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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-18-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00297

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00297


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Budget request $155 bilNavy releases scal 2014 proposale Department of the Navy released April 10 its proposed $155.8 billion budget for scal year 2014. is budget is part of the $525 billion defense budget President Barack Obama submitted to Congress on the same day. Rear Adm. Joseph Mulloy, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed media at the Department of Defense budget press conference about the Navy and Marine Corps por tion of the budget, which was a $4.2 billion decrease from last years baseline appropriation. So the bottom line (for mili tary personnel), the Navys going to slow growth slightly over time. Weve pretty much reached the point where, to be able to operate with the force we have and to be able to properly man and train, we need these forces, Mulloy said. is years budget submission was guided by the CNOs ten ants of warghting rst, operate forward and be ready. Mulloy said the Navy is funding our forces operating forward, pro viding money to maintain and train those units getting ready to deploy, and investing in the people, ships and technology of our future force. e budget includes a $49 billion request for operations and maintenance. is is an ap proximately three percent re duction, but it allows the Navy to maintain its commitment in the Middle East and the Western Pacic, consistent with the De fense Strategy. is years submission also supports readiness for our nextto-deploy ships and units who will be preparing for their de ployments in FY14. e Navy has also increased its ship depot-level maintenance account to increase the scope and complexity of our mainte nance availabilities. e Navy has also requested $43.5B for ship, aircraft, weapons and other procure ment for programs including Babys health in spotlightNSB Branch Health Clinic doing its part for National Infant Immunization WeekNational Infant Immunization Week, sponsored by the World Health Organiza tion, takes place from April 20 to 27. is annual observance seeks to improve the health of children age two and younger. Vaccines are particularly crucial for infants, who are most vulnerable to infec tious diseases. Childhood immunizations protect against 14 diseases that can cause serious illness, disability or even death: hepa titis A, hepatitis B, diphtheria, haemophilus inuenza b (Hib), pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio, inuenza, measles, mumps, rotavirus, rubella, tetanus and chickenpox. U.S. vaccines are extremely safe. eyre regulated like any other medication and, in addition to that, theres a national tracking system for adverse eects, said Capt. Jo seph McQuade, Naval Hospital Jacksonville director for public health and family medi cine physician. And the risk of the disease Up Periscope Classic top-5 songs with Joe Sabo Page 11 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Tension up North Korea making world uneasy Page 6 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Gateway Inn honored Bi-Annual Crew Reunion April 18 to 21 at Kings Bay e USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) Association will be holding its Bi-Annual Crew Reunion at Kings Bay, April 18 to 21. e meetings will take place at the Springeld Inn & Suites. e main event of this gathering will be the super barbecue, which will be held at the Bancroft Sail Memorial at 1 p.m., Fri day, April 19, right on the eld along side the Bancroft Sail Exhibit which is just out side the Franklin Gate to the Kings Bay base. e attendees of this reunion are former submarine Sailors from the various crew who manned the boat during its 27 years of service to the Navy. ere will crew members from the very rst crew, back in 1966 when it was com mis sioned, and from the very last crew, in 1993, when it was decommis sioned. Eightyve for mer Bancroft Sailors are registered to at tend the four-day event. When the boat was re-cycled, the sail section was brought to the NSB Kings Bay and a mockup of the submarine was constructed, with the actual sail on top, in 1999. A dedication ceremony was held in 2000, with some of its former crew present. Since then, a formal organization was formed and char tered, and we have re unions every other year. said Bill Badaluc ca, sec retary of the USS George Bancroft SSBN 643 Association. e last time we were in Kings Bay was in 2003. USS George Bancro vets onboard ... stop by and meet the Sailors that went to sea on that machine to maintain the countrys first line of deterrent force ... Bill Badalucca USS George Bancroft Association secretary Kings Bay hotel earns Navys 3-star Zumwalt Award for excellenceNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Gateway Inn and Suites employees received the ree-Star Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt Award for excellence in hous ing and lodging management, during an awards ceremony and appreciation pot luck luncheon March 27. Capt. Harvey Guey, commanding of cer of NSB Kings Bay, presented the coveted award to the sta. Sta members also received with a certicate of appreci ation for their hard work and dedication. Presenting the Zumwalt Award to such a hardworking and dedicated sta is an honor, Guey said. e sta works so hard to make every guest feel welcome and at home. I have received nothing but positive feedback for the quality of the facilities, services and customer support provided by NGIS Kings Bay. e Zumwalt Awards, named after the former Chief of Naval Operations, Adm.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase began April 11, and remains open until 5 a.m., April 23 for ac tive-duty Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based pro gram enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders nine to seven months from their projected rotation date. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with a January 2014 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a December 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a November 2013 PRD. If applicable, these Sailors with Fleet Ride-Perform to Serve approval may review advertised bil lets in CMS/ID during the applica tion phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career coun selor. e application phase is about 11 days, giving Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command prior to submitting applications before the ap plication phase closes. Detailers ll all advertised activeduty billets each month using Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proac tive in getting an assignment of their choice by using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Prefer ence section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, lo cation, platform and community, as well as indicate which special pro grams and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers always will attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selec tions rst. However, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers must also follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sail or requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, priori tized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Com mand and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, quali cations, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. e Kings Bay Employer Commit tee has set a deadline of 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, for students who live in Camden County to apply for two $500 college scholarships. e funding for the scholarships will come from an endowment fund established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employ ment marketing representative at the Kings Bay Career Center. Under the endowment fund, the scholarships will be granted to graduating seniors, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their fresh man year at an accredited institu tion of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants must also be working part-time for a minimum of 15 hours per week. e scholarships are nonrenewable and not based on nan cial need. To qualify for the scholarships, applicants must submit an applica tion, school records, test scores, and a two-to-three page essay. e theme of the essay is how to use education and training to de velop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Scholarship recipients will be se lected by the employer committees scholarship subcommittee. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a scholarship subcommittee member, at rbaldwin@ camden.k12.ga.us or call her at (912) 729-4790. All documents must be submitted by the 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, deadline to be considered. Applications for the scholarships are available at the Georgia Depart ment of Labors Kings Bay Career Center, at 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys. For additional information, contact Faith Copeland-Pittman at the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Commit tee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS golf benefit April 26Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Four Man Scramble Golf Tournament to benet NMCRS has been rescheduled for 8:30 a.m., Friday, April 26, at NSB Kings Bay Trident Lakes Golf Course. Entry fee is $ 40 per person or $160 per team, which includes cart, green fee and lunch of hamburgers, hotdogs, chips and drink, plus there will be prizes for longest drive on No. 17, closest to the pin on No. 8 and 13 and the top nishing teams. Call or e-mail Kevin @ 573-8475/6 or kevin.doetch@navy. mil for team and individual sign-ups. Pointof-contact for the golf tournament is edward. groover@navy.mil.Flying models show April 20The Kings Bay RC Modelers First Annual Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 20, weather permitting, no rain date planned yet, at Oakwell RC Airfield at the end of Clarks Bluff and Oakwell Road. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for location, pictures and updates. Events included a full-scale ultralight fly-in and display, displays of a 1923 Ford T-Bucket, a 1936 Studebaker and RC planes. Flight demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. If turn out is good, there also will be a Night Flying Demonstration with mini LED Parachute drop at 9 p.m. that evening. Bring a chair and enjoy a bon-fire. Food and drink available on site.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time Visiting Nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. Current RN license from Georgia, cur rent CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, current automobile insurance, good driving re cord and reliable transportation needed. Start ing annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. In terested parties may obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www.nmcrs. org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Of ce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Deadline for scholarships April 22 Employer Committee April PCS application phase open Naval Personnel As Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month kickedo, the recent Navy-wide Sexual Assault and Prevention-Fleet training for E6 and below Sailors recorded a 97 percent completion rate by April 9, highlighting the Navys continued focus on this critical issue. Following on the heels of Na vys SAPR-F training, Aprils SAA PM serves as another part of the Navys campaign to stop sexual assault and promote a culture of respect and professionalism in the force. Overall performance by commands in completing the SAPRF training was superb, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Chief of Naval Personnel. While we still have some remaining Sailors to train, from the top down, our Navy has embraced the need to take a stand against this crime and take care of our shipmates. Helping our Sailors understand that they have not only the pow er, but the responsibility to step in and prevent assaults is a major step forward. e SAAPM Department of Defense eme is We own it. ...Well solve it ... together. is month provides another opportunity to emphasize our ongoing commitment to instill a climate that does not tolerate, condone or ignore sexist behav ior, sexual harassment or sexual assault, Van Buskirk said. We have accomplished a great deal in the past year with our leadership and eet eorts, but we must remember that SAPR is an ongoing eort by everyone in the chain of command. e recent SAPR-F training has also been approved to serve as this years General Mili tary Training for sexual assault awareness. Previous documentation of SAPR-F for E6 and below has been rolled over to automati cally document completion of the FY13 SAPR GMT Lesson, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Refresher Training. Command E7 and above are encouraged to complete re quired annual SAPR GMT train ing during Sexual Assault Aware ness and Prevention Month and may use the revised SAPR-F Course Facilitation Guide to meet the FY-13 SAPR GMT re quirement vice completing CP PD-GMT-SAPRRT-1.0. e revised SAPR-F training is not required for all E-7 and above, but is a convenient and highly encouraged method for them to complete the required SAPR GMT for the scal year, said Capt. William Marvel, SAPR Task Force chief of sta. It serves an additional benet of exposing them to the SAPR-F training that their E-6 and below personnel received. Naval Administrative Message 075/13 provides additional details and links to turn-key prod ucts to facilitate delivery of SAA PM messaging and events. ose products are located on the Navy Personnel Command SAPR Web site www.sapr.navy. mil. e revised SAPR-F course fa cilitation guide for E-7 and above can be downloaded from the SAPR-L/F training Web page 222. public.navy.mil/bupers-ncp/ support/sapr/pages/training. aspx or or from Navy Knowledge Online (select the leadership tab and scroll down the page to the SAPR training section). Sexual assault prevention is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Cen tury Sailor and Marine initiative, which builds resiliency to hone the most combat-eective force in the history of the Department of the Navy.SAPR training completed in eet Navy Ed & Training

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Anger management seminar April 24Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like sugges tions on how to stop temper tan trums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A mini mum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a cou ple to get away from the distrac tions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communi cate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through the practical and cre ative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more informa tion, contact at 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financial ly stable, with at least one year Fleet & Family Support Center workshops April Sexual Assault Awareness Victims of crime have seen many dierences emerge over the last few years. In the past, victims rights were never con sidered. Most courtrooms were closed to them, their voices were not a part of the judicial pro cess, and the need for understanding and infor mation was ignored. Sexual assault victims were often blamed for their assault. Today, the resolve of victims, and those who serve them, has reaped positive results. e Vic tims Rights Discipline began in America more than two decades ago and included constitutional amendments for victims rights and an update to Department of Defense policies. Thank Your SAPR Advocate Day April 19 Wear Denim Day April 24 left before PRD from their commands. This train ing take place 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs represen tative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge pro gram should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be avail able for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Navy photos by MCCS Tony CasulloElmo R. Zumwalt, was estab lished in 1974 to recognize com mands that achieve the highest level of service standards. e accreditation program was established to signicantly im prove customer service, nancial management, operations, facilities and the overall lodging ex perience for guests aboard naval facilities. Being awarded the Zum walt award is a quite an honor and achievement, said Dennis Manacup, Kings Bay NGIS gen eral manager. e NGIS Employee of the Year Awards for associate, housekeeper, supervisor and manager were also awarded at the ceremony. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites celebrates award

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 5 e second day of the 2013 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition, held at the Gaylord National Harbor Resort and Convention Center April 9, focused on developing scally responsible technological solutions. One such development will see a solid-state laser aboard a ship for the rst time in scal year 2014. Our directed energy initiatives, and specically the solid-state laser, are among our highest priority science and technology programs, said Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, chief of naval research. e solid-state laser program is central to our commitment to quickly deliver advanced capabilities to forward-deployed forces. is capability provides a tremendously aordable answer to the costly problem of defending against asymmetric threats, and that kind of innovative approach is crucial in a scally constrained environment. e announcement to deploy the laser onboard USS Ponce (AFSB 15) comes as Navy researchers continue to make signicant progress on directed energy weapons, allowing the service to deploy a laser weapon on a Navy ship two years ahead of schedule. e at-sea demonstration in FY 14 is part of a wider portfolio of near-term Navy directed energy programs that promise rapid elding, demonstration and prototyping eorts for shipboard, airborne and ground sys tems. Our conservative data tells us a shot of directed en ergy costs under $1, Klunder said. Compare that to the hundreds of thousands of dollars it costs to re a missile, and you can begin to see the merits of this capability. e Oce of Naval Research and Naval Sea Systems Command recently performed demonstrations of highenergy lasers aboard a moving surface combatant ship, as well as against remotely piloted aircraft. rough careful planning of such demonstrations and by leveraging investments made through other Depart ment of Defense agencies, researchers have been able to increase the ruggedness, power and beam quality of lasers, more than doubling the range of the weapons. Video of the demonstration of the high-energy laser aboard a moving surface combatant ship and against re motely piloted aircraft can be seen at youtube.OmoldX lwKYO. Other developments displayed at the expo included an unmanned aerial system fueled by hydrogen fuel cells and an electro-magnetic aircraft launch system. We are part of the new EMALS program, said Gina Andersen, marketing and communications manager, Kato Engineering. We do power generation for the na val ships and whether its power generation or electro mechanical solutions, we can provide it. Its a greener option. While the barbecue is for crewmembers and senior sta ocers from the base, the sail exhibit always is open to the public. You can always stop by and meet the Sailors that went to sea on that machine to maintain the countrys rst line of de terrent force during the cold war years. With the advent of the Ohio-class submarines and the end of the Cold War, the older Franklinclass submarines were no longer needed and Bancroft was decommis sioned and struck from the Navy list. Alerted to Bancrofts imminent destruc tion, a grassroots eort on the part of St. Marys Sub marine Museum, a local submarine veterans organization, former Bancroft crew members and local businesses raised the nec essary funding to bring the submarines sail to Kings Bay and to construct the exhibit. Saved from the recycling bin, the sail was brought to Kings Bay in 1998 for use in an exhibit honoring the Navys submarine service centennial. From October 1999 to March 2000, members of Construction Battalion Unit 412 cleared and grubbed 500 tons of soil and trees to construct the footings, foundation and lighting necessary for the exhibit. e Seabees molded the earth to re semble a submarine hull, allowing a contractor to then spray the earthen hull with a thick coat of black gunite. e display readied for dedication on April 7, 2000, became the centerpiece for Kings Bays celebration of the sub marine forces 100th anniversary. More than 2,000 people from the local area and across the country joined the dedication as Bancroft, one of the for Freedom, came alive once again. e Bancroft Sail Exhibit is located in front of the main entrance to the base, at the intersection of St. Marys Road and Georgia State Highway Spur 40. USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) was the fourth Navy ship of that name. It displaced 7,320 tons on the surface and 8,250 tons submerged. Bancroft was 425 feet in length and 33 feet at the beam, and car ried 16 Polaris missiles. Bancroft was later con verted to carry the Trident C-4 ballistic missile. In comparison, todays Ohio class submarines have a displacement of 16,764 tons surfaced and 18,750 ton submerged, are 560 feet in length and 42 feet at the beam, carrying 24 Trident II D-5 ballistic missiles. George Bancroft, 18001891, was appointed Secretary of the Navy in President James K. Polks cabinet in 1844. Although holding the post for only 18 months, he made his tenure memorable by es tablishing the Naval Academy at Annapolis and en couraging the growth and importance of the Naval Observatory. In 1845, as acting Secre tary of War he signed the order causing Gen. Zach ary Taylor to cross into Mexico leading directly to the Mexican War. As Secretary of the Navy he issued the orders to Commodore Sloat on the Pacic Coast which brought about the occu pation of San Francisco and other California cities. Naval History and Heritage Command and Commander, Navy Instal lations Command contributed to this report. e Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alabama (SSBN 731) returned home to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor April 3, concluding a 108-day strategic deter rent patrol by its Gold Crew, one of the longest patrols in recent history for a Bangor-based SSBN. Words cannot possibly describe the joy and happiness I have to be home, said ST3 Loren Dilworth, who received the happiest of welcome-home presents, a rst look at his 12-day-old son, born during the nal days of Alabamas patrol. Dilworth and ET3 Renan Cardenas, another new father, were among the rst Gold Crew members welcomed at Ban gor Plaza by a boisterous homecoming, courtesy of family members who hadnt seen their Sailors since before Christmas. Im ready for him to be home, said Cardenas wife, Jennifer, who was nally able to introduce her husband to their one-month-old son. I was ready weeks ago. Alabama, which departed Bangor Dec. 17, became the rst SSBN based at Ban gor to complete a deterrent patrol of 100 days or more since 2010, when the Blue Crew of USS Maine (SSBN 741) conduct ed a 105-day patrol. As a result, members of the Gold Crew will be eligible to wear the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, presented to Sail ors who deploy away from their home port for at least 90 days. Ive been in the Navy almost 19 years, and this was the longest length of time Ive spent at sea without setting foot on dry land, said Cmdr. Kevin Schultz, commanding ocer of the Gold Crew. is patrol was a testament to both the robustness of the superb design of our submarines and to the crews dedication and professional expertise to maintain the ship, x material issues that came up, and enable us to remain at sea providing Americas survivable strategic deterrent. e Gold Crew put its patrol time to good use, as 17 Sailors completed their submarine qualications while under way. By doing so, they earned the right to wear the coveted submariners dol phins. While the crew is glad to add a ribbon to their uniforms, the long patrol was stressful for both the crew and our fami lies, Schultz said. Im very thankful for the love and support our families have provided that enabled us to accomplish our mission. Im very proud of my crew for the great work they did on this patrol. Its good to be home. e sixth of 18 Ohio-class SSBNs, Ala bama is one of eight ballistic missile submarines homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nations strategic forces. Alabama ends long patrol Navy League hosts Air-Sea-Land Expo Joint Strike Fighter, Littoral Combat Ship, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, and P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Following last years budget for FY13, this budget includes cuts and other initiatives that will reduce planned spending across several years. e FY14 budget re quest does not reect the future uncertainty associated with the implemen tation of sequestration as it is submitted as part of the Presidents balanced decit reduction plan. BudgetBancro e Sexual Assault Pre vention and Response Program, for the military community, continues to support victims and community agencies. e month of April is a time for people to re member and honor those who have been victims of sexual assault. is in cludes direct victims as well as secondary victims, such as friends and family of the victim, police/law enforcement, and victim advocates. Take a moment to think of how many people are aected by the crime of sexual assault each year. Always remember that courage and hope is at the core of every victim and every survivor. For more information on sexual assault or to contact a victim advocate, call SafeHelpline at (877) 995-524 or on-call Victim Advocate Kings Bay at (912) 674-6827 or log onto SafeHelpline.org. Aware

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With tensions on the Korean Peninsula reaching their high est level in the 60 years since the war there ended, the United States and South Korea are pre pared to defend against a North Korean attack, should one come, the U.S. Pacic Command commander told Congress today. I am satised that we are ready today, Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III told the Senate Armed Ser vices Committee. Locklear expressed confidence in the capa bilities of U.S. and South Korean forc es and their ability to intercept a North Ko rean ballistic missile if one is launched in the coming days, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has threatened. But expressing concern about any steps that could cause mis calculation and quickly escalate, Locklear said he would recom mend such an action only after conrming where it was headed and to defend the homeland or a U.S. ally. e best thing we as mili taries can do is to preserve the peace, [and] to get it back to peace so diplomacy can work, and we would hope that could be done in North Korea, he said. But it is a very dangerous situation. It is something we have to watch, and it could be quite volatile. North Korea dominated to days Senate hearing, originally scheduled to focus on Pacoms scal 2014 budget request. Army Gen. James D. ur man, commander of United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forc es Korea, had been scheduled to testify alongside Locklear, but remained in South Korea to deal with the situation there. Locklear recognized in his prepared remarks concerns about North Koreas nuclear and missile programs and its concentration of combat forces along the demilitarized zone. But particularly troubling, he said, has been North Koreas willingness to use tactics that could cause miscalculation and spin out of control into conict. ese provocations represent a clear and direct threat to U.S. national security and regional peace and stability, he said. Locklear said he felt condent that the allies have demonstrat ed to the North Korean leader ship, as well as the American population, our ability and our willingness to defend our na tion, to defend our people, to defend our allies and to defend our forward deployed forces. e admiral told the Senate panel he is satised with actions being taken in response to the North Korean threat, including a B-2 bomber ight over South Korea and the planned deployment of missile defenses to Guam. e B-2 ight during the regu larly scheduled Foal Eagle ex ercise was a good opportunity for my forces in Pacom to coor dinate with [U.S. Strategic Command], and for us to be able to demonstrate the capability, Locklear said. And I believe that it was visibly demonstrated [and] was done at the right time to indicate the capabilities that the United States has to ensure the defense of our allies and our homeland. In addition, two Navy ships with missile defense capabilities have been positioned closer to the peninsula, and the Defense Department announced last week that Terminal High Altitude Air Defense System assets he would deploy to Guam as a precautionary measure. Locklear told the panel he agreed with the Defense Depart ment decision to delay a routine reliability test of a Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic mis sile in light of what he acknowl edged as a particularly tenuous time. Asked by a committee mem ber, Locklear acknowledged he wished China would play a larg er role in helping to curb North Koreas provocations. I feel they could do more, he said. e North Korean situation is inuencing resourcing decisions at a time that sequestra tion is having a direct impact on near-term operational readiness, Locklear told the panel. Budget constraints have forced Pacom to prioritize its assets to ensure the most pressing prob lems are properly addressed with the right force levels and the right levels of readiness, he said. And today, that most pressing situation is what is happening on the peninsula in Korea. He lamented about budget impacts that will come to light over the longer term as overall readiness levels begin to de cline. In some cases, he said, large-scale exercises designed to ensure future force readiness are being cancelled for lack of ight hours, transportation or funds to cover the fuel costs. e rebalance toward the Asia-Pacic region oers an op portunity to ensure the proper balance of capabilities there and to reemphasize the U.S. commitment to this vital part of the globe, Locklear said. He ex pressed concern, however, that sequestration and other budget shortfalls under the continuing appropriations resolution could undermine those eorts. We have been accepting ad ditional risk in the Indo-AsiaPacic region for some time, Locklear told the panel. Our re balance strategy is in place, and we are making progress. Implementing and sustaining the strategic rebalance will require long-term, sustained commit ment and resources. Tension highest in Korea since wars end Faiths remains returnede Department of De fense POW/Missing Personnel Oce announced April 10 that a serviceman, who was unaccounted-for from the Korean War, has been identied and will be re turned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Lt. Col. Don C. Faith Jr. of Washington, Ind., will be buried April 17, in Arlington National Cemetery. Faith was a veteran of World War II and went on to serve in the Ko rean War. In late 1950, Faiths 1st Bat talion, 32nd Infantry Regi ment, which was attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team, was advancing along the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir, in North Korea. From Nov. 27 to Dec. 1, 1950, the Chinese Peoples Volunteer Forces encircled and attempted to overrun the U.S. position. During this series of attacks, Faiths commander went missing, and Faith assumed command of the 31st RCT. As the battle continued, the 31st RCT, which came to be known as Task Force Faith was forced to withdraw south along Route 5 to a more de fensible position. During the withdrawal, Faith continuously rallied his troops, and personally led an assault on a CPVF position. Records compiled after the battle of the Chosin Res ervoir, to include eyewit ness reports from survivors of the battle, indicated that Faith was seriously injured by shrapnel on Dec. 1, 1950, and subsequently died from those injuries on Dec. 2. His body was not recovered by U.S. forces at that time. Faith was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor the Unit ed States highest military honor, for personal acts of exceptional valor during the battle. In 2004, a joint U.S. and Democratic Peoples Repub lic of North Korea team sur veyed the area where Faith was last seen. His remains were located and returned to the U.S. for identication. To identify Faiths remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identication Labora tory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identi cation tools, such as dental comparison. ey also used mitochondrial DNA, which matched Faiths brother. More than 7,900 Ameri cans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Missile defenders pre paring for the deploy ment of the Terminal High Altitude Air De fense System to Guam are ready for the mission, the Army general at their home station reported, noting his full condence in the ability of U.S. air defense systems to protect against North Korean missiles. We dont know the duration of the deployment, but what we do know is that they are ready, Army Maj. Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, commander of the 1st Ar mored Division and Fort Bliss, Texas, said April 5 during a news confer ence at the fort. e Defense Depart ment announced ear lier its plans to deploy a THAAD system to Guam as a precautionary move to strengthen the regional defense posture against the North Korean regional ballistic missile threat. All three of the Armys THAAD batteries, part of the 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command, are based at Fort Bliss. e THAAD system is a land-based missile defense system that includes a truck-mounted launcher, a complement of interceptor missiles, an AN/TPY-2 tracking ra dar and an integrated re control system. Once deployed, the THAAD system will work in tandem with other missile defense systems in the region to provide multi-tiered protection, Pittard explained. Aegis cruisers and other air defense systems will provide lower-level cover age. Patriot missiles and other systems will pro vide defenses at slightly higher altitudes. e THADD system operates at the next level, capable of shooting down short-, mediumand intermediate-range ballistic missiles in their ter minal phase. e THADD interceptors use a hit-tokill approach, relying on the kinetic energy of the impact to destroy the in coming missile. ese layered air de fenses could take out a missile launched by North Korea fairly quickly, Pittard said. We are very condent of that, he added. Missiles bound for Guam 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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is so much greater than the very small risk from vaccination. For instance, the disease diphtheria has a one in 20 risk of death, while the DTaP vaccine, which prevents diphtheria, tetanus and pertus sis, has no known risk of death and a one in 1,000 risk of continuous crying followed by full recovery. Some vaccine-prevent able diseases, like pertus sis (whooping cough) and chickenpox, remain common in the U.S. Other diseases prevent ed by vaccines are no lon ger common in this coun try because of vaccines. However, if vaccination stopped or dropped o, the few cases in the U.S. could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases. Vaccines reduce the risk of infection by working with the bodys natural defenses to help it safely develop immunity to dis ease. Vaccines imitate an infection, but dont cause illness. Vaccines do cause the same immune re sponse as a real infection, so the body can ght dis ease if exposed in the fu ture. Sometimes, after get ting a vaccine, the imitation infection can cause minor symptoms, such as mild fever. is is normal and expected as the body builds immunity. Immunization is one of the most important things a parent can do to protect their childrens health. Walk-in to Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays immunizations clinic 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday or call (912) 573-8250. Find out more at www. cdc.gov/vaccines. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population, 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families, more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www. facebook/NavalHospi talJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at you tube.com/uder/Naval HospitalJax Sign up for e-mail up dates at nhjaxconnect@ med.navy.mil. e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Put ting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 573-8475. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years or older. Games are 5-v-5, best of three games and double elimination. Maximum 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sun days at 1 p.m. with WreckIt-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be avail able for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 Baby MWR Sports 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation showing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 5734564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and cor porate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. MWR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 9

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I wanted to ask a question that wives, children and even military members could answer, so this week I asked what the top five songs are on your playlist, iPod or even the top five songs you hear on the radio. After asking this question, I realized that I didnt have just five favorite songs, but I chose five songs by favor ite artists of mine U2s New Years Day, The Beatles Day in the Life, Marvin Gayes Mercy Me Metallicas Sanitarium and Eric B. and Rakims Follow the Leader. Jennifer Beauchamp Subway St. Marys The Fray You Found Me, Sublime Bad Finger, The Doors Love Me Two Times, Rhianna Live Your Life, Linkin Park What Ive Done. Emily Musser Family member Cocoa Beach, Fla. Jason Mraz Im Yours, Taylor Swift White Horse, Kelly Clarkson Sucks Without You Here, Stone Sour Through Glass, Radio Head Creep. CS2 David Caperus USS Alaska Rochester, N.Y. Various artists Rocky IV montage, O.A.R. Crazy Game of Poker, Van Halen Right Now, Elvis Presley Hound Dog, Eddie Money Take Me Home Tonight. MA3 Marcus Hill Kings Bay Security Warner Robins Gucci Mane Photo Shoot Gucci Mane Bricks, Jamie Foxx Alcohol, Busta Rhymes Hustler Anthem, Soulja Boy Hey You There. Sandra Paneczko Navy Exchange Bristol, Conn. Taylor Swift White Horse Lee Ann Womack Last Call, Alan Jackson Small Town Southern Man Jason Aldean Shes Country, Kenny Chesney Everybody Goes To Heaven. Katie Poche Family member Baton Rouge, La. Paramore Decode, Linkin Park Leave Out All The Rest, Miley Cyrus Seven Things, Blue Foundation Eyes on Fire, Flo Rida Right Round. Up eriscope with MC1 Joe Sabo Classic April 16, 2009 e KA-BAR ghting knife has long been associated with the United States Marine Corps. Since World War II, the two have hardly been separated. According to the ocial KA-BAR Web site, www.ka-bar.com, legend has it that the name KA-BAR originated from a letter to the Union Cutlery Company from a nameless fur trapper in the early 1920s. In the letter, the fur trapper wrote, in almost illegible handwriting, that when his rie jammed, he used his knife to kill the bear, though all that was legible of his writing was K A BAR. e knife company is said to have been so honored by this testimonial that they used the term KA-BAR as their ocial trademark. e Marine Corps made its own mark on the now famous ghting blade in the 1940s. According to the KA-BAR Web site, af ter the start of World War II, KA-BAR sub mitted a ghting/utility knife to the Marine Corps Quartermaster Department. e company and the Marine Corps worked together to improve upon an al ready quality knife. After revising the knife to suit the Ma rine Corps hand-to-hand ghting needs, they developed what we now think of as the KA-BAR ghting/utility knife. e KA-BAR is a quintessential part of the Marine Corps and its legacy, said Sgt. KA-BAR a Corps icon THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 11

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$153 billion VA request aims to boost care President Barack Obama April 10 proposed a $152.7 billion Veterans Aairs Department bud get for scal year 2014, a 10.2 percent increase over scal 2013 funding that will support VAs goals to expand access to health care and other benets, eliminate the disability claims backlog, and end homelessness among vet erans, VA officials said. The budget request includes $66.5 billion in discre tionary spend ing, largely for health care, and $86.1 billion for mandatory programs, mostly disability compensation and pensions for veterans. is budget will have a positive impact on the lives of veterans, their families and survivors for generations to come, VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki said. e president believes in veterans and their families and believes in providing them the care and benets theyve earned and deserve. e $66.5 billion total in discretionary spending includes about $3.1 bil lion in collections from health insurers and vet eran copayments in addition to the $63.5 billion in discretionary funding announced last week. VAs commitment to veterans spans generations, Shinseki added. From the men and wom en of the greatest genera tion to the veterans who have returned from Iraq and those returning from Afghanistan, VA will make sure our benets are use ful and accessible. VA operates the largest integrated health care sys tem in the country, with nearly 9 million enrollees, and the eighth-largest life insurance program. e department pro vides monthly disability pay, pensions and survivors payments to more than 4 million people as well as education assis tance to 1 million students and mortgage guarantees to 1.5 million homeowners. VA also has the larg est cemetery system in the nation. With a medical care budget request of $54.6 billion, VA is positioned to provide care to 6.5 mil lion veterans in the s cal year beginning Oct. 1. e patient total includes 675,000 people whose military service began af ter Sept. 11, 2001. Major spending categories within the health care budget request are: $6.9 billion for mental health; $4.1 billion for health care for Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn; $2.5 billion for pros thetics; $601 million for spinal cord injuries; $246 million for trau matic brain injuries; $230 million for read justment counseling; and $7.6 billion for longterm care. e proposed budget would ensure that care and other benets are available to veterans when and where they need them, VA ocials said, noting that it includes: $460 million in home telehealth funding, which helps patients monitor chronic health care problems through innovative uses of the telephone, a 4.4 percent increase over the current year; $422 million for wom en-specic medical care, an increase of nearly 14 percent over the present level; $799 million for the activation of new and enhanced health care facilities; $16 million for the construction of three new national cemeteries; and $8.8 million for VetSuccess on Campus at 84 facilities, a program that helps Veterans transi tion to college life. e proposed budget provides for full imple mentation of VAs Trans formation Plan a series of people, process and technology initiatives in scal 2014. is plan, ocials said, will systematically reduce the claims backlog and reach Shinsekis 2015 goal of eliminating the backlog and processing all claims within 125 days with 98 percent accuracy. Major initiatives in the budget proposal invest $291 million to bring leading-edge technology to the claims backlog, including $136 million for the Vet erans Claims Intake Pro gram and $155 million for the next generation of the electronic claims process ing system, Veterans Ben ets Management System. A major strategic VA goal is to end homeless ness among veterans in 2015. e budget request tar gets $1.4 billion for programs to prevent or reduce homelessness, including: $300 million for Supportive Services for Veteran Families to pro mote housing stability; $278 million for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Aairs Supportive Housing program, known as HUD-VASH, wherein VA provides case man agement services for at-risk veterans and their families and HUD provides permanent hous ing through its Housing Choice Voucher program; and $250 million in grant and per diem payments that support temporary housing provided by community-based organi zations. In March, about 783,000 veterans were unem ployed, a gure that in cludes 207,000 unemployed post-9/11 veterans. e scal 2014 budget request proposes a Veter ans Job Corps, focused on investing in veterans skills and experience, putting tens of thousands of veter ans into civilian jobs. Budget features of this initiative include: $1 billion in manda tory funds to help unem ployed veterans; A target of putting 20,000 veterans to work within the next ve years in conservation, law enforcement and infra structure jobs on public lands; Developing back-towork programs for vet erans with other federal agencies, including the Interior and Agriculture departments, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Army Corps of Engineers; and Supporting jobproducing projects with contracts and grants with nonfederal organizations, such as states, nonprot organizations and private businesses. Other features of the ad ministrations scal 2014 VA budget request include $250 million to administer the VA-run system of na tional cemeteries, $3.7 billion for information technology, and $1.2 billion in construction, cemetery grants and extended care grants. Engine failure causes crash No one was injured when an F/A-18F Su per Hornet crashed into the water while operat ing near USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the North Arabian Sea, on April 8. Search and Rescue swimmers from an SH-60F of HS-5 Night Dippers recovered the two aircrew and safely delivered them back to the carrier. e two aircrew, from VFA-103 Jolly Rogers based in Virginia Beach, Va., safely ejected from their jet when it incurred an engine failure at 12:20 p.m. local time. Eisenhower is home ported in Norfolk, Va., and is on a scheduled deploy ment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater se curity cooperation eorts. is incident is under investigation. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp recently attended an announcement by the City of New London, Conn., and the National Coast Guard Museum Association to formally unveil the design and location for the proposed National Coast Guard Museum. As the oldest U.S. maritime service, and the only U.S. military service without a national museum, the National Coast Guard Museum will aord the public an oppor tunity to learn about the rich and notewor thy achievements of the men and women who forged the services history of the past 223 years. A video of the event, including the Commandants remarks regarding the importance of the National Coast Guard Museum, can be found on the New London Days Web site. James Coleman, Jr., chairman of the National Coast Guard Museum Associa tion Board, unveiled the plans. All I can say after so many years is Semper Paratus! he said. We are ready and eager to get this job done. Coleman also evoked the Museum As sociations mission, respect the past, en gage the present and look to the future. e Coast Guard has supported eorts to build a National Coast Guard Museum since the 1990s. e New London site designation and proposed design represent a critical rst step towards making the museum a reality. In a recent letter expressing gratitude to the National Coast Guard Museum Association members for their eorts, the commandant wrote the museum project is a tribute to those in the Long Blue Line who sacriced, during war and peace, since the founding of our Republic to protect and defend the United States of America. e museum the Coast Guard current ly has is tucked away on the grounds of the picturesque Coast Guard Academy. It contains artifacts that span the two hun dred and twenty-plus-year history of the service. Featuring everything from models of a series of early steamships to the 270foot cutter that plies the waters of today, the exquisite craftsmanship captures the changes in ship design over the last two hundred years. For gurehead bus and wood carv ers alike, the museum oers a small but choice collection of carvings. Of special value is the gurehead from the Coast Guards training ship Eagle. One of the largest gureheads dis played in an American museum, it hangs as if mounted on the bow of a ship. Cannon, paintings, uniforms, and medals round out the displays. A stroll through the grounds of the Academy, watching the ag raising and lowering, attending a chapel service, reading the memorials in the park over looking the ames River, and, when available, walking the decks of barque Eagle and reviewing the Corps of Cadets, immerse those who come to the Acad emy in the history of the U.S. Coast Guard and its predecessors: the Life Saving Ser vice, the Steamboat Inspection Service, the Lighthouse Establishment, and the Revenue Cutter Service. www.uscg.mil contributed to this re port. National Coast Guard Museum plan unveiled Marines and Sailors with III Marine Expeditionary Force returned to Okinawa following the conclusion of the Nepal humanitarian assistance and disaster relief tabletop exercise. e purpose of the exer cise, conducted recently was to improve III MEFs ability to respond to an HADR scenario in Nepal through coordination and planning with the govern ment of Nepal, U.S. De partments of Defense and State, international and national agencies, and multinational parties. Recognizing the on going earthquake risk, we continue to emphasize preparation and en hance interoperability to build U.S. and Nepalese response capacity, said Col. Gregory Winston, the defense attach with the U.S. Embassy Katmandu, Nepal. Members of the National Society for Earth quake Technology-Nepal escorted Marines, sailors, soldiers and airmen with III MEF, U.S. Army Pacic and Pacic Air Forces on a vulnerability tour and earthquake walk through Katmandu. e purpose of the tour was to help participants identify key earthquake vulnerabilities in Katman du and existing resources available in the event of a disaster and familiarize themselves with typical features of construction in the area. Following the tour, ex ercise participants spent four days discussing, plan ning and preparing for an earthquake, altogether and in smaller groups based around functional areas and specialties. e nal portion of the exercise saw participants use the knowledge gained and relationships built throughout the week to conduct a one-day earth quake simulation exercise. is one-day simula tion involved a variety of earthquake scenarios pre sented to the group. Participants discussed and presented resources they could provide based on the scenario and how they would plan and work together with other organizations to mitigate and solve the presented prob lem. Lt. Gen. Nepal Chand, the chief of general sta of the Nepalese Army, and Peter Bodde, the U.S. am bassador to Nepal, attend ed presentations and the closing ceremony along with various government of Nepal and the Nepalese Army leaders. Coordination that is done now, in advance of an earthquake, will pay immeasurable dividends later in the form of time and lives saved, Bodde said. e relationships you forged this week will put us several steps ahead when an earthquake oc curs. e plans and prepa rations you have discussed together on paper must be put into action. Following the closing ceremony, Col. John A. Ostrowski, the chief of sta for 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, III MEF, and Chand exchanged gifts and participants from both sides attended a friendship event. III MEF is scheduled to return to Nepal later in 2013 to participate in a eld training exercise to further test and rene plans and practices dis cussed during the tabletop exercise. e invaluable inputs you have contributed while discussing daily is sues during the course of this exercise will certain ly contribute to a better HADR response in your respective elds, Chand said. I sincerely thank you for your active partici pation during the exercise, which not only helped you to reach a common un derstanding, but helped you formulate recommen dations, which are certain to aid in saving lives and mitigating human suer ing during an earthquake.Corps goes to Katmandu Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Centers Health Promotion and Wellness campaign announced the launch of its Reproductive and Sexual Health program Apr. 11. e sub-campaign is part of a Fleet-wide eort to encourage Sailors, Marines, their families and health educators to access resources about preventing sexually transmit ted infections, like HIV, and unin tended pregnancies. ese prevention strategies aim to increase the health and readiness of the Navy and Marine Corps forces. e timing of the announce ment is aligned with NMCPHCs Sexual Health Month and the Center for Disease Control and Preven tions Sexually Transmitted Disease Awareness Month. April is NMCPHC Sexual Health Month, an opportunity for every command to help their shipmates chart a safe course with the free, easy-to-use materials in our April Health Promotion Toolbox, said Michael R. Bob MacDonald, who is NMCPHCs Public Health Educa tor. NMCPHCs Sexual Health and Responsibility Program is the cor nerstone of the Reproductive and Sexual Health sub-campaign. According to MacDonald, SHARP is an eort to create a cultural norm within the Navy and Marine Corps in which sexual health is encour aged, supported and expected. SHARP aims to reduce the occur rence of STIs, including HIV, and unplanned pregnancies among Sail ors, Marines and their families to levels specied in selected Healthy People 2020 Objectives. Practical tools, educational resources and prevention strategies are available through the SHARP sub-campaign Web site, including best practices for preventing STIs and HIV, and information about long-acting reversible contraceptives, such as birth control implants and intrauterine devices, to help Sailors and Marines navigate family planning. To access and download Reproductive and Sexual Health materials visit: www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/repor ductive-sexual-health/Pages/repro ductive-sexual-health.aspx. e Reproductive and Sexual Health sub-campaign is part of the NMCPHCs HPW Campaign, which provides innovative and evidencebased health promotion and well ness programs and services that facilitate readiness and resilience, prevent illness and injury, hasten re covery and promote lifelong healthy behaviors and lifestyles. HPW aligns with the 21st Cen tury Sailor and Marine Initiative, a set of objectives and policies across a spectrum of wellness, that maximizes each Sailors and Marines personal readiness to hone the most eective combat force in the history of the Department of the Navy; as well as Operation Live Well, a De fense Department campaign target ing service members, veterans and military operational leaders encour aging them to live healthy and active lifestyles. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible ben eciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines world wide, providing critical mission sup port aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld. Follow the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center on Facebook for the latest news and updates on health promotion and wellness.Center starts sexual health campaignCarlos Ruiz, martial arts instructor trainer at the Camp Geiger Martial Arts Instructors Course train ing facility. Since World War II, Marines have gone into combative engagements with a KA-BAR at their side. Its part of who we are. e knife was so popu lar with Marines due to its quality and performance that it was unocially reactivated during the Ko rean, Vietnamese, Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom conicts. e KA-BAR is an ex cellent ghting knife, said Ruiz. In my opinion it is the best ghting knife the Marine Corps has ever had. Its not too big or too small. e blade is just long enough without being unruly. And it can stay incredibly sharp. Its also extremely versatile. You can do a lot of things with it, but its still rst and foremost a ghting knife.KA-BAR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 13

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Navy Fitness launched StayFit!, a tness newslet ter promoting tness as fun for Sailors and their families, April 8. e newsletter will be monthly and includes a monthly workout. We really wanted to get away from the focus of t ness only to support the physical readiness tests, said Lt. Cmdr. Austin La tour, an exercise physiologist with the Navy Physical Readiness Oce. Fitness, exercise, just biking with your family should be about fun and being ac tive. If you are active and are watchful about what you eat, the tness test will take care of itself. e workout will include a group of exercises that will focus on an area of tness,. Well have a link that explains the workout and then weve named each workout after an in dividual in the Navy who has shown perseverance or is historical, like a pris oner of war or leader in his or her community. e newsletter also will highlight commands that exemplify taking tness beyond the twice annual PRT and mandatory work out time. We want to highlight commands and leadership who show that spending time together building that sense of community in an active way makes them a stronger, better unit, beyond just meeting a re quirement, Latour said. e newsletter will be available on the www.npc. navy.mil Web site under the Physical Readiness tab. StayFit! promotes tness e Navy has cancelled the remaining 2013 performances of its Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. e squadron will continue to train to maintain ying prociency until further notice at its home station in Pen sacola, Fla. Recognizing budget realities, cur rent Defense policy states that out reach events can only be supported with local assets at no cost to the gov ernment. is is one of many steps the Navy is taking to ensure resources are in place to support forces operating for ward now and those training to relieve them. e Navy believes there is value in demonstrating the professionalism and capabilities of our Navy and Marine Corps Naval Aviation team, thus inspir ing future generations of Sailors and Marines. e Navy intends to continue aerial demonstrations in the future as the budget situation permits.Navy Blue Angel shows grounded by budget 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Navy College information e Naval School of Explosive Ordnance Dis posal here, held a memo rial dedication ceremony at the Boatman Advanced EOD Training Facility April 2. e dedication served in recognizing those who served in Combined Joint Task Force Troy, Iraq, and honoring Explosive Ordnance Disposal tech nicians who made the ultimate sacrice during Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. is memorial is dedi cated to remembering all those who served in Troy during a decade of irregular combat and counter insurgency operations, said Capt. Joseph Pola nin, commanding ocer of NAVSCOLEOD. eir unsurpassed commit ment, tireless dedication, and bold vision made the idea of a counter-IED task force a vibrant reality. at is what Troy was all about. It evolved rapidly to continually defeat the en emys weapon of choice, the IED. It succeeded due to good people sacricing much and because just and worthy causes were pursued with tenacity and courage. CJTF Troy was estab lished in 2005 as the rst operational counter-IED task force in U.S. military history. It was staed by joint service EOD techni cians and diverse subject matter experts to integrate U.S. and multinational counter-IED capabilities, to protect U.S. and coali tion forces, and to advise and assist Iraqi security forces. CJTF Paladin is a similar task force in Afghanistan. CJTF Troy provided counter-IED expertise and support to U.S. forces through training, recom mending materiel solutions, and weapons technical intelligence col lection and exploitation to defeat IED networks, said Capt. Edward Eidson, commander of CJTF Troy from Dec. 2010 to Sept. 2011 and current com mander of EOD Group One. EOD dedicates new memorial THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Active and retired Sailors paid trib ute to 129 Navy and civilian technicians during a 50th anniversary commemor tion ceremony aboard Naval Base Kit sap Bangor, April 10, to honor those who perished aboard attack submarine USS resher (SSN 593) in 1963. We gather today to remember the men of the resher, said Submarine Squadron 17 Command Master Chief Lance Meord. resher was commissioned in August 1961, and built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, as the rst in her class of 3,700-ton nuclear-powered attack submarines. e technology of that day allowed her to be a fast, quiet, deep-diving ves sel. resher completed overhaul and began testing her systems participating in post-overhaul sea trials April 10, 1963. Accompanied by the submarine rescue ship Skylark (ASR 20), resher oper ated in the Atlantic Ocean more than 200 miles east of Cape Cod, Mass., where it started deep-diving tests. Fifty years ago [129] of our Sailors left port and didnt return, said Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, commander, Submarine Group 9. We gather to honor them today. As we reect and commem orate these [129] Sailors, we take with us the lessons learned on that fateful day. As resher proceeded upon the deepdiving test, Skylark started receiving gar bled communications from the resher indicating trouble. resher sank o the coast of Massachusetts during that deepdiving test, making it the rst nuclearpowered submarine lost at sea and the largest loss of life in the submarine forces history. May we never forget our friends on the resher, said Cmdr. Steven Orren, NBK Bangor chaplain. May we serve our nation with renewed strength thanks to the resher and her crew. After the loss of the resher the Navy established the Submarine Safety pro gram, which has become a worldwide model for safety and quality assurance. By imposing a strict quality control process and material control requirements throughout a submarines service life, SUBSAFE helps to ensure the safety of the crew members, and events like the resher are not repeated. e ceremony meant a lot, said Steve Corcoran, vice commander, Submarine Veterans Bremerton Base. Its important for us to honor our sub group members. It wasnt an option for us to come out and support. We had to be here. Kittery, Maine, the nal homeport of USS resher, will dedicate a 129-foot agpole in Memorial Circle on April 7, 2013. e agpole height will serve as a permanent reminder of the 129 men who died that morning, ensuring they will for ever be honored in and around the town where resher was built and homeport ed. Kitsap has memorial service for resher Naval Air Station Whidbey Is lands recycling facility held its 17th annual Dumpster Dive, April 10. e dumpster dive is an opportu nity to educate Sailors by allowing them to see what waste is thrown out around the community, said Mi chael Barenburg, NASWIs environ mental services supervisor. We are just trying to change the perspective on how our community looks at waste, Barenburg said. When trash is collected through out the community, it is brought to the recycling center where volun teers get hands-on experience by sorting it to determine how much waste can be recycled. is should aect people who are part of the event and help them realize how they can help the environment, Barenburg said. As a community, we will get a shift in thinking what we can reuse, recycle, or throw away. More than 30 Sailors assigned to NASWI and tenant commands par ticipated in the dumpster dive. I came to learn about the recy cling process and to see what I can recycle at my home, said Yeoman 3rd Class Yasenia Barraza, assigned to NASWI. At home I have a full trash can every week and I know I can cut down on the waste. e Department of the Navy Earth Day theme for 2013 is Global Reach Local Action. e theme is meant to encourage Sailors, Marines, DoD civilian employees and their fam ily members to take local action to show the Navys dedication to pro tecting the environment. Rus Hawkins, a truck operator at Navy Whidbey Recycle, said that the dumpster dive is a great way to in crease awareness of neighborhood recycling programs. e Navy mandates we recycle, Hawkins said. So we show the Sail ors what is recyclable and they can take back that education to their commands. roughout the months of April and May, commands within Navy Region Northwest will be partici pating in various Earth Day related events like local clean-up projects. Navy and Marine Corps com mands ocially celebrate Earth Day April 22. Earth Day ocially started April 22, 1970.Whidbey Island stresses recyclingWe were also the rst Navy headquarters to act as the core sta for the Joint Task Force. CJTF Troy was disestab lished on Sept. 1, 2011. EOD Technicians from all four services left Troy to serve at other commands and stas where they continue to defeat IEDs and deter emerging threats from terrorists, violent ex tremists, or other poten tial adversaries across the globe. Eidson noted that due directly to their eorts, the enduring concept of a counter-IED task force is now part of joint doctrine. Regardless of our ser vice specialties, collec tively, our weapon system is our mind and our body, Eidson said. We equip the man instead of manning equipment and our success is dependent on our ability to out-think our opponent. At the in dividual level, that means we must succeed every time. Our enemy only has to succeed once. Builder 1st Class Don ald Wintersteen was the primary force behind the construction of the dis play case that surrounds the items from the original memorial at CJTF Troy in Baghdad, Iraq, which in cludes boots, a helmet, a demilitarized M-16 rie, and dog tags from each of the fallen EOD Techni cians that hang from the grip of the rie. From planning the dis play case to the building and staining, I spent more than 100 hours on it, Win tersteen said. Ive been building things like this for the past 20 years. It was an honor doing this and as I set up the display, I read the names on each set of dog tags as I hung them on the rie. e CJTF Troy memorial will be on permanent dis play at the Boatman AEOD training facility quarter deck for all students and visitors to see and serve as an enduring reminder for all to contemplate the tenacity and resolve of those who established Troy. NASSCOLEOD is home to the Advanced Improvised Explosive Device Disposal course, which teaches advanced tactics, techniques, and procedures to experienced joint service EOD technicians and select government personnel. NAVSCOLEOD is also home to the EOD Memo rial in Niceville, Fla., dedicated to all EOD service members killed in action since 1941. EOD

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 17 An Army chaplain, Capt. Emil J. Kapaun, was post humously awarded the Medal of Honor, April 11, for his actions leading up to his capture as a prison er of war in North Korea. President Barack Obama presented the medal to Kapauns neph ew, Ray Kapaun, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. Ray was joined by oth er family members and veterans of the Korean War who served with Ka paun. Kapaun was or dained a priest in 1940, and served under the Ro man Catholic Diocese of Wichita in Pilsen, Kan. In 1944, he began serv ing as an Army chaplain. In 1993, Kapaun was named a Servant of God by the Vatican, and is cur rently a candidate for sainthood. During the Medal of Honor ceremony, Obama described Kapauns acts of courage and compassion. When commanders ordered an evacuation, he chose to stay and tend to their wounds, Obama said. When the enemy broke through and there was combat hand-tohand, he carried on, com forting the injured and the dying, oering them some measure of peace before they left this Earth. When enemy forces bore down, it seemed like the end. Father Kapaun spotted a wounded Chinese ocer. He pleaded with (him) and convinced him to call out to his fellow Chinese. e shooting stopped, and they negotiated a safe surrender, saving those American lives. en as Father Kapaun was being led away, he saw another American, wounded, unable to walk, lying in a ditch, defense less. An enemy soldier was standing over him, rie aimed at his head ready to shoot. Father Kapaun pushed the enemy soldier aside. And then as the enemy soldier watched, stunned, Father Kapaun carried that wounded American away. is is the battle we honor today. An American Soldier who didnt re a gun, but who wielded the mightiest weapon of all, the love for his brothers, so pure, that he was willing to die so they might live. He carried that wounded Soldier for four miles on the death march and when Father Kapaun grew tired, hed help the wounded Soldier hop on one leg. When other prisoners stumbled, he picked them up. When they wanted to quit, knowing stragglers would be shot, he begged them to keep walking. e president then when on to describe how Kapaun cared for the Sol diers right up until the time of his death. Obama then presented the Medal of Honor to Ray Kapaun, Father Kapauns nephew. ABOVE AND BEYOND Kapauns Medal of Hon or nomination is for con spicuous acts of gallantry and intrepidity, at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty, Nov. 1-2, 1950, during the Korean War. Among the documents and interviews within the nomination pack age, one of the narratives reads: As Chinese Com munist forces encircled (3rd Battalion, 8th Cav alry during the battle of Unsan,) Kapaun moved fearlessly from foxhole to foxhole under enemy di rect re in order to provide comfort and reassurance to the outnumbered Sol diers. When the Chinese commandos attacked the battalion command post, Kapaun and other mem bers of the headquarters withdrew 500 meters across a nearby river, but Kapaun re turned to help the wound ed, gather ing approxi mately 30 injured men into the relative protection of a Korean dugout. e narrative goes on to describe how the battal ion became entirely sur rounded by enemy forces. It recounts how Kapaun spent the next day, Nov. 2, repeatedly rescuing the wounded from no-mans land outside the perim eter. As the battalions posi tion became hopeless, Kapaun rejected several chances to escape, instead volunteering to stay behind and care for the wounded. At dusk, he made his way back to the dugout. Among the injured Americans was a wounded Chinese ocer, it contin ues. As Chinese infantry closed in on their position, Kapaun convinced him to negotiate for the safety of the injured Americans. e narrative then de scribes how, after Ka pauns capture, he inter vened to save the life of a fellow Soldier who was lying in a nearby ditch with a broken ankle and other injuries. As Chinese soldiers prepared to ex ecute the Soldier, Ka paun risked his own life by pushing the Chinese soldier aside thereby saving the Soldiers life. e narrative continues with other acts of bravery and charity, both dur ing the march north and throughout their ordeal at the prisoners of war camp. Kapaun died there, May 23, 1951. Many prisoners of war were inspired by Kapaun, including Mike Dowe, who at the time was a rst lieutenant. He recount ed how U.S. Soldiers ran out of ammunition in the Anju, North Korea, area in early November 1950, when wave after wave of Chinese Communist forc es launched a surprise at tack across the border into Korea. ousands of Soldiers were taken prisoner and were forced to march northward in what Dowe termed death marches. Soldiers who were too weak or injured to keep up were shot, he said. It was then that Dowe, who was a member of the 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, rst saw Kapaun carrying the wounded and encouraging others to do the same. e POWs eventually were taken to a valley near Pyoktong, near the Yalu River in northwest North Korea near the Chinese border. I dont know the name of that valley, but we called it the Kapaun Valley because that is where Father Kapaun instilled in us a will to live, he said. Kapaun tended to the wounded and encouraged people to share and help each other, Dowe said. He also snuck out of camp at night and stole food, which he would bring back and share with ev eryone. en, in January 1951, the Soldiers were moved to Pyoktong, along the Yalu River. e enlisted were located in a valley and the ocers were separated and placed on a hill, Dowe said. Turkish prisoners were co-located with the en listed. Conditions in the camps were miserable during winter 1950-1951, which Dowe said was one of the coldest ever in Ko rea. Temperatures then had dipped to minus 28F. Dowe said the Soldiers were still wearing their summer uniforms, because theyd been told they would be home by anksgiving 1950, not re alizing at the time that the Chinese would join the North Koreans in attack ing the United Nations forces. All of the trees in the area had been stripped away, but there was a wood fence around the of cers compound on the hill, Dowe said. Each morning, Kapaun got up before everyone else and went out into the subzero weather to col lect wood from that fence, he said. Kapaun would use that wood to heat wa ter for coee in a pan that he had fashioned from scrap metal. Dowe said he still has vivid recollections of that little guy with the beard and scraggly hat pulled over his ears, made from the sleeve of a sweater, bringing coee to everyone. You cant imagine how good that was to start the day o for us. At night, the men would pass the time telling stories be fore falling asleep, Dowe said. A favorite topic was de scribing the food theyd like to order once they got home. Some of the best stories were told by Father Ka paun, who described his mothers cooking back on the farm, in Kansas, Dowe said. Kapaun was always keeping the mens spirits up, he added. e chaplain continued to make nighttime forays outside the prison camp to the surrounding coun tryside, with the purpose of stealing food for the Sol diers in the camps. Dowe often accompanied him on what he termed ration runs. Sometimes they would raid a warehouse where 50 pound bags of millet and cracked corn were stored. Dowe said millet is like bird seed and very hard to digest. e two would rst distribute it to the en listed. Soon, Kapaun became known as the Great ief, Dowe said. He explained that the nick name was given to him, not just because he was so successful at stealing food, but also because it was learned that Kapaun prayed to Saint Dismas, who was the penitent thief crucied alongside Jesus, as described in the Bible. e Chinese often try to brainwash the POWs by lecturing them on the evils of capitalism and the virtues of a communist so ciety, Dowe said. Father Kapaun would rebut the lectures with intelligent responses that the Chinese found impos sible to counter, Dowe recalled. at would in furiate them. Some who resisted the lectures would be tortured or killed. We thought Father Kapaun would be killed as well. At one point, the guards took Kapaun away. We thought that was the end for him, Dowe said. en, a few days later they brought him back to camp. ey were absolutely afraid of him, Dowe said, explaining why he was returned. ere was an aura about the guy. He was fearless. He had a way of addressing people that was frank and straightfor ward. ey couldnt un derstand why he wasnt afraid like others. reats and intimidation had no eect on him. More than half of the prisoners died that win ter, Dowe said. ey of ten died at night and the Soldiers would drag the bodies outside. Every day there were burial details. Soldiers assigned to these details would carry the bodies about half a mile past the enlisted area in the valley and across the Yalu to an island where they would be buried. Father Kapaun always volunteered for burial de tails, Dowe said. Hed recover the clothing from the dead, wash it, and then provide clean cloth ing to the enlisted. Besides providing cloth ing to the Soldiers, Kapaun would dress their wounds, oer words of encourage ment and say prayers, Dowe said, adding that he did this despite being warned by the guards not to minister to the Soldiers. Despite warnings from the guards, Kapaun got up extra early on Easter Day 1950 to begin a special sunrise service. It would be his last Easter. It was a fantastic ser mon, Dowe recalled, say ing it was the most mo mentous event in his life. He said hymns were sung and the echoes carried. Soon, he said, POWs up and down the valley were joining in. It was absolutely amazing. ere were a few who claimed that Father Kapaun seemed to have a halo around him. e Chinese quickly arrived, but then became too afraid to stop the service, Dowe said. e week after the ser mon, Kapaun collapsed from a blood clot in his leg, Dowe said. ere were some American doctors in the camp who treated it and he was walking and eating again soon after. Kapaun then con tracted pneumonia. e military doctors took care of that as well, Dowe said. After Kapaun recovered, guards became upset that he hadnt died. ey pre pared to remove him to the death camp, a place where very sick prisoners were taken to die, and where no food or medical attention was given to them. When the guards came, we pushed them away, Dowe said. ey brought in troops with bayonets and threatened everyone if people didnt pick him up and carry him away. Father Kapaun told everyone to stop resisting and not to ght them on my behalf. I was in tears, he continued, his voice tinged with emotion. And then he turned to me and said Mike, dont cry. Im going where Ive always wanted to go. And when I get there, Ill be saying a prayer for all of you. After the death of Kapaun, some of the guards who spoke English cond ed to Dowe that they were afraid of the unconquer able spirit of a free man loyal only to his God and his country. After the war, which ended in 1953, Dowe was invited to testify to the committee involved in writing the POW Code of Conduct, which is still in eect today. Dowe said Kapaun had a strong in uence on him and he shared that with the com mittee, which emphasized the loyalty and keeping the faith aspects of the code. Father Kapaun instilled that kind of loyalty in others, enabling them to maintain their honor, self-respect and will to live, Dowe said. Ive seen over and over again that those who did not display that loyalty would invari ably give up and die, often within 24 hours. Dowe said Eisenhower gave him a personal com mendation for his contri bution to the committee. However, Dowe said the real credit should go to Kapaun, whom he cred its with saving the lives of hundreds of POWs, direct ly or indirectly. Following the war, Dowe went on to serve in the Army, retiring as a colonel in 1970 and then working as a defense contractor. He currently is a scientist at Raytheon. He said he prays to Kapaun every night, asking him for help and guid ance. And, he said, he knows Kapaun is in Heaven pray ing for him and his fellow POWs. Dowe said Kapaun had a positive impact on the many non-Catholics in the prison camp as well. He said the commander of the Turkish POWs told him as they were being liberated, I will pray to my God Allah for Father Kapaun. MOH posthumously awarded to chaplain

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18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013



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Budget request $155 bilNavy releases scal 2014 proposale Department of the Navy released April 10 its proposed $155.8 billion budget for scal year 2014. is budget is part of the $525 billion defense budget President Barack Obama submitted to Congress on the same day. Rear Adm. Joseph Mulloy, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed media at the Department of Defense budget press conference about the Navy and Marine Corps portion of the budget, which was a $4.2 billion decrease from last years baseline appropriation. So the bottom line (for military personnel), the Navys going to slow growth slightly over time. Weve pretty much reached the point where, to be able to operate with the force we have and to be able to properly man and train, we need these forces, Mulloy said. is years budget submission was guided by the CNOs tenants of warghting rst, operate forward and be ready. Mulloy said the Navy is funding our forces operating forward, providing money to maintain and train those units getting ready to deploy, and investing in the people, ships and technology of our future force. e budget includes a $49 billion request for operations and maintenance. is is an approximately three percent reduction, but it allows the Navy to maintain its commitment in the Middle East and the Western Pacic, consistent with the Defense Strategy. is years submission also supports readiness for our nextto-deploy ships and units who will be preparing for their deployments in FY14. e Navy has also increased its ship depot-level maintenance account to increase the scope and complexity of our mainte nance availabilities. e Navy has also requested $43.5B for ship, aircraft, weapons and other procure ment for programs including Babys health in spotlightNSB Branch Health Clinic doing its part for National Infant Immunization WeekNational Infant Immunization Week, sponsored by the World Health Organization, takes place from April 20 to 27. is annual observance seeks to improve the health of children age two and younger. Vaccines are particularly crucial for infants, who are most vulnerable to infectious diseases. Childhood immunizations protect against 14 diseases that can cause serious illness, disability or even death: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, diphtheria, haemophilus inuenza b (Hib), pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio, inuenza, measles, mumps, rotavirus, rubella, tetanus and chickenpox. U.S. vaccines are extremely safe. eyre regulated like any other medication and, in addition to that, theres a national tracking system for adverse eects, said Capt. Joseph McQuade, Naval Hospital Jacksonville director for public health and family medicine physician. And the risk of the disease Up Periscope Classic top-5 songs with Joe Sabo Page 11 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Tension up North Korea making world uneasy Page 6 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Gateway Inn honored Bi-Annual Crew Reunion April 18 to 21 at Kings Bay e USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) Association will be holding its Bi-Annual Crew Reunion at Kings Bay, April 18 to 21. e meetings will take place at the Springeld Inn & Suites. e main event of this gathering will be the super barbecue, which will be held at the Bancroft Sail Memorial at 1 p.m., Friday, April 19, right on the eld along side the Bancroft Sail Exhibit which is just outside the Franklin Gate to the Kings Bay base. e attendees of this reunion are former submarine Sailors from the various crew who manned the boat during its 27 years of service to the Navy. ere will crew members from the very rst crew, back in 1966 when it was commis sioned, and from the very last crew, in 1993, when it was decommis sioned. Eightyve former Bancroft Sailors are registered to attend the four-day event. When the boat was re-cycled, the sail section was brought to the NSB Kings Bay and a mockup of the submarine was constructed, with the actual sail on top, in 1999. A dedication ceremony was held in 2000, with some of its former crew present. Since then, a formal organization was formed and chartered, and we have re unions every other year. said Bill Badaluc ca, secretary of the USS George Bancroft SSBN 643 Association. e last time we were in Kings Bay was in 2003. USS George Bancro vets onboard ... stop by and meet the Sailors that went to sea on that machine to maintain the countrys first line of deterrent force ... Bill Badalucca USS George Bancroft Association secretary Kings Bay hotel earns Navys 3-star Zumwalt Award for excellenceNaval Submarine Base Kings Bay Navy Gateway Inn and Suites employees received the ree-Star Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt Award for excellence in housing and lodging management, during an awards ceremony and appreciation potluck luncheon March 27. Capt. Harvey Guey, commanding ofcer of NSB Kings Bay, presented the coveted award to the sta. Sta members also received with a certicate of appreciation for their hard work and dedication. Presenting the Zumwalt Award to such a hardworking and dedicated sta is an honor, Guey said. e sta works so hard to make every guest feel welcome and at home. I have received nothing but positive feedback for the quality of the facilities, services and customer support provided by NGIS Kings Bay. e Zumwalt Awards, named after the former Chief of Naval Operations, Adm.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase began April 11, and remains open until 5 a.m., April 23 for active-duty Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders nine to seven months from their projected rotation date. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with a January 2014 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a December 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a November 2013 PRD. If applicable, these Sailors with Fleet Ride-Perform to Serve approval may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is about 11 days, giving Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command prior to submitting applications before the application phase closes. Detailers ll all advertised activeduty billets each month using Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers always will attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst. However, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers must also follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. e Kings Bay Employer Committee has set a deadline of 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, for students who live in Camden County to apply for two $500 college scholarships. e funding for the scholarships will come from an endowment fund established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employment marketing representative at the Kings Bay Career Center. Under the endowment fund, the scholarships will be granted to graduating seniors, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited institution of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants must also be working part-time for a minimum of 15 hours per week. e scholarships are nonrenewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarships, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores, and a two-to-three page essay. e theme of the essay is how to use education and training to develop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Scholarship recipients will be selected by the employer committees scholarship subcommittee. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a scholarship subcommittee member, at rbaldwin@ camden.k12.ga.us or call her at (912) 729-4790. All documents must be submitted by the 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, deadline to be considered. Applications for the scholarships are available at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center, at 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys. For additional information, contact Faith Copeland-Pittman at the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS golf benefit April 26Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bays Four Man Scramble Golf Tournament to benet NMCRS has been rescheduled for 8:30 a.m., Friday, April 26, at NSB Kings Bay Trident Lakes Golf Course. Entry fee is $ 40 per person or $160 per team, which includes cart, green fee and lunch of hamburgers, hotdogs, chips and drink, plus there will be prizes for longest drive on No. 17, closest to the pin on No. 8 and 13 and the top nishing teams. Call or e-mail Kevin @ 573-8475/6 or kevin.doetch@navy. mil for team and individual sign-ups. Pointof-contact for the golf tournament is edward. groover@navy.mil.Flying models show April 20The Kings Bay RC Modelers First Annual Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 20, weather permitting, no rain date planned yet, at Oakwell RC Airfield at the end of Clarks Bluff and Oakwell Road. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for location, pictures and updates. Events included a full-scale ultralight fly-in and display, displays of a 1923 Ford T-Bucket, a 1936 Studebaker and RC planes. Flight demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. If turn out is good, there also will be a Night Flying Demonstration with mini LED Parachute drop at 9 p.m. that evening. Bring a chair and enjoy a bon-fire. Food and drink available on site.NMCRS seeks part-time nurseNavy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking a part-time Visiting Nurse at the oce in Kings Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach ing health info/providing resource information and support to Navy and Marine Corps families, including mom/babies, retirees and combat veterans. Current RN license from Georgia, cur rent CPR certication or ability to obtain within 3 months of employment, valid drivers license, current automobile insurance, good driving re cord and reliable transportation needed. Start ing annual salary is $20,515 plus benets. In terested parties may obtain an application and application addendum by visiting www.nmcrs. org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Of ce at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James Madison Road, Bldg. 1032.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Deadline for scholarships April 22 Employer Committee April PCS application phase open Naval Personnel As Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month kickedo, the recent Navy-wide Sexual Assault and Prevention-Fleet training for E6 and below Sailors recorded a 97 percent completion rate by April 9, highlighting the Navys continued focus on this critical issue. Following on the heels of Navys SAPR-F training, Aprils SAAPM serves as another part of the Navys campaign to stop sexual assault and promote a culture of respect and professionalism in the force. Overall performance by commands in completing the SAPRF training was superb, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Chief of Naval Personnel. While we still have some remaining Sailors to train, from the top down, our Navy has embraced the need to take a stand against this crime and take care of our shipmates. Helping our Sailors understand that they have not only the power, but the responsibility to step in and prevent assaults is a major step forward. e SAAPM Department of Defense eme is We own it. ...Well solve it ... together. is month provides another opportunity to emphasize our ongoing commitment to instill a climate that does not tolerate, condone or ignore sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault, Van Buskirk said. We have accomplished a great deal in the past year with our leadership and eet eorts, but we must remember that SAPR is an ongoing eort by everyone in the chain of command. e recent SAPR-F training has also been approved to serve as this years General Military Training for sexual assault awareness. Previous documentation of SAPR-F for E6 and below has been rolled over to automatically document completion of the FY13 SAPR GMT Lesson, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Refresher Training. Command E7 and above are encouraged to complete required annual SAPR GMT training during Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month and may use the revised SAPR-F Course Facilitation Guide to meet the FY-13 SAPR GMT requirement vice completing CPPD-GMT-SAPRRT-1.0. e revised SAPR-F training is not required for all E-7 and above, but is a convenient and highly encouraged method for them to complete the required SAPR GMT for the scal year, said Capt. William Marvel, SAPR Task Force chief of sta. It serves an additional benet of exposing them to the SAPR-F training that their E-6 and below personnel received. Naval Administrative Message 075/13 provides additional details and links to turn-key products to facilitate delivery of SAAPM messaging and events. ose products are located on the Navy Personnel Command SAPR Web site www.sapr.navy. mil. e revised SAPR-F course facilitation guide for E-7 and above can be downloaded from the SAPR-L/F training Web page 222. public.navy.mil/bupers-ncp/ support/sapr/pages/training. aspx or or from Navy Knowledge Online (select the leadership tab and scroll down the page to the SAPR training section). Sexual assault prevention is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative, which builds resiliency to hone the most combat-eective force in the history of the Department of the Navy.SAPR training completed in eet Navy Ed & Training

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Anger management seminar April 24Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a cou ple to get away from the distrac tions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communi cate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues facing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of onehour sessions walks participants through the practical and cre ative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a post-military job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financial ly stable, with at least one year Fleet & Family Support Center workshops April Sexual Assault Awareness Victims of crime have seen many dierences emerge over the last few years. In the past, victims rights were never considered. Most courtrooms were closed to them, their voices were not a part of the judicial process, and the need for understanding and information was ignored. Sexual assault victims were often blamed for their assault. Today, the resolve of victims, and those who serve them, has reaped positive results. e Victims Rights Discipline began in America more than two decades ago and included constitutional amendments for victims rights and an update to Department of Defense policies. Thank Your SAPR Advocate Day April 19 Wear Denim Day April 24 left before PRD from their commands. This train ing take place 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs represen tative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge pro gram should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be avail able for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Navy photos by MCCS Tony CasulloElmo R. Zumwalt, was established in 1974 to recognize commands that achieve the highest level of service standards. e accreditation program was established to signicantly improve customer service, nancial management, operations, facilities and the overall lodging experience for guests aboard naval facilities. Being awarded the Zumwalt award is a quite an honor and achievement, said Dennis Manacup, Kings Bay NGIS general manager. e NGIS Employee of the Year Awards for associate, housekeeper, supervisor and manager were also awarded at the ceremony. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites celebrates award

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 5 e second day of the 2013 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition, held at the Gaylord National Harbor Resort and Convention Center April 9, focused on developing scally responsible technological solutions. One such development will see a solid-state laser aboard a ship for the rst time in scal year 2014. Our directed energy initiatives, and specically the solid-state laser, are among our highest priority science and technology programs, said Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, chief of naval research. e solid-state laser program is central to our commitment to quickly deliver advanced capabilities to forward-deployed forces. is capability provides a tremendously aordable answer to the costly problem of defending against asymmetric threats, and that kind of innovative approach is crucial in a scally constrained environment. e announcement to deploy the laser onboard USS Ponce (AFSB 15) comes as Navy researchers continue to make signicant progress on directed energy weapons, allowing the service to deploy a laser weapon on a Navy ship two years ahead of schedule. e at-sea demonstration in FY 14 is part of a wider portfolio of near-term Navy directed energy programs that promise rapid elding, demonstration and prototyping eorts for shipboard, airborne and ground systems. Our conservative data tells us a shot of directed energy costs under $1, Klunder said. Compare that to the hundreds of thousands of dollars it costs to re a missile, and you can begin to see the merits of this capability. e Oce of Naval Research and Naval Sea Systems Command recently performed demonstrations of highenergy lasers aboard a moving surface combatant ship, as well as against remotely piloted aircraft. rough careful planning of such demonstrations and by leveraging investments made through other Department of Defense agencies, researchers have been able to increase the ruggedness, power and beam quality of lasers, more than doubling the range of the weapons. Video of the demonstration of the high-energy laser aboard a moving surface combatant ship and against remotely piloted aircraft can be seen at youtube.OmoldXlwKYO. Other developments displayed at the expo included an unmanned aerial system fueled by hydrogen fuel cells and an electro-magnetic aircraft launch system. We are part of the new EMALS program, said Gina Andersen, marketing and communications manager, Kato Engineering. We do power generation for the naval ships and whether its power generation or electromechanical solutions, we can provide it. Its a greener option. While the barbecue is for crewmembers and senior sta ocers from the base, the sail exhibit always is open to the public. You can always stop by and meet the Sailors that went to sea on that machine to maintain the countrys rst line of deterrent force during the cold war years. With the advent of the Ohio-class submarines and the end of the Cold War, the older Franklinclass submarines were no longer needed and Bancroft was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Alerted to Bancrofts imminent destruction, a grassroots eort on the part of St. Marys Submarine Museum, a local submarine veterans organization, former Bancroft crew members and local businesses raised the necessary funding to bring the submarines sail to Kings Bay and to construct the exhibit. Saved from the recycling bin, the sail was brought to Kings Bay in 1998 for use in an exhibit honoring the Navys submarine service centennial. From October 1999 to March 2000, members of Construction Battalion Unit 412 cleared and grubbed 500 tons of soil and trees to construct the footings, foundation and lighting necessary for the exhibit. e Seabees molded the earth to resemble a submarine hull, allowing a contractor to then spray the earthen hull with a thick coat of black gunite. e display readied for dedication on April 7, 2000, became the centerpiece for Kings Bays celebration of the submarine forces 100th anniversary. More than 2,000 people from the local area and across the country joined the dedication as Bancroft, one of the for Freedom, came alive once again. e Bancroft Sail Exhibit is located in front of the main entrance to the base, at the intersection of St. Marys Road and Georgia State Highway Spur 40. USS George Bancroft (SSBN 643) was the fourth Navy ship of that name. It displaced 7,320 tons on the surface and 8,250 tons submerged. Bancroft was 425 feet in length and 33 feet at the beam, and carried 16 Polaris missiles. Bancroft was later converted to carry the Trident C-4 ballistic missile. In comparison, todays Ohio class submarines have a displacement of 16,764 tons surfaced and 18,750 ton submerged, are 560 feet in length and 42 feet at the beam, carrying 24 Trident II D-5 ballistic missiles. George Bancroft, 18001891, was appointed Secretary of the Navy in President James K. Polks cabinet in 1844. Although holding the post for only 18 months, he made his tenure memorable by establishing the Naval Academy at Annapolis and encouraging the growth and importance of the Naval Observatory. In 1845, as acting Secretary of War he signed the order causing Gen. Zachary Taylor to cross into Mexico leading directly to the Mexican War. As Secretary of the Navy he issued the orders to Commodore Sloat on the Pacic Coast which brought about the occupation of San Francisco and other California cities. Naval History and Heritage Command and Commander, Navy Installations Command contributed to this report. e Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alabama (SSBN 731) returned home to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor April 3, concluding a 108-day strategic deterrent patrol by its Gold Crew, one of the longest patrols in recent history for a Bangor-based SSBN. Words cannot possibly describe the joy and happiness I have to be home, said ST3 Loren Dilworth, who received the happiest of welcome-home presents, a rst look at his 12-day-old son, born during the nal days of Alabamas patrol. Dilworth and ET3 Renan Cardenas, another new father, were among the rst Gold Crew members welcomed at Bangor Plaza by a boisterous homecoming, courtesy of family members who hadnt seen their Sailors since before Christmas. Im ready for him to be home, said Cardenas wife, Jennifer, who was nally able to introduce her husband to their one-month-old son. I was ready weeks ago. Alabama, which departed Bangor Dec. 17, became the rst SSBN based at Bangor to complete a deterrent patrol of 100 days or more since 2010, when the Blue Crew of USS Maine (SSBN 741) conducted a 105-day patrol. As a result, members of the Gold Crew will be eligible to wear the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, presented to Sailors who deploy away from their home port for at least 90 days. Ive been in the Navy almost 19 years, and this was the longest length of time Ive spent at sea without setting foot on dry land, said Cmdr. Kevin Schultz, commanding ocer of the Gold Crew. is patrol was a testament to both the robustness of the superb design of our submarines and to the crews dedication and professional expertise to maintain the ship, x material issues that came up, and enable us to remain at sea providing Americas survivable strategic deterrent. e Gold Crew put its patrol time to good use, as 17 Sailors completed their submarine qualications while underway. By doing so, they earned the right to wear the coveted submariners dolphins. While the crew is glad to add a ribbon to their uniforms, the long patrol was stressful for both the crew and our families, Schultz said. Im very thankful for the love and support our families have provided that enabled us to accomplish our mission. Im very proud of my crew for the great work they did on this patrol. Its good to be home. e sixth of 18 Ohio-class SSBNs, Alabama is one of eight ballistic missile submarines homeported at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, providing the survivable leg of the nations strategic forces. Alabama ends long patrol Navy League hosts Air-Sea-Land Expo Joint Strike Fighter, Littoral Combat Ship, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, and P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Following last years budget for FY13, this budget includes cuts and other initiatives that will reduce planned spending across several years. e FY14 budget request does not reect the future uncertainty associated with the implementation of sequestration as it is submitted as part of the Presidents balanced decit reduction plan. BudgetBancro e Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, for the military community, continues to support victims and community agencies. e month of April is a time for people to remember and honor those who have been victims of sexual assault. is includes direct victims as well as secondary victims, such as friends and family of the victim, police/law enforcement, and victim advocates. Take a moment to think of how many people are aected by the crime of sexual assault each year. Always remember that courage and hope is at the core of every victim and every survivor. For more information on sexual assault or to contact a victim advocate, call SafeHelpline at (877) 995-524 or on-call Victim Advocate Kings Bay at (912) 674-6827 or log onto SafeHelpline.org. Aware

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With tensions on the Korean Peninsula reaching their highest level in the 60 years since the war there ended, the United States and South Korea are prepared to defend against a North Korean attack, should one come, the U.S. Pacic Command commander told Congress today. I am satised that we are ready today, Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III told the Senate Armed Services Committee. Locklear expressed confidence in the capabilities of U.S. and South Korean forces and their ability to intercept a North Korean ballistic missile if one is launched in the coming days, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has threatened. But expressing concern about any steps that could cause miscalculation and quickly escalate, Locklear said he would recommend such an action only after conrming where it was headed and to defend the homeland or a U.S. ally. e best thing we as militaries can do is to preserve the peace, [and] to get it back to peace so diplomacy can work, and we would hope that could be done in North Korea, he said. But it is a very dangerous situation. It is something we have to watch, and it could be quite volatile. North Korea dominated todays Senate hearing, originally scheduled to focus on Pacoms scal 2014 budget request. Army Gen. James D. urman, commander of United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea, had been scheduled to testify alongside Locklear, but remained in South Korea to deal with the situation there. Locklear recognized in his prepared remarks concerns about North Koreas nuclear and missile programs and its concentration of combat forces along the demilitarized zone. But particularly troubling, he said, has been North Koreas willingness to use tactics that could cause miscalculation and spin out of control into conict. ese provocations represent a clear and direct threat to U.S. national security and regional peace and stability, he said. Locklear said he felt condent that the allies have demonstrated to the North Korean leadership, as well as the American population, our ability and our willingness to defend our nation, to defend our people, to defend our allies and to defend our forward deployed forces. e admiral told the Senate panel he is satised with actions being taken in response to the North Korean threat, including a B-2 bomber ight over South Korea and the planned deployment of missile defenses to Guam. e B-2 ight during the regularly scheduled Foal Eagle exercise was a good opportunity for my forces in Pacom to coordinate with [U.S. Strategic Command], and for us to be able to demonstrate the capability, Locklear said. And I believe that it was visibly demonstrated [and] was done at the right time to indicate the capabilities that the United States has to ensure the defense of our allies and our homeland. In addition, two Navy ships with missile defense capabilities have been positioned closer to the peninsula, and the Defense Department announced last week that Terminal High Altitude Air Defense System assets he would deploy to Guam as a precautionary measure. Locklear told the panel he agreed with the Defense Department decision to delay a routine reliability test of a Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile in light of what he acknowledged as a particularly tenuous time. Asked by a committee member, Locklear acknowledged he wished China would play a larger role in helping to curb North Koreas provocations. I feel they could do more, he said. e North Korean situation is inuencing resourcing decisions at a time that sequestration is having a direct impact on near-term operational readiness, Locklear told the panel. Budget constraints have forced Pacom to prioritize its assets to ensure the most pressing problems are properly addressed with the right force levels and the right levels of readiness, he said. And today, that most pressing situation is what is happening on the peninsula in Korea. He lamented about budget impacts that will come to light over the longer term as overall readiness levels begin to decline. In some cases, he said, large-scale exercises designed to ensure future force readiness are being cancelled for lack of ight hours, transportation or funds to cover the fuel costs. e rebalance toward the Asia-Pacic region oers an opportunity to ensure the proper balance of capabilities there and to reemphasize the U.S. commitment to this vital part of the globe, Locklear said. He expressed concern, however, that sequestration and other budget shortfalls under the continuing appropriations resolution could undermine those eorts. We have been accepting additional risk in the Indo-AsiaPacic region for some time, Locklear told the panel. Our rebalance strategy is in place, and we are making progress. Implementing and sustaining the strategic rebalance will require long-term, sustained commitment and resources. Tension highest in Korea since wars end Faiths remains returnede Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Oce announced April 10 that a serviceman, who was unaccounted-for from the Korean War, has been identied and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Lt. Col. Don C. Faith Jr. of Washington, Ind., will be buried April 17, in Arlington National Cemetery. Faith was a veteran of World War II and went on to serve in the Korean War. In late 1950, Faiths 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, which was attached to the 31st Regimental Combat Team, was advancing along the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir, in North Korea. From Nov. 27 to Dec. 1, 1950, the Chinese Peoples Volunteer Forces encircled and attempted to overrun the U.S. position. During this series of attacks, Faiths commander went missing, and Faith assumed command of the 31st RCT. As the battle continued, the 31st RCT, which came to be known as Task Force Faith was forced to withdraw south along Route 5 to a more defensible position. During the withdrawal, Faith continuously rallied his troops, and personally led an assault on a CPVF position. Records compiled after the battle of the Chosin Reservoir, to include eyewitness reports from survivors of the battle, indicated that Faith was seriously injured by shrapnel on Dec. 1, 1950, and subsequently died from those injuries on Dec. 2. His body was not recovered by U.S. forces at that time. Faith was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor the United States highest military honor, for personal acts of exceptional valor during the battle. In 2004, a joint U.S. and Democratic Peoples Republic of North Korea team surveyed the area where Faith was last seen. His remains were located and returned to the U.S. for identication. To identify Faiths remains, scientists from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command and the Armed Forces DNA Identication Laboratory used circumstantial evidence and forensic identication tools, such as dental comparison. ey also used mitochondrial DNA, which matched Faiths brother. More than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Missile defenders preparing for the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Air Defense System to Guam are ready for the mission, the Army general at their home station reported, noting his full condence in the ability of U.S. air defense systems to protect against North Korean missiles. We dont know the duration of the deployment, but what we do know is that they are ready, Army Maj. Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, commander of the 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss, Texas, said April 5 during a news conference at the fort. e Defense Depart ment announced ear lier its plans to deploy a THAAD system to Guam as a precautionary move to strengthen the regional defense posture against the North Korean regional ballistic missile threat. All three of the Armys THAAD batteries, part of the 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command, are based at Fort Bliss. e THAAD system is a land-based missile defense system that includes a truck-mounted launcher, a complement of interceptor missiles, an AN/TPY-2 tracking radar and an integrated re control system. Once deployed, the THAAD system will work in tandem with other missile defense systems in the region to provide multi-tiered protection, Pittard explained. Aegis cruisers and other air defense systems will provide lower-level coverage. Patriot missiles and other systems will provide defenses at slightly higher altitudes. e THADD system operates at the next level, capable of shooting down short-, mediumand intermediate-range ballistic missiles in their ter minal phase. e THADD interceptors use a hit-tokill approach, relying on the kinetic energy of the impact to destroy the in coming missile. ese layered air defenses could take out a missile launched by North Korea fairly quickly, Pittard said. We are very condent of that, he added. Missiles bound for Guam 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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is so much greater than the very small risk from vaccination. For instance, the disease diphtheria has a one in 20 risk of death, while the DTaP vaccine, which prevents diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, has no known risk of death and a one in 1,000 risk of continuous crying followed by full recovery. Some vaccine-preventable diseases, like pertussis (whooping cough) and chickenpox, remain common in the U.S. Other diseases prevented by vaccines are no longer common in this country because of vaccines. However, if vaccination stopped or dropped o, the few cases in the U.S. could very quickly become tens or hundreds of thousands of cases. Vaccines reduce the risk of infection by working with the bodys natural defenses to help it safely develop immunity to disease. Vaccines imitate an infection, but dont cause illness. Vaccines do cause the same immune response as a real infection, so the body can ght disease if exposed in the future. Sometimes, after getting a vaccine, the imitation infection can cause minor symptoms, such as mild fever. is is normal and expected as the body builds immunity. Immunization is one of the most important things a parent can do to protect their childrens health. Walk-in to Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bays immunizations clinic 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday or call (912) 573-8250. Find out more at www. cdc.gov/vaccines. NBHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. Of NH Jacksonvilles patient population, 215,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families, more than 57,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To nd out more about NBHC Kings Bay, visit the command Web site at www.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www. facebook/NavalHospi talJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at youtube.com/uder/Naval HospitalJax Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@ med.navy.mil. e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Putting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 573-8475. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years or older. Games are 5-v-5, best of three games and double elimination. Maximum 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with WreckIt-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 Baby MWR Sports 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation showing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 5734564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 to adult. For more information, call (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and cor porate promotions. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. MWR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 9

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I wanted to ask a question that wives, children and even military members could answer, so this week I asked what the top five songs are on your playlist, iPod or even the top five songs you hear on the radio. After asking this question, I realized that I didnt have just five favorite songs, but I chose five songs by favor ite artists of mine U2s New Years Day, The Beatles Day in the Life, Marvin Gayes Mercy Me Metallicas Sanitarium and Eric B. and Rakims Follow the Leader. Jennifer Beauchamp Subway St. Marys The Fray You Found Me, Sublime Bad Finger, The Doors Love Me Two Times, Rhianna Live Your Life, Linkin Park What Ive Done. Emily Musser Family member Cocoa Beach, Fla. Jason Mraz Im Yours, Taylor Swift White Horse, Kelly Clarkson Sucks Without You Here, Stone Sour Through Glass, Radio Head Creep. CS2 David Caperus USS Alaska Rochester, N.Y. Various artists Rocky IV montage, O.A.R. Crazy Game of Poker, Van Halen Right Now, Elvis Presley Hound Dog, Eddie Money Take Me Home Tonight. MA3 Marcus Hill Kings Bay Security Warner Robins Gucci Mane Photo Shoot Gucci Mane Bricks, Jamie Foxx Alcohol, Busta Rhymes Hustler Anthem, Soulja Boy Hey You There. Sandra Paneczko Navy Exchange Bristol, Conn. Taylor Swift White Horse Lee Ann Womack Last Call, Alan Jackson Small Town Southern Man Jason Aldean Shes Country, Kenny Chesney Everybody Goes To Heaven. Katie Poche Family member Baton Rouge, La. Paramore Decode, Linkin Park Leave Out All The Rest, Miley Cyrus Seven Things, Blue Foundation Eyes on Fire, Flo Rida Right Round. Up eriscope with MC1 Joe Sabo Classic April 16, 2009 e KA-BAR ghting knife has long been associated with the United States Marine Corps. Since World War II, the two have hardly been separated. According to the ocial KA-BAR Web site, www.ka-bar.com, legend has it that the name KA-BAR originated from a letter to the Union Cutlery Company from a nameless fur trapper in the early 1920s. In the letter, the fur trapper wrote, in almost illegible handwriting, that when his rie jammed, he used his knife to kill the bear, though all that was legible of his writing was K A BAR. e knife company is said to have been so honored by this testimonial that they used the term KA-BAR as their ocial trademark. e Marine Corps made its own mark on the now famous ghting blade in the 1940s. According to the KA-BAR Web site, after the start of World War II, KA-BAR submitted a ghting/utility knife to the Marine Corps Quartermaster Department. e company and the Marine Corps worked together to improve upon an already quality knife. After revising the knife to suit the Marine Corps hand-to-hand ghting needs, they developed what we now think of as the KA-BAR ghting/utility knife. e KA-BAR is a quintessential part of the Marine Corps and its legacy, said Sgt. KA-BAR a Corps icon THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 11

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$153 billion VA request aims to boost care President Barack Obama April 10 proposed a $152.7 billion Veterans Aairs Department budget for scal year 2014, a 10.2 percent increase over scal 2013 funding that will support VAs goals to expand access to health care and other benets, eliminate the disability claims backlog, and end homelessness among veterans, VA officials said. The budget request includes $66.5 billion in discre tionary spend ing, largely for health care, and $86.1 billion for mandatory programs, mostly disability compensation and pensions for veterans. is budget will have a positive impact on the lives of veterans, their families and survivors for generations to come, VA Secretary Eric K. Shinseki said. e president believes in veterans and their families and believes in providing them the care and benets theyve earned and deserve. e $66.5 billion total in discretionary spending includes about $3.1 billion in collections from health insurers and veteran copayments in addition to the $63.5 billion in discretionary funding announced last week. VAs commitment to veterans spans generations, Shinseki added. From the men and women of the greatest generation to the veterans who have returned from Iraq and those returning from Afghanistan, VA will make sure our benets are useful and accessible. VA operates the largest integrated health care system in the country, with nearly 9 million enrollees, and the eighth-largest life insurance program. e department provides monthly disability pay, pensions and survivors payments to more than 4 million people as well as education assistance to 1 million students and mortgage guarantees to 1.5 million homeowners. VA also has the largest cemetery system in the nation. With a medical care budget request of $54.6 billion, VA is positioned to provide care to 6.5 million veterans in the scal year beginning Oct. 1. e patient total includes 675,000 people whose military service began after Sept. 11, 2001. Major spending categories within the health care budget request are: $6.9 billion for mental health; $4.1 billion for health care for Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn; $2.5 billion for prosthetics; $601 million for spinal cord injuries; $246 million for traumatic brain injuries; $230 million for readjustment counseling; and $7.6 billion for longterm care. e proposed budget would ensure that care and other benets are available to veterans when and where they need them, VA ocials said, noting that it includes: $460 million in home telehealth funding, which helps patients monitor chronic health care problems through innovative uses of the telephone, a 4.4 percent increase over the current year; $422 million for women-specic medical care, an increase of nearly 14 percent over the present level; $799 million for the activation of new and enhanced health care facilities; $16 million for the construction of three new national cemeteries; and $8.8 million for VetSuccess on Campus at 84 facilities, a program that helps Veterans transition to college life. e proposed budget provides for full implementation of VAs Transformation Plan a series of people, process and technology initiatives in scal 2014. is plan, ocials said, will systematically reduce the claims backlog and reach Shinsekis 2015 goal of eliminating the backlog and processing all claims within 125 days with 98 percent accuracy. Major initiatives in the budget proposal invest $291 million to bring leading-edge technology to the claims backlog, including $136 million for the Veterans Claims Intake Program and $155 million for the next generation of the electronic claims processing system, Veterans Benets Management System. A major strategic VA goal is to end homelessness among veterans in 2015. e budget request targets $1.4 billion for programs to prevent or reduce homelessness, including: $300 million for Supportive Services for Veteran Families to promote housing stability; $278 million for the Housing and Urban Development-Veterans Aairs Supportive Housing program, known as HUD-VASH, wherein VA provides case management services for at-risk veterans and their families and HUD provides permanent housing through its Housing Choice Voucher program; and $250 million in grant and per diem payments that support temporary housing provided by community-based organizations. In March, about 783,000 veterans were unemployed, a gure that includes 207,000 unemployed post-9/11 veterans. e scal 2014 budget request proposes a Veterans Job Corps, focused on investing in veterans skills and experience, putting tens of thousands of veterans into civilian jobs. Budget features of this initiative include: $1 billion in mandatory funds to help unemployed veterans; A target of putting 20,000 veterans to work within the next ve years in conservation, law enforcement and infrastructure jobs on public lands; Developing back-towork programs for veterans with other federal agencies, including the Interior and Agriculture departments, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Army Corps of Engineers; and Supporting jobproducing projects with contracts and grants with nonfederal organizations, such as states, nonprot organizations and private businesses. Other features of the administrations scal 2014 VA budget request include $250 million to administer the VA-run system of national cemeteries, $3.7 billion for information technology, and $1.2 billion in construction, cemetery grants and extended care grants. Engine failure causes crash No one was injured when an F/A-18F Super Hornet crashed into the water while operating near USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the North Arabian Sea, on April 8. Search and Rescue swimmers from an SH-60F of HS-5 Night Dippers recovered the two aircrew and safely delivered them back to the carrier. e two aircrew, from VFA-103 Jolly Rogers based in Virginia Beach, Va., safely ejected from their jet when it incurred an engine failure at 12:20 p.m. local time. Eisenhower is homeported in Norfolk, Va., and is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation eorts. is incident is under investigation. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp recently attended an announcement by the City of New London, Conn., and the National Coast Guard Museum Association to formally unveil the design and location for the proposed National Coast Guard Museum. As the oldest U.S. maritime service, and the only U.S. military service without a national museum, the National Coast Guard Museum will aord the public an opportunity to learn about the rich and noteworthy achievements of the men and women who forged the services history of the past 223 years. A video of the event, including the Commandants remarks regarding the importance of the National Coast Guard Museum, can be found on the New London Days Web site. James Coleman, Jr., chairman of the National Coast Guard Museum Association Board, unveiled the plans. All I can say after so many years is Semper Paratus! he said. We are ready and eager to get this job done. Coleman also evoked the Museum Associations mission, respect the past, engage the present and look to the future. e Coast Guard has supported eorts to build a National Coast Guard Museum since the 1990s. e New London site designation and proposed design represent a critical rst step towards making the museum a reality. In a recent letter expressing gratitude to the National Coast Guard Museum Association members for their eorts, the commandant wrote the museum project is a tribute to those in the Long Blue Line who sacriced, during war and peace, since the founding of our Republic to protect and defend the United States of America. e museum the Coast Guard currently has is tucked away on the grounds of the picturesque Coast Guard Academy. It contains artifacts that span the two hundred and twenty-plus-year history of the service. Featuring everything from models of a series of early steamships to the 270foot cutter that plies the waters of today, the exquisite craftsmanship captures the changes in ship design over the last two hundred years. For gurehead bus and wood carvers alike, the museum oers a small but choice collection of carvings. Of special value is the gurehead from the Coast Guards training ship Eagle. One of the largest gureheads displayed in an American museum, it hangs as if mounted on the bow of a ship. Cannon, paintings, uniforms, and medals round out the displays. A stroll through the grounds of the Academy, watching the ag raising and lowering, attending a chapel service, reading the memorials in the park overlooking the ames River, and, when available, walking the decks of barque Eagle and reviewing the Corps of Cadets, immerse those who come to the Academy in the history of the U.S. Coast Guard and its predecessors: the Life Saving Service, the Steamboat Inspection Service, the Lighthouse Establishment, and the Revenue Cutter Service. www.uscg.mil contributed to this report. National Coast Guard Museum plan unveiled Marines and Sailors with III Marine Expeditionary Force returned to Okinawa following the conclusion of the Nepal humanitarian assistance and disaster relief tabletop exercise. e purpose of the exercise, conducted recently was to improve III MEFs ability to respond to an HADR scenario in Nepal through coordination and planning with the government of Nepal, U.S. Departments of Defense and State, international and national agencies, and multinational parties. Recognizing the ongoing earthquake risk, we continue to emphasize preparation and enhance interoperability to build U.S. and Nepalese response capacity, said Col. Gregory Winston, the defense attach with the U.S. Embassy Katmandu, Nepal. Members of the National Society for Earthquake Technology-Nepal escorted Marines, sailors, soldiers and airmen with III MEF, U.S. Army Pacic and Pacic Air Forces on a vulnerability tour and earthquake walk through Katmandu. e purpose of the tour was to help participants identify key earthquake vulnerabilities in Katmandu and existing resources available in the event of a disaster and familiarize themselves with typical features of construction in the area. Following the tour, exercise participants spent four days discussing, planning and preparing for an earthquake, altogether and in smaller groups based around functional areas and specialties. e nal portion of the exercise saw participants use the knowledge gained and relationships built throughout the week to conduct a one-day earthquake simulation exercise. is one-day simulation involved a variety of earthquake scenarios presented to the group. Participants discussed and presented resources they could provide based on the scenario and how they would plan and work together with other organizations to mitigate and solve the presented problem. Lt. Gen. Nepal Chand, the chief of general sta of the Nepalese Army, and Peter Bodde, the U.S. ambassador to Nepal, attended presentations and the closing ceremony along with various government of Nepal and the Nepalese Army leaders. Coordination that is done now, in advance of an earthquake, will pay immeasurable dividends later in the form of time and lives saved, Bodde said. e relationships you forged this week will put us several steps ahead when an earthquake occurs. e plans and preparations you have discussed together on paper must be put into action. Following the closing ceremony, Col. John A. Ostrowski, the chief of sta for 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, III MEF, and Chand exchanged gifts and participants from both sides attended a friendship event. III MEF is scheduled to return to Nepal later in 2013 to participate in a eld training exercise to further test and rene plans and practices discussed during the tabletop exercise. e invaluable inputs you have contributed while discussing daily issues during the course of this exercise will certainly contribute to a better HADR response in your respective elds, Chand said. I sincerely thank you for your active participation during the exercise, which not only helped you to reach a common understanding, but helped you formulate recommendations, which are certain to aid in saving lives and mitigating human suering during an earthquake.Corps goes to Katmandu Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Centers Health Promotion and Wellness campaign announced the launch of its Reproductive and Sexual Health program Apr. 11. e sub-campaign is part of a Fleet-wide eort to encourage Sailors, Marines, their families and health educators to access resources about preventing sexually transmitted infections, like HIV, and unintended pregnancies. ese prevention strategies aim to increase the health and readiness of the Navy and Marine Corps forces. e timing of the announcement is aligned with NMCPHCs Sexual Health Month and the Center for Disease Control and Preventions Sexually Transmitted Disease Awareness Month. April is NMCPHC Sexual Health Month, an opportunity for every command to help their shipmates chart a safe course with the free, easy-to-use materials in our April Health Promotion Toolbox, said Michael R. Bob MacDonald, who is NMCPHCs Public Health Educator. NMCPHCs Sexual Health and Responsibility Program is the cornerstone of the Reproductive and Sexual Health sub-campaign. According to MacDonald, SHARP is an eort to create a cultural norm within the Navy and Marine Corps in which sexual health is encouraged, supported and expected. SHARP aims to reduce the occurrence of STIs, including HIV, and unplanned pregnancies among Sailors, Marines and their families to levels specied in selected Healthy People 2020 Objectives. Practical tools, educational resources and prevention strategies are available through the SHARP sub-campaign Web site, including best practices for preventing STIs and HIV, and information about long-acting reversible contraceptives, such as birth control implants and intrauterine devices, to help Sailors and Marines navigate family planning. To access and download Reproductive and Sexual Health materials visit: www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/repor ductive-sexual-health/Pages/repro ductive-sexual-health.aspx. e Reproductive and Sexual Health sub-campaign is part of the NMCPHCs HPW Campaign, which provides innovative and evidencebased health promotion and wellness programs and services that facilitate readiness and resilience, prevent illness and injury, hasten recovery and promote lifelong healthy behaviors and lifestyles. HPW aligns with the 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative, a set of objectives and policies across a spectrum of wellness, that maximizes each Sailors and Marines personal readiness to hone the most eective combat force in the history of the Department of the Navy; as well as Operation Live Well, a Defense Department campaign targeting service members, veterans and military operational leaders encouraging them to live healthy and active lifestyles. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld. Follow the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center on Facebook for the latest news and updates on health promotion and wellness.Center starts sexual health campaignCarlos Ruiz, martial arts instructor trainer at the Camp Geiger Martial Arts Instructors Course training facility. Since World War II, Marines have gone into combative engagements with a KA-BAR at their side. Its part of who we are. e knife was so popular with Marines due to its quality and performance that it was unocially reactivated during the Korean, Vietnamese, Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom conicts. e KA-BAR is an excellent ghting knife, said Ruiz. In my opinion it is the best ghting knife the Marine Corps has ever had. Its not too big or too small. e blade is just long enough without being unruly. And it can stay incredibly sharp. Its also extremely versatile. You can do a lot of things with it, but its still rst and foremost a ghting knife.KA-BAR THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 13

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Navy Fitness launched StayFit!, a tness newsletter promoting tness as fun for Sailors and their families, April 8. e newsletter will be monthly and includes a monthly workout. We really wanted to get away from the focus of tness only to support the physical readiness tests, said Lt. Cmdr. Austin Latour, an exercise physiologist with the Navy Physical Readiness Oce. Fitness, exercise, just biking with your family should be about fun and being active. If you are active and are watchful about what you eat, the tness test will take care of itself. e workout will include a group of exercises that will focus on an area of tness,. Well have a link that explains the workout and then weve named each workout after an individual in the Navy who has shown perseverance or is historical, like a prisoner of war or leader in his or her community. e newsletter also will highlight commands that exemplify taking tness beyond the twice annual PRT and mandatory workout time. We want to highlight commands and leadership who show that spending time together building that sense of community in an active way makes them a stronger, better unit, beyond just meeting a re quirement, Latour said. e newsletter will be available on the www.npc. navy.mil Web site under the Physical Readiness tab. StayFit! promotes tness e Navy has cancelled the remaining 2013 performances of its Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels. e squadron will continue to train to maintain ying prociency until further notice at its home station in Pen sacola, Fla. Recognizing budget realities, current Defense policy states that outreach events can only be supported with local assets at no cost to the government. is is one of many steps the Navy is taking to ensure resources are in place to support forces operating for ward now and those training to relieve them. e Navy believes there is value in demonstrating the professionalism and capabilities of our Navy and Marine Corps Naval Aviation team, thus inspir ing future generations of Sailors and Marines. e Navy intends to continue aerial demonstrations in the future as the budget situation permits.Navy Blue Angel shows grounded by budget 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Navy College information e Naval School of Explosive Ordnance Disposal here, held a memorial dedication ceremony at the Boatman Advanced EOD Training Facility April 2. e dedication served in recognizing those who served in Combined Joint Task Force Troy, Iraq, and honoring Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians who made the ultimate sacrice during Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. is memorial is dedicated to remembering all those who served in Troy during a decade of irregular combat and counter insurgency operations, said Capt. Joseph Polanin, commanding ocer of NAVSCOLEOD. eir unsurpassed commitment, tireless dedication, and bold vision made the idea of a counter-IED task force a vibrant reality. at is what Troy was all about. It evolved rapidly to continually defeat the enemys weapon of choice, the IED. It succeeded due to good people sacricing much and because just and worthy causes were pursued with tenacity and courage. CJTF Troy was established in 2005 as the rst operational counter-IED task force in U.S. military history. It was staed by joint service EOD technicians and diverse subject matter experts to integrate U.S. and multinational counter-IED capabilities, to protect U.S. and coalition forces, and to advise and assist Iraqi security forces. CJTF Paladin is a similar task force in Afghanistan. CJTF Troy provided counter-IED expertise and support to U.S. forces through training, recommending materiel solutions, and weapons technical intelligence collection and exploitation to defeat IED networks, said Capt. Edward Eidson, commander of CJTF Troy from Dec. 2010 to Sept. 2011 and current commander of EOD Group One. EOD dedicates new memorial THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Active and retired Sailors paid tribute to 129 Navy and civilian technicians during a 50th anniversary commemortion ceremony aboard Naval Base Kitsap Bangor, April 10, to honor those who perished aboard attack submarine USS resher (SSN 593) in 1963. We gather today to remember the men of the resher, said Submarine Squadron 17 Command Master Chief Lance Meord. resher was commissioned in August 1961, and built at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, as the rst in her class of 3,700-ton nuclear-powered attack submarines. e technology of that day allowed her to be a fast, quiet, deep-diving vessel. resher completed overhaul and began testing her systems participating in post-overhaul sea trials April 10, 1963. Accompanied by the submarine rescue ship Skylark (ASR 20), resher operated in the Atlantic Ocean more than 200 miles east of Cape Cod, Mass., where it started deep-diving tests. Fifty years ago [129] of our Sailors left port and didnt return, said Rear Adm. Dietrich Kuhlmann, commander, Submarine Group 9. We gather to honor them today. As we reect and commemorate these [129] Sailors, we take with us the lessons learned on that fateful day. As resher proceeded upon the deepdiving test, Skylark started receiving garbled communications from the resher indicating trouble. resher sank o the coast of Massachusetts during that deepdiving test, making it the rst nuclearpowered submarine lost at sea and the largest loss of life in the submarine forces history. May we never forget our friends on the resher, said Cmdr. Steven Orren, NBK Bangor chaplain. May we serve our nation with renewed strength thanks to the resher and her crew. After the loss of the resher the Navy established the Submarine Safety program, which has become a worldwide model for safety and quality assurance. By imposing a strict quality control process and material control requirements throughout a submarines service life, SUBSAFE helps to ensure the safety of the crew members, and events like the resher are not repeated. e ceremony meant a lot, said Steve Corcoran, vice commander, Submarine Veterans Bremerton Base. Its important for us to honor our sub group members. It wasnt an option for us to come out and support. We had to be here. Kittery, Maine, the nal homeport of USS resher, will dedicate a 129-foot agpole in Memorial Circle on April 7, 2013. e agpole height will serve as a permanent reminder of the 129 men who died that morning, ensuring they will forever be honored in and around the town where resher was built and homeported. Kitsap has memorial service for resher Naval Air Station Whidbey Islands recycling facility held its 17th annual Dumpster Dive, April 10. e dumpster dive is an opportunity to educate Sailors by allowing them to see what waste is thrown out around the community, said Michael Barenburg, NASWIs environmental services supervisor. We are just trying to change the perspective on how our community looks at waste, Barenburg said. When trash is collected throughout the community, it is brought to the recycling center where volunteers get hands-on experience by sorting it to determine how much waste can be recycled. is should aect people who are part of the event and help them realize how they can help the environment, Barenburg said. As a community, we will get a shift in thinking what we can reuse, recycle, or throw away. More than 30 Sailors assigned to NASWI and tenant commands participated in the dumpster dive. I came to learn about the recycling process and to see what I can recycle at my home, said Yeoman 3rd Class Yasenia Barraza, assigned to NASWI. At home I have a full trash can every week and I know I can cut down on the waste. e Department of the Navy Earth Day theme for 2013 is Global Reach Local Action. e theme is meant to encourage Sailors, Marines, DoD civilian employees and their family members to take local action to show the Navys dedication to protecting the environment. Rus Hawkins, a truck operator at Navy Whidbey Recycle, said that the dumpster dive is a great way to increase awareness of neighborhood recycling programs. e Navy mandates we recycle, Hawkins said. So we show the Sailors what is recyclable and they can take back that education to their commands. roughout the months of April and May, commands within Navy Region Northwest will be participating in various Earth Day related events like local clean-up projects. Navy and Marine Corps commands ocially celebrate Earth Day April 22. Earth Day ocially started April 22, 1970.Whidbey Island stresses recyclingWe were also the rst Navy headquarters to act as the core sta for the Joint Task Force. CJTF Troy was disestablished on Sept. 1, 2011. EOD Technicians from all four services left Troy to serve at other commands and stas where they continue to defeat IEDs and deter emerging threats from terrorists, violent extremists, or other potential adversaries across the globe. Eidson noted that due directly to their eorts, the enduring concept of a counter-IED task force is now part of joint doctrine. Regardless of our service specialties, collectively, our weapon system is our mind and our body, Eidson said. We equip the man instead of manning equipment and our success is dependent on our ability to out-think our opponent. At the individual level, that means we must succeed every time. Our enemy only has to succeed once. Builder 1st Class Donald Wintersteen was the primary force behind the construction of the display case that surrounds the items from the original memorial at CJTF Troy in Baghdad, Iraq, which includes boots, a helmet, a demilitarized M-16 rie, and dog tags from each of the fallen EOD Technicians that hang from the grip of the rie. From planning the display case to the building and staining, I spent more than 100 hours on it, Wintersteen said. Ive been building things like this for the past 20 years. It was an honor doing this and as I set up the display, I read the names on each set of dog tags as I hung them on the rie. e CJTF Troy memorial will be on permanent display at the Boatman AEOD training facility quarterdeck for all students and visitors to see and serve as an enduring reminder for all to contemplate the tenacity and resolve of those who established Troy. NASSCOLEOD is home to the Advanced Improvised Explosive Device Disposal course, which teaches advanced tactics, techniques, and procedures to experienced joint service EOD technicians and select government personnel. NAVSCOLEOD is also home to the EOD Memorial in Niceville, Fla., dedicated to all EOD service members killed in action since 1941. EOD

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013 17 An Army chaplain, Capt. Emil J. Kapaun, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, April 11, for his actions leading up to his capture as a prisoner of war in North Korea. President Barack Obama presented the medal to Kapauns nephew, Ray Kapaun, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. Ray was joined by other family members and veterans of the Korean War who served with Kapaun. Kapaun was ordained a priest in 1940, and served under the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wichita in Pilsen, Kan. In 1944, he began serving as an Army chaplain. In 1993, Kapaun was named a Servant of God by the Vatican, and is currently a candidate for sainthood. During the Medal of Honor ceremony, Obama described Kapauns acts of courage and compassion. When commanders ordered an evacuation, he chose to stay and tend to their wounds, Obama said. When the enemy broke through and there was combat hand-tohand, he carried on, comforting the injured and the dying, oering them some measure of peace before they left this Earth. When enemy forces bore down, it seemed like the end. Father Kapaun spotted a wounded Chinese ocer. He pleaded with (him) and convinced him to call out to his fellow Chinese. e shooting stopped, and they negotiated a safe surrender, saving those American lives. en as Father Kapaun was being led away, he saw another American, wounded, unable to walk, lying in a ditch, defenseless. An enemy soldier was standing over him, rie aimed at his head ready to shoot. Father Kapaun pushed the enemy soldier aside. And then as the enemy soldier watched, stunned, Father Kapaun carried that wounded American away. is is the battle we honor today. An American Soldier who didnt re a gun, but who wielded the mightiest weapon of all, the love for his brothers, so pure, that he was willing to die so they might live. He carried that wounded Soldier for four miles on the death march and when Father Kapaun grew tired, hed help the wounded Soldier hop on one leg. When other prisoners stumbled, he picked them up. When they wanted to quit, knowing stragglers would be shot, he begged them to keep walking. e president then when on to describe how Kapaun cared for the Soldiers right up until the time of his death. Obama then presented the Medal of Honor to Ray Kapaun, Father Kapauns nephew. ABOVE AND BEYOND Kapauns Medal of Honor nomination is for conspicuous acts of gallantry and intrepidity, at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty, Nov. 1-2, 1950, during the Korean War. Among the documents and interviews within the nomination package, one of the narratives reads: As Chinese Communist forces encircled (3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry during the battle of Unsan,) Kapaun moved fearlessly from foxhole to foxhole under enemy direct re in order to provide comfort and reassurance to the outnumbered Soldiers. When the Chinese commandos attacked the battalion command post, Kapaun and other members of the headquarters withdrew 500 meters across a nearby river, but Kapaun re turned to help the wound ed, gather ing approxi mately 30 injured men into the relative protection of a Korean dugout. e narrative goes on to describe how the battalion became entirely surrounded by enemy forces. It recounts how Kapaun spent the next day, Nov. 2, repeatedly rescuing the wounded from no-mans land outside the perimeter. As the battalions position became hopeless, Kapaun rejected several chances to escape, instead volunteering to stay behind and care for the wounded. At dusk, he made his way back to the dugout. Among the injured Americans was a wounded Chinese ocer, it continues. As Chinese infantry closed in on their position, Kapaun convinced him to negotiate for the safety of the injured Americans. e narrative then describes how, after Kapauns capture, he intervened to save the life of a fellow Soldier who was lying in a nearby ditch with a broken ankle and other injuries. As Chinese soldiers prepared to execute the Soldier, Kapaun risked his own life by pushing the Chinese soldier aside thereby saving the Soldiers life. e narrative continues with other acts of bravery and charity, both during the march north and throughout their ordeal at the prisoners of war camp. Kapaun died there, May 23, 1951. Many prisoners of war were inspired by Kapaun, including Mike Dowe, who at the time was a rst lieutenant. He recounted how U.S. Soldiers ran out of ammunition in the Anju, North Korea, area in early November 1950, when wave after wave of Chinese Communist forces launched a surprise attack across the border into Korea. ousands of Soldiers were taken prisoner and were forced to march northward in what Dowe termed death marches. Soldiers who were too weak or injured to keep up were shot, he said. It was then that Dowe, who was a member of the 19th Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, rst saw Kapaun carrying the wounded and encouraging others to do the same. e POWs eventually were taken to a valley near Pyoktong, near the Yalu River in northwest North Korea near the Chinese border. I dont know the name of that valley, but we called it the Kapaun Valley because that is where Father Kapaun instilled in us a will to live, he said. Kapaun tended to the wounded and encouraged people to share and help each other, Dowe said. He also snuck out of camp at night and stole food, which he would bring back and share with everyone. en, in January 1951, the Soldiers were moved to Pyoktong, along the Yalu River. e enlisted were located in a valley and the ocers were separated and placed on a hill, Dowe said. Turkish prisoners were co-located with the enlisted. Conditions in the camps were miserable during winter 1950-1951, which Dowe said was one of the coldest ever in Korea. Temperatures then had dipped to minus 28F. Dowe said the Soldiers were still wearing their summer uniforms, because theyd been told they would be home by anksgiving 1950, not realizing at the time that the Chinese would join the North Koreans in attacking the United Nations forces. All of the trees in the area had been stripped away, but there was a wood fence around the ofcers compound on the hill, Dowe said. Each morning, Kapaun got up before everyone else and went out into the subzero weather to collect wood from that fence, he said. Kapaun would use that wood to heat water for coee in a pan that he had fashioned from scrap metal. Dowe said he still has vivid recollections of that little guy with the beard and scraggly hat pulled over his ears, made from the sleeve of a sweater, bringing coee to everyone. You cant imagine how good that was to start the day o for us. At night, the men would pass the time telling stories before falling asleep, Dowe said. A favorite topic was describing the food theyd like to order once they got home. Some of the best stories were told by Father Kapaun, who described his mothers cooking back on the farm, in Kansas, Dowe said. Kapaun was always keeping the mens spirits up, he added. e chaplain continued to make nighttime forays outside the prison camp to the surrounding countryside, with the purpose of stealing food for the Soldiers in the camps. Dowe often accompanied him on what he termed ration runs. Sometimes they would raid a warehouse where 50 pound bags of millet and cracked corn were stored. Dowe said millet is like bird seed and very hard to digest. e two would rst distribute it to the enlisted. Soon, Kapaun became known as the Great ief, Dowe said. He explained that the nickname was given to him, not just because he was so successful at stealing food, but also because it was learned that Kapaun prayed to Saint Dismas, who was the penitent thief crucied alongside Jesus, as described in the Bible. e Chinese often try to brainwash the POWs by lecturing them on the evils of capitalism and the virtues of a communist society, Dowe said. Father Kapaun would rebut the lectures with intelligent responses that the Chinese found impossible to counter, Dowe recalled. at would infuriate them. Some who resisted the lectures would be tortured or killed. We thought Father Kapaun would be killed as well. At one point, the guards took Kapaun away. We thought that was the end for him, Dowe said. en, a few days later they brought him back to camp. ey were absolutely afraid of him, Dowe said, explaining why he was returned. ere was an aura about the guy. He was fearless. He had a way of addressing people that was frank and straightforward. ey couldnt understand why he wasnt afraid like others. reats and intimidation had no eect on him. More than half of the prisoners died that winter, Dowe said. ey often died at night and the Soldiers would drag the bodies outside. Every day there were burial details. Soldiers assigned to these details would carry the bodies about half a mile past the enlisted area in the valley and across the Yalu to an island where they would be buried. Father Kapaun always volunteered for burial details, Dowe said. Hed recover the clothing from the dead, wash it, and then provide clean clothing to the enlisted. Besides providing clothing to the Soldiers, Kapaun would dress their wounds, oer words of encouragement and say prayers, Dowe said, adding that he did this despite being warned by the guards not to minister to the Soldiers. Despite warnings from the guards, Kapaun got up extra early on Easter Day 1950 to begin a special sunrise service. It would be his last Easter. It was a fantastic sermon, Dowe recalled, saying it was the most momentous event in his life. He said hymns were sung and the echoes carried. Soon, he said, POWs up and down the valley were joining in. It was absolutely amazing. ere were a few who claimed that Father Kapaun seemed to have a halo around him. e Chinese quickly arrived, but then became too afraid to stop the service, Dowe said. e week after the sermon, Kapaun collapsed from a blood clot in his leg, Dowe said. ere were some American doctors in the camp who treated it and he was walking and eating again soon after. Kapaun then contracted pneumonia. e military doctors took care of that as well, Dowe said. After Kapaun recovered, guards became upset that he hadnt died. ey prepared to remove him to the death camp, a place where very sick prisoners were taken to die, and where no food or medical attention was given to them. When the guards came, we pushed them away, Dowe said. ey brought in troops with bayonets and threatened everyone if people didnt pick him up and carry him away. Father Kapaun told everyone to stop resisting and not to ght them on my behalf. I was in tears, he continued, his voice tinged with emotion. And then he turned to me and said Mike, dont cry. Im going where Ive always wanted to go. And when I get there, Ill be saying a prayer for all of you. After the death of Kapaun, some of the guards who spoke English conded to Dowe that they were afraid of the unconquerable spirit of a free man loyal only to his God and his country. After the war, which ended in 1953, Dowe was invited to testify to the committee involved in writing the POW Code of Conduct, which is still in eect today. Dowe said Kapaun had a strong inuence on him and he shared that with the committee, which emphasized the loyalty and keeping the faith aspects of the code. Father Kapaun instilled that kind of loyalty in others, enabling them to maintain their honor, self-respect and will to live, Dowe said. Ive seen over and over again that those who did not display that loyalty would invariably give up and die, often within 24 hours. Dowe said Eisenhower gave him a personal commendation for his contribution to the committee. However, Dowe said the real credit should go to Kapaun, whom he credits with saving the lives of hundreds of POWs, directly or indirectly. Following the war, Dowe went on to serve in the Army, retiring as a colonel in 1970 and then working as a defense contractor. He currently is a scientist at Raytheon. He said he prays to Kapaun every night, asking him for help and guidance. And, he said, he knows Kapaun is in Heaven praying for him and his fellow POWs. Dowe said Kapaun had a positive impact on the many non-Catholics in the prison camp as well. He said the commander of the Turkish POWs told him as they were being liberated, I will pray to my God Allah for Father Kapaun. MOH posthumously awarded to chaplain

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18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 18, 2013