambers Workforce Development Committee. Harper said it was helpful to see the specialized work that TRF performs to support maintenance and the refurbishing of equipment to other military entities. e shops shared data that showed the cost savings to the Department of Defense and taxpayers that has resulted from their skill and ability to rebuild, refurbish and ret expensive equipment, hardware and electronic circuitry, as well as network and database support that must meet military ready standards. at the industrial and technical applications relate to the skill base and ex pertise needed to diversify and grow a more industrial workforce in Camden County, Harper said. Carra Goodman, workbased learning coordinator in Clinch County, said she had never thought about life on a submarine and how it was a self-contained unit that required the occupants to reuse, and lter their air, water and waste while at sea. e fact that the submarine shoots missiles was really all I considered the submarine had to do, Goodman said, as she watched the many tasks Hill described regarding life on submarines. Hill discussed the rela tive, sustained comfort levels that top-working equipment necessitates for the submariner. Several educators remarked that their knowledge of subma rines was limited to what they had seen in the movie, Hunt for Red October. To expand educators exposure to the intricate, industrial applications that are detailed is what is needed to relate STEM opportunities to students planning their future. e Camden Partnerships chairman of forums and tours, Barrett King, also accompanied the group, anticipating that similar events will occur through the collaboration of the partnership and Baldwin. King expressed thanks that Hill recognizes the need to host educators and community stakeholders to become more informed about TRFs mission. With a local civilian workforce at TRF averaging around 1,000, we want educators to be able to relate opportunities to the rising workforce as well as community leaders to link skill sets to growth opportunities that could diversify Camdens economic base, he said. A luncheon followed the tour coordinated by Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson. Jeerson encouraged educators serving military students to partner with their respective SLO to form alliances with their local military installation. is need was emphasized by McNeill, luncheon speaker, who encouraged advocacy. McNeill related how the communitys advocacy for the submarine force and the conversion of the four boats from SSBN to SSGN had expanded capability to the mission of the submarine force. at allowed Camden County to welcome the USS Florida and the USS Georgia to Kings Bay. She encouraged educators to advocate for the training needed to prepare the emerging workforce to have the science, technology, engineering and math skills needed for the mili tary and to grow southeast Georgias regional eco nomic development. Saturday, April 13th marked yet another spring season of the Kings Bay Youth Sports soccer and t-ball programs began Saturday, April 13. More than one thousand adults and children showed up to mark opening day for both the Youth Sports Soccer Complex and the Youth T-Ball Fields, located in base housing. e Youth Sports Soccer Complex, next to the track, consists of eight soccer elds for players from ages three to 15. e complex also has a playground and a concessions stand for various refreshments. e t-ball elds, located behind the Kings Bay Youth Center in base housing, consists of two ball elds, a playground and a small concession stand. Between these two spring sports, 450 players learn from more than 100 volunteer coaches, covering the various aspects of the game, along with values of sportsmanship, teamwork, and respecting peers. Past Youth Sports players are now working alongside these coaches as Youth Sports teen ocials, to teach a new generation of players about the principles of building teamwork and about always putting your best foot forward. In addition to the Youth Sports soccer, t-ball and basketball programs, a variety of sports camps for youth players is oered. Among this summers various camps will be former Jacksonville Universitys Mens Soccer Coach Mike Johnson returning with T-N-T Soccer Training Camp, Johnsons Back to Basics Basketball Camp and Camden County High Schools Coach Moores Volleyball Camp. If you would like to know more about the Kings Bay Youth Sports Program or any of the camps, call 5738202. Spring sports underway St. Marys Middle School adopted USS Rhode Island runners USS George Bancroft reunion TRF sibility likely playing out rst in two areas. One is on these territorial issues, Dempsey said, referring to disputes China has with other countries in the region over islands in both the East China Sea and South China Sea. e idea of great power and great responsibility would mean, to them, that they shouldnt try to resolve those territorial issues coercively, just because they happen to be a hundred times bigger than some of their neighbors. A second area where Chinese power holds great potential inuence, he said, is in the future of the Pacic region. e third objective, developing a mutual code of behavior, could begin with a discussion of theoretical encounters, Dempsey suggested. Maybe through a series of vignettes, we would notionally discuss a vignette where [U.S. and Chinese forces] encounter each other in the air, at sea, or the more dicult one, ... cyber, the chairman said. But we have to work toward it.Dempsey

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble mak ing it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to register call 573-4513.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. FFSC Pirates Cove Galley menus

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e U.S. intelligence community assesses with varying degrees of condence that the Syrian regime has used chemical weapons, specically the nerve-agent sarin, on a small scale in that violence-torn nation, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said April 25. On the last evening of his ve-nation trip to the Middle East as defense secretary, Hagel told reporters traveling with him that the White House delivered a letter on the topic this morning to several members of Congress. e intelligence community has been assessing information for some time on this issue, and the decision to reach this conclusion was made within the past 24 hours, the secretary said. I have been in close contact with senior ocials in Washington since then to discuss this serious matter. Hagel said the United States cant conrm the weapons origin, but we do believe that any use of chemical weapons in Syria would very likely have originated with the [Bashar] Assad regime. e White House letter, signed by Miguel Rodriguez, director of the Oce of Legislative Aairs, on President Barack Obamas behalf, responded to an April 24 inquiry by unidentied members of Con gress. They asked, Has the Assad regime, or Syrian elements associated with or supported by the Assad regime used chemical weapons in Syria since the current conict began in March 2011? In response, the let ter said, our intelligence committee does assess with varying degrees of condence that the Syrian regime has used chemi cal weapons on a small scale in Syria, specially the chemical agent sarin. is assessment is based in part on physiological samples. e letter said the chain of custody is not clear, so its not clear how the exposure occurred or under what conditions. We need to know the full story and get it right, Hagel told reporters. us far, according to the letter, we believe that the Assad regime maintains custody of these weapons and has demonstrated a willingness to escalate its horric use of violence against the Syrian people. e Obama administration will remain in close consultation with you and the Congress on these mat ters, the letter continued. In the interim, the administration is prepared for all contingencies so that we can respond appropriately to any conrmed use of chemical weapons, consistent with our national interests. As the letter states, Hagel said, the president has made it clear that the use of chemical weapons or the transfer of such weapons to terrorist groups would be unacceptable. e United States has an obligation to fully investigate, including with key partners and allies and through the United Nations, evidence of chemical weapons use in Syria, the secretary added. Hagel traveled to Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, and the military and government leaders of each country have expressed concern about the deteriorating situation in Syria, he observed. is subject, Syria, and in particular chemical weapons, is just part of a larger challenge in the Middle East, Hagel said. It is so vitally important for our United States interests, as well as for our allies, that we work to stabilize and secure these [Middle East] countries, the secretary concluded, because if this region of the world essentially gets itself into a situation where its ungovernable and out of control, then this will be an astoundingly huge problem for all of the world. Marines and Sailors from the 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion and Combat Logistics Regiment 35 participated in a jungle environmental survival training class instructed by Philippine reconnaissance Marines, April 10 during exercise Balikatan 2013. e training helped the Marines better understand jungle warfare tactics and further strengthened the relationship between the two forces. is was a good opportunity to share the information we have and the tactics we use to survive in the jungle, said Philippine Marine Sgt. Bimbo Busico, a JEST instructor and intelligence analyst with the Philippines Force Reconnaissance Battalion. It wasnt only about training, but also about the camaraderie amongst the forces. We are always sharing our tactics and techniques. e bilateral training led by the Philippine Marines showcased the strong relationship between the Philippines and U.S., according to U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Iain A. Orr, an engineer equipment mechanic with CLR-35. As treaty allies, the Armed Forces of the Philippines and U.S. military have a long-standing friendship that has contributed to regional security, stability and is deeply rooted in cooperation. It was nice to be able to learn some dierent ways to survive in a jungle environment, said Orr. If I ever need to survive or live in the jungle, I would try my best to think back to this training and apply it to the best of my ability. e JEST was an important factor in achieving one of the goals of BK 13 which is to increase interoperability and enhance military-to-military relations and combined combat capabilities. We also taught them about the psychological aspect on how to survive in the jungle because no matter how well trained you are you may not know the things that will aect your mind, Busico said. Your skills will be useless if you do not have prioritization. I enjoyed this training and I was able to take in a lot of new techniques on how to catch food, gather water and make a shelter, said Orr. I may not have thought of ever doing some of those techniques. Balikatan is an annual Philippine-U.S. bilateral exercise. Humanitarian assistance and training activities enable the Philippine and American service members to build lasting relationships, train together and provide assistance in communities where the need is the greatest.Marines train in jungleSarin use suspected THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 7

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The National Basketball Association playoffs have begun, with 16 teams from the Eastern and Western Divisions in the hunt for the title. Last season, the Miami Heat beat the Oklahoma City Thunder four games to one for the crown. Both teams are in the hunt again and are favorites in Las Vegas, with Miami holding the bookies edge to win it all. My experts at Pirates Cove Galley agreed, making Miami a 3-to-2 favorite to go all the way. Ill make in 4-to-2, Heat.CS2 Phillip Smith Pirates Cove Galley St. Louis OKC (Oklahoma City). theyve got the best lineup. Theyre young and Kevin Durant is the MVP. MTSA Jason Gale Trident Training Facility Queen Creek, Ariz. Miami. (Dwyane) Wade, (Chris) Bosh and (LeBron) James, if they stay healthy, nobody will be came to come close to them. CS2 Joseph Chandler Unaccompanied Housing Caldwell, Ohio Ill take the (Oklahoma City) Thunder. The Durant(Since injured Russell) Westbrook combo is unstoppable. CS3 Marcus Branch Pirates Cove Galley Brooklyn, N.Y. Im going with the Brooklyn Nets, because Im from Brooklyn. MM2 Chris Bishop Pirates Cove Galley Jacksonville, Fla. I think Miami is going to repeat. The gap between the talent of Miami and the rest of the teams is just too great MTSN Tyler Platt Trident Training Facility Taylors, S.C. Miami. The Big Three are a close-knit trio. There shouldnt be a single team that can keep up with them. And, they have one of the best coaching staffs. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Trident Refit honorees Trio remembered Coast Guard Patrol Forc es Southwest Asia held a ceremony at Naval Support Activity Bahrain April 24 in remembrance of the ninth anniversary of the at tack on patrol coastal ship USS Firebolt (PC 10). Saturday, April 24, 2004, Firebolt was attacked near Iraqs oil terminals while conducting maritime security operations in the Northern Arabian Gulf. e attack claimed the lives of three servicemembers Navy Boatswains Mate 1st Class Michael Pernaselli, Signalman 2nd Class Christopher Watts and Coast Guard Damage Controlman 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. ese three are now immortalized at a memorial on NSA Bahrain, in the courtyard outside the U.S. Coast Guard oce, where the ceremony was held. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 built the memorial. Speakers at the ceremony included Deputy Com mander, U.S. 5th Fleet, U.S. Naval Forces Central Com mand, Rear Adm. Kevin Scott; Commodore, Com mander, Task Force 55, Capt. Stephen Evans; and Commodore, U.S. Coast Guard Patrol Forces South west Asia, Capt. Paul Flynn. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 On May 4 1942, the Battle of the Coral Sea opened as Task Force 17 under Rear Adm. Frank Jack Fletcher attacked the Japanese Tulagi Invasion Force, led by Rear Adm. Shima Kiyohide at Tulagi. Elements of the Japanese 3d Kure Special Landing Force had gone ashore there, as well as on neighboring Gavutu, to establish defenses between April 29 and May 2. Dauntlesses and Devastators (VB 5, VS 5, VT 5), supported by Wildcats (VF 42) from Yorktown (CV-5) carried out three strikes against the Japanese ships. ey sank the destroyer Kikuzuki, the minesweeper Tama Maru and the auxiliary minesweepers Wa 1 and Wa 2 and damaged the destroyer Yuzuki, the minelayer Okinoshima, the transport Azumasan Maru, and cargo ship Kozui Maru. Lt. John J. Jo Jo Powers of VB 5 participated in all three strikes, receiving credit for one direct hit, two close-misses and a persistent low-level strafing attack. e Yorktown Air Group suered two Wildcats and one Devastator lost, due to navigational errors and fuel exhaustion. e destroyer Hammann (DD-412) rescued the two downed Wildcat pilots from Guadalcanal, but the destroyer Perkins (DD-377), however, sent to retrieve the downed Devastator crew south of the island, did not locate the missing men. e pilot and his radioman though, ultimately reached the New Hebrides in a schooner with a Chinese crew. at same day, Japanese transports sailed from Rabaul, bound for Port Moresby to carry out Operation Mo. e Battle of the Coral Sea resumed next day as Fletchers force turned north to engage the Japanese Carrier Strike Force. at day, Japanese land attack planes carrying torpedoes (4th Kokutai) or bombs (Genzan Kokutai) attacked the Support Group detached to intercept the Port Moresby Invasion Force; the destroyer Farragut (DD-348) was damaged by friendly re while engaged in repelling the air attack. Later, mistaken for the Japanese Port Moresby Invasion Force, Rear Adm. John G. Craces ships were bombed by USAAF B-26s that straddle the Australian heavy cruiser HMAS Australia and near-missed the heavy cruiser Chicago (CA-29) and the destroyer Perkins. Meanwhile, Dauntlesses and Devastators (VB 2, VB 5, VS 2, VS 5, VT 2, VT 5) from Yorktown and Lexington (CV-2) attacked the Japanese Close Support Force and sank the small carrier Shoho in Coral Sea, o Misima Island. During the action o Misima, Lt. Jo Jo Powers and Lt. (j.g.) William E. Hall, USNR (VS 2) skillfully and determinedly pressed home their attacks. at night, Powers (VB 5s gunnery ocer), lecturing his squadron on point of aim and diving technique, advocated a low-level release point to ensure accuracy, a philosophy he had demonstrated in the attack on Shoho. Elsewhere that day, mistaken at the outset for a carrier and a cruiser, however, the oiler Neosho (AO-23) and destroyer Sims (DD-409), detached and operating independently from the U.S. carrier force, came under attack by Japanese planes, although the enemy recognizes the mistake in time to avoid expending torpedoes. Neosho was damaged by bombs and a crashing dive bomber, and Sims was sunk. On board the crippled Neosho, CWT Oscar V. Peterson, although badly wounded, risks his life to close bulkhead stop valves, receiving severe burns. In the waning daylight, the Japanese attempt to nd TF-17 ran afoul of bad weather. Some of their carrier bombers actually entered the landing pattern for Yorktown, but are driven o by antiaircraft re and ghters. e operational losses of Japanese planes in the unsuccessful mission to nd the Americans, however, lessen the number of eective aircraft they can employ the next day. e Battle of the Coral Sea concluded on May 8 after a Dauntless pilot (VS 2) from Lexington sighted the Japanese Carrier Strike Force formed around the large carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku. As VB 5s pilots quit the ready room on board Yorktown to man their planes, Lt. Powers exhorted his squadronmates. Remember the folks back home are counting on us, he said. I am going to get a hit if I have to lay it [his bomb] on their ight deck. Dauntlesses from Lexington and Yorktown damage Shokaku and force her retirement. Lt. Powers scored a direct hit on Shokaku, pressing home his attack to a perilously low altitude of 200 feet but failing to recover from his dive. For his heroism on that day, as well as on the previous day and on May 4, Powers was awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously. At the same time, Japanese carrier bombers and attack planes hit TF 17. e comparatively few ghters on hand compelled the continuation of the use of Dauntlesses as a stop-gap anti-torpedo plane patrol. In the valiant eort, Trident Lakes Golf Clubs lakes will be open for shing May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may sh the lake on the front 9 and Saturday, May 18 you may sh the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes shing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and NSB Kings Bay Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the NSB Kings Bay permits. is is open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Mays free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information on whats playing, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Trident Lakes shing soon Navy College information May 1942: Coral Sea set stage for Midway

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Lt. Hall (VS 2), whose performance of duty the previous day as a dive bomber pilot had elicited favorable notice, distinguished himself as a ghter pilot in attacking the Japanese planes pressing home their assault on his ship. Although Hall was badly wounded, he brought his damaged Dauntless, and his radioman, back to Lexington having participated in the destruction of at least three torpedo planes, bravery and skill recognized later with the Medal of Honor. Japanese dive bombers and torpedo planes, however, penetrated the screening aircraft and ships and damaged carriers Lexington with bombs and torpedoes and Yorktown with bombs. On board Yorktown, Lt. Milton E. Ricketts, a classmate of Jo Jo Powers and a plankowner who had served on the carrier since it was commissioned in 1937, was in charge of an engineering repair party and was mortally wounded when a bomb passed through and exploded just beneath his compartment, killing, stunning or wounding all of his men. Ricketts, despite his wounds, opened the valve on a nearby re plug, partially led out the hose, and directed water into the burning compartment before he died. For his extraordinary heroism, he is awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously. Lexington, further damaged when gasoline vapors are ignited, triggering massive explosions, was later abandoned when res blazed out of control. She was then scuttled by the destroyer Phelps (DD-360). e Japanese canceled Operation Mo in the wake of the Battle of the Coral Sea. In the wake of the battle, the oiler Neosho, damaged and adrift since 7 May and deemed beyond salvage, was scuttled by torpedoes and gunre of the destroyer Henley (DD-391), which rescued the survivors from Neosho and Sims. Among those men is the badly injured CWT Peterson, who died of his wounds. For his extraordinary heroism and distinguished gallantry on board Neosho during her ordeal on May 7, Peterson was awarded the Medal of Honor, posthumously. at same day, the submarine S-42 (SS-153) torpedoed the Japanese minelayer Okinoshima, damaged by Yorktown Air Group planes at Tulagi on May 4, west of Buka Island, Solomons. e submarine S-44 (SS-155), sister ship of S-42, torpedoed and sank the Japanese repair ship Shoei Maru on May 12, 15 miles southwest of Cape St. George, and survived counterattacks by her victims escort. Shoei Maru had been en route to try and salvage the damaged minelayer Okinoshima. e attempt to save Okinoshima, damaged the previous day by S-42, by transport Kinryu Maru and destroyer Mochizuki, failed, and the doomed minelayer sank, essentially the last ship casualty of the Battle of the Coral Sea. e Battle of the Coral Sea was the rst engagement in modern naval history in which opposing warships did not exchange a shot and all damage was inicted by carrier aircraft. In halting the Japanese push southward and blunting the seaborne thrust toward Port Moresby, Coral Sea proved a strategic victory. American carrier aircrews prove their mettle, and deprive the Japanese of three carriers, Shokaku, Zuikaku, and Shoho, earmarked for the planned Midway Operation. e Japanese failure to take Port Moresby by sea forces them to adopt an overland strategy that ultimately proved disastrous. Although the enemy believes her to have been sunk, Yorktown was made seaworthy and given an air group to enable her to join Enterprise (CV-6) and Hornet (CV-8), deployed to surprise a Japanese carrier task force at Midway. Coral Sea e Navy joins our nation in celebrating the contributions of generations of patriots during Asian American and Pacic Islander Heritage Month throughout May. e Navy announced April 29 this years national theme is Building Leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion. Asians and Pacic Islanders of various nationalities and ancestry have been serving in our Navy since the early 19th century. Asians and Pacic Islanders have continued to be at the forefront as leaders in every aspect of American life, including Senator Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaiis rst Congressman and the rst Japanese American to serve in Congress. Having enlisted in the US Army at age 17 and serving during the Second World War, Senator Inouye was a great champion of all the armed forces throughout his career. He received the Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism and indomitable leadership during an engagement in World War II. On Dec. 17, 2012 Senator Inouye passed away, leaving behind a noted legacy of leadership and a drive to enhance inclusion in our Armed Forces and across our country. In 2013, Sailors of Asian and Pacic Islander heritage comprise 6.5 percent of our active duty Naval force. More than 20,000 active duty Sailors, 4,000 Reservists, and 18,900 Navy civilian employees identify as Asian American or Pacic Islander, including 10 ag ocers, nine members of the Senior Executive Service, and 176 master chief petty ocers. Asian Americans and Pacic Islanders encompass over 50 ethnic and language groups, representing a vast array of cultures, nationalities, and historical roots. Directed by Congress in 1978 and established by Presidential Proclamation in 1979, Asian/ Pacic American Heritage Week was rst observed the week of May 4, 1979. Navy observes Asian American, Pacic Islander Heritage Month 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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Information Dominance will become a recognized warfare area on par with other traditional warfare areas and is becoming one of our most powerful assets, said Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Chief Engineer Rear Adm. James Rodman during a panel discussion on information and non-kinetic warfare and the growing cyber security threat. We need to look at the warfare arena dierently, Rodman said. We need to know what arrows we have in our quiver and then dene those non-kinetic elements so that we can treat them in a more level set environment. SPAWAR Commander Rear Adm. Patrick Brady echoed Rodman during his follow on keynote address discussing the importance of technical authority in information warfare during the 35th Annual C4ISR Symposium April 23 to 25 in San Diego. e value of a unied technical authority is that it helps us identify security gaps in our networks, Brady said. It creates better situational awareness, more resilient information technology architectures and standardized platforms so that we can gain a better understanding of the impact of cyber vulnerabilities on our critical warghting systems. To support this cyber imperative and achieve power in an information warfare arena, a greater level of information sharing will be required. As in the civilian world, the Navy continues to operate in a highly interactive environment regarding global networks, interconnected applications and services. To help combat the emerging cyber threat, the Department of the Navy routinely interacts with the other services, government agencies, allied and coalition partners, commercial organizations and universities to combat the security challenges faced in the world of networks, the cloud and cyberspace. is is cyber warfare in the information age, a form of non-kinetic warfare on a virtual global battleeld that will change warfare as we know it. It is low-in tensity warfare that is often systemic in nature, such as a hacker setting loose a vi rus on a network system. ough it may not cause an immediate and direct impact to loss of life, it can still wreak havoc on the lives of individuals and organizations that encounter it, including the Department of Defense. SPAWAR Systems Center Pacic Commanding O cer, Capt. Joseph Beel reit erated by stating that warf ighting is about eects. Whether there is a kinetic or non-kinetic eect to achieve, in the long run it is cheaper, less risky and better to use a non-kinetic eect, Beel said. Information warfare is really where you bring in the potential for non-kinetic eects. at kind of non-kinetic impact makes information warfare the ideal warghting arena. When the United States went into Iraq in the 90s, if we wanted to take down the enemys air trac control and defense systems, we could bomb them, which we did very eectively, Beel said. e difference today is that everything is so networked. With Information Warfare, the capability may exist to take them down by introducing a virus into some sort of cyber attack scenario, without risking bombers or sending people ashore for battle. e DOD makes more than one billion Internet connections daily and passes 40 terabytes of data. DOD networks are scanned and probed by cyber adversaries on average six million times per day, so identifying weak links and potential attacks can be a challenge. Many lessons have been learned over the years about the value of information sharing. Rodman said had DOD been able to connect the dots more quickly prior to 9/11, some of the events might have been prevented. ere is a tremendous need to make the availability of information seamless so that the warfighter can access it more quickly, Rodman said. To achieve that level of power, we need to nd a better way of sharing information. e rapid elasticity of the cloud makes it a seductive choice; however, there is the potential for loss of privacy and an increased risk to security should information get into the wrong hands. Whereas in the past a threat was isolated to a sin gle server system, a cloudbased environment makes it easier to compromise everyone, and all types of data hosted at a particular location are vulnerable on the back end of a breach. e Navy frequently adapts commercial software for operational purposes; however, in doing so there is the potential for hackers to compromise systems, which could then threaten national security. Technical authoritys focus on standardization and variance reduction makes it easier to certify systems and reduce the training burden on operators so they can focus on cyber warghting, Brady said. SPAWARs technical authority initiative is instrumental to the Navys cyber posture and to our warghting eectiveness in a non-kinetic environment. It puts SPAWAR in the lead to develop architectures and systems with built in defense in depth attributes. ough it can be challenging to identify or classify the typical cyber threat, most run the gamut from non-professional to nation-state sponsored hackers; sometimes it is an internal threat of lax security choices on the part of the IT user. Whether malicious or unintentional, the threat is never static and the com plexity of todays systems and networks presents sig nicant security challenges for the Navys producers and consumers of IT. As the Navys Information Dominance systems command, SPAWAR designs, develops and deploys advanced communications and information capabili ties for the warghter. With more than 8,900 acquisition professionals located around the world and close to the eet, the organization is at the forefront of research, engineering and support services that provide vital decision superiority for the warghter. SPAWAR leaders speak to growing cyber threat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, May 2, 2013 13

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