<%BANNER%>

The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-25-2013 )

DARK ITEM
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00298

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00298


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God themeCalling all Knights of the Kingdom! e Command Religious Pro gram of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay invites your children to be a part of the 2013 Vacation Bible School Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited to join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 24 to 28, at the chapel. Registration for VBS will begin Monday, May 20, and continue through Monday, June 17 in the main oce of the chapel, which is across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS, but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to reg ister early to avoid missing out on this Bi ble adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS students arriving at Kingdom Rock where they will meet new Bible Buddies like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children will learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs, but most impor tantly, they will learn that Gods love, family and friends, prayer, trust, and the Bible can help us all do one thing stand strong! Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on Old and New Testament accounts of faith, in cluding the Shepherds Psalm (23rd Psalm), Esther pleading for the life of the Israelites, and Nehemiah rebuilding the wall. Students also will study the life of Christ, His res urrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important les sons will be presented through dramatic play during Epic Bible Adventures and outdoor tour nament games. Of course, Kingdom Rock adventures like these would not be complete without delicious snacks Up Periscope USS Bancroft veterans meet Mr. Question Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Sub Ball Tolling of Boats part of pageantry Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Armed Services Committee warned by Navy, MarinesWith members of Congress continuing to express concern about the impact of sequestration on the military, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus told a congres sional panel April 16 that the Navy and Marine Corps will be able to meet their current and future mis sions only with proper resourcing. e departments ability to meet the demands of todays op erations in support of our defense strategic guidance depends on anticipating and preparing for the changing geo political landscape and having the proper resources ready to deploy, Mabus told the House Armed Services Committee in prepared testimony. e department will continue to maintain the capabilities required to ensure that the Navy and Marine Corps is the nest expeditionary force in the world; however, proper resourc ing is needed to maintain our capacity for global operations. In light of a budget-driven, Pentagon-wide review of strate gic priorities, he added, every thing will be on the table. Ma bus tes tified alongside Adm. Jona than W. Green ert, chief of naval operations, Leadership testies before House panel ... proper resourcing is needed to maintain our capacity for global operations ... Ray Mabus Secretary of Navy VBS registration starts May 20 NSBs Pirates Cove Galley gets new outdoor grill Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay galley has a new outdoor grill for ev eryone to enjoy on those nice Georgia days when barbecue hits the spot. e galley had a grand opening on April 12 for those servicemembers eating at the new grill. e outdoor grill is the biggest in the Southeast Region and the only one to have an exhaust hood and Aqueous Potassium Carbonate sys tem for re safety. Construction of the grill estimated at about $150,000, took about eight Atlantic subs have FORMC change Wes Koshoer relieves Kirk Saunders in Norfolk ceremony Force Master Chief (Sub marines) Wes Koshoer has relieved Force Master Chief (Submarines) Kirk Saunders as Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Force Master Chief. e Newport, R.I.-native relieved Saunders during a change-of-oce ceremony. Saunders served as the SUB LANT Force Master Chief from July 2010 to April 2013. He will report to the Navy Consolidated Brig Chesapeake, located at the Naval Support Activity Hamp ton Roads, Northwest Annex in Chesapeake, Va. NAVCONBRIG Chesapeake, also known as the Joint Regional Correctional Facility Mid-Atlantic, serves as the Mid-Atlantic Regions correctional facility for both pre-trial and post-trial pris oners and is available for use by commands from all branches of the armed services. Prior to leaving SUBLANT, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces/ Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, presented Saunders with a Legion of Merit medal.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 A David-and-Goliath scenario an Army installation commander standing up to a multi-billion-dollar industry over the deaths of three of his soldiers has borne fruit in a national Food and Drug Adminis tration warning and the drug mak ers decision to stop production of a controversial dietary supplement. Army Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, com mander of Fort Bliss, Texas, and the 1st Armored Division, lauded US Plabss announcement that it would stop production of Jack3d. e supplement contains dimeth ylamylamine, or DMAA, a stimulant popular among bodybuilders and dieters that the FDA last week linked to elevated blood pressure and heart attacks. Pittards crusade against the supplement began in 2011, when two Fort Bliss soldiers, Pfc. Michael Sparling and Sgt. Demekia Cola, died of heart failure during physical training. eir autopsies reviewed that DMAA use was a contributing factor in their deaths. In July 2012, another Fort Bliss soldier, Pfc. David Artis, died of heart stroke during physical tness training. His death also was linked to DMAA use. Pittard, who instituted a campaign to reduce suicides and other prevent able deaths on arrival at Fort Bliss, immediately demanded that prod ucts containing DMAA be removed from the shelves of a commercial vi tamin store outlet on the post. It was an unpopular move, he told reporters april 18, raising the ire of the Fort Bliss community, questions from some Army leaders, and criti cism from manufacturers of supplemental products. But regardless, we stood rm in the face of that criticism, Pittard said. We felt it was the right thing to do for our soldiers. e pushback, he said, actually strengthened the resolve at Fort Bliss to take the ght beyond the installations gates. Partnering with the Consortium for Health and Military Performance and the Pentagons Department of Military and Emergency Medicine, Pittard and his sta set their eye on eradicating DMAA products across not only the Army, but also the en tire Defense Department. is unied campaign spurred the Army to ban supplements containing DMAA from all installations in March 2012. Four months later, the Defense Department followed suit, banning them from all U.S. installations. In the next promising development, the FDA issued an advisory last week warning consumers not to buy dietary supplements containing DMAA. But the biggest victory, Pittard said, was the decision by USPlabs, the manufacturer of Jack3d, to stop using DMAA in its products. Yesterdays action by USPlabs really in many ways vindicates those on Fort Bliss who fought so hard and fought the supplement and billiondollar drug industry on this issue, he said. Pittard expressed thanks to the Army and Air Force Exchange Ser vice and Army and DOD leader ship for supporting the eort. He acknowledged that it took courage to collectively stand up to powerful drug companies and others who resisted their eorts. And we believe this will save countless lives in the future, he said. Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., com mander, Navy Region Southeast, presented ve Navy Meritorious Ci vilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources Program during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 17. e ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR special ists from region headquarters to major commands on board installa tions throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mis sion would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment oppor tunity, workers compensation, and stang and classication for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approxi mately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Com mands, such as Naval Facilities En gineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. e new Navy-wide model will position HR specialists at each major command, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. e decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Aairs with the goal of de livering more streamlined and cus tomer-focused support. Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, said the transi tion comes with distinct benets. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to fo cus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several dif ferent commands at the same time, she said. is focus provides the opportunity for better customer ser vice through specic, command-fo cused HR servicing and better part nerships with customers. e new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logistical challenges. It re quired extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of les and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby ex pressed his appreciation for each of the program members eorts throughout the process. is was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your everyday workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willing ness to work long hours and pay at tention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentralization is a ma jor transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian em ployees should not expect to see many changes in the way they re ceive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery mod el. ere may be a change in the HR professional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new ser vicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new sys tem will be provided from NAS Jack sonville, but HR professionals will be responsive to phone calls and emails and are available to meet via video teleconference, she added. Additional information regarding the specic processes and proce dures of regional delivery of HR ser vices will be published in the near future. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS golf benefit April 26Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Four Man Scramble Golf Tournament to benet NMCRS has been rescheduled for 8:30 a.m., Friday, April 26, at NSB Kings Bay Trident Lakes Golf Course. Entry fee is $ 40 per person or $160 per team, which includes cart, green fee and lunch of hamburgers, hotdogs, chips and drink, plus there will be prizes for longest drive on No. 17, closest to the pin on No. 8 and 13 and the top nishing teams. Call or e-mail Kevin @ 573-8475/6 or kevin.doetch@navy. mil for team and individual sign-ups. Pointof-contact for the golf tournament is edward. groover@navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any stick er, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawinge Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Qualied students can participate in a quarterly drawing for awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500, for a total of $5,500 per quarter. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school, may enter. Eligible students include de pendent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Now hear this! SE human resources decentralized Southeast Region HR Supplements banned aer deaths Southeast Region HR and Gen. James. F. Amos, commandant of the Ma rine Corps. All three leaders spoke of shortfalls and having to do more with less in the coming years if the hundreds of millions of dollars in cuts triggered by last months budget sequester remain. We do it to the very best we possibly can, Amos said, but he suggested that at some point, such cuts could undercut the ratio nale for having the Marine Corps, which is on a path to shrink from just over 202,000 Marines to 182,100. e Marine Corps re mains the nations ready hedge against unpredict able crisis, an insurance policy that buys time when hours matter. Amos cited the bombing at the Boston Marathon and the ongoing uncer tainty over North Koreas intentions to illustrate how an unpredictable and cha otic security environment demonstrates that the need for this highly capa ble and ready force is more pressing now than ever. Aware of the nations scal restraints, Amos said, the Corps will make hard decisions about what it needs. But he added that with declining resources to address the emerging security challenges, neoisolationism does not ad vance our nations national interest. Greenert said shortfalls this scal year alone, while mitigated by congres sional action last month, will be compounded if sequestration continues, leading to a $23 billion shortfall in 2014. e situation already has led the Navy to recommend cancelling one ship deployment to the Pacic, two to Europe and all but one to the U.S Southern Command region. Overall, due to reduced training and maintenance, about two-thirds of the eet will be less than fully mission capable and not certied for major combat operations, he said, em phasizing that this state of readiness does not apply to Navy forces and assets supporting operations in Afghanistan. e hearing follows President Barack Obamas submission of a $526.6 billion defense budget re quest for scal year 2014, one largely consistent with the previous years, but delivered amid a budget landscape that envisions $500 billion in ad ditional defense cuts over the next 10 years if there is no change in current law. If Congress does not act to change that, Amos warned, the Marine Corps will have to undergo a top-to-bottom re-examination of priorities, mis sions and what it will take to continue to be the na tions expeditionary force in readiness.House

PAGE 3

Year of Military Women begins e United States Navy Memorial hosted the ocial kick-o of the Year of Military Women during a ribboncutting ceremony April 11. is is the rst time the Navy Memorial will be hon oring not only Navy women, but also the women who have, and still serve in the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Chief of Naval Personnel, Adm. Scott Van Buskirk was the guest speaker at the event, and said he was honored to attend the ceremony, because he knows how essen tial womens leadership and contributions have been to the Navy and the nation. I know that rst-hand, and I see that each and every day when I have the opportunity in my job to go out and meet the men and women who serve in our Navy and also in our Marine Corps, Van Buskirk said. Senior leaders from each of the services, and members of congress attended the event and were able to get the rst look at the collection of original uniforms worn by pioneering World War I Yeoman (F) and female Ma rines. Among the most signicant is a uniform worn by Capt. Mildred McAfee, the rst director of the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, or WAVES, who commanded 82,000 women during World War II. e Executive Vice President of the Navy Memorial, Cindy McCalip said the memorial wanted to include women of all branches of service to highlight the com mon bond between all military women. Women tend to support other women whether it be from one service or another service, McCalip said, so its important that we keep that connection going and we didnt want to alienate any women in the military, so were trying to be very inclusive of all the services. e exhibit highlights many of the women who made military history through their leadership and determination. In our military, we judge leadership abilities by the capacity to get the job done well, Buskirk said. Man, woman, people of color, white, Hispanic ... that doesnt matter. What matters is that you can meet the mission and you can get the job done. And as demonstrated day in and day out, our women arent just meeting that mis sion, theyre leading the way, going above and beyond. Fleet Master Chief April Beldo said that events like Year of Military Women allow for the opportunity to rec ognize the past contributions of women to the armed forces. If it wasnt for those women who went before me, I would not be standing here today, Beldo said. is al lows me to give honor and homage to the hard work that they did while they were serving. Celebrations of the Year of Military Women will con tinue throughout the year and will include book signings, golf tournaments and symposiums. served from the Kings Kitchen. VBS knights will end their days with more lively songs, a review the days lesson and a rehearsal of the Bible verse of the day. What a great time chil dren will have as they be come knights of Kingdom Rock. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, preassemble crafts and deco rate classrooms. Whether you are a parent, an in volved teen, a command representative or a com munity volunteer your help is needed. Volunteers sign up at the chapel oce now for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program infor mation, contact the cha pel sta at (912) 573-4501. Put on your armor and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools royal jour ney through Gods Word. months to build and is the rst for Windamir Devel opment and Construc tion, an on base contrac tor, who was contracted through Public Works. Pirates Cove Galley CS1 Dennis Briggs said two members of the galley sta were particularly helpful in making the grill become a reality. LS2 Eric Bencs and MM2 Christopher Bishop oversaw the construction from start to nish, CS1 Dennis Briggs said. e design of the grill is incorporated into the structure of the building, which allows for patrons to enjoy the outdoor cov ered eating area. Accessories of the grill include two covered gas grills, a steam line, a chill line, a chill box, warmers, exhaust hood with APC system and lights. Use of the grill is for galley meals and galley events only. VBSGrill Never Quit event needs volunteers Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facil itate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call or e-mail MC1 Brian na K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will re ceive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5

PAGE 6

An engagement 25 years ago on April 14, 1988 sparked a determined and quick response four days later from the U.S., known as Operation Praying Mantis, which demonstrated the same priorities the Navy maintains today. In early 1988, as part of Operation Earnest Will the U.S. Navy was engaged in maintaining freedom of navigation in the Ara bian Gulf as Iraq and Iran continued in a bloody war. e USS Enterprise (CVN 65) was operating in the region. Little did anyone know that what would happen that day would draw naval forces into action and alter the course of history. Watchstanders aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), Northeast of Qa tar, sighted three mines oating approximately one-half mile from the ship. Twenty minutes after the rst sighting, as Samuel B. Roberts was backing clear of the mineeld, it struck a submerged mine. e blast injured 10 Sail ors and tore a 21-foot hole in the hull, nearly ripping the warship in half. Quick and determined actions by the crew, who worked for seven hours to stabilize the ship, kept the vessel from sinking. We heard about it right away, and very shortly thereafter I was told I was going to y o to Bah rain to help put a plan together and command one of the Surface Action Groups, said Vice Adm. (Ret.) James B Perkins, III, who was a Surface Action Group commander during Operation Praying Mantis. We spent the 17th of April ying from one side of the gulf to the other, brieng the SAG commanders as to what the plan was. Four days after the mine blast, forces, of the nowJoint Task Force Middle East, executed a response Operation Praying Mantis. e operation called for the destruction of two oil platforms used by Iran to coordinate attacks on merchant shipping. e gas-oil platforms were huge structures, Perkins said. What I had in mind were the oil platforms o the coast of Santa Barbra. But these were oating cities with berthing quarters and all that sort of stu, Perkins recalled. On the morning [of April 18] we called them up and told them, in Farsi and English, that we were getting ready to destroy them and to get o the platforms, Perkins said. ere was a lot of running around looking for boats to leave the decks. By the end of that day the coalition air and surface units not only destroyed the two oil rigs but also Iranian units attempting to counter-attack U.S. forces. Naval aircraft and the destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG 16) sank the Iranian frigate Sahand (F 74) with harpoon missiles and laser-guided bombs. A laser-guided bomb, dropped from a Navy A-6 Intruder, disabled frigate Sabalan (F 73), and Stan dard missiles launched from the cruiser USS Wainwright (CG 28) and frigates USS Bagley (FF 1069) and USS Simpson (FFG 56) destroyed the 147-foot missile patrol boat Joshan (P 225). In further combat, A-6s sank one Bodghammer high-speed patrol boats and neutralized four more of the speedboats. e air wing from En terprise did a superb job taking on the Bodgham mers, Perkins said. By the end of the opera tion, U.S. air and surface units had sunk, or severely damaged, half of Irans op erational eet. is particular exer cise, in my view, nished the Iranian Navy in the Arabian Gulf, said Per kins. ey were still around, but after that op eration, they didnt have as active a stance. Operation Praying Mantis proved a milestone in naval history. For the rst time since World War II, U.S. naval forces and supporting aircraft fought a major surface action against a determined enemy. e success of Praying Man tis and the broad-based allied naval cooperation during Operation Earnest Will proved the value of joint and combined op erations in the Gulf and led the way for the mas sive joint coalition eort that occurred during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. e operation also dem onstrated the importance of being ready to ght and win today, of providing oshore options to deter, inuence and win in an era of uncertainty; and showcased the teamwork, talent and imagination of the Navys diverse, capa ble force. It also proved the value of all the training the Navy had done. You have to be ready on a moments notice, Perkins said. You may not always have sucient time to get prepared, so train hard and often. (In this case) it worked out very well.Operation Praying Mantis put hurt on Iran 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 7

Saunders was cited for his management and vi sionary approach in implementing numerous initiatives which positively aected more than 22,000 Sailors in the Submarine Force, and for his impres sive resourcefulness in providing the Force Com mander and Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy valuable insight, guidance, and deckplate perspective. In mentoring 70 Com mand Master Chiefs, and Chiefs of the Boat, Saunders enthusiastically re juvenated the Chief Petty Ocer Mess in the Atlantic Fleet area of responsibility. Koshoers previous assignment was as Com mand Master Chief, Commander, Submarine Group Two in Groton, Conn. Koshoer joined the Navy in March 1989. After Basic Training in Great Lakes, Ill., he attend ed Basic Enlisted Submarine School and Submarine Radioman A and C schools, before reporting to his rst sea assignment, the Los Angeles-class at tack submarine USS Phoe nix (SSN 702), home port ed in Norfolk, Va. Other sea assignments have included the PreCommissioning Unit Cheyenne (SSN 773), which was under construction at Newport News Shipyard, Newport News, Va.; the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Bal timore (SSN 704), home ported in Norfolk, Va.; the Los Angeles-class at tack submarine USS Jack sonville (SSN 699), home ported in Norfolk, Va.; and the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), home ported in Groton, Conn., where he served as the Chief of the Boat and was selected as a Command Master Chief.Atlantic THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 9

Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel success fully raised and returned to shore a sunken patrol boat (PB 502), April 18. Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10, a Navy Reserve unit based in Jacksonville, Fla., was conducting a routine training event sailing from Jacksonville to Charles ton when one of their pa trol boats transiting into Charleston Harbor ran aground on a jetty on the south side on the chan nel entrance at 9:41 p.m., April 13. Salvage operations like this are quite common, we train to respond to all types of incidents from planes going down to boats sinking and each one brings up its own unique challenges, said Chief Warrant Ocer John Sullivan, MDSU2 opera tions ocer-in-charge of the salvage operation. e 34-foot patrol boat was surfaced ursday morning by Navy Div ers from approximately 20 feet of water and was towed to shore by a con tracted salvage company. e 8-person Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDS) Company, MDS Co. 2-4 based in Virginia Beach, Va., arrived in Charles ton Tuesday and worked with local Coast Guard and maritime ocials to determine how to safely recover the submerged vessel by using another similar patrol boat ashore as a model. MDSU2 Divers then performed a site survey to determine the extent of damage to the vessel. On Wednesday and ursday Divers installed lift points, placed belly bands on the submerged vessel prior to rigging for lift and recov ery, and attached salvage lift bags capable of lifting 22,000 pounds. Once secured, the ves sel was carefully brought to the surface ursday morning by the lift bags and checked for stability. I thought my team did outstanding. is is what we train for, Sullivan said. We developed a plan. We executed it, and I thought my team did outstanding. PB 502 was then towed to the U.S. Coast Guard Station at Tradd Street. Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2 is conducting a thorough investigation into the cause of the incident. ree Sailors were injured when the boat ran aground. ey were trans ported to the Medical Uni versity of South Carolina where they were listed in stable condition.For a change of pace from my normal routine of pestering people at the exchange or at the galley, I went to the USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) reunion at the Bancroft Sail Memorial Friday. I wanted to find out how crew members of the Bancroft ended up in the Navy, and on submarines, and what they did after their military service. Like all the veterans groups Ive been around, these great guys were very easy to talk to and wonderful at sharing their stories. FTB1 David Murphy USS Bancroft to Ellsworth, Wisc. I got my Army draft notice in 1966. That started the whole thing in motion. I wanted to do something special for my country, so I chose subs. (After) I was a computer engineer for quite a while and now I work in computer sci ence at the University of Minnesota. EMC Herby Ortiz USS Bancroft to Chesterfield, Va. My uncle Herby was on the Nautilus. I looked up to him, and he encour aged me, so I volunteered for sub school. Im retired now, but I went to school on the GI Bill and was an industrial engineer at Fort Lee in Virginia for 24 years. MS3 Mike Flammia USS Bancroft to Shirley, N.Y. My cousin, Louis Capone, was a commander of sub base personnel. That made me want to go into the Navy and submarines. (After) I became an auto mechanic and just recently retired. MMCS Calvin Harris USS Bancroft to Kingsland My brother was on a submarine, so after I got out of high school, I joined. It sounded inter esting. I served 26 years on four subs. I retired from the Navy in here on the (Kings Bay) base. ETCM Bud Warren USS Bancroft to Virginia Beach, Va. I was working on a farm and I heard stories from guys coming home from World War II how glam orous the Navy was. I became an engineman at sub school and Groton was close to home, so I went. (After) I spent another 23 years as a civil ian working for the Navy. Lt. Cmdr. Tom Brayman USS Bancroft to Pensacola, Fla. A couple of buddies and I decided to join the Navy. They didnt show up at the recruiters, but I joined. I was on destroyers. Then I volunteered for a special program, the Polaris pro gram, and volunteered for submarines. Now Im a Web site builder and photographer. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Divers raise sunken boat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Distinguished visitors, area commanders and family members attended the Commander, Subma rine Group Two change of command ceremony at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton, April 15. Rear Adm. Ken Perry relieved Rear Adm. Rick Breckenridge during the time-honored change of command ceremony. Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces spoke at the ceremony praising Breck enridge for his achieve ments as the group com mander for nearly two years. Connor highlighted the signicance of Brecken ridges time in command emphasizing that technol ogy is one part of the solution, but its the people that excel at the mission. e general public thinks that we can do all of these things because of our technology, Con nor said. I would say that the technology is neces sary but only part of the solution. e rest involves people, people who are skilled and well led. Rick has made a huge contri bution in this area as a teacher, as a mentor and as a living example of high standards. Rick, congratulations on a job superbly well done. Connor further re ected on the foundation of the undersea domain, which are the people. We need training that supports their growing mission set. We need to ensure we sustain a culture that values the contribu tion of every Sailor, and a balanced lifestyle that rec ognizes and rewards our Sailors and their families for the extended time they spend at sea under austere conditions conducting the vital business of defending this great country, Con nor said. Connor further congratulated Breckenridge on his follow-on assign ment wishing him the best of luck as he returns to Washington, D.C. Rick and I once had the opportunity to run the halls of the Penta gon together as we did our best to sustain and grow the submarine force in the face of budgetary challenges, Connor said. Rick will get to do that again, and, although I do not envy him heading back into that battle, Rick, Im glad to know that the Submarine Force will be well represented by your wisdom, energy, creativity and experience. Breckenridge will depart Groton to assume the position of Director, Un dersea Warfare Division in Washington, D.C. Connor also praised both Breckenridge and Perry for their leader ship capabilities and what they bring to the people of Group Two. For the men and wom en of Group Two, you are fortunate to have served alongside Admiral Breck enridge, and you are fortunate that you will be serv ing alongside Admiral Ken Perry, Connor said. Breckenridge assumed command of COMSUB GRU Two on Aug. 26, 2011. During Breckenridges tenure at the Group, as submarines deployed worldwide and other crews prepared to deploy in turn, the admiral reected on the vitally im portant mission of our submariners. e most tangible out come of eective opera tions at the Group level is getting our submarines deployed on time to where the operational commanders want them. e demand signal still remains incredibly high from our combatant com manders, Breckenridge said. Every day we can have a submarine out de ployed is vitally impor tant, and weve been able to accomplish that in my time here is large credit not to the commander but to all of the personnel who work so hard to keep these ships out to sea. Additionally, Breckenridge oversaw seven other submarines in various stages of new construc tion and maintenance overhaul. He praised the submarine shipbuilding industry for their out standing support of the submarine force. We are very fortunate to have the healthiest segment of shipbuilding probably in the world, Breckenridge said. ey are delivering complex, state of the art, front-line warships under budget and ahead of schedule. ats pretty uncommon. During his command tour, Breckenridge played a key role in the delivery of two Virginia-class sub marines and served as the ocer in tactical command for the sea trials of USS Mississippi (SSN 782) prior to her commissioning in June 2012. While bestowing praise on the shipbuilding in dustry both at General Dynamics Electric Boat and Huntington Ingalls Industries, Breckenridge reected on the Sailors who operate the subma rines. What Ive seen here as Group Two riding Vir Story Time with MCSFBn families Sub Group Two had new leader 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 11

e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be award ed for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course through out play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Put ting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 573-8475. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years or older. Games are 5-v-5, best of three games and double elimination. Maximum 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation showing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more infor mation, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sun days at 1 p.m. with WreckIt-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be avail able for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 ginia and Los Angeles class submarines with their motivated and inspired crews is that it really still all comes down to the Sailors, Breckenridge said. At the end of the day, it still comes back to those young Americans who sign up for this very challenging line of work to take these complex plat forms out to sea and do the most incredible things with them. Both Breckenridge and Perry have sons who have followed in their fathers footsteps by serving in the Navy. Breckenridges eldest son, Lt. Ryan Breckenridge, based in California, attend ed the ceremony. Lt.j.g. Al Perry, who is assigned to a submarine in Hawaii, and Ensign Dave Perry, who is undergoing pilot training in Florida were both un able to attend.Group Two THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the abil ity of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their mari tal relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one anoth er better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their life time. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26, with another session May 13 and 14 Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This train ing take place 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 29 and May 6, 13 and 20. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered May 1 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. May 1. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and trans fers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing refer ral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attend ing the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of manag ing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current informaFleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 13

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13 e extraordinary ser vice of 80 men was remembered April 18 at the tribute to the Doolittle Raiders on the 71st an niversary of the Army Air Force squadrons ight from a Navy aircraft car rier to bomb Japan during World War II. During a luncheon at the Northwest Florida Fairgrounds in Fort Wal ton Beach, Rear Adm. Don Quinn, commander, Naval Education and Training Command in Pensacola, Fla., addressed more than 600 people who had come to honor the remaining Raiders. Of the original 80 mem bers of the Doolittle Raid ers, four are still living and three attended the events scheduled over several days in Fort Walton Beach, including luncheons, dinners and a parade. Raiders present includ ed Lt. Col. Richard Cole, co-pilot with Col. Jimmy Doolittle; Sta Sgt. David atcher, an engineer and gunner on crew 7; and Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, engi neer for crew 15. e fourth Raider who was unable to attend is Lt. Col. Robert Hite, co-pilot of crew 16. I couldnt have picked a better group of people to go into combat with, said Cole, when asked about his fellow Raiders. I think the young people today have the same spirit we had. ey also have bet ter training and a higher level of technology in their training. During his remarks, Quinn said the spirit of the Doolittle Raiders would continue. I take exception to the idea that this is the last reunion, Quinn told the audience. I expect that in every year of our nations existence from this day forward that this event will continue to be celebrated, both in this world and the next. It will be celebrated because of the extraordi nary service of 80 ordinary Americans. It will be cel ebrated because in todays mind-numbing barrage of digital information, we Americans often need to be reminded of who we are. Quinn was invited to speak about the Navys role in the Doolittle Raid and how it initiated a chain of events that led to the American victory at the Battle of Midway. He began his remarks by explaining how Army General Billy Mitchell was instrumental in cre ating the realization that military aviation would be crucial in future conicts. On July 21, 1921 Mitchells team used biplanes and 2,000 pound bombs to sink a captured German battleship. He proved that battle ships were vulnerable to attack from the air, Quinn said. e Navy Bureau of Aeronautics was established less than a month later. I nd it tting, and more than a little ironic, that the aircraft which were used on the Doolittle Raid were North American B-25 Mitchell bombers, and they launched o a carrier that probably would not have existed had Billy Mitchell not educated us all on the po tential of air power, said Quinn. In speaking about the Navys role in the raid on Japan, he outlined how the idea of launching Army bombers from an aircraft carrier came from Capt. Francis Low, a sub mariner, and the original feasibility study done by Capt. Donald Duncan, a Navy aviator, was com posed of 30 handwritten pages which outlined all the key concepts for the successful bombing raid. Eglin Air Field was marked o to represent the length of a carrier ight deck, and Navy Lt. Henry Miller taught the Army crews how to take o in a short distance, Quinn said. e crews ew their air craft to Alameda, Calif., where the planes were craned onto the deck of the new aircraft car rier USS Hornet (CV-8), skippered by Capt. Marc Mitscher. Hornet was escorted by the rest of Task Force 18, which included two cruis ers, four destroyers and a eet oiler for refueling the ships. Aboard Hornet, the Army crews continued to prepare and train with the Navy. Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Jurika, who had served in Tokyo as a Naval Attache, provided intelligence on Japan and potential tar gets, Quinn said. e Hornets navigation ocer conducted training in celestial navigation, and the Army crews practiced while sitting in their air craft. e admiral also point ed out that weather was a key factor in the mili tary operation, and while planners continued to review historical weather patterns, two submarines, USS resher (SS-200) and USS Trout (SS-202), patrolled the coast of Ja pan gathering intelligence and weather data. To provide additional protection, Adm. William Bull Halsey was ordered to sail from Pearl Har bor with Task Force 16 to rendezvous with Hornets group. Along with the aircraft carrier USS En terprise (CV-6), the Task Force included two more cruisers, four destroyers and an additional oiler. As Quinn explained, the carriers were spotted by Japanese picket boats, and the Army Air Force crews were forced to launch ear lier than expected, which meant they would have less fuel after their bomb ing raid, making their es cape to China more dan gerous. e planes successfully launched o the deck of the USS Hornet and into history. While the Japanese Navy high command was focused on spreading the empire into the resourcerich Indian Ocean, Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the Combined Fleet, wanted to elimi nate the American Pacic Fleets combat power, Quinn said. e direct attack on the homeland gave Yamamotos plan (to attack Midway) instant credibility. In June 1942, units of the U.S. Army, Navy and Ma rine Corps joined in action against a Japanese inva sion eet at Midway Island. Fighting for three days, the American forces won. Adm. Nimitz called Midway a glorious page in our history. It was certain ly a turning point for Naval Aviation, said Quinn. e strategic impact of this relatively insignicant tactical action liter ally drove the Japanese Navy to the pivotal battle at Midway. And to some degree, we can thank Billy Mitchell for that. Doolittle Raider says this is not last reunion tion on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and main tenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to register call 573-4513. FFSC

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013



PAGE 1

Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God themeCalling all Knights of the Kingdom! e Command Religious Program of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay invites your children to be a part of the 2013 Vacation Bible School Kingdom Rock Where Kids Stand Strong for God. Children who have completed kindergarten through fth grade are invited to join in the fun 9 a.m. to noon, June 24 to 28, at the chapel. Registration for VBS will begin Monday, May 20, and continue through Monday, June 17 in the main oce of the chapel, which is across the parking lot from the Navy Exchange. ere is no cost for VBS, but there is limited space available. Families are encouraged to register early to avoid missing out on this Bible adventure. Each day will begin with the VBS students arriving at Kingdom Rock where they will meet new Bible Buddies like Victoria the Fox, Sir Valiant the Lion and Duke the Stallion. Children will learn fun movements to upbeat Bible songs, but most importantly, they will learn that Gods love, family and friends, prayer, trust, and the Bible can help us all do one thing stand strong! Bible lessons throughout the week will focus on Old and New Testament accounts of faith, including the Shepherds Psalm (23rd Psalm), Esther pleading for the life of the Israelites, and Nehemiah rebuilding the wall. Students also will study the life of Christ, His resurrection, and the encouraging words He left with His followers. ese important lessons will be presented through dramatic play during Epic Bible Adventures and outdoor tournament games. Of course, Kingdom Rock adventures like these would not be complete without delicious snacks Up Periscope USS Bancroft veterans meet Mr. Question Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Sub Ball Tolling of Boats part of pageantry Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Armed Services Committee warned by Navy, MarinesWith members of Congress continuing to express concern about the impact of sequestration on the military, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus told a congressional panel April 16 that the Navy and Marine Corps will be able to meet their current and future missions only with proper resourcing. e departments ability to meet the demands of todays operations in support of our defense strategic guidance depends on anticipating and preparing for the changing geopolitical landscape and having the proper resources ready to deploy, Mabus told the House Armed Services Committee in prepared testimony. e department will continue to maintain the capabilities required to ensure that the Navy and Marine Corps is the nest expeditionary force in the world; however, proper resourcing is needed to maintain our capacity for global operations. In light of a budget-driven, Pentagon-wide review of strategic priorities, he added, everything will be on the table. Ma bus testified alongside Adm. Jona than W. Green ert, chief of naval operations, Leadership testies before House panel ... proper resourcing is needed to maintain our capacity for global operations ... Ray Mabus Secretary of Navy VBS registration starts May 20 NSBs Pirates Cove Galley gets new outdoor grill Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay galley has a new outdoor grill for everyone to enjoy on those nice Georgia days when barbecue hits the spot. e galley had a grand opening on April 12 for those servicemembers eating at the new grill. e outdoor grill is the biggest in the Southeast Region and the only one to have an exhaust hood and Aqueous Potassium Carbonate system for re safety. Construction of the grill estimated at about $150,000, took about eight Atlantic subs have FORMC change Wes Koshoer relieves Kirk Saunders in Norfolk ceremony Force Master Chief (Submarines) Wes Koshoer has relieved Force Master Chief (Submarines) Kirk Saunders as Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Force Master Chief. e Newport, R.I.-native relieved Saunders during a change-of-oce ceremony. Saunders served as the SUBLANT Force Master Chief from July 2010 to April 2013. He will report to the Navy Consolidated Brig Chesapeake, located at the Naval Support Activity Hampton Roads, Northwest Annex in Chesapeake, Va. NAVCONBRIG Chesapeake, also known as the Joint Regional Correctional Facility Mid-Atlantic, serves as the Mid-Atlantic Regions correctional facility for both pre-trial and post-trial prisoners and is available for use by commands from all branches of the armed services. Prior to leaving SUBLANT, Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces/ Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, presented Saunders with a Legion of Merit medal.

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 A David-and-Goliath scenario an Army installation commander standing up to a multi-billion-dollar industry over the deaths of three of his soldiers has borne fruit in a national Food and Drug Administration warning and the drug makers decision to stop production of a controversial dietary supplement. Army Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, commander of Fort Bliss, Texas, and the 1st Armored Division, lauded USPlabss announcement that it would stop production of Jack3d. e supplement contains dimethylamylamine, or DMAA, a stimulant popular among bodybuilders and dieters that the FDA last week linked to elevated blood pressure and heart attacks. Pittards crusade against the supplement began in 2011, when two Fort Bliss soldiers, Pfc. Michael Sparling and Sgt. Demekia Cola, died of heart failure during physical training. eir autopsies reviewed that DMAA use was a contributing factor in their deaths. In July 2012, another Fort Bliss soldier, Pfc. David Artis, died of heart stroke during physical tness training. His death also was linked to DMAA use. Pittard, who instituted a campaign to reduce suicides and other prevent able deaths on arrival at Fort Bliss, immediately demanded that prod ucts containing DMAA be removed from the shelves of a commercial vi tamin store outlet on the post. It was an unpopular move, he told reporters april 18, raising the ire of the Fort Bliss community, questions from some Army leaders, and criticism from manufacturers of supplemental products. But regardless, we stood rm in the face of that criticism, Pittard said. We felt it was the right thing to do for our soldiers. e pushback, he said, actually strengthened the resolve at Fort Bliss to take the ght beyond the installations gates. Partnering with the Consortium for Health and Military Performance and the Pentagons Department of Military and Emergency Medicine, Pittard and his sta set their eye on eradicating DMAA products across not only the Army, but also the entire Defense Department. is unied campaign spurred the Army to ban supplements containing DMAA from all installations in March 2012. Four months later, the Defense Department followed suit, banning them from all U.S. installations. In the next promising development, the FDA issued an advisory last week warning consumers not to buy dietary supplements containing DMAA. But the biggest victory, Pittard said, was the decision by USPlabs, the manufacturer of Jack3d, to stop using DMAA in its products. Yesterdays action by USPlabs really in many ways vindicates those on Fort Bliss who fought so hard and fought the supplement and billiondollar drug industry on this issue, he said. Pittard expressed thanks to the Army and Air Force Exchange Service and Army and DOD leadership for supporting the eort. He acknowledged that it took courage to collectively stand up to powerful drug companies and others who resisted their eorts. And we believe this will save countless lives in the future, he said. Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, presented ve Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 letters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources Program during a ceremony on board Naval Air Station Jacksonville April 17. e ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquarters to major commands on board installations throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mission would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and stang and classication for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approximately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. e new Navy-wide model will position HR specialists at each major command, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. e decentralization plan was created last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Aairs with the goal of delivering more streamlined and customer-focused support. Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, said the transition comes with distinct benets. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR professionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different commands at the same time, she said. is focus provides the opportunity for better customer service through specic, command-focused HR servicing and better partnerships with customers. e new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logistical challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of les and casework, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members eorts throughout the process. is was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your everyday workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willingness to work long hours and pay attention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentralization is a major transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery mod el. ere may be a change in the HR professional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new ser vicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each functional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR professionals will be responsive to phone calls and emails and are available to meet via video teleconference, she added. Additional information regarding the specic processes and procedures of regional delivery of HR services will be published in the near future. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS golf benefit April 26Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Four Man Scramble Golf Tournament to benet NMCRS has been rescheduled for 8:30 a.m., Friday, April 26, at NSB Kings Bay Trident Lakes Golf Course. Entry fee is $ 40 per person or $160 per team, which includes cart, green fee and lunch of hamburgers, hotdogs, chips and drink, plus there will be prizes for longest drive on No. 17, closest to the pin on No. 8 and 13 and the top nishing teams. Call or e-mail Kevin @ 573-8475/6 or kevin.doetch@navy. mil for team and individual sign-ups. Pointof-contact for the golf tournament is edward. groover@navy.mil.Security issues sticker reminderIt is the policy of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay that no motor vehicle with any sticker, decal, emblem or other device containing profane or lewd words or pictures, describing sexual acts or excretory functions on parts of the human body, be allowed on base.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time visiting nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. RN license from Georgia, CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, automobile insurance, good driving record and reliable transportation needed. Starting annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. Obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www. nmcrs.org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Oce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Exchange has student drawinge Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. Qualied students can participate in a quarterly drawing for awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500, for a total of $5,500 per quarter. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school, may enter. Eligible students include de pendent children of active duty military mem bers, reservists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services. Now hear this! SE human resources decentralized Southeast Region HR Supplements banned aer deaths Southeast Region HR and Gen. James. F. Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps. All three leaders spoke of shortfalls and having to do more with less in the coming years if the hundreds of millions of dollars in cuts triggered by last months budget sequester remain. We do it to the very best we possibly can, Amos said, but he suggested that at some point, such cuts could undercut the ratio nale for having the Marine Corps, which is on a path to shrink from just over 202,000 Marines to 182,100. e Marine Corps remains the nations ready hedge against unpredictable crisis, an insurance policy that buys time when hours matter. Amos cited the bombing at the Boston Marathon and the ongoing uncer tainty over North Koreas intentions to illustrate how an unpredictable and cha otic security environment demonstrates that the need for this highly capa ble and ready force is more pressing now than ever. Aware of the nations scal restraints, Amos said, the Corps will make hard decisions about what it needs. But he added that with declining resources to address the emerging security challenges, neoisolationism does not advance our nations national interest. Greenert said shortfalls this scal year alone, while mitigated by congressional action last month, will be compounded if sequestration continues, leading to a $23 billion shortfall in 2014. e situation already has led the Navy to recommend cancelling one ship deployment to the Pacic, two to Europe and all but one to the U.S Southern Command region. Overall, due to reduced training and maintenance, about two-thirds of the eet will be less than fully mission capable and not certied for major combat operations, he said, emphasizing that this state of readiness does not apply to Navy forces and assets supporting operations in Afghanistan. e hearing follows President Barack Obamas submission of a $526.6 billion defense budget request for scal year 2014, one largely consistent with the previous years, but delivered amid a budget landscape that envisions $500 billion in additional defense cuts over the next 10 years if there is no change in current law. If Congress does not act to change that, Amos warned, the Marine Corps will have to undergo a top-to-bottom re-examination of priorities, missions and what it will take to continue to be the nations expeditionary force in readiness.House

PAGE 3

Year of Military Women begins e United States Navy Memorial hosted the ocial kick-o of the Year of Military Women during a ribboncutting ceremony April 11. is is the rst time the Navy Memorial will be honoring not only Navy women, but also the women who have, and still serve in the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Chief of Naval Personnel, Adm. Scott Van Buskirk was the guest speaker at the event, and said he was honored to attend the ceremony, because he knows how essential womens leadership and contributions have been to the Navy and the nation. I know that rst-hand, and I see that each and every day when I have the opportunity in my job to go out and meet the men and women who serve in our Navy and also in our Marine Corps, Van Buskirk said. Senior leaders from each of the services, and members of congress attended the event and were able to get the rst look at the collection of original uniforms worn by pioneering World War I Yeoman (F) and female Marines. Among the most signicant is a uniform worn by Capt. Mildred McAfee, the rst director of the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, or WAVES, who commanded 82,000 women during World War II. e Executive Vice President of the Navy Memorial, Cindy McCalip said the memorial wanted to include women of all branches of service to highlight the common bond between all military women. Women tend to support other women whether it be from one service or another service, McCalip said, so its important that we keep that connection going and we didnt want to alienate any women in the military, so were trying to be very inclusive of all the services. e exhibit highlights many of the women who made military history through their leadership and determination. In our military, we judge leadership abilities by the capacity to get the job done well, Buskirk said. Man, woman, people of color, white, Hispanic ... that doesnt matter. What matters is that you can meet the mission and you can get the job done. And as demonstrated day in and day out, our women arent just meeting that mission, theyre leading the way, going above and beyond. Fleet Master Chief April Beldo said that events like Year of Military Women allow for the opportunity to recognize the past contributions of women to the armed forces. If it wasnt for those women who went before me, I would not be standing here today, Beldo said. is allows me to give honor and homage to the hard work that they did while they were serving. Celebrations of the Year of Military Women will continue throughout the year and will include book signings, golf tournaments and symposiums. served from the Kings Kitchen. VBS knights will end their days with more lively songs, a review the days lesson and a rehearsal of the Bible verse of the day. What a great time children will have as they become knights of Kingdom Rock. Interested in helping? To make this years VBS a success the chapel needs volunteers to help build and decorate sets, preassemble crafts and decorate classrooms. Whether you are a parent, an involved teen, a command representative or a community volunteer your help is needed. Volunteers sign up at the chapel oce now for one of the many service opportunities available. For more program information, contact the chapel sta at (912) 573-4501. Put on your armor and join this exciting Vacation Bible Schools royal journey through Gods Word. months to build and is the rst for Windamir Development and Construction, an on base contractor, who was contracted through Public Works. Pirates Cove Galley CS1 Dennis Briggs said two members of the galley sta were particularly helpful in making the grill become a reality. LS2 Eric Bencs and MM2 Christopher Bishop oversaw the construction from start to nish, CS1 Dennis Briggs said. e design of the grill is incorporated into the structure of the building, which allows for patrons to enjoy the outdoor covered eating area. Accessories of the grill include two covered gas grills, a steam line, a chill line, a chill box, warmers, exhaust hood with APC system and lights. Use of the grill is for galley meals and galley events only. VBSGrill Never Quit event needs volunteers Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 ocers and chief petty ocers to facilitate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event, 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m., May 19. For more information, call or e-mail MC1 Brianna K. Dandridge at (904) 396-5909, ext. 1150. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, visit neverquitnever.com. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5

PAGE 6

An engagement 25 years ago on April 14, 1988 sparked a determined and quick response four days later from the U.S., known as Operation Praying Mantis, which demonstrated the same priorities the Navy maintains today. In early 1988, as part of Operation Earnest Will the U.S. Navy was engaged in maintaining freedom of navigation in the Arabian Gulf as Iraq and Iran continued in a bloody war. e USS Enterprise (CVN 65) was operating in the region. Little did anyone know that what would happen that day would draw naval forces into action and alter the course of history. Watchstanders aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58), Northeast of Qa tar, sighted three mines oating approximately one-half mile from the ship. Twenty minutes after the rst sighting, as Samuel B. Roberts was backing clear of the mineeld, it struck a submerged mine. e blast injured 10 Sailors and tore a 21-foot hole in the hull, nearly ripping the warship in half. Quick and determined actions by the crew, who worked for seven hours to stabilize the ship, kept the vessel from sinking. We heard about it right away, and very shortly thereafter I was told I was going to y o to Bahrain to help put a plan together and command one of the Surface Action Groups, said Vice Adm. (Ret.) James B Perkins, III, who was a Surface Action Group commander during Operation Praying Mantis. We spent the 17th of April ying from one side of the gulf to the other, brieng the SAG commanders as to what the plan was. Four days after the mine blast, forces, of the nowJoint Task Force Middle East, executed a response Operation Praying Mantis. e operation called for the destruction of two oil platforms used by Iran to coordinate attacks on merchant shipping. e gas-oil platforms were huge structures, Perkins said. What I had in mind were the oil platforms o the coast of Santa Barbra. But these were oating cities with berthing quarters and all that sort of stu, Perkins recalled. On the morning [of April 18] we called them up and told them, in Farsi and English, that we were getting ready to destroy them and to get o the platforms, Perkins said. ere was a lot of running around looking for boats to leave the decks. By the end of that day the coalition air and surface units not only destroyed the two oil rigs but also Iranian units attempting to counter-attack U.S. forces. Naval aircraft and the destroyer USS Joseph Strauss (DDG 16) sank the Iranian frigate Sahand (F 74) with harpoon missiles and laser-guided bombs. A laser-guided bomb, dropped from a Navy A-6 Intruder, disabled frigate Sabalan (F 73), and Standard missiles launched from the cruiser USS Wainwright (CG 28) and frigates USS Bagley (FF 1069) and USS Simpson (FFG 56) destroyed the 147-foot missile patrol boat Joshan (P 225). In further combat, A-6s sank one Bodghammer high-speed patrol boats and neutralized four more of the speedboats. e air wing from Enterprise did a superb job taking on the Bodghammers, Perkins said. By the end of the operation, U.S. air and surface units had sunk, or severely damaged, half of Irans operational eet. is particular exercise, in my view, nished the Iranian Navy in the Arabian Gulf, said Perkins. ey were still around, but after that operation, they didnt have as active a stance. Operation Praying Mantis proved a milestone in naval history. For the rst time since World War II, U.S. naval forces and supporting aircraft fought a major surface action against a determined enemy. e success of Praying Mantis and the broad-based allied naval cooperation during Operation Earnest Will proved the value of joint and combined operations in the Gulf and led the way for the massive joint coalition eort that occurred during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. e operation also demonstrated the importance of being ready to ght and win today, of providing oshore options to deter, inuence and win in an era of uncertainty; and showcased the teamwork, talent and imagination of the Navys diverse, capable force. It also proved the value of all the training the Navy had done. You have to be ready on a moments notice, Perkins said. You may not always have sucient time to get prepared, so train hard and often. (In this case) it worked out very well.Operation Praying Mantis put hurt on Iran 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 7

Saunders was cited for his management and vi sionary approach in implementing numerous initiatives which positively aected more than 22,000 Sailors in the Submarine Force, and for his impres sive resourcefulness in providing the Force Com mander and Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy valuable insight, guidance, and deckplate perspective. In mentoring 70 Com mand Master Chiefs, and Chiefs of the Boat, Saunders enthusiastically re juvenated the Chief Petty Ocer Mess in the Atlantic Fleet area of responsibility. Koshoers previous assignment was as Com mand Master Chief, Commander, Submarine Group Two in Groton, Conn. Koshoer joined the Navy in March 1989. After Basic Training in Great Lakes, Ill., he attend ed Basic Enlisted Submarine School and Submarine Radioman A and C schools, before reporting to his rst sea assignment, the Los Angeles-class at tack submarine USS Phoe nix (SSN 702), home port ed in Norfolk, Va. Other sea assignments have included the PreCommissioning Unit Cheyenne (SSN 773), which was under construction at Newport News Shipyard, Newport News, Va.; the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Baltimore (SSN 704), home ported in Norfolk, Va.; the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Jacksonville (SSN 699), home ported in Norfolk, Va.; and the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), home ported in Groton, Conn., where he served as the Chief of the Boat and was selected as a Command Master Chief.Atlantic THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7

PAGE 8

8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 9

Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel success fully raised and returned to shore a sunken patrol boat (PB 502), April 18. Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10, a Navy Reserve unit based in Jacksonville, Fla., was conducting a routine training event sailing from Jacksonville to Charleston when one of their patrol boats transiting into Charleston Harbor ran aground on a jetty on the south side on the channel entrance at 9:41 p.m., April 13. Salvage operations like this are quite common, we train to respond to all types of incidents from planes going down to boats sinking and each one brings up its own unique challenges, said Chief Warrant Ocer John Sullivan, MDSU2 operations ocer-in-charge of the salvage operation. e 34-foot patrol boat was surfaced ursday morning by Navy Divers from approximately 20 feet of water and was towed to shore by a contracted salvage company. e 8-person Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDS) Company, MDS Co. 2-4 based in Virginia Beach, Va., arrived in Charleston Tuesday and worked with local Coast Guard and maritime ocials to determine how to safely recover the submerged vessel by using another similar patrol boat ashore as a model. MDSU2 Divers then performed a site survey to determine the extent of damage to the vessel. On Wednesday and ursday Divers installed lift points, placed belly bands on the submerged vessel prior to rigging for lift and recovery, and attached salvage lift bags capable of lifting 22,000 pounds. Once secured, the vessel was carefully brought to the surface ursday morning by the lift bags and checked for stability. I thought my team did outstanding. is is what we train for, Sullivan said. We developed a plan. We executed it, and I thought my team did outstanding. PB 502 was then towed to the U.S. Coast Guard Station at Tradd Street. Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2 is conducting a thorough investigation into the cause of the incident. ree Sailors were injured when the boat ran aground. ey were transported to the Medical University of South Carolina where they were listed in stable condition.For a change of pace from my normal routine of pestering people at the exchange or at the galley, I went to the USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) reunion at the Bancroft Sail Memorial Friday. I wanted to find out how crew members of the Bancroft ended up in the Navy, and on submarines, and what they did after their military service. Like all the veterans groups Ive been around, these great guys were very easy to talk to and wonderful at sharing their stories. FTB1 David Murphy USS Bancroft to Ellsworth, Wisc. I got my Army draft notice in 1966. That started the whole thing in motion. I wanted to do something special for my country, so I chose subs. (After) I was a computer engineer for quite a while and now I work in computer sci ence at the University of Minnesota. EMC Herby Ortiz USS Bancroft to Chesterfield, Va. My uncle Herby was on the Nautilus. I looked up to him, and he encouraged me, so I volunteered for sub school. Im retired now, but I went to school on the GI Bill and was an industrial engineer at Fort Lee in Virginia for 24 years. MS3 Mike Flammia USS Bancroft to Shirley, N.Y. My cousin, Louis Capone, was a commander of sub base personnel. That made me want to go into the Navy and submarines. (After) I became an auto mechanic and just recently retired. MMCS Calvin Harris USS Bancroft to Kingsland My brother was on a submarine, so after I got out of high school, I joined. It sounded interesting. I served 26 years on four subs. I retired from the Navy in here on the (Kings Bay) base. ETCM Bud Warren USS Bancroft to Virginia Beach, Va. I was working on a farm and I heard stories from guys coming home from World War II how glam orous the Navy was. I became an engineman at sub school and Groton was close to home, so I went. (After) I spent another 23 years as a civil ian working for the Navy. Lt. Cmdr. Tom Brayman USS Bancroft to Pensacola, Fla. A couple of buddies and I decided to join the Navy. They didnt show up at the recruiters, but I joined. I was on destroyers. Then I volunteered for a special program, the Polaris pro gram, and volunteered for submarines. Now Im a Web site builder and photographer. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Divers raise sunken boat THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Distinguished visitors, area commanders and family members attended the Commander, Submarine Group Two change of command ceremony at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton, April 15. Rear Adm. Ken Perry relieved Rear Adm. Rick Breckenridge during the time-honored change of command ceremony. Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces spoke at the ceremony praising Breckenridge for his achievements as the group commander for nearly two years. Connor highlighted the signicance of Breckenridges time in command emphasizing that technology is one part of the solution, but its the people that excel at the mission. e general public thinks that we can do all of these things because of our technology, Connor said. I would say that the technology is necessary but only part of the solution. e rest involves people, people who are skilled and well led. Rick has made a huge contribution in this area as a teacher, as a mentor and as a living example of high standards. Rick, congratulations on a job superbly well done. Connor further reected on the foundation of the undersea domain, which are the people. We need training that supports their growing mission set. We need to ensure we sustain a culture that values the contribution of every Sailor, and a balanced lifestyle that recognizes and rewards our Sailors and their families for the extended time they spend at sea under austere conditions conducting the vital business of defending this great country, Connor said. Connor further congratulated Breckenridge on his follow-on assignment wishing him the best of luck as he returns to Washington, D.C. Rick and I once had the opportunity to run the halls of the Pentagon together as we did our best to sustain and grow the submarine force in the face of budgetary challenges, Connor said. Rick will get to do that again, and, although I do not envy him heading back into that battle, Rick, Im glad to know that the Submarine Force will be well represented by your wisdom, energy, creativity and experience. Breckenridge will depart Groton to assume the position of Director, Undersea Warfare Division in Washington, D.C. Connor also praised both Breckenridge and Perry for their leadership capabilities and what they bring to the people of Group Two. For the men and women of Group Two, you are fortunate to have served alongside Admiral Breckenridge, and you are fortunate that you will be serving alongside Admiral Ken Perry, Connor said. Breckenridge assumed command of COMSUBGRU Two on Aug. 26, 2011. During Breckenridges tenure at the Group, as submarines deployed worldwide and other crews prepared to deploy in turn, the admiral reected on the vitally important mission of our submariners. e most tangible outcome of eective operations at the Group level is getting our submarines deployed on time to where the operational commanders want them. e demand signal still remains incredibly high from our combatant commanders, Breckenridge said. Every day we can have a submarine out deployed is vitally important, and weve been able to accomplish that in my time here is large credit not to the commander but to all of the personnel who work so hard to keep these ships out to sea. Additionally, Breckenridge oversaw seven other submarines in various stages of new construction and maintenance overhaul. He praised the submarine shipbuilding industry for their outstanding support of the submarine force. We are very fortunate to have the healthiest segment of shipbuilding probably in the world, Breckenridge said. ey are delivering complex, state of the art, front-line warships under budget and ahead of schedule. ats pretty uncommon. During his command tour, Breckenridge played a key role in the delivery of two Virginia-class submarines and served as the ocer in tactical command for the sea trials of USS Mississippi (SSN 782) prior to her commissioning in June 2012. While bestowing praise on the shipbuilding industry both at General Dynamics Electric Boat and Huntington Ingalls Industries, Breckenridge reected on the Sailors who operate the submarines. What Ive seen here as Group Two riding VirStory Time with MCSFBn families Sub Group Two had new leader 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 11

e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Putting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 573-8475. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years or older. Games are 5-v-5, best of three games and double elimination. Maximum 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation showing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with WreckIt-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 ginia and Los Angeles class submarines with their motivated and inspired crews is that it really still all comes down to the Sailors, Breckenridge said. At the end of the day, it still comes back to those young Americans who sign up for this very challenging line of work to take these complex platforms out to sea and do the most incredible things with them. Both Breckenridge and Perry have sons who have followed in their fathers footsteps by serving in the Navy. Breckenridges eldest son, Lt. Ryan Breckenridge, based in California, attend ed the ceremony. Lt.j.g. Al Perry, who is assigned to a submarine in Hawaii, and Ensign Dave Perry, who is undergoing pilot training in Florida were both un able to attend.Group Two THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the abil ity of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their mari tal relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one anoth er better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their life time. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26, with another session May 13 and 14 Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This train ing take place 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., May 16. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar May 29Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, May 29. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 29 and May 6, 13 and 20. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered May 1 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. May 1. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for May 14Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 14. For more information, call 573-4513. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, May 7, 14, 21 and 28. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., May 23. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting May 20The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., May 20. For more information, contact at 573-4513.OCONUS Smooth Move Plus Kids upcomingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers, covering the new Defense Personel Property System Web site, transportation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation ser vices. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 to 8 p.m., May 28. For details and registration, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets May 15The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., May 15. To register, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 9 to 11 a.m., May 8. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13 and 14. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., May 16. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current informaFleet & Family Support Center workshops Billboard winner 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 13

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13 e extraordinary service of 80 men was remembered April 18 at the tribute to the Doolittle Raiders on the 71st anniversary of the Army Air Force squadrons ight from a Navy aircraft carrier to bomb Japan during World War II. During a luncheon at the Northwest Florida Fairgrounds in Fort Walton Beach, Rear Adm. Don Quinn, commander, Naval Education and Training Command in Pensacola, Fla., addressed more than 600 people who had come to honor the remaining Raiders. Of the original 80 members of the Doolittle Raiders, four are still living and three attended the events scheduled over several days in Fort Walton Beach, including luncheons, dinners and a parade. Raiders present included Lt. Col. Richard Cole, co-pilot with Col. Jimmy Doolittle; Sta Sgt. David atcher, an engineer and gunner on crew 7; and Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, engineer for crew 15. e fourth Raider who was unable to attend is Lt. Col. Robert Hite, co-pilot of crew 16. I couldnt have picked a better group of people to go into combat with, said Cole, when asked about his fellow Raiders. I think the young people today have the same spirit we had. ey also have better training and a higher level of technology in their training. During his remarks, Quinn said the spirit of the Doolittle Raiders would continue. I take exception to the idea that this is the last reunion, Quinn told the audience. I expect that in every year of our nations existence from this day forward that this event will continue to be celebrated, both in this world and the next. It will be celebrated because of the extraordinary service of 80 ordinary Americans. It will be celebrated because in todays mind-numbing barrage of digital information, we Americans often need to be reminded of who we are. Quinn was invited to speak about the Navys role in the Doolittle Raid and how it initiated a chain of events that led to the American victory at the Battle of Midway. He began his remarks by explaining how Army General Billy Mitchell was instrumental in creating the realization that military aviation would be crucial in future conicts. On July 21, 1921 Mitchells team used biplanes and 2,000 pound bombs to sink a captured German battleship. He proved that battleships were vulnerable to attack from the air, Quinn said. e Navy Bureau of Aeronautics was established less than a month later. I nd it tting, and more than a little ironic, that the aircraft which were used on the Doolittle Raid were North American B-25 Mitchell bombers, and they launched o a carrier that probably would not have existed had Billy Mitchell not educated us all on the potential of air power, said Quinn. In speaking about the Navys role in the raid on Japan, he outlined how the idea of launching Army bombers from an aircraft carrier came from Capt. Francis Low, a submariner, and the original feasibility study done by Capt. Donald Duncan, a Navy aviator, was composed of 30 handwritten pages which outlined all the key concepts for the successful bombing raid. Eglin Air Field was marked o to represent the length of a carrier ight deck, and Navy Lt. Henry Miller taught the Army crews how to take o in a short distance, Quinn said. e crews ew their aircraft to Alameda, Calif., where the planes were craned onto the deck of the new aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV-8), skippered by Capt. Marc Mitscher. Hornet was escorted by the rest of Task Force 18, which included two cruisers, four destroyers and a eet oiler for refueling the ships. Aboard Hornet, the Army crews continued to prepare and train with the Navy. Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Jurika, who had served in Tokyo as a Naval Attache, provided intelligence on Japan and potential targets, Quinn said. e Hornets navigation ocer conducted training in celestial navigation, and the Army crews practiced while sitting in their aircraft. e admiral also pointed out that weather was a key factor in the military operation, and while planners continued to review historical weather patterns, two submarines, USS resher (SS-200) and USS Trout (SS-202), patrolled the coast of Japan gathering intelligence and weather data. To provide additional protection, Adm. William Bull Halsey was ordered to sail from Pearl Harbor with Task Force 16 to rendezvous with Hornets group. Along with the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV-6), the Task Force included two more cruisers, four destroyers and an additional oiler. As Quinn explained, the carriers were spotted by Japanese picket boats, and the Army Air Force crews were forced to launch earlier than expected, which meant they would have less fuel after their bombing raid, making their escape to China more dangerous. e planes successfully launched o the deck of the USS Hornet and into history. While the Japanese Navy high command was focused on spreading the empire into the resourcerich Indian Ocean, Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, commander of the Combined Fleet, wanted to eliminate the American Pacic Fleets combat power, Quinn said. e direct attack on the homeland gave Yamamotos plan (to attack Midway) instant credibility. In June 1942, units of the U.S. Army, Navy and Ma rine Corps joined in action against a Japanese inva sion eet at Midway Island. Fighting for three days, the American forces won. Adm. Nimitz called Midway a glorious page in our history. It was certainly a turning point for Naval Aviation, said Quinn. e strategic impact of this relatively insignicant tactical action literally drove the Japanese Navy to the pivotal battle at Midway. And to some degree, we can thank Billy Mitchell for that. Doolittle Raider says this is not last reunion tion on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and main tenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 28 to 31. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? This workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and create a family budget. This class will be 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. Call 573-4513 for more information.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., May 18 and 19. For more information and to register call 573-4513. FFSC

PAGE 14

14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013

PAGE 15

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 25, 2013