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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-11-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00296

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00296


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Bentley onboard PlayersCountry music star to play at PGA Tours Salute to Navy May 8Continuing a PGA Tour tra dition of honoring men and women in uniform, e Players Championship unveiled a full slate of activities and programs that will take place during the 2013 event as part of Birdies for the Brave, a military outreach initiative proudly supported by the PGA Tour. Highlighting the military appreciation activities in the tradition of years past, e Players announced, along with Capitol Records Nashville, that coun try music star Dierks Bentley will give a special performance on Wednesday, May 8, during Military Appreciation Day, as the tournament returns to e Players Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass, May 6 to 12. On May 8, Bentley will be a part of the Military Apprecia tion Day ceremony, this year themed, A Salute to the United States Navy. e program on the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse Lawn will include pageantry by military personnel. In addition to Bentleys per formance, e Players will provide all active duty, retired, and Reserve military person nel along with their dependents with complimentary admission to the tournament all week. e Players also oers discounted admission to veterans. Military members who are in terested in the complimentary admission should go to pgatour. com/the players and click on the ticket link for instructions about how to gain complimen tary access to the tournament, which is a dierent process than the past. Non-ca reer mili tary veter ans should Lt. Kelly Chufo, MT1 Jerey Alexander, Trident Ret honored Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay recognized those military athletes on March 27 that dedi cate their time and eort to sports, their military duties, and their communities. Morale, Welfare, and Recre ation Kings Bay sponsored the event to recognize those athletes who encompass what this event means. e Male Athlete of the Year was MT1 Jerey Alexander. e Female Athlete of the Year was Lt. Kelly Chufo. Along with the male and fe male athlete of the year, MWR awarded Trident Ret Facility the Kings Bay Captains Cup, for the second year in a row. e Captains Cup Program is comprised of various sport ing events. e team that accu mulates the most points wins and has its name engraved on the Captains Cup trophy and a banner displayed at the Fitness Complex. MWR reported Alexanders combination of outstanding military accomplishments, in tramural sports participation and seless community involve ment has made him the com mittees selection. Alexander participated in sev eral intramural sports programs, including the regional Tri-Base Softball and ag football tour naments. He has also acted as captain and player/coach for several teams and encouraged participation from his fellow sailors. Notable service recognitions that Alexander received during his military career include an Admirals Letter of Appreciation for his service at SWFLANT, as well as Commanding Ocers Letter of Appreciation for his service aboard USS Wyoming. Alexander has an impressive history of community involve ment and charity work. As a member of the NSB Kings Bay Honor Guard, he is the acting Funeral Detail Coordinator. In his position, he has coordinated and/or participated in 59 funer al service details. Other notable volunteer con tributions include a 9/11 memo rial ceremony at Trident Training Facility, a Wounded Warrior memorial in St. Marys and the Lost Submarine Memorial in St. Marys. MWR said Alexander distin guishes himself as an exemplary sailor while on-duty and a self less humanitarian in the local and military communities. Chufo has shown herself to be a shining example of enthu siasm and passion for both her military career, as well as physi cal tness here at Kings Bay, the MWR selection process noted. Her tireless dedication to the t ness and well-being of her peers both on-base and in the com munity has made her the com mittees selection. Chufo is most famous for her leadership during the TRF command Physical Training, her participation in all base runs and her encouragement of indi viduals in the Fitness Complex. She goes above and beyond to help others get in better shape and become healthier. Chufo is a player/tness coach for the Fernandina Roll Up Periscope What will you do with your tax refund? Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Good causes Children out to stop bullying, child abuse Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com In the early years of the nuclear Navy, the most advanced submarine in the world sank during testing and was ultimately crushed by water pressure due to a chain of events that ostensibly started with a small leak of seawater. If so, the sub was destroyed by the simplest of causes bad brazing in some of its pipes. e disaster killed all aboard the sub and led to the revamping of many of the manufacturing pro cesses for both surface and undersea U.S. naval vessels. It also helped spur the development of deep-sea exploration vehicles. e second USS resher (SSN-593) was laid down on May 28, 1958 by the Portsmouth, N.H., Naval Shipyard and launched on July 9 1960. e nuclear-powered submarine was spon sored by Mrs. Frederick B. Warder and commissioned on Aug. 3, 1961, with Cmdr. Dean W. Axene in command. Following trials, the nuclear attack submarine took part in Nuclear submarine Exercise 3-61 o the northeastern coast of the United States from Sept. 18 to 24. On Oct. 18, the submarine headed south along the east coast. After calling at San Juan, Puerto Rico, it conducted further trials and testred its torpedo system, before returning to Stratcom broadens dialogue on nature of situation changesNo one can accuse Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler, com mander of U.S. Strategic Command, of seeking out yes men. For the past four years, he has hosted an annual sympo sium near the Stratcom headquarters here to shed new light on the whole concept of deter rence and how the command strives to provide it on behalf of the Defense Department. Getting those far-ung views was relatively easy during the Cold War, when the discourse lled lecture halls and library shelves around the world. Deterrence was pretty straightfor ward at that time: attack the United States or its allies, and you risk a devas tating counterattack. Recognition by both the United States and the Soviet Union of the consequences -mutually assured destruction -is con sidered a key factor in prevent ing the Cold War from escalat ing into an outright conict. But while nuclear deterrence remains vital to U.S. security to day, Kehler said, its not enough to protect the United States against the range of threats it Strategic deterrence concepts evolving USS Alaska (SSBN 732), homeported at Naval Sub marine Base, Kings Bay, is the 2012 Omaha Trophy winner in the Submarine Ballistic Missile catetory. Gen. C. Robert Kehler, Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, recently an nounced all 2012 Omaha Trophy winners. e honor awarded annually to military units demonstrating the highest performance standards in USSTRATCOMs mission USS Alaska earns Omaha resher lost 50 years agoMWR recognizes top athletes, teams SUBSAFE culture prospersSafety programs record unblemished in nuclear sub eetOn April 10, 1963, the Navys most technologically advanced and newest nuclear powered submarine, USS resher (SSN 593), would lose communication with the surface while engaged in a deep test dive o the coast of Massachusetts. All 112 Sailors and 17 civilian technicians were lost that horric day. Remembering the tragic loss on what marks the 50th commemoration of reshers sinking and understanding its impact on todays Submarine Safety culture echoes through

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 NAVADMIN 084/13 released April 1 provides a summary on all Navy Working Uniform Type I related guid ance and announces the authorized wear of the aiguillette and the ex panded wear of the 9-inch rough side out and 8-inch ight deck steel toed safety boots with the NWU Type I. We believe we owed our Sailors the best opportunity to be suc cessful with regards to the uniform wear of the NWU and felt like if we captured all the information into a single NAVADMIN, that would be the right thing to do, said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. Providing this clarity and education is very important to me. Since the roll-out of the NWU Type I in December 2008, Fleet in put has resulted in the revised poli cy and rules of wear. NAVADMIN 084/13 discusses in detail the description, uniform components, standards of appear ance, occasions for wear, and prop er care instructions. e NAVADMIN, at commanding ocers discretion, expands the au thorized footwear to be worn with NWU Type I to include a black 9-inch leather (smooth) steel-toed boot, a black 9-inch rough side out leather steel toed boot and a black 8-inch aviation ight deck steel toed boot. Also at the commanding ocers discretion, aiguillettes can be worn with the NWU Type I shirt and parka by personnel assigned to billets in which aiguillettes are a prescribed uniform item. Personnel should be aware that puncturing the outer shell of the parka will compromise the manu facturers water proof guarantee and void the lifetime warranty. Par kas that are punctured or torn will have to be repaired or replaced at the owners expense. e Kings Bay Employer Commit tee has set a deadline of 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, for students who live in Camden County to apply for two $500 college scholarships. e funding for the scholarships will come from an endowment fund established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employ ment marketing representative at the Kings Bay Career Center. Under the endowment fund, the scholarships will be granted to graduating seniors, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their fresh man year at an accredited institu tion of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants must also be working part-time for a minimum of 15 hours per week. e scholarships are nonrenewable and not based on nan cial need. To qualify for the scholarships, applicants must submit an applica tion, school records, test scores, and a two-to-three page essay. e theme of the essay is how to use education and training to de velop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Scholarship recipients will be se lected by the employer committees scholarship subcommittee. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a scholarship subcommittee member, at rbaldwin@ camden.k12.ga.us or call her at (912) 729-4790. All documents must be submitted by the 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, deadline to be considered. Applications for the scholarships are available at the Georgia Depart ment of Labors Kings Bay Career Center, at 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys. For additional information, contact Faith Copeland-Pittman at the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Commit tee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS Stroller Strut April 13A Stroller Strut, benetting the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 13, at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fit ness Center outdoor track. e event includes door prizes for registered walkers, a stroller decoration competition and prizes for most laps walked. Registration is $5. Registration forms are available at the Fitness Complex and the NMCRS.Gulfstream exec MOAA speakerMichael Creo, senior human resources man ager of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. in Bruns wick, Ga., will be the guest speaker at the April 16 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association. e events begins with a 5:30 p.m. social hour at Osprey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Meal cost is $20. RSVP by April 12 with Capt. Oreen Crouch, USN (Re.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.Flying models show April 20The Kings Bay RC Modelers First Annual Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 20, weather permitting, no rain date planned yet, at Oakwell RC Airfield at the end of Clarks Bluff and Oakwell Road. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for location, pictures and updates. Events included a full-scale ultralight fly-in and display, displays of a 1923 Ford T-Bucket, a 1936 Studebaker and RC planes. Flight demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. If turn out is good, there also will be a Night Flying Demonstration with mini LED Parachute drop at 9 p.m. that evening. Bring a chair and enjoy a bon-fire. Food and drink available on site.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergradu ate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bb communitiesfoundation.org. Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Now hear this! Deadline for scholarships April 22 Employer Committee Working uniform regs changed Naval Personnel As Sailors prepare to participate in the Semi-Annual Physical Fit ness Assessment, Navy Physical Readiness Program ocials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accurate, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Moore added that just like an in dividual would check their bank ac count after payday, Sailors need to check their PRIMS following a PFA. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guide lines established in the Navys Phys ical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reects non-participation status due to deployment, IA, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any correc tions can be made by the CFL at the command level. After six months of PFA comple tion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals commanding of cer, on letter head, that grants au thorization to make the change. In most cases the data is going to be correct, but since the CFL is entering data by hand for the entire command, it is possible that a number may get transposed or a line of data missed, Moore said. e sooner a discrepancy is identied, the faster it can be xed. PRIMS was introduced in 2002 as the Navys ocial source for Sailors PFA data. It is used to monitor and track the progress of active-duty and Reserve personnel and identify, screen, educate and monitor mem bers.Sailors need to verify PRIMS data Naval Personnel Navy ocials encourage topperforming Sailors to volunteer for Recruit Division Commander, in a Naval message released April 2. According to NAVADMIN 085/13, the motivation and professional de velopment of recruits is a vital Navy mission that requires outstanding role models. RDC assignment is challenging, but rewarding. It oers a number of professional development, leader ship and career advancement op portunities. e tasks required are mentally, physically and emotionally de manding, and require proven selfdiscipline and imaginative prob lem-solving skills. Sailors assigned as RDCs must continually demonstrate superior leadership and motivational skills in demanding and often unique situa tions. RDCs are eligible for the following benets: Special Duty Assignment Pay of $450 per month. Additional annual clothing allowance of $220. Free dry cleaning services while actively training a recruit division. Opportunity to earn a Master Training Specialist qualification. Guaranteed choice of coast assignment upon completion of tour. Award of Recruit Training Service Ribbon. Participation in the RTC Command Meritorious Advancement Program for petty officers second class. Per MILPERSMAN 1306-954, E-5 Sailors must have a minimum of six years active service with two years time-in-rate upon application to serve as an RDC. E-6s must have a minimum of six years active service upon applying. ere are no minimum years of service or time in rate requirements for chiefs and above. Applicants must be warfarequalied, however, waivers may be granted on case-by-case basis. Sail ors must have scored good low or higher in each category on the most recent Physical Fitness Assessment. e RDC candidate must be able to perform and pass the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test before the screening is submitted to NPC. Waiver of the run portion of the PRT is not allowed. A complete listing of eligibility requirements and application procedures can be found in MILPERS MAN 1306-954. Sailors who meet the require ments and would like to apply for the RDC program should submit a 1306/7 enlisted personnel action re quest to their rating detailer. According to the message, there are approximately 200 openings for new RDCs each year. Upon acceptance to the RDC pro gram, Sailors will attend three weeks of instructor school to obtain the Navy seeking recruit commanders Naval Personnel

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e Navy will join the nation in reecting on all whose lives were lost or forever altered by the Holocaust during the annual commemoration of the Holocaust Days of Remembrance, observed this year from April 7 to 14. With a national theme Never Again: Heeding the Warning Signs, the Holocaust Days of Remem brance invite people to look back, to examine how intervention by individuals or countries could have changed the course of history, and to remind participants that fear and indierence to hatred cre ates an opportunity for evil to thrive. e Days of Remem brance included the observance of Yom Hashoah or Holocaust Remembrance Day, Monday, April 8. Yom Hashoah corresponds to the 27th day of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar and marks the an niversary of the Warsaw ghetto uprising. When the actual date of Yom Hashoah falls on a Friday, the state of Israel observes Yom Hashoah on the preceding ursday. When it falls on a Sunday, Yom Hashoah is observed on the following Monday. e United States Congress established the Days of Remembrance as our nations annual commemoration of the Holocaust, memorializing the millions of victims of perse cution and mass murder. e Holocaust was the state-sponsored, systematic annihilation of Euro pean Jews and other per secuted minorities by Nazi Germany and its collabo rators. Between 1933 and 1945, more than six mil lion Jews were murdered. Additionally, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, Roma (Gypsies), Jehovahs Witnesses, Catholics, po litical dissidents, the phys ically and mentally dis abled, and homosexuals suered grievous persecu tion under Nazi tyranny. e Days of Remem brance serve as an op portunity for our nation to reect on the loss of these victims, as well as a reminder of the moral ob ligation of each individual to remain vigilant against hatred, persecution, and tyranny. 9502 Navy Enlisted Clas sication and a 13-week RDC School. RDC C school is a physically challenging, intensive, hands-on train ing course that provides prospective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physical readiness to suc ceed as an RDC. Commands must en sure prospective RDC candidates are properly screened to help reduce attrition from RDC C school. Tour lengths are a minimum of 36 months after graduation from RDC School.Recruit Memorials remember Holocaust More than 300 service members whose homes were unlawfully foreclosed upon between 2006 and 2010 are due to receive more than $39 million in relief for alleged violations of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, Justice Department ocials announced April 5. e relief stems from the Justice Departments 2011 settlements with BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, a subsidiary of Bank of America Corp., and Saxon Mortgage Servicing Inc., a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley, ocials said. Under the rst settlement, Bank of America is re quired to pay more than $36.8 million to service mem bers whose homes were foreclosed upon unlawfully be tween 2006 and 2010. Each service member will receive a minimum of $116,785, plus compensation for any eq uity lost with interest, ocials said, and Bank of America already has begun compensating 142 service members whose homes were illegally foreclosed on between 2006 and the middle of 2009. Under the same agreement, Bank of America agreed to provide information about its foreclosures from mid2009 through the end of 2010. As a result of that review, Bank of America will now pay 155 service members whose homes it illegally foreclosed on. Borrowers receiving payment under this settlement may receive an additional payment under a settlement between Bank of America and federal banking regulators the Oce of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System if the foreclosure occurred in 2009 or 2010. Payments provided under the federal banking regulators settle ment will bring the total amount received by eligible borrowers to $125,000, plus equity where applicable. Under the second settlement, Saxon Mortgage Ser vices Inc. is in the process of paying out more than $2.5 million to 19 service members whose homes were un lawfully foreclosed upon between 2006 and 2010. Each service member will receive a minimum of $130,555.56, plus compensation for any equity lost with interest. Bank of America is one of ve mortgage servicers that entered into a settlement, known as the National Mort gage Settlement, with the Justice Department in 2012 regarding its foreclosure practices. e Justice Depart ment is overseeing ongoing audits of the ve largest mortgage servicers in the country Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citibank, JP Morgan Chase and Ally to identify violations of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Acts foreclosure provisions between Jan. 1, 2006, and April 4, 2012, and a 6 percent interest rate cap provision between Jan. 1, 2008, and April 4, 2012. e $36.8 million being paid by Bank of America to 297 service members is pursuant to the 2011 consent decree which predated the National Mortgage Settlement and represents only the nonjudicial foreclosures con ducted by Bank of America, Justice Department ocials said. Most service members wrongly foreclosed on will receive $125,000 plus any lost equity.Unlawful foreclosures settled for $39 million THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Through the use of the puppets, the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay recently talked to kinder garten through fifth-grade students at the Child and Youth Programs about bullying. After the puppet show, the children participated in activities that taught them how to respond when they see bullying occur. The children also made a banner of No Bullying rules they felt they should follow to be a good friend.Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay photos The Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, in collaboration with the Morale Welfare and Recreation, Child Youth Programs and the Child Development Center, sponsored the 2nd Annual Childrens Walk, Roll and Stroll against Child Abuse April 2 to bring awareness to child abuse prevention. The children participated in organized activi ties, face painting and enjoyed healthy snacks provided by Health Promotions. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba welcomed the children and participated in the walk. FFSC photos and Navy photos by MCCS Tony Casullo

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 5 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., April 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar April 24Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and sup port the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relation ship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To regis ter call 573-4513.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for April 17A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, April 17. It pro vides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 16. This workshop is an opportunity to share experienc es, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 16Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. For more information, call 573-4513. Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, April 12. Registration required by calling 573-4513. program April 17The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provi sions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Preventing child abuse observed Before today is over, ve children will die from being abused. At least two of them will be babies, less than a year old. e other three probably havent yet celebrat ed their fth birthdays. e blue ribbon symbolizes the more than 5.2 million children reported abused each year to Child Protective Services throughout the United States. In 1982, by Presidential Proclamation, April was declared Child Abuse Prevention Month. Since that time, child abuse and neglect awareness activities have been promoted across the country during this month. In the spring of 1989, a Virginia grandmother began the blue ribbon campaign as a tribute to her grandson. e three-year old died at the hands of his mothers abusive boyfriend. e grandmother tied a blue ribbon to the an tenna of her car as a way to remember him and to alert her community to the tragedy of child abuse. Since that time, concerned citizens all over the country have worn the blue ribbon as a symbol of the need to prevent child abuse and neglect. A blue ribbon is the international symbol for Child Abuse Prevention. e color blue was cho sen to represent the bruised and battered bodies of the thousands of children that are abused every day. It serves as a constant reminder that all of us have a responsibility to help keep chil dren safe. Many times children grow up in an abusive environment and eventually become abusing parents. Without appropriate education on positive April 17 A Child Abuse Prevention Information table will be at the Commissary, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pick up a blue ribbon and information.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Navy College information areas. Selections are based on formal evaluations, meritorious achievement, safety, and other factors such as community involvement and humanitarian actions. e winners are: Global Operations Trophy: 50th Space Wing, Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Trophy: 90th Missile Wing, F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. Submarine Ballistic Missile Trophy: USS ALASKA (SSBN 732), Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Strategic Aircraft Operations Trophy: Strategic Communications Wing One, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. Each year, Omahas Stra tegic Command Consultation Committee sponsors the Omaha Trophy in rec ognizing four outstanding units. e categories reect the commands primary lines of operation, continued emphasis on strate gic deterrence, and their evolving role in global op erations. e former Strategic Air Command Consultation Committee rst presented the Omaha Trophy as a single trophy to the Strate gic Air Command in 1971 on behalf of the citizens of Omaha. e number of awards increased over the years as the commands missions and organizational struc ture changed. USSTRATCOM is one of ten U.S. unied com mands under the De partment of Defense. e command, including components, employs more than 4,300 people representing all four ser vices including DOD civilians and contractors who oversee the commands operationally-focused global strategic mission.Alaska also log on to pgatour. com/the players and nd instructions about how to obtain discounted tickets to the tournament.On May 5, e Players will host the second annual Military Veterans Job Fair from noon to 3 p.m in e Turn hospitality structure located to players left on the hill next to the 18th green of e Players Stadium Course. May 8, Military Appreciation Day, e Players will kick o the opening of the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet, with an opening ceremony at 11 a.m. that will include a wounded warrior. e Patriots Outpost will provide military guests with complimentary food and beverages and a place to view tour nament action from 11:30 a.m. to the end of play each day, from Wednes day through Sunday. On-site parking is free for all fans MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for ursday through Sunday. Fans can take advantage of the Four For Free parking incentive this year, in which any car with four or more passengers is admitted free of charge. Fans must have a voucher to park for the Four for Free program. Visit pgatour.com/theplayers to download a free parking voucher. More information about e Players is available at pgatour.com/theplayers. out the Submarine Force. ough the exact cause of the reshers loss may never be discovered, the Navys investigation leads to the conclusion that a silver-brazed joint in an engine room seawater pipe failed. As insignicant as one piece may seem initially, that single failed joint from approximately 3,000 other silver-brazed joints onboard resher may have compromised the hulls watertight integrity, and would trigger a series of terrifying events. e joint failure caused seawater to short circuit an electrical switchboard and ooded the space, which, in turn, triggered the ships reactor to shut down and initiated a loss of propulsion. With neither power nor propulsion, the boats commanding ocer, Lt. Cmdr. John Wesley Har vey, most likely ordered a main ballast tank blow that would force highpressure air into the sub marines ballast tanks. is logical order, tragical ly, may have only added to the problem, according to the Navys theory of the loss. High-pressure air is more commonly known as compressed air. Com pressed air released through a narrow passage becomes extremely cold, cold enough to freeze any moisture in the air if moisture is present. When high-pressure air was re leased, the moisture may have frozen, blocking the path from the compressed air bottles to the ballast tanks with ice. As the engine room con tinued to ood, the boats propulsion incapacitated and the ballast tanks be came incapable of making the ship buoyant, resh er likely slid backwards beyond its crush depth and imploded, instantly killing all 129 men aboard. A stunned nation de manded answers. e Navy convened a Court of Inquiry and a Design Appraisal Board to investigate the tragedy and issue ndings to help prevent another similar loss. To apply the lessons learned, the Navy stood up a new quality assur ance program less than two months after resher sank. July 8, 1963, the Chief, Bureau of Ships, now known as NAVSEA, es tablished the Submarine Safety, or SUBSAFE, Pro gram. SUBSAFE is a qual ity assurance program to provide maximum rea sonable assurance for the boats watertight integrity and to ensure it can re cover from ooding casualties. SUBSAFEs mission is to provide maximum reasonable assurance of watertight integrity and operability, and integrity of critical systems neces sary to control and recover from a ooding casualty, said Rear Adm. Joseph To falo, commander, Submarine Group Ten. e SUB SAFE program focuses its eorts on those areas or components of a subma rine that, should they fail, would result in a high like lihood of ooding and the loss of the ship. SUBSAFE encompasses all systems exposed to sea pressure or those systems critical to ooding recov ery. e entire process from the work done to the ma terials used on those sys tems is tightly controlled to ensure the materials used in their assembly, along with methods of as sembly, maintenance and testing are correct. Every submarine requires SUBSAFE certication with traceable quality evidence from delivery to the Navy and by main taining that certication throughout the life of the submarine. SUBSAFEs safety record speaks for itself. e Navy has not lost a SUBSAFE certied sub marine since the incep tion of the program. Since 1963, only USS Scorpion (SSN 589), a non-SUBSAFE certied submarine, has been lost at sea. One of the things the submarine force is very good at is determining the root cause of an event and developing the ap propriate short and long term corrective actions. e SUBSAFE program is a perfect example of this, Tofalo said. Every day, Kings Bay Sailors and the civilian workforce from Trident Ret Facility to engine room levels expertly ex ecute this comprehensive program, and in doing, so honor the memory of the 129 Americans who lost their lives on April 10, 1963. SUBSAFE is an all hands eort throughout Team Kings Bay. Everyone on base has a piece of making submarines operational and staying mis sion ready. Its part of the Team Kings Bay culture. e SUBSAFE culture stresses safety, per sonal responsibility and accountability. Asking questions is not only en couraged, but required. Avoiding assumptions and enforcing verication of requirements are also mandatory. is safety culture em bedded in the Submarine Force provides direct nonnegotiable requirements such as multiple standard ized audits which hold personnel at every level personally accountable for themselves and their fellow submariners. To perpetuate this mindset, the SUBSAFE Program holds annual, mandatory training for those within NAVSEA with SUBSAFE responsibilities. SUBSAFE Bentley

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ways to parent child abuse will continue to escalate. It is up to us as a society to increase public awareness that child abuse exists and that it can be prevented through education. Join the ght against child abuse, get your blue ribbon today. e Blue Ribbon Mis sion is: Encourage community and individual involvement in recognizing and preventing child abuse and neglect. Educate families, chil dren, neighbors, organi zations and communities on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Assist families in achieving healthy par enting practices through education and resources. Empower individuals to intervene in abuse and neglect situations when appropriate. How you can help pre vent child abuse and neglect: Educate yourself on the facts and causes of child abuse and neglect in Camden County. Volunteer at an orga nization that helps families and children. Mentor a child who may be at risk of being abused or neglected. Take a parenting class. Invite another parent to join you. Give support to a mother, father or caregiv er experiencing stress. Write letters to elected representatives in support of parent education and child abuse prevention. Arrange for a speaker at your organization or workplace to help edu cate others and spread the word about child abuse and neglect and how to keep kids safe. Help spread the child abuse prevention and healthy parenting mes sage. Cap. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, signed the NSB Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Proclamation March 25 at FFSC. As part of NSB Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Month activities, a Child Abuse Prevention Billboard Contest with the theme Every Child Counts is ongoing. Commanddecorated billboards will be placed around the base to bring awareness to Kings Bay community to Break the Cycle of child abuse. Also, Pinwheels for Prevention are blue pin wheels placed on the base to bring awareness to Break the Cycle of child abuse.Child Portsmouth Nov. 29. e ship remained in port through the end of the year and spent the rst two months of 1962 evalu ating its sonar system and Submarine Rocket system. In March, the subma rine participated in NU SUBEX 2-62, an exercise designed to improve the tactical capabilities of nuclear submarines, and in antisubmarine warfare training with Task Group ALPHA. O Charleston, the ship undertook operations observed by the Naval Antisubmarine Warfare Council, before it returned briey to New England waters, from whence it proceeded to Florida for SUBROC tests. While mooring at Port Canaveral, the submarine was accidentally struck by a tug which damaged one of its ballast tanks. After repairs at Groton, Conn., by the Electric Boat Company, the ship returned south for more tests and trials o Key West. resher then returned northward and remained in dockyard hands through the early spring of 1963. On April 9, as described in public documents, the resher was escorted by another Navy vessel, the USS Skylark (ASR-20), out to the edge of the conti nental shelf o Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where the Atlantic Ocean oor drops precipitously to 8,000 feet. e Skylark was standing by for rescue if anything went wrong at a few hundred feet, though at the depths at which they were operating there would have been little she could do if the USS resher went too deep. In company with Sky lark, resher put to sea with 16 ocers and 96 en listed men, plus 17 civilian technicians to observe her performance during the deep-diving tests. At 6:35 a.m. on the morn ing of April 10, resher spotted Skylark through its periscope to ensure Skylark was in range, and prepared to dive in stages down to maximum depth for testing. At four hundred feet, the crew checked the sub for leaks in the hull, the t tings and the plumbing. en the sub descended further. At 7:45 a.m., resher reported that it was at half her test depth. A little over an hour later, at 9:02 AM, a request came from the resher to Skylarks navigator to re peat a course heading. A minute later came a slightly more disturbing message: Experiencing minor problem. Have pos itive angle. It remains uncertain what was happening at this time, but the best the ory, based on the Naval in vestigation report, is that some pipes had started to leak in the submarines engine room. ese leaks allowed electrically conductive seawater to get into the electronics that controlled the nuclear reactor, which in turn short ed out and shut the reac tor down. In order to lighten the vehicle, so that the weak ened propellers could get it to the surface, or even allow the sub to oat up on its own, the normal pro cedure would be to blow the water out of the ballast tanks and ll them with air, increasing the submarines buoyancy. at the subs crew were attempt ing to do so is evidenced by the next message from the stricken craft, shortly after the rst troubling message Attempting to blow. e microphone then picked up sounds of compressed air being blown through the lines to the ballast tanks. At this point, Navy in vestigators believe, based on tests performed later on another vessel, strain ers in the lines upstream of the ballast tank valves iced up. is occurs because the high volume of air moving past the strain ers at such high velocity would have caused them to cool rapidly. Icing up of the strainers would have reduced the air ow such that ei ther the tanks couldnt be cleared at all, or at least not fast enough, because its clear that the boat con tinued to sink. ere was only one more ominous voice communication: ...test depth. From this point on, the only sounds picked up by the open microphone were the distinctive and dismaying creaks of straining metal and fasteners as the craft sank deeper and started to crush under the unimaginable external pressure. e submarine eventually broke into several pieces, killing almost instantly all 129 crew and observers aboard. It continued to sink, falling almost two miles to the oor of the Atlan tic, prematurely ending the career of the most ad vanced submarine built to that date. Rescue ship Recovery (ASR-43) subsequently recovered bits of debris, in cluding gloves and bits of internal insulation. Photographs taken by bathyscaph Trieste proved that the submarine had broken up, taking all hands on board to their deaths in 5,500 of water, some 220 miles east of Boston. resher was ocially declared lost in April 1963. Navy investigation found the proximate cause of the disaster was the leak of seawater into the reactor control elec tronics. This shut down the reactor, resulting in the inability of the boat to control itself or get back to the surface. According to published reports, there were per haps several factors that came together to destroy the resher and its crew. e leak itself probably occurred because of faulty brazing of the piping at the shipyard. Prior to the resher loss, the instal lation procedure for pipes less than four inches in di ameter was to put a silver ring at the joint between two points and braze it with a torch. Subsequent investigation of other ships after the accident showed that, though joints created in this manner appeared solid, when broken apart there was no silver in them, indicating that they were much weaker than had been previously esti mated. In general, the design and standards for the non-nuclear portions of the vessel seemed to have been more lax than those for the nuclear reactor and its associated systems. e icing of the line strainers, resulting in the failure of the ballast tanks to empty themselves of water fast enough, also contributed to events. is latter problem was a failure to meet design specication. Had either of these methods for sur facing been eective, the reactor loss would likely not have been catastroph ic, because the crew could have dealt with the leaks and reactor problems on the surface. Finally, had the test ing occurred in shallower water, per haps with the ocean bot tom just slight ly be low test depth, in which the Skylark could have potentially come to their aid, the crew might have been saved, if not resher it self. resher is in six ma jor sections on the ocean oor, with the majority in a single debris eld about 400 yards square. e major sections are the sail, sonar dome, bow section, engineering spaces, oper ations spaces and the tail section. Owing to the pressur ized-water nuclear reactor in the engine room, deep ocean radiological monitoring operations were conducted in August 1983 and August 1986. e site had been previously mon itored in 1965 and 1977 and none of the samples obtained showed any evidence of release of radioactivity from the reactor fuel elements. Fission products were not detected above con centrations typical of worldwide background levels in sediment, water, or marine life samples. As a result of the loss of the resher, a major new initiative was under taken by the Navy, called SUBSAFE, to reform design and manufacturing processes. Part of this initiative was to end the practice of brazing smaller pipes, and to instead start welding and doing x-ray inspection of joints to ver ify their integrity. It also resulted in chang es in designs of the system that blows out the ballast tanks, providing a capa bility to do so seven times faster than the system used in the USS resher. resher now faces. Stratcoms primary mis sion objective is to de ter strategic attack on the U.S., our allies and part ners by making anyone who might contemplate such an attack recognize that they will not achieve their goals and will pay an extraordinary price if they try, he told Congress ear lier this month. Providing that deter rence is no longer a onesize-ts-all proposition, he explained, and has to be tailored to each individual threat and challenge. In practice, 21st-century deterrence encompasses a wider range of complementary tools, the general said: nuclear, conventional and nonkinetic capabilities; limited missile defenses; and un fettered access and use of space and cyberspace. And reective of the U.S. emphasis on whole-ofgovernment approaches to national security challenges, he said, it also in cludes soft power con tributions from across the interagency spectrum. How to bring this all to gether is heady stu, and opinions vary widely in how to provide this 21stcentury form of deterrence. Its a subject that Kehler and his Stratcom sta fo cus on every day, work ing in lock-step with their military and U.S. government partners to maintain strong deterrence that protects the United States and assures its allies and friends, Stratcom ocials said. Yet ironically, o cials here note a dearth of the kind of discussion that owed freely when the challenge was so much less daunting. So Stratcom is actively stirring up debate and so liciting diverse viewpoints as it strives to shape an ap proach to deterrence for now and into the future, Pat McKenna, Stratcoms plans evaluation and research division chief, told American Forces Press Service. e command spon sors an annual symposium that brings together hundreds of experts from the military, government, industry and international realms and academic leaders to delve into the subject. Stratcom also sponsors an annual writ ing contest to encourage critical thinking among students and professors at senior military colleges, as well as civilian colleges and universities, on the theories of strategic de terrence and how it is ap plied. e Gen. Larry D. Welch Writing Award is named to honor the former Strategic Air Command command er who went on to become the Air Force chief of sta and, after retirement, president of the Institute of Defense Analysis. e goal of these eorts is to stimulate discussion that generates a deeper understanding of the is sue, McKenna said. e upcoming sympo sium, scheduled for July, will include several keynote speakers and panel discus sions that highlight the full spectrum of viewpoints. What we strive to do is bring those alternative points of view together in a public forum and invigo rate the debate, McKenna said. We want this to be a catalyst to push that de bate along and get a ro bust discussion going on so we can examine many of the issues. Delving into the issue helps to provide insight into what promotes deter rence and what doesnt, and how seemingly posi tive approaches can back re if not applied correctly, he said. e discussion enlightens leaders at Strat com and across the De fense Department and U.S. government as they strive to achieve deterrence in a changing geopolitical en vironment, he added. e symposium en genders and reinvigorates the debate so we can un derstand those issues, McKenna said. And understanding the diversity of opinion on the subject is important as not only Stratcom, but the U.S. gov ernment as a whole strives to implement policies and procedures to achieve their objectives.Stratcom As a result of the loss, a major new initiative called SUBSAFE was undertaken. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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I guess every so often reality smacks me across the face like a cold mackerel. For whatever reason, I thought this question would bring all sorts of wonder ful answers, like Vacationing in Katmandu, Getting a new Mercedes-Benz, or Buying caviar and treating my friends. Not hardly. In this day and age, you see the notnearly-so-glamorous results. Still, Im impressed by the practical and responsible answers given here. Me? Im taking my money and blowing it on a trip to Boise, Idaho, to relive an old liberty call with two of my 1970s ship mates, including one who lives there. Wahoo! I should buy new tires. But, alas, Im terminally adolescent.ETCS Ronnie Tucker Naval Submarine Support Center Montgomery, Ala. I already got it, and I already spent it on bills. QMC Lawan Jackson Port Operations Winchester, Ark. Paying bills. MASN Alexandra Wiens Security Force Battalion Austin, Texas Restoring my bank account. BU2 James Delduco Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Poughquag, N.Y. Im using it to pay bills. MC1 James Kimber Submarine Group 10 Portland, Ore. People get tax returns? SW2 Andres Hoven Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Edina, Minn. Im saving for a home. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Al ternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club mem bers, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Priz es will be awarded for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Putting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 5738475. Kidsfest 2013 April is Child Abuse Prevention Month and Month of the Military Child so MWR is Celebrating Children 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 13 at the Under the Pines Park and tennis courts. Giant inflat ables, face painting, Fun Zones, costume characters, photo ops, cake walk, arts and crafts, and youth demonstrations by Crooked River State Park and Paks Karate. Food will be avail able for purchase. Call (912) 573-4564 for more information. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years and older. Game rules are 5-v-5, with best of three games and double elimination. Maximum of 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. 2nd Annual Information, Tickets and Travel/Outdoor Adventure Center Open House Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Last Air bender April 4, Happy Feet April 5, Hotel Transylvania April 6 and 7, Dr. Seuss: e Lorax April 13 and 14, Wreck-It-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be avail able for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 MWR Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Marines with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit, alongside members of the Japan Ground SelfDefense Force, conducted a closing ceremony for Exercise Iron Fist 2013, at Camp Pendleton, Calif. recently. e purpose of the an nual bilateral amphibious exercise is to improve interoperability, enhance military-to-military relations, hone individual and small-unit skills neces sary for eective crisis re sponse, and to eectively conduct contingency operations across the Pacic. Exercise Iron Fist 2013, a continuation of our bi lateral military-to-military training and engagement, has proven successful in many ways, said Col. Christopher D. Taylor, commanding ocer of 13th MEU. Our training and social engagement over the last couple of weeks has allowed us to build warrior bonds and personal friendships; we have gained a better understanding of each others culture and enhanced our tactical skills in par ticular in our amphibious capabilities. And of course, we have had some fun. For three weeks, infantry Marines with 1st Bat talion, 4th Marine Regi ment, romped through southern Californias most rugged military training facilities with troops from Japans Western Army Infantry Regiment aboard Camp Pendleton, in the desert terrain of the Marine Air-Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms and aboard the Navys USS Boxer (LHD4) and USS Pearl Harbor before conducting a nal training event at San Cle mente Island. e exercise aorded the Marines and members of JGSDF to conduct an exchange of knowledge on weaponry, maneuver war fare tactics and get their boots wet during rapid, expeditious amphibious operations. As our two great Na tions continue to develop our military relationship, we will be able to look back on this exercise and see its importance, Taylor said. e personal friend ships and appreciation of each others culture gained here will continue to be important parts of the trust relationships we have built upon. e US Japanese strategic part nership is stronger than ever. Marines and members of the JGSDF were also af forded the unique oppor tunity to train alongside the 13th MEUs aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squad ron 166, based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif. During the exercise VMM-166 employed their CH-53E Super Stallion and MV-22 Osprey heli copters to further enhance ship-to-shore movement aboard the Navys USS Boxer (LHD-4) to San Cle mente Island. We will analyze the results of this exercise to enhance our capabil ity, identify points of improvements, and return together to gain and re ect on the education of our soldiers and Marines of tomorrow, Kunii said. I greatly appreciate the hospitality given from the bottom of all the Marines and Sailors hearts. Im looking forward to training with U.S. Marines and Navy again. Exercise Iron Fist 2013 is just one of a variety of bi-lateral exercises conducted to strengthen the bond between U.S. and Ja pan forces. Marines with 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade are slated to team up with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit and a larger group of Japan forces in June for the second portion of Ex ercise Dawn Blitz 13.2. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, May 17, inflatables will be up and on-site with weather permitting. Wet N Wild and Westgate resorts will be on-site for questions and promotions. OAC is offering 25 per cent off all moonwalk and slide rent als reserved at the event for anytime in May and June. ITT will be doing a Grand Prize drawing for a two-night stay at Westgate Resorts in Orlando, plus four tickets to Wet N Wild. The drawing will be at 2 p.m. on May 17, and you must be present to win. Starting May 1, any purchase made at OAC/ITT will give you a chance to get an additional ticket for the Grand Prize drawing. For more information, call (912) 573-8103. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation show ing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate pro motions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at RackN-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more infor mation? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basket ball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-9492.MWR MSC ships supply outpost Military Sealift Command-chartered ships concluded cargo operations April 2 in Port Hue neme, Calif., for Operation Deep Freeze, the annual Joint Task Force Support for Antarctica. MSC-chartered container ship MV Ocean Gi ant arrived in Port Huen eme March 27 and began ooading more than 500 pieces of cargo. e cargo included containers lled with retrograde materials such as trash and recyclable mate rials for disposal and rolling stock equipment removed from the remote scientic outpost at McMurdo Sta tion Antarctica. In addition to the retrograde materials, ice-core samples were delivered for future use by sci entists who study the global climate. Reserve Sailors from Ex peditionary Port Unit 114 served as pierside liaison between the ship, cargo handlers and the National Science Foundation per sonnel during the ooad. Operation Deep Freeze is a mission of teamwork; teamwork between the personnel and the climate, said Larry Larsson, an MSC military transportation specialist. is season we achieved uncommon results, in a very challenging location. It was a fantastic eort by all who supported ODF and a true example of our motto, MSC delivers. One of two MSC-char tered ships supporting this years ODF operations, Ocean Giant was ac companied in Antarctica by MSC-charted ship MV Maersk Perry. Perry provided 100 per cent of the diesel fuel, jet fuel and gasoline needed for the sustainment of the station through the harsh winter period. e Perry also provided fuel for the National Science Foundations char tered scientic research ship R/V Nathanial B. Palmer and the ice-break er I/B Vladimir Ignatyuk. An MSC-chartered car go ship and tanker have made the challenging voy age to Antarctica every year since the station was established in 1955. MSC operates approximately 110 non-combat ant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by de ployed U.S. forces and co alition partners. Japanese train with Corps e largest renewable energy project in U.S. military history is slated to begin soon at Fort Bliss, Texas, a big step toward the installations goal of generating all the energy it uses, Army Maj. Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, the in stallation and 1st Armored Division commander, announced April 5. e Army Corps of En gineers gave the ocial nod this week for El Paso Electric to start work on a 20-megawatt solar farm that will power all of the division headquarters and most of the eastern sector of the sprawling installation, Pittard told reporters at a news conference. e partnership is the rst between the military and a major local util ity on a renewable energy project of this scale, he re ported. is is the largest solar project at any installation to date in [the Defense Department]. We are very, very proud of that, he said. It is exciting to be leading the American mil itary in renewable energy, [and] reducing our carbon footprint, both goals of Fort Bliss environmental campaign plan. e solar farm, to be completed in 2015, is just one part of the posts sweeping plans to re duce its energy consump tion and dependence on nonrenewable energy. Fort Bliss already hosts a 1.4-megawatt solar ar ray, the Armys secondlargest, and has installed a 13.4-megawatt rooftop solar array on post hous ing. In addition, another 20-megawatt contract with El Paso Electric is in the works, as well as a plan with the city of El Paso to convert waste to energy, Pittard said. Meanwhile, installation ocials are pursuing wind and geothermal initiatives and promoting recycling and more e cient water use, he said. ey also planted 14,700 trees well on their way to the goal of 20,000 and have built bike and walk ing paths and encouraged people to use fuel-ecient vehicles. e goal, Pittard told reporters, is to achieve Net Zero, meaning the post creates all the energy it uses. While reducing Fort Bliss carbon footprint and energy costs, the initia tives will contribute to the Armys energy conservation and security goal of using 25 percent renewable energy by 2015. Fort Bliss to launch militarys largest renewable energy project

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel today sig naled possible big changes ahead for his department in acquisition, personnel and organization on April 3, as he delivered his rst major policy speech as Pentagon chief. Hagel outlined his plan of attack for the strategic and nancial challenges the Defense Department faces during remarks at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C. We need to challenge all past assumptions, and we need to put everything on the table, he said. Hagel said DODs task is to prepare for the future, but not in a way that ne glects, or is oblivious to, the realities of the pres ent. At his direction, Hagel said, Deputy Defense Sec retary Ash Carter, working with Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, is leading a review of the departments strategic choices and management. e review is intended to identify the challenges, uncertainties, risks and opportunities connected to both strategic priorities and budget uncertainty. Its also about matching missions with resources looking at ends, ways and means, he said. e review will consider big choices, change that involves not just tweaking or chipping away at exist ing structures and practic es but, where necessary, fashioning entirely new ones that are better suited to 21st-century realities and challenges, the secre tary said. Reshaping the defense enterprise means con fronting the principal drivers of growth in the departments base bud get namely acquisitions, personnel costs and over head, Hagel said. e Pentagons biggest budget challenge is not its top-line budget, he said, but where that money is being spent internally. Spiraling costs to sustain existing structures and in stitutions, to provide per sonnel benets, and to develop replacements for aging weapons platforms will, if unchecked, even tually crowd out spending on procurement, op erations and readiness, he said, which are the budget categories that enable the military to be, and stay, prepared. Hagel said the U.S. mili tary has grown more de ployable, expeditionary, exible, lethal and cer tainly more professional since 9/11. It has also grown sig nicantly older as measured by the age of major platforms and it has grown enormously more expensive in every way, he said. e department will get out ahead of challenges, Hagel said. He said he has told the senior leaders across the department and the ser vices that we are all in this together, and we will come out of it together. Hagel said the militarys modernization strategy still depends on systems that are vastly more ex pensive and technologi cally risky than what were promised or budgeted for. e department must develop an acquisition system that responds more quickly and eectively to the needs of troops and commanders in the eld, he said, one that rewards cost-eectiveness so that our programs do not continue to take longer, cost more and deliver less than initially planned and promised. On the personnel front, Hagel said, DOD lead ers must determine how many military and civil ian people they have, how many they need, and how to compensate them for their service. He said that process will involve questioning the right mix of civilian and military members, the right balance between of cer and enlisted service members, and the appro priate troop strength dedicated to combat, support and administrative duties. Hagel said he also advocates a hard look at de fense organization. e militarys opera tional forces, its battalions, ships and aircraft wings, have shrunk dramatically since the Cold War era, he noted. Yet the threeand four-star command and support structures sitting atop these smaller ghting forces have stayed intact, with minor exceptions, he added, and in some cases, they are actually increasing in size and rank. Hagel said the review will examine funding for those headquarters and support structures, along with DOD elements including the Oce of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Sta, the combatant commands and the de fense agencies and eld activities. e military is not, and should never be, run like a corporation, Ha gel said. But that does not mean we dont have a good deal to learn from what the private sector has achieved over the past 20 to 30 years, in which reducing layers of upper and middle management not only reduced costs and micromanagement, it also led to more agile and ef fective organizations and more empowered junior leaders. e secretary acknowl edged that making dra matic changes in acqui sition systems, benets and force structure could prove unwise, untenable or politically impossible. Yet we have no choice but to take a very close look and see how we can do all of this better, he said. Hagel noted that his two immediate predecessors as defense secretary Leon E. Panetta and Robert M. Gates each led eorts to cut costs across the department. But sequester cuts and budget uncertainty have led to far more abrupt and deeper reductions than were planned or ex pected, he added. Now, DOD is grappling with the serious and immediate challenges of se quester, which is forcing us to take as much as a $41 billion cut in this current scal year, and if it contin ues, will reduce projected defense spending by an other $500 billion over the next decade, the secretary said. Much more hard work, dicult decisions and strategic prioritizing re main to be done, he said, and deep political and institutional obstacles to necessary reforms will need to be engaged and overcome. e secretary said the departments enduring mission, defending the nation and advancing Americas strategic inter ests, must be approached in the context of unprec edented shifts in the world order, new global chal lenges and deep global s cal uncertainty. e 21st-century secu rity landscape is marked by the threat of violent ex tremism from weak states and ungoverned spaces in the Middle East and North Africa, Hagel said. Other security issues, he said, include the pro liferation of weapons and materials; increasing ac cess to advanced military technology among state and nonstate actors, risks of regional conict that could draw in the United States, and the debilitat ing and dangerous curse of human despair and poverty, as well as the un certain implications of en vironmental degradation. Hagel said cyberattacks, which barely registered as a threat a decade ago, have grown into a dening security challenge which allows enemies to strike security, energy, economic and other criti cal infrastructure with the benet of anonymity and distance. All in all, Hagel said, the world is combustible and complex, and Americas responsibilities are enor mous. e militarys role in Hagel: DOD review will lead to big choices THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 11

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meeting those responsibilities is essential, he said, but as part of a total government approach. Most of the pressing security challenges today have important political, economic, and cultural components, and do not necessarily lend themselves to being resolved by conventional military strength, the secretary noted. Defense leaders need time, exibility, budget certainty and partnership with Congress to eective ly explore new approaches to acquisition, personnel, and overhead costs, he said. Hagel emphasized that future strategic planning will emphasize DODs inherent strengths of leadership development, training, mobility and lo gistics, special operations, cyber, space, and research and development. e goal of the senior leadership of this depart ment today is to learn from the miscalculations and mistakes of the past drawdowns, and make the right decisions that will sustain our military strength, ad vance our strategic inter ests, and protect our na tion well into the future, Hagel said. e secretary concluded with some comments on the nations role in the world. Amid budget tur moil, nancial crisis and a war-weary population, Hagel said, questions arise about Americas global leadership. America does not have the luxury of retrenchment, the secretary as serted. We have too many global interests at stake, including our security, prosperity, and our future. If America leaves a leadership vacuum, he said, the next great power may not be as judicious or re sponsible as the United States has been since World War II. We have made mis takes and miscalculations with our great power, Hagel said. But as history has advanced, America has helped make a better world for all people with its power. A world where America does not lead is not the world I wish my children to inherit. Quoting President eodore Roosevelt, Hagel said America cannot bear these responsibilities aright unless its voice is potent for peace and justice with the assured self-condence of the just man armed. What distinguishes America and its people, he said, is our commitment to making a better life for all people. We are a wise, thought ful and steady nation, wor thy of our power, generous of spirit, and humble in our purpose, he added. at is the America we will defend together, with the purpose and self-condence of the just man armed. ers, a Womens Flat Track Roller Derby Team. As a member of the Rollers, she partners with Go Yoga Amelia Island to pioneer ROGA which is a form of yoga for roller derby. Chufo was selected as TRFs Pub lic Aairs Ocer and has been rec ognized for resurrecting the TRF newsletter, the Trident Tribute. MWR said Chufo is highly regarded within TRF, as well as NSB Kings Bay community, as a passionate in dividual who constantly strives to improve her and others. Athletes ReviewGermans join carrier group e German Sachsenclass frigate Hamburg (F220) is the rst German ship to fully integrate and deploy with an American carrier strike group, and April 3 marked its second week of operating in the North Arabian Sea with USS Dwight D. Eisenhow er (CVN 69). e Hamburg will stay a part of the strike group un til the groups completion of operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Respon sibility. Both Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, com mander CSG 8, and Cmdr. Ralf Kuchler, commanding ocer of Hamburg, hope this is the start of a long partnership between their two countries. It has been a pleasure to work with Hamburg, Manazir said. She has integrated seamlessly with our strike group and I would feel condent de ploying with a German ship in any situation. While this is the rst time a German ship has been part of a carrier strike group, it is not the rst time one has trained and deployed with American ships. FGS Hessen (F221) completed interoperability exercises and deployed with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in 2010, but de tached in the Mediterra nean Sea. German ships routinely collaborate with American ships in the European Unions Operation Atalan ta, an anti-piracy mission around the Horn of Africa, as Hamburg did in 2011. While integration was slow at rst to allow time for the sides to get ac quainted with one anoth er, Hamburg now helps IKE by coordinating the air space around the strike group and in defense of its surface assets. is is the role Kuchler said he foresees German Sachsen-class frigates ful lling in the future. Within Carrier Strike Group 8, my mission is to provide the admiral the same service he is used from a U.S. cruiser within the boundaries of my na tional rules of engage ment, which is to safely coordinate the airspace around the carrier and to protect IKE if the situation demands, Kuchler said. Hamburg is suited to do that, as she has some simi lar surface-to-air and antiship missiles. e Sachsen-class frigate is the only ship in the western world with three types of surface to air mis siles: the Standard Missile 2 block IIIA, the Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile and the Rolling Airframe Mis sile. Soldiers have been sup portive of the eorts, col lectively raising $1 million last year through recy cling. e proceeds were channeled to Morale, Welfare and Recreation projects such as skating parks and spinning cycles, prompting even more re cycling, which Pittard said he hopes will reach $1.5 million this year. Everybody is getting involved in that, because they see the positive re sults of recycling, he said. Pittard also reported a dramatic drop in elec tricity use in post housing. Changing behavior and promoting a culture that encourages energy conservation are keys to achieving Net Zero. As en couraged as he is by Fort Bliss progress, Pittard said he sees a link between these eorts and his pri mary mission of ensuring combat-ready forces. e solar farm, along with our environment campaign plan, are both part of a larger eort to make Fort Bliss the most t, most healthy, most resilient community in America that is environ mentally sound and is best at preparing soldiers and units for combat, he said. As soldiers take advantage of more outdoor spaces, theyre getting out of their barracks and es tablishing a closer sense of community, Pittard said.Energy 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 13 Responses to North Korea will be measured U.S. leaders are taking North Korean threats seriously and will continue to make measured re sponses to Kim Jong Uns bellicosity, Defense Sec retary Chuck Hagel said in Washington D.C., April 3. e secretary spoke to students at the National Defense University at Fort Lesley J. McNair. The North Korean leader has threat ened to shell the South Korean capital of Seoul and to launch mis siles at Guam, Hawaii and the western United States. He also rescinded the armistice North Korea signed with the United Nations in 1953 that ended hostilities on the Korean Peninsula. Earlier, he an nounced he was restarting a nuclear plant to produce more weapons-grade uranium and plutonium. It only takes being wrong once, and I dont want to be the secretary of defense that was wrong once, Hagel said in answer to a students ques tion. We will continue to take these threats serious ly. I hope the North will ratchet this very danger ous rhetoric down. For decades, ocials have urged North Korean leaders to abide by the agreements they signed. ese include a denuclearized Korean Peninsula and an end to provoca tions against South Korea. But the North Korean governments behavior has resulted in sanctions, and millions of children there have had their growth stunted by malnu trition. e world is willing to help North Korea, Hagel said. But they have to be a responsible member of the world community, he added. You dont achieve that responsibility and peace and prosperity by making nuclear threats and taking very provocative actions. North Korea has a nu clear capacity and is work ing on the missile systems to deliver those weapons. As they have ratcheted up their dangerous, bel licose rhetoric, [North Korea presents] a real and clear danger and threat to American allies and the U.S. homeland itself, the secretary said. I think we have taken measured responses to those threats. We are undergoing joint exercises with the South Koreans now. We are doing everything we can, working with the Chinese and others, to defuse the situation on the peninsula. e secretary spoke with new Chinese De fense Minister Gen. Chang Wanquan, April 2. e two men discussed ways for the two nations to work together. e United States and China can bridge their dierences by concentrat ing on common interests, Hagel said. Its not dier ences that matter, it is how you deal with them, he said. You build a platform for a relationship on your common interests, not on your dierences. North Korea is a good example of a common in terest, the secretary said. Certainly, the Chinese dont want a complicated and combustible situation to explode into a worse situation, he said. Its not in their interests for that to happen. Its certainly not in our interest or our allies interests. Missiles deployed to Guam e Defense Depart ment will deploy a Ter minal High Altitude Area Defense System, or THAAD, ballistic missile defense system to Guam in the coming weeks as a precaution ary move to strengthen the regional defense posture against the North Korean regional ballistic missile threat, Pentagon ocials an nounced April 3. e THAAD system is a land-based missile defense system that includes a truck-mount ed launcher, a complement of interceptor missiles, an AN/TPY-2 tracking radar and an integrated re control system.

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Bentley onboard PlayersCountry music star to play at PGA Tours Salute to Navy May 8Continuing a PGA Tour tradition of honoring men and women in uniform, e Players Championship unveiled a full slate of activities and programs that will take place during the 2013 event as part of Birdies for the Brave, a military outreach initiative proudly supported by the PGA Tour. Highlighting the military appreciation activities in the tradition of years past, e Players announced, along with Capitol Records Nashville, that country music star Dierks Bentley will give a special performance on Wednesday, May 8, during Military Appreciation Day, as the tournament returns to e Players Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass, May 6 to 12. On May 8, Bentley will be a part of the Military Appreciation Day ceremony, this year themed, A Salute to the United States Navy. e program on the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse Lawn will include pageantry by military personnel. In addition to Bentleys performance, e Players will provide all active duty, retired, and Reserve military personnel along with their dependents with complimentary admission to the tournament all week. e Players also oers discounted admission to veterans. Military members who are interested in the complimentary admission should go to pgatour. com/the players and click on the ticket link for instructions about how to gain complimentary access to the tournament, which is a dierent process than the past. Non-ca reer military veterans should Lt. Kelly Chufo, MT1 Jerey Alexander, Trident Ret honored Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay recognized those military athletes on March 27 that dedicate their time and eort to sports, their military duties, and their communities. Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Kings Bay sponsored the event to recognize those athletes who encompass what this event means. e Male Athlete of the Year was MT1 Jerey Alexander. e Female Athlete of the Year was Lt. Kelly Chufo. Along with the male and female athlete of the year, MWR awarded Trident Ret Facility the Kings Bay Captains Cup, for the second year in a row. e Captains Cup Program is comprised of various sporting events. e team that accumulates the most points wins and has its name engraved on the Captains Cup trophy and a banner displayed at the Fitness Complex. MWR reported Alexanders combination of outstanding military accomplishments, intramural sports participation and seless community involvement has made him the committees selection. Alexander participated in several intramural sports programs, including the regional Tri-Base Softball and ag football tournaments. He has also acted as captain and player/coach for several teams and encouraged participation from his fellow sailors. Notable service recognitions that Alexander received during his military career include an Admirals Letter of Appreciation for his service at SWFLANT, as well as Commanding Ocers Letter of Appreciation for his service aboard USS Wyoming. Alexander has an impressive history of community involvement and charity work. As a member of the NSB Kings Bay Honor Guard, he is the acting Funeral Detail Coordinator. In his position, he has coordinated and/or participated in 59 funeral service details. Other notable volunteer contributions include a 9/11 memorial ceremony at Trident Training Facility, a Wounded Warrior memorial in St. Marys and the Lost Submarine Memorial in St. Marys. MWR said Alexander distinguishes himself as an exemplary sailor while on-duty and a selfless humanitarian in the local and military communities. Chufo has shown herself to be a shining example of enthusiasm and passion for both her military career, as well as physical tness here at Kings Bay, the MWR selection process noted. Her tireless dedication to the tness and well-being of her peers both on-base and in the community has made her the committees selection. Chufo is most famous for her leadership during the TRF command Physical Training, her participation in all base runs and her encouragement of individuals in the Fitness Complex. She goes above and beyond to help others get in better shape and become healthier. Chufo is a player/tness coach for the Fernandina RollUp Periscope What will you do with your tax refund? Page 9 Coming soon NSB Kings Bays 35th anniversary May 22, 23 Good causes Children out to stop bullying, child abuse Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com In the early years of the nuclear Navy, the most advanced submarine in the world sank during testing and was ultimately crushed by water pressure due to a chain of events that ostensibly started with a small leak of seawater. If so, the sub was destroyed by the simplest of causes bad brazing in some of its pipes. e disaster killed all aboard the sub and led to the revamping of many of the manufacturing processes for both surface and undersea U.S. naval vessels. It also helped spur the development of deep-sea exploration vehicles. e second USS resher (SSN-593) was laid down on May 28, 1958 by the Portsmouth, N.H., Naval Shipyard and launched on July 9 1960. e nuclear-powered submarine was sponsored by Mrs. Frederick B. Warder and commissioned on Aug. 3, 1961, with Cmdr. Dean W. Axene in command. Following trials, the nuclear attack submarine took part in Nuclear submarine Exercise 3-61 o the northeastern coast of the United States from Sept. 18 to 24. On Oct. 18, the submarine headed south along the east coast. After calling at San Juan, Puerto Rico, it conducted further trials and testred its torpedo system, before returning to Stratcom broadens dialogue on nature of situation changesNo one can accuse Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler, commander of U.S. Strategic Command, of seeking out yes men. For the past four years, he has hosted an annual symposium near the Stratcom headquarters here to shed new light on the whole concept of deterrence and how the command strives to provide it on behalf of the Defense Department. Getting those far-ung views was relatively easy during the Cold War, when the discourse lled lecture halls and library shelves around the world. Deterrence was pretty straightfor ward at that time: attack the United States or its allies, and you risk a devastating counterattack. Recognition by both the United States and the Soviet Union of the consequences -mutually assured destruction -is considered a key factor in preventing the Cold War from escalating into an outright conict. But while nuclear deterrence remains vital to U.S. security today, Kehler said, its not enough to protect the United States against the range of threats it Strategic deterrence concepts evolving USS Alaska (SSBN 732), homeported at Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, is the 2012 Omaha Trophy winner in the Submarine Ballistic Missile catetory. Gen. C. Robert Kehler, Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, recently announced all 2012 Omaha Trophy winners. e honor awarded annually to military units demonstrating the highest performance standards in USSTRATCOMs mission USS Alaska earns Omaha resher lost 50 years agoMWR recognizes top athletes, teams SUBSAFE culture prospersSafety programs record unblemished in nuclear sub eetOn April 10, 1963, the Navys most technologically advanced and newest nuclear powered submarine, USS resher (SSN 593), would lose communication with the surface while engaged in a deep test dive o the coast of Massachusetts. All 112 Sailors and 17 civilian technicians were lost that horric day. Remembering the tragic loss on what marks the 50th commemoration of reshers sinking and understanding its impact on todays Submarine Safety culture echoes through

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 NAVADMIN 084/13 released April 1 provides a summary on all Navy Working Uniform Type I related guid ance and announces the authorized wear of the aiguillette and the ex panded wear of the 9-inch rough side out and 8-inch ight deck steel toed safety boots with the NWU Type I. We believe we owed our Sailors the best opportunity to be successful with regards to the uniform wear of the NWU and felt like if we captured all the information into a single NAVADMIN, that would be the right thing to do, said Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Mike Stevens. Providing this clarity and education is very important to me. Since the roll-out of the NWU Type I in December 2008, Fleet input has resulted in the revised policy and rules of wear. NAVADMIN 084/13 discusses in detail the description, uniform components, standards of appearance, occasions for wear, and proper care instructions. e NAVADMIN, at commanding ocers discretion, expands the au thorized footwear to be worn with NWU Type I to include a black 9-inch leather (smooth) steel-toed boot, a black 9-inch rough side out leather steel toed boot and a black 8-inch aviation ight deck steel toed boot. Also at the commanding ocers discretion, aiguillettes can be worn with the NWU Type I shirt and parka by personnel assigned to billets in which aiguillettes are a prescribed uniform item. Personnel should be aware that puncturing the outer shell of the parka will compromise the manufacturers water proof guarantee and void the lifetime warranty. Parkas that are punctured or torn will have to be repaired or replaced at the owners expense. e Kings Bay Employer Committee has set a deadline of 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, for students who live in Camden County to apply for two $500 college scholarships. e funding for the scholarships will come from an endowment fund established in 2005 in memory of the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died in 2003. Foreman was an employment marketing representative at the Kings Bay Career Center. Under the endowment fund, the scholarships will be granted to graduating seniors, including homeschoolers, who live in Camden County and are entering their freshman year at an accredited institution of higher education. In addition to attending school, applicants must also be working part-time for a minimum of 15 hours per week. e scholarships are nonrenewable and not based on nancial need. To qualify for the scholarships, applicants must submit an application, school records, test scores, and a two-to-three page essay. e theme of the essay is how to use education and training to develop or support a new business or industry in the Kings Bay area. Scholarship recipients will be selected by the employer committees scholarship subcommittee. Questions should be directed to Rachel Baldwin, a scholarship subcommittee member, at rbaldwin@ camden.k12.ga.us or call her at (912) 729-4790. All documents must be submitted by the 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22, deadline to be considered. Applications for the scholarships are available at the Georgia Department of Labors Kings Bay Career Center, at 406 Osborne St. in St. Marys. For additional information, contact Faith Copeland-Pittman at the career center at (912) 673-6942. Employer committees are groups of local business representatives who establish and maintain working relationships between employers and GDOL career centers. e Kings Bay Employer Committee works with the Kings Bay Career Center. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Special Olympics seeks volunteerse Area 16 Georgia Special Olympics will be at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay May 2 and is seeking volunteers to help sta this event. An appreciation cookout for volunteers will follow. Any interested persons should contact EM1 Cody Guidry at cody.j.guidry@ navy.mil or (912) 573-2550.NMCRS Stroller Strut April 13A Stroller Strut, benetting the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 13, at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fitness Center outdoor track. e event includes door prizes for registered walkers, a stroller decoration competition and prizes for most laps walked. Registration is $5. Registration forms are available at the Fitness Complex and the NMCRS.Gulfstream exec MOAA speakerMichael Creo, senior human resources manager of Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. in Brunswick, Ga., will be the guest speaker at the April 16 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association. e events begins with a 5:30 p.m. social hour at Osprey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Meal cost is $20. RSVP by April 12 with Capt. Oreen Crouch, USN (Re.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.Flying models show April 20The Kings Bay RC Modelers First Annual Field Day and RC Air Show is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 20, weather permitting, no rain date planned yet, at Oakwell RC Airfield at the end of Clarks Bluff and Oakwell Road. Visit www.kingsbayrc.com for location, pictures and updates. Events included a full-scale ultralight fly-in and display, displays of a 1923 Ford T-Bucket, a 1936 Studebaker and RC planes. Flight demonstrations begin at 11 a.m. If turn out is good, there also will be a Night Flying Demonstration with mini LED Parachute drop at 9 p.m. that evening. Bring a chair and enjoy a bon-fire. Food and drink available on site.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Now hear this! Deadline for scholarships April 22 Employer Committee Working uniform regs changed Naval Personnel As Sailors prepare to participate in the Semi-Annual Physical Fitness Assessment, Navy Physical Readiness Program ocials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accurate, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Moore added that just like an individual would check their bank account after payday, Sailors need to check their PRIMS following a PFA. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guidelines established in the Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reects non-participation status due to deployment, IA, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any corrections can be made by the CFL at the command level. After six months of PFA completion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals commanding ofcer, on letter head, that grants authorization to make the change. In most cases the data is going to be correct, but since the CFL is entering data by hand for the entire command, it is possible that a number may get transposed or a line of data missed, Moore said. e sooner a discrepancy is identied, the faster it can be xed. PRIMS was introduced in 2002 as the Navys ocial source for Sailors PFA data. It is used to monitor and track the progress of active-duty and Reserve personnel and identify, screen, educate and monitor members.Sailors need to verify PRIMS data Naval Personnel Navy ocials encourage topperforming Sailors to volunteer for Recruit Division Commander, in a Naval message released April 2. According to NAVADMIN 085/13, the motivation and professional development of recruits is a vital Navy mission that requires outstanding role models. RDC assignment is challenging, but rewarding. It oers a number of professional development, leadership and career advancement opportunities. e tasks required are mentally, physically and emotionally demanding, and require proven selfdiscipline and imaginative problem-solving skills. Sailors assigned as RDCs must continually demonstrate superior leadership and motivational skills in demanding and often unique situations. RDCs are eligible for the following benets: Special Duty Assignment Pay of $450 per month. Additional annual clothing allowance of $220. Free dry cleaning services while actively training a recruit division. Opportunity to earn a Master Training Specialist qualification. Guaranteed choice of coast assignment upon completion of tour. Award of Recruit Training Service Ribbon. Participation in the RTC Command Meritorious Advancement Program for petty officers second class. Per MILPERSMAN 1306-954, E-5 Sailors must have a minimum of six years active service with two years time-in-rate upon application to serve as an RDC. E-6s must have a minimum of six years active service upon applying. ere are no minimum years of service or time in rate requirements for chiefs and above. Applicants must be warfarequalied, however, waivers may be granted on case-by-case basis. Sailors must have scored good low or higher in each category on the most recent Physical Fitness Assessment. e RDC candidate must be able to perform and pass the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test before the screening is submitted to NPC. Waiver of the run portion of the PRT is not allowed. A complete listing of eligibility requirements and application procedures can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-954. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for the RDC program should submit a 1306/7 enlisted personnel action request to their rating detailer. According to the message, there are approximately 200 openings for new RDCs each year. Upon acceptance to the RDC program, Sailors will attend three weeks of instructor school to obtain the Navy seeking recruit commanders Naval Personnel

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e Navy will join the nation in reecting on all whose lives were lost or forever altered by the Holocaust during the annual commemoration of the Holocaust Days of Remembrance, observed this year from April 7 to 14. With a national theme Never Again: Heeding the Warning Signs, the Holocaust Days of Remembrance invite people to look back, to examine how intervention by individuals or countries could have changed the course of history, and to remind participants that fear and indierence to hatred creates an opportunity for evil to thrive. e Days of Remembrance included the observance of Yom Hashoah or Holocaust Remembrance Day, Monday, April 8. Yom Hashoah corresponds to the 27th day of Nisan on the Hebrew calendar and marks the anniversary of the Warsaw ghetto uprising. When the actual date of Yom Hashoah falls on a Friday, the state of Israel observes Yom Hashoah on the preceding ursday. When it falls on a Sunday, Yom Hashoah is observed on the following Monday. e United States Congress established the Days of Remembrance as our nations annual commemoration of the Holocaust, memorializing the millions of victims of persecution and mass murder. e Holocaust was the state-sponsored, systematic annihilation of European Jews and other persecuted minorities by Nazi Germany and its collaborators. Between 1933 and 1945, more than six million Jews were murdered. Additionally, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, Roma (Gypsies), Jehovahs Witnesses, Catholics, political dissidents, the physically and mentally disabled, and homosexuals suered grievous persecution under Nazi tyranny. e Days of Remembrance serve as an opportunity for our nation to reect on the loss of these victims, as well as a reminder of the moral obligation of each individual to remain vigilant against hatred, persecution, and tyranny. 9502 Navy Enlisted Classication and a 13-week RDC School. RDC C school is a physically challenging, intensive, hands-on training course that provides prospective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physical readiness to succeed as an RDC. Commands must ensure prospective RDC candidates are properly screened to help reduce attrition from RDC C school. Tour lengths are a minimum of 36 months after graduation from RDC School.Recruit Memorials remember Holocaust More than 300 service members whose homes were unlawfully foreclosed upon between 2006 and 2010 are due to receive more than $39 million in relief for alleged violations of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, Justice Department ocials announced April 5. e relief stems from the Justice Departments 2011 settlements with BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, a subsidiary of Bank of America Corp., and Saxon Mortgage Servicing Inc., a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley, ocials said. Under the rst settlement, Bank of America is required to pay more than $36.8 million to service members whose homes were foreclosed upon unlawfully between 2006 and 2010. Each service member will receive a minimum of $116,785, plus compensation for any equity lost with interest, ocials said, and Bank of America already has begun compensating 142 service members whose homes were illegally foreclosed on between 2006 and the middle of 2009. Under the same agreement, Bank of America agreed to provide information about its foreclosures from mid2009 through the end of 2010. As a result of that review, Bank of America will now pay 155 service members whose homes it illegally foreclosed on. Borrowers receiving payment under this settlement may receive an additional payment under a settlement between Bank of America and federal banking regulators the Oce of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System if the foreclosure occurred in 2009 or 2010. Payments provided under the federal banking regulators settlement will bring the total amount received by eligible borrowers to $125,000, plus equity where applicable. Under the second settlement, Saxon Mortgage Services Inc. is in the process of paying out more than $2.5 million to 19 service members whose homes were unlawfully foreclosed upon between 2006 and 2010. Each service member will receive a minimum of $130,555.56, plus compensation for any equity lost with interest. Bank of America is one of ve mortgage servicers that entered into a settlement, known as the National Mortgage Settlement, with the Justice Department in 2012 regarding its foreclosure practices. e Justice Department is overseeing ongoing audits of the ve largest mortgage servicers in the country Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Citibank, JP Morgan Chase and Ally to identify violations of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Acts foreclosure provisions between Jan. 1, 2006, and April 4, 2012, and a 6 percent interest rate cap provision between Jan. 1, 2008, and April 4, 2012. e $36.8 million being paid by Bank of America to 297 service members is pursuant to the 2011 consent decree which predated the National Mortgage Settlement and represents only the nonjudicial foreclosures conducted by Bank of America, Justice Department ocials said. Most service members wrongly foreclosed on will receive $125,000 plus any lost equity.Unlawful foreclosures settled for $39 million THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Through the use of the puppets, the Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay recently talked to kindergarten through fifth-grade students at the Child and Youth Programs about bullying. After the puppet show, the children participated in activities that taught them how to respond when they see bullying occur. The children also made a banner of No Bullying rules they felt they should follow to be a good friend.Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay photos The Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, in collaboration with the Morale Welfare and Recreation, Child Youth Programs and the Child Development Center, sponsored the 2nd Annual Childrens Walk, Roll and Stroll against Child Abuse April 2 to bring awareness to child abuse prevention. The children participated in organized activities, face painting and enjoyed healthy snacks provided by Health Promotions. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba welcomed the children and participated in the walk. FFSC photos and Navy photos by MCCS Tony Casullo

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 5 Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., April 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar April 24Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Reconnect: Marriage enrichment workshopThe Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for April 17A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, April 17. It pro vides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 16. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Paying for College program upcomingThis two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783.Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for April 16Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. For more information, call 573-4513. Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting April 22The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, informa tion, samples and tips on com pleting the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, April 12. Registration required by calling 573-4513. program April 17The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Preventing child abuse observed Before today is over, ve children will die from being abused. At least two of them will be babies, less than a year old. e other three probably havent yet celebrated their fth birthdays. e blue ribbon symbolizes the more than 5.2 million children reported abused each year to Child Protective Services throughout the United States. In 1982, by Presidential Proclamation, April was declared Child Abuse Prevention Month. Since that time, child abuse and neglect awareness activities have been promoted across the country during this month. In the spring of 1989, a Virginia grandmother began the blue ribbon campaign as a tribute to her grandson. e three-year old died at the hands of his mothers abusive boyfriend. e grandmother tied a blue ribbon to the antenna of her car as a way to remember him and to alert her community to the tragedy of child abuse. Since that time, concerned citizens all over the country have worn the blue ribbon as a symbol of the need to prevent child abuse and neglect. A blue ribbon is the international symbol for Child Abuse Prevention. e color blue was chosen to represent the bruised and battered bodies of the thousands of children that are abused every day. It serves as a constant reminder that all of us have a responsibility to help keep children safe. Many times children grow up in an abusive environment and eventually become abusing parents. Without appropriate education on positive April 17 A Child Abuse Prevention Information table will be at the Commissary, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Pick up a blue ribbon and information.

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6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Navy College information areas. Selections are based on formal evaluations, meritorious achievement, safety, and other factors such as community involvement and humanitarian actions. e winners are: Global Operations Trophy: 50th Space Wing, Schriever Air Force Base, Colo. Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Trophy: 90th Missile Wing, F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyo. Submarine Ballistic Missile Trophy: USS ALASKA (SSBN 732), Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Strategic Aircraft Operations Trophy: Strategic Communications Wing One, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. Each year, Omahas Strategic Command Consultation Committee sponsors the Omaha Trophy in recognizing four outstanding units. e categories reect the commands primary lines of operation, continued emphasis on strategic deterrence, and their evolving role in global operations. e former Strategic Air Command Consultation Committee rst presented the Omaha Trophy as a single trophy to the Strategic Air Command in 1971 on behalf of the citizens of Omaha. e number of awards increased over the years as the commands missions and organizational structure changed. USSTRATCOM is one of ten U.S. unied commands under the Department of Defense. e command, including components, employs more than 4,300 people representing all four services including DOD civilians and contractors who oversee the commands operationally-focused global strategic mission.Alaska also log on to pgatour. com/the players and nd instructions about how to obtain discounted tickets to the tournament.On May 5, e Players will host the second annual Military Veterans Job Fair from noon to 3 p.m in e Turn hospitality structure located to players left on the hill next to the 18th green of e Players Stadium Course. May 8, Military Appreciation Day, e Players will kick o the opening of the Birdies for the Brave Patriots Outpost military hospitality chalet, with an opening ceremony at 11 a.m. that will include a wounded warrior. e Patriots Outpost will provide military guests with complimentary food and beverages and a place to view tournament action from 11:30 a.m. to the end of play each day, from Wednesday through Sunday. On-site parking is free for all fans MondayWednesday, but parking passes must be purchased in advance for ursday through Sunday. Fans can take advantage of the Four For Free parking incentive this year, in which any car with four or more passengers is admitted free of charge. Fans must have a voucher to park for the Four for Free program. Visit pgatour.com/theplayers to download a free parking voucher. More information about e Players is available at pgatour.com/theplayers. out the Submarine Force. ough the exact cause of the reshers loss may never be discovered, the Navys investigation leads to the conclusion that a silver-brazed joint in an engine room seawater pipe failed. As insignicant as one piece may seem initially, that single failed joint from approximately 3,000 other silver-brazed joints onboard resher may have compromised the hulls watertight integrity, and would trigger a series of terrifying events. e joint failure caused seawater to short circuit an electrical switchboard and ooded the space, which, in turn, triggered the ships reactor to shut down and initiated a loss of propulsion. With neither power nor propulsion, the boats commanding ocer, Lt. Cmdr. John Wesley Harvey, most likely ordered a main ballast tank blow that would force highpressure air into the submarines ballast tanks. is logical order, tragically, may have only added to the problem, according to the Navys theory of the loss. High-pressure air is more commonly known as compressed air. Compressed air released through a narrow passage becomes extremely cold, cold enough to freeze any moisture in the air if moisture is present. When high-pressure air was released, the moisture may have frozen, blocking the path from the compressed air bottles to the ballast tanks with ice. As the engine room continued to ood, the boats propulsion incapacitated and the ballast tanks became incapable of making the ship buoyant, resher likely slid backwards beyond its crush depth and imploded, instantly killing all 129 men aboard. A stunned nation demanded answers. e Navy convened a Court of Inquiry and a Design Appraisal Board to investigate the tragedy and issue ndings to help prevent another similar loss. To apply the lessons learned, the Navy stood up a new quality assurance program less than two months after resher sank. July 8, 1963, the Chief, Bureau of Ships, now known as NAVSEA, established the Submarine Safety, or SUBSAFE, Program. SUBSAFE is a quality assurance program to provide maximum reasonable assurance for the boats watertight integrity and to ensure it can recover from ooding casualties. SUBSAFEs mission is to provide maximum reasonable assurance of watertight integrity and operability, and integrity of critical systems necessary to control and recover from a ooding casualty, said Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group Ten. e SUBSAFE program focuses its eorts on those areas or components of a submarine that, should they fail, would result in a high likelihood of ooding and the loss of the ship. SUBSAFE encompasses all systems exposed to sea pressure or those systems critical to ooding recovery. e entire process from the work done to the materials used on those systems is tightly controlled to ensure the materials used in their assembly, along with methods of assembly, maintenance and testing are correct. Every submarine requires SUBSAFE certication with traceable quality evidence from delivery to the Navy and by maintaining that certication throughout the life of the submarine. SUBSAFEs safety record speaks for itself. e Navy has not lost a SUBSAFE certied submarine since the inception of the program. Since 1963, only USS Scorpion (SSN 589), a non-SUBSAFE certied submarine, has been lost at sea. One of the things the submarine force is very good at is determining the root cause of an event and developing the appropriate short and long term corrective actions. e SUBSAFE program is a perfect example of this, Tofalo said. Every day, Kings Bay Sailors and the civilian workforce from Trident Ret Facility to engine room levels expertly execute this comprehensive program, and in doing, so honor the memory of the 129 Americans who lost their lives on April 10, 1963. SUBSAFE is an all hands eort throughout Team Kings Bay. Everyone on base has a piece of making submarines operational and staying mission ready. Its part of the Team Kings Bay culture. e SUBSAFE culture stresses safety, personal responsibility and accountability. Asking questions is not only encouraged, but required. Avoiding assumptions and enforcing verication of requirements are also mandatory. is safety culture embedded in the Submarine Force provides direct nonnegotiable requirements such as multiple standardized audits which hold personnel at every level personally accountable for themselves and their fellow submariners. To perpetuate this mindset, the SUBSAFE Program holds annual, mandatory training for those within NAVSEA with SUBSAFE responsibilities. SUBSAFE Bentley

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ways to parent child abuse will continue to escalate. It is up to us as a society to increase public awareness that child abuse exists and that it can be prevented through education. Join the ght against child abuse, get your blue ribbon today. e Blue Ribbon Mission is: Encourage community and individual involvement in recognizing and preventing child abuse and neglect. Educate families, children, neighbors, organizations and communities on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Assist families in achieving healthy parenting practices through education and resources. Empower individuals to intervene in abuse and neglect situations when appropriate. How you can help prevent child abuse and neglect: Educate yourself on the facts and causes of child abuse and neglect in Camden County. Volunteer at an organization that helps families and children. Mentor a child who may be at risk of being abused or neglected. Take a parenting class. Invite another parent to join you. Give support to a mother, father or caregiver experiencing stress. Write letters to elected representatives in support of parent education and child abuse prevention. Arrange for a speaker at your organization or workplace to help educate others and spread the word about child abuse and neglect and how to keep kids safe. Help spread the child abuse prevention and healthy parenting message. Cap. Harvey L. Guey, Jr., Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay commanding ocer, signed the NSB Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Proclamation March 25 at FFSC. As part of NSB Kings Bay Child Abuse Prevention Month activities, a Child Abuse Prevention Billboard Contest with the theme Every Child Counts is ongoing. Commanddecorated billboards will be placed around the base to bring awareness to Kings Bay community to Break the Cycle of child abuse. Also, Pinwheels for Prevention are blue pinwheels placed on the base to bring awareness to Break the Cycle of child abuse.Child Portsmouth Nov. 29. e ship remained in port through the end of the year and spent the rst two months of 1962 evaluating its sonar system and Submarine Rocket system. In March, the submarine participated in NUSUBEX 2-62, an exercise designed to improve the tactical capabilities of nuclear submarines, and in antisubmarine warfare training with Task Group ALPHA. O Charleston, the ship undertook operations observed by the Naval Antisubmarine Warfare Council, before it returned briey to New England waters, from whence it proceeded to Florida for SUBROC tests. While mooring at Port Canaveral, the submarine was accidentally struck by a tug which damaged one of its ballast tanks. After repairs at Groton, Conn., by the Electric Boat Company, the ship returned south for more tests and trials o Key West. resher then returned northward and remained in dockyard hands through the early spring of 1963. On April 9, as described in public documents, the resher was escorted by another Navy vessel, the USS Skylark (ASR-20), out to the edge of the continental shelf o Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where the Atlantic Ocean oor drops precipitously to 8,000 feet. e Skylark was standing by for rescue if anything went wrong at a few hundred feet, though at the depths at which they were operating there would have been little she could do if the USS resher went too deep. In company with Skylark, resher put to sea with 16 ocers and 96 enlisted men, plus 17 civilian technicians to observe her performance during the deep-diving tests. At 6:35 a.m. on the morning of April 10, resher spotted Skylark through its periscope to ensure Skylark was in range, and prepared to dive in stages down to maximum depth for testing. At four hundred feet, the crew checked the sub for leaks in the hull, the ttings and the plumbing. en the sub descended further. At 7:45 a.m., resher reported that it was at half her test depth. A little over an hour later, at 9:02 AM, a request came from the resher to Skylarks navigator to repeat a course heading. A minute later came a slightly more disturbing message: Experiencing minor problem. Have positive angle. It remains uncertain what was happening at this time, but the best theory, based on the Naval investigation report, is that some pipes had started to leak in the submarines engine room. ese leaks allowed electrically conductive seawater to get into the electronics that controlled the nuclear reactor, which in turn shorted out and shut the reactor down. In order to lighten the vehicle, so that the weakened propellers could get it to the surface, or even allow the sub to oat up on its own, the normal procedure would be to blow the water out of the ballast tanks and ll them with air, increasing the submarines buoyancy. at the subs crew were attempting to do so is evidenced by the next message from the stricken craft, shortly after the rst troubling message Attempting to blow. e microphone then picked up sounds of compressed air being blown through the lines to the ballast tanks. At this point, Navy investigators believe, based on tests performed later on another vessel, strainers in the lines upstream of the ballast tank valves iced up. is occurs because the high volume of air moving past the strainers at such high velocity would have caused them to cool rapidly. Icing up of the strainers would have reduced the air ow such that either the tanks couldnt be cleared at all, or at least not fast enough, because its clear that the boat continued to sink. ere was only one more ominous voice communication: ...test depth. From this point on, the only sounds picked up by the open microphone were the distinctive and dismaying creaks of straining metal and fasteners as the craft sank deeper and started to crush under the unimaginable external pressure. e submarine eventually broke into several pieces, killing almost instantly all 129 crew and observers aboard. It continued to sink, falling almost two miles to the oor of the Atlantic, prematurely ending the career of the most advanced submarine built to that date. Rescue ship Recovery (ASR-43) subsequently recovered bits of debris, including gloves and bits of internal insulation. Photographs taken by bathyscaph Trieste proved that the submarine had broken up, taking all hands on board to their deaths in 5,500 of water, some 220 miles east of Boston. resher was ocially declared lost in April 1963. Navy investigation found the proximate cause of the disaster was the leak of seawater into the reactor control elec tronics. This shut down the reactor, resulting in the inability of the boat to control itself or get back to the surface. According to published reports, there were perhaps several factors that came together to destroy the resher and its crew. e leak itself probably occurred because of faulty brazing of the piping at the shipyard. Prior to the resher loss, the installation procedure for pipes less than four inches in diameter was to put a silver ring at the joint between two points and braze it with a torch. Subsequent investigation of other ships after the accident showed that, though joints created in this manner appeared solid, when broken apart there was no silver in them, indicating that they were much weaker than had been previously estimated. In general, the design and standards for the non-nuclear portions of the vessel seemed to have been more lax than those for the nuclear reactor and its associated systems. e icing of the line strainers, resulting in the failure of the ballast tanks to empty themselves of water fast enough, also contributed to events. is latter problem was a failure to meet design specication. Had either of these methods for surfacing been eective, the reactor loss would likely not have been catastrophic, because the crew could have dealt with the leaks and reactor problems on the surface. Finally, had the testing occurred in shallower water, per haps with the ocean bot tom just slight ly be low test depth, in which the Skylark could have potentially come to their aid, the crew might have been saved, if not resher itself. resher is in six major sections on the ocean oor, with the majority in a single debris eld about 400 yards square. e major sections are the sail, sonar dome, bow section, engineering spaces, operations spaces and the tail section. Owing to the pressurized-water nuclear reactor in the engine room, deep ocean radiological monitoring operations were conducted in August 1983 and August 1986. e site had been previously monitored in 1965 and 1977 and none of the samples obtained showed any evidence of release of radioactivity from the reactor fuel elements. Fission products were not detected above concentrations typical of worldwide background levels in sediment, water, or marine life samples. As a result of the loss of the resher, a major new initiative was undertaken by the Navy, called SUBSAFE, to reform design and manufacturing processes. Part of this initiative was to end the practice of brazing smaller pipes, and to instead start welding and doing x-ray inspection of joints to verify their integrity. It also resulted in changes in designs of the system that blows out the ballast tanks, providing a capa bilit y to do so seven times faster than the system used in the USS resher. resher now faces. Stratcoms primary mission objective is to deter strategic attack on the U.S., our allies and partners by making anyone who might contemplate such an attack recognize that they will not achieve their goals and will pay an extraordinary price if they try, he told Congress earlier this month. Providing that deter rence is no longer a onesize-ts-all proposition, he explained, and has to be tailored to each individual threat and challenge. In practice, 21st-century deterrence encompasses a wider range of complementary tools, the general said: nuclear, conventional and nonkinetic capabilities; limited missile defenses; and unfettered access and use of space and cyberspace. And reective of the U.S. emphasis on whole-ofgovernment approaches to national security challenges, he said, it also includes soft power contributions from across the interagency spectrum. How to bring this all to gether is heady stu, and opinions vary widely in how to provide this 21stcentury form of deterrence. Its a subject that Kehler and his Stratcom sta focus on every day, working in lock-step with their military and U.S. government partners to maintain strong deterrence that protects the United States and assures its allies and friends, Stratcom ocials said. Yet ironically, ocials here note a dearth of the kind of discussion that owed freely when the challenge was so much less daunting. So Stratcom is actively stirring up debate and soliciting diverse viewpoints as it strives to shape an approach to deterrence for now and into the future, Pat McKenna, Stratcoms plans evaluation and research division chief, told American Forces Press Service. e command sponsors an annual symposium that brings together hundreds of experts from the military, government, industry and international realms and academic leaders to delve into the subject. Stratcom also sponsors an annual writing contest to encourage critical thinking among students and professors at senior military colleges, as well as civilian colleges and universities, on the theories of strategic deterrence and how it is applied. e Gen. Larry D. Welch Writing Award is named to honor the former Strategic Air Command commander who went on to become the Air Force chief of sta and, after retirement, president of the Institute of Defense Analysis. e goal of these eorts is to stimulate discussion that generates a deeper understanding of the issue, McKenna said. e upcoming sympo sium, scheduled for July, will include several keynote speakers and panel discus sions that highlight the full spectrum of viewpoints. What we strive to do is bring those alternative points of view together in a public forum and invigorate the debate, McKenna said. We want this to be a catalyst to push that debate along and get a robust discussion going on so we can examine many of the issues. Delving into the issue helps to provide insight into what promotes deter rence and what doesnt, and how seemingly posi tive approaches can back re if not applied correctly, he said. e discussion enlightens leaders at Strat com and across the De fense Department and U.S. government as they strive to achieve deterrence in a changing geopolitical en vironment, he added. e symposium engenders and reinvigorates the debate so we can understand those issues, McKenna said. And understanding the diversity of opinion on the subject is important as not only Stratcom, but the U.S. government as a whole strives to implement policies and procedures to achieve their objectives.Stratcom As a result of the loss, a major new initiative called SUBSAFE was undertaken. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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I guess every so often reality smacks me across the face like a cold mackerel. For whatever reason, I thought this question would bring all sorts of wonder ful answers, like Vacationing in Katmandu, Getting a new Mercedes-Benz, or Buying caviar and treating my friends. Not hardly. In this day and age, you see the notnearly-so-glamorous results. Still, Im impressed by the practical and responsible answers given here. Me? Im taking my money and blowing it on a trip to Boise, Idaho, to relive an old liberty call with two of my 1970s ship mates, including one who lives there. Wahoo! I should buy new tires. But, alas, Im terminally adolescent.ETCS Ronnie Tucker Naval Submarine Support Center Montgomery, Ala. I already got it, and I already spent it on bills. QMC Lawan Jackson Port Operations Winchester, Ark. Paying bills. MASN Alexandra Wiens Security Force Battalion Austin, Texas Restoring my bank account. BU2 James Delduco Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Poughquag, N.Y. Im using it to pay bills. MC1 James Kimber Submarine Group 10 Portland, Ore. People get tax returns? SW2 Andres Hoven Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit 202 Edina, Minn. Im saving for a home. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e Annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club has been rescheduled for Friday, April 26, with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six-holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Putting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the Course. For more information, call pro shop at (912) 5738475. Kidsfest 2013 April is Child Abuse Prevention Month and Month of the Military Child so MWR is Celebrating Children 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 13 at the Under the Pines Park and tennis courts. Giant inflatables, face painting, Fun Zones, costume characters, photo ops, cake walk, arts and crafts, and youth demonstrations by Crooked River State Park and Paks Karate. Food will be available for purchase. Call (912) 573-4564 for more information. Intramural Dodgeball Tournament Pre-register through April 25 for this 4 p.m., Friday, April 26, event at the Fitness Complex. Its $30 per team. Each team member must be 18 years and older. Game rules are 5-v-5, with best of three games and double elimination. Maximum of 14 teams. Trophy for first place. For more details, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. 2nd Annual Information, Tickets and Travel/Outdoor Adventure Center Open House Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Aprils free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Last Airbender April 4, Happy Feet April 5, Hotel Transylvania April 6 and 7, Dr. Seuss: e Lorax April 13 and 14, Wreck-It-Ralph April 20 and 21 and Brave April 27 and 28. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in to watch the movie, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movies for kids Just about kids Liberty call Grand Outing reset April 26 MWR Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Marines with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit, alongside members of the Japan Ground SelfDefense Force, conducted a closing ceremony for Exercise Iron Fist 2013, at Camp Pendleton, Calif. recently. e purpose of the annual bilateral amphibious exercise is to improve interoperability, enhance military-to-military relations, hone individual and small-unit skills necessary for eective crisis response, and to eectively conduct contingency operations across the Pacic. Exercise Iron Fist 2013, a continuation of our bilateral military-to-military training and engagement, has proven successful in many ways, said Col. Christopher D. Taylor, commanding ocer of 13th MEU. Our training and social engagement over the last couple of weeks has allowed us to build warrior bonds and personal friendships; we have gained a better understanding of each others culture and enhanced our tactical skills in particular in our amphibious capabilities. And of course, we have had some fun. For three weeks, infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, romped through southern Californias most rugged military training facilities with troops from Japans Western Army Infantry Regiment aboard Camp Pendleton, in the desert terrain of the Marine Air-Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms and aboard the Navys USS Boxer (LHD4) and USS Pearl Harbor before conducting a nal training event at San Clemente Island. e exercise aorded the Marines and members of JGSDF to conduct an exchange of knowledge on weaponry, maneuver warfare tactics and get their boots wet during rapid, expeditious amphibious operations. As our two great Nations continue to develop our military relationship, we will be able to look back on this exercise and see its importance, Taylor said. e personal friendships and appreciation of each others culture gained here will continue to be important parts of the trust relationships we have built upon. e US Japanese strategic partnership is stronger than ever. Marines and members of the JGSDF were also afforded the unique opportunity to train alongside the 13th MEUs aviation combat element, Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 166, based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif. During the exercise VMM-166 employed their CH-53E Super Stallion and MV-22 Osprey helicopters to further enhance ship-to-shore movement aboard the Navys USS Boxer (LHD-4) to San Clemente Island. We will analyze the results of this exercise to enhance our capability, identify points of improvements, and return together to gain and reect on the education of our soldiers and Marines of tomorrow, Kunii said. I greatly appreciate the hospitality given from the bottom of all the Marines and Sailors hearts. Im looking forward to training with U.S. Marines and Navy again. Exercise Iron Fist 2013 is just one of a variety of bi-lateral exercises conducted to strengthen the bond between U.S. and Japan forces. Marines with 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade are slated to team up with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit and a larger group of Japan forces in June for the second portion of Exercise Dawn Blitz 13.2. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday, May 17, inflatables will be up and on-site with weather permitting. Wet N Wild and Westgate resorts will be on-site for questions and promotions. OAC is offering 25 percent off all moonwalk and slide rentals reserved at the event for anytime in May and June. ITT will be doing a Grand Prize drawing for a two-night stay at Westgate Resorts in Orlando, plus four tickets to Wet N Wild. The drawing will be at 2 p.m. on May 17, and you must be present to win. Starting May 1, any purchase made at OAC/ITT will give you a chance to get an additional ticket for the Grand Prize drawing. For more information, call (912) 573-8103. Fishing at Trident Lakes Golf Club The lakes will be open again on May 17 and 18. On Friday, May 17, you may fish the lake on the front 9 & Sat., May 18 you may fish the lake on back 9. Trident Lakes Golf Course lakes fishing is from 6 to 8 a.m., $5 per person/catch and release or $7 per person/catch and keep. Every one 16 years old and older must have a Georgia State Fishing License and Subase Fishing Permit. Outdoor Adventures sells the Subase Permits. Open to all patrons 10 years old and older. Pre-register at Outdoor Adventures, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. All patrons, under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. For more details, call OAC at (912) 573-8103. Movie Under the Stars Saturday, April 20 at dusk, about 8 p.m., at Under the Pines Park and Tennis Courts enjoy free admission with the feature presentation showing Rise of the Guardians (PG). Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Kings Bay Dominos has a Pizza Movie Deal for the evening of Large Any Way You Want It $10 each. For more information about the movie call, (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate pro motions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook.com/ kingsbaydominos Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at RackN-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492.MWR MSC ships supply outpost Military Sealift Command-chartered ships concluded cargo operations April 2 in Port Hueneme, Calif., for Operation Deep Freeze, the annual Joint Task Force Support for Antarctica. MSC-chartered container ship MV Ocean Giant arrived in Port Hueneme March 27 and began ooading more than 500 pieces of cargo. e cargo included containers lled with retrograde materials such as trash and recyclable mate rials for disposal and rolling stock equipment removed from the remote scientic outpost at McMurdo Sta tion Antarctica. In addition to the retrograde materials, ice-core samples were delivered for future use by sci entists who study the global climate. Reserve Sailors from Expeditionary Port Unit 114 served as pierside liaison between the ship, cargo handlers and the National Science Foundation personnel during the ooad. Operation Deep Freeze is a mission of teamwork; teamwork between the personnel and the climate, said Larry Larsson, an MSC military transportation specialist. is season we achieved uncommon results, in a very challenging location. It was a fantastic eort by all who supported ODF and a true example of our motto, MSC delivers. One of two MSC-chartered ships supporting this years ODF operations, Ocean Giant was accompanied in Antarctica by MSC-charted ship MV Maersk Perry. Perry provided 100 percent of the diesel fuel, jet fuel and gasoline needed for the sustainment of the station through the harsh winter period. e Perry also provided fuel for the National Science Foundations chartered scientic research ship R/V Nathanial B. Palmer and the ice-breaker I/B Vladimir Ignatyuk. An MSC-chartered cargo ship and tanker have made the challenging voyage to Antarctica every year since the station was established in 1955. MSC operates approximately 110 non-combatant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners. Japanese train with Corps e largest renewable energy project in U.S. military history is slated to begin soon at Fort Bliss, Texas, a big step toward the installations goal of generating all the energy it uses, Army Maj. Gen. Dana J.H. Pittard, the installation and 1st Armored Division commander, announced April 5. e Army Corps of Engineers gave the ocial nod this week for El Paso Electric to start work on a 20-megawatt solar farm that will power all of the division headquarters and most of the eastern sector of the sprawling installation, Pittard told reporters at a news conference. e partnership is the rst between the military and a major local utility on a renewable energy project of this scale, he reported. is is the largest solar project at any installation to date in [the Defense Department]. We are very, very proud of that, he said. It is exciting to be leading the American military in renewable energy, [and] reducing our carbon footprint, both goals of Fort Bliss environmental campaign plan. e solar farm, to be completed in 2015, is just one part of the posts sweeping plans to reduce its energy consumption and dependence on nonrenewable energy. Fort Bliss already hosts a 1.4-megawatt solar array, the Armys secondlargest, and has installed a 13.4-megawatt rooftop solar array on post housing. In addition, another 20-megawatt contract with El Paso Electric is in the works, as well as a plan with the city of El Paso to convert waste to energy, Pittard said. Meanwhile, installation ocials are pursuing wind and geothermal initiatives and promoting recycling and more ecient water use, he said. ey also planted 14,700 trees well on their way to the goal of 20,000 and have built bike and walking paths and encouraged people to use fuel-ecient vehicles. e goal, Pittard told reporters, is to achieve Net Zero, meaning the post creates all the energy it uses. While reducing Fort Bliss carbon footprint and energy costs, the initiatives will contribute to the Armys energy conservation and security goal of using 25 percent renewable energy by 2015. Fort Bliss to launch militarys largest renewable energy project

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel today signaled possible big changes ahead for his department in acquisition, personnel and organization on April 3, as he delivered his rst major policy speech as Pentagon chief. Hagel outlined his plan of attack for the strategic and nancial challenges the Defense Department faces during remarks at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C. We need to challenge all past assumptions, and we need to put everything on the table, he said. Hagel said DODs task is to prepare for the future, but not in a way that neglects, or is oblivious to, the realities of the present. At his direction, Hagel said, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter, working with Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, is leading a review of the departments strategic choices and management. e review is intended to identify the challenges, uncertainties, risks and opportunities connected to both strategic priorities and budget uncertainty. Its also about matching missions with resources looking at ends, ways and means, he said. e review will consider big choices, change that involves not just tweaking or chipping away at existing structures and practices but, where necessary, fashioning entirely new ones that are better suited to 21st-century realities and challenges, the secretary said. Reshaping the defense enterprise means confronting the principal drivers of growth in the departments base budget namely acquisitions, personnel costs and overhead, Hagel said. e Pentagons biggest budget challenge is not its top-line budget, he said, but where that money is being spent internally. Spiraling costs to sustain existing structures and institutions, to provide personnel benets, and to develop replacements for aging weapons platforms will, if unchecked, eventually crowd out spending on procurement, operations and readiness, he said, which are the budget categories that enable the military to be, and stay, prepared. Hagel said the U.S. military has grown more deployable, expeditionary, exible, lethal and certainly more professional since 9/11. It has also grown signicantly older as measured by the age of major platforms and it has grown enormously more expensive in every way, he said. e department will get out ahead of challenges, Hagel said. He said he has told the senior leaders across the department and the services that we are all in this together, and we will come out of it together. Hagel said the militarys modernization strategy still depends on systems that are vastly more expensive and technologically risky than what were promised or budgeted for. e department must develop an acquisition system that responds more quickly and eectively to the needs of troops and commanders in the eld, he said, one that rewards cost-eectiveness so that our programs do not continue to take longer, cost more and deliver less than initially planned and promised. On the personnel front, Hagel said, DOD leaders must determine how many military and civilian people they have, how many they need, and how to compensate them for their service. He said that process will involve questioning the right mix of civilian and military members, the right balance between ofcer and enlisted service members, and the appropriate troop strength dedicated to combat, support and administrative duties. Hagel said he also advocates a hard look at defense organization. e militarys operational forces, its battalions, ships and aircraft wings, have shrunk dramatically since the Cold War era, he noted. Yet the threeand four-star command and support structures sitting atop these smaller ghting forces have stayed intact, with minor exceptions, he added, and in some cases, they are actually increasing in size and rank. Hagel said the review will examine funding for those headquarters and support structures, along with DOD elements including the Oce of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Sta, the combatant commands and the defense agencies and eld activities. e military is not, and should never be, run like a corporation, Hagel said. But that does not mean we dont have a good deal to learn from what the private sector has achieved over the past 20 to 30 years, in which reducing layers of upper and middle management not only reduced costs and micromanagement, it also led to more agile and effective organizations and more empowered junior leaders. e secretary acknowledged that making dramatic changes in acquisition systems, benets and force structure could prove unwise, untenable or politically impossible. Yet we have no choice but to take a very close look and see how we can do all of this better, he said. Hagel noted that his two immediate predecessors as defense secretary Leon E. Panetta and Robert M. Gates each led eorts to cut costs across the department. But sequester cuts and budget uncertainty have led to far more abrupt and deeper reductions than were planned or expected, he added. Now, DOD is grappling with the serious and immediate challenges of sequester, which is forcing us to take as much as a $41 billion cut in this current scal year, and if it continues, will reduce projected defense spending by another $500 billion over the next decade, the secretary said. Much more hard work, dicult decisions and strategic prioritizing remain to be done, he said, and deep political and institutional obstacles to necessary reforms will need to be engaged and overcome. e secretary said the departments enduring mission, defending the nation and advancing Americas strategic interests, must be approached in the context of unprecedented shifts in the world order, new global challenges and deep global scal uncertainty. e 21st-century security landscape is marked by the threat of violent extremism from weak states and ungoverned spaces in the Middle East and North Africa, Hagel said. Other security issues, he said, include the proliferation of weapons and materials; increasing access to advanced military technology among state and nonstate actors, risks of regional conict that could draw in the United States, and the debilitating and dangerous curse of human despair and poverty, as well as the uncertain implications of environmental degradation. Hagel said cyberattacks, which barely registered as a threat a decade ago, have grown into a dening security challenge which allows enemies to strike security, energy, economic and other critical infrastructure with the benet of anonymity and distance. All in all, Hagel said, the world is combustible and complex, and Americas responsibilities are enormous. e militarys role in Hagel: DOD review will lead to big choices THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 11

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meeting those responsibilities is essential, he said, but as part of a total government approach. Most of the pressing security challenges today have important political, economic, and cultural components, and do not necessarily lend themselves to being resolved by conventional military strength, the secretary noted. Defense leaders need time, exibility, budget certainty and partnership with Congress to eectively explore new approaches to acquisition, personnel, and overhead costs, he said. Hagel emphasized that future strategic planning will emphasize DODs inherent strengths of leadership development, training, mobility and logistics, special operations, cyber, space, and research and development. e goal of the senior leadership of this department today is to learn from the miscalculations and mistakes of the past drawdowns, and make the right decisions that will sustain our military strength, advance our strategic interests, and protect our nation well into the future, Hagel said. e secretary concluded with some comments on the nations role in the world. Amid budget turmoil, nancial crisis and a war-weary population, Hagel said, questions arise about Americas global leadership. America does not have the luxury of retrenchment, the secretary asserted. We have too many global interests at stake, including our security, prosperity, and our future. If America leaves a leadership vacuum, he said, the next great power may not be as judicious or responsible as the United States has been since World War II. We have made mistakes and miscalculations with our great power, Hagel said. But as history has advanced, America has helped make a better world for all people with its power. A world where America does not lead is not the world I wish my children to inherit. Quoting President eodore Roosevelt, Hagel said America cannot bear these responsibilities aright unless its voice is potent for peace and justice with the assured self-condence of the just man armed. What distinguishes America and its people, he said, is our commitment to making a better life for all people. We are a wise, thoughtful and steady nation, worthy of our power, generous of spirit, and humble in our purpose, he added. at is the America we will defend together, with the purpose and self-condence of the just man armed. ers, a Womens Flat Track Roller Derby Team. As a member of the Rollers, she partners with Go Yoga Amelia Island to pioneer ROGA which is a form of yoga for roller derby. Chufo was selected as TRFs Public Aairs Ocer and has been recognized for resurrecting the TRF newsletter, the Trident Tribute. MWR said Chufo is highly regarded within TRF, as well as NSB Kings Bay community, as a passionate individual who constantly strives to improve her and others. Athletes ReviewGermans join carrier group e German Sachsenclass frigate Hamburg (F220) is the rst German ship to fully integrate and deploy with an American carrier strike group, and April 3 marked its second week of operating in the North Arabian Sea with USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). e Hamburg will stay a part of the strike group until the groups completion of operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Both Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, commander CSG 8, and Cmdr. Ralf Kuchler, commanding ocer of Hamburg, hope this is the start of a long partnership between their two countries. It has been a pleasure to work with Hamburg, Manazir said. She has integrated seamlessly with our strike group and I would feel condent deploying with a German ship in any situation. While this is the rst time a German ship has been part of a carrier strike group, it is not the rst time one has trained and deployed with American ships. FGS Hessen (F221) completed interoperability exercises and deployed with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in 2010, but detached in the Mediterranean Sea. German ships routinely collaborate with American ships in the European Unions Operation Atalanta, an anti-piracy mission around the Horn of Africa, as Hamburg did in 2011. While integration was slow at rst to allow time for the sides to get acquainted with one another, Hamburg now helps IKE by coordinating the air space around the strike group and in defense of its surface assets. is is the role Kuchler said he foresees German Sachsen-class frigates fullling in the future. Within Carrier Strike Group 8, my mission is to provide the admiral the same service he is used from a U.S. cruiser within the boundaries of my national rules of engagement, which is to safely coordinate the airspace around the carrier and to protect IKE if the situation demands, Kuchler said. Hamburg is suited to do that, as she has some similar surface-to-air and antiship missiles. e Sachsen-class frigate is the only ship in the western world with three types of surface to air missiles: the Standard Missile 2 block IIIA, the Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile and the Rolling Airframe Missile. Soldiers have been supportive of the eorts, collectively raising $1 million last year through recycling. e proceeds were channeled to Morale, Welfare and Recreation projects such as skating parks and spinning cycles, prompting even more recycling, which Pittard said he hopes will reach $1.5 million this year. Everybody is getting involved in that, because they see the positive results of recycling, he said. Pittard also reported a dramatic drop in electricity use in post housing. Changing behavior and promoting a culture that encourages energy conservation are keys to achieving Net Zero. As encouraged as he is by Fort Bliss progress, Pittard said he sees a link between these eorts and his primary mission of ensuring combat-ready forces. e solar farm, along with our environment campaign plan, are both part of a larger eort to make Fort Bliss the most t, most healthy, most resilient community in America that is environmentally sound and is best at preparing soldiers and units for combat, he said. As soldiers take advantage of more outdoor spaces, theyre getting out of their barracks and establishing a closer sense of community, Pittard said.Energy 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013 13 Responses to North Korea will be measured U.S. leaders are taking North Korean threats seriously and will continue to make measured responses to Kim Jong Uns bellicosity, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in Washington D.C., April 3. e secretary spoke to students at the National Defense University at Fort Lesley J. McNair. The North Korean leader has threat ened to shell the South Korean capital of Seoul and to launch missiles at Guam, Hawaii and the western United States. He also rescinded the armistice North Korea signed with the United Nations in 1953 that ended hostilities on the Korean Peninsula. Earlier, he announced he was restarting a nuclear plant to produce more weapons-grade uranium and plutonium. It only takes being wrong once, and I dont want to be the secretary of defense that was wrong once, Hagel said in answer to a students question. We will continue to take these threats seriously. I hope the North will ratchet this very dangerous rhetoric down. For decades, ocials have urged North Korean leaders to abide by the agreements they signed. ese include a denuclearized Korean Peninsula and an end to provocations against South Korea. But the North Korean governments behavior has resulted in sanctions, and millions of children there have had their growth stunted by malnutrition. e world is willing to help North Korea, Hagel said. But they have to be a responsible member of the world community, he added. You dont achieve that responsibility and peace and prosperity by making nuclear threats and taking very provocative actions. North Korea has a nuclear capacity and is working on the missile systems to deliver those weapons. As they have ratcheted up their dangerous, bellicose rhetoric, [North Korea presents] a real and clear danger and threat to American allies and the U.S. homeland itself, the secretary said. I think we have taken measured responses to those threats. We are undergoing joint exercises with the South Koreans now. We are doing everything we can, working with the Chinese and others, to defuse the situation on the peninsula. e secretary spoke with new Chinese Defense Minister Gen. Chang Wanquan, April 2. e two men discussed ways for the two nations to work together. e United States and China can bridge their dierences by concentrating on common interests, Hagel said. Its not dierences that matter, it is how you deal with them, he said. You build a platform for a relationship on your common interests, not on your dierences. North Korea is a good example of a common interest, the secretary said. Certainly, the Chinese dont want a complicated and combustible situation to explode into a worse situation, he said. Its not in their interests for that to happen. Its certainly not in our interest or our allies interests. Missiles deployed to Guam e Defense Department will deploy a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense System, or THAAD, ballistic missile defense system to Guam in the coming weeks as a precautionary move to strengthen the regional defense posture against the North Korean regional ballistic missile threat, Pentagon ocials announced April 3. e THAAD system is a land-based missile defense system that includes a truck-mounted launcher, a complement of interceptor missiles, an AN/TPY-2 tracking radar and an integrated re control system.

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 11, 2013