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The Kings Bay periscope ( 04-04-2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00295

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00295

Full Text














mK~i


Vol. 48 Issue 13


www.cnic.navy.mil/kingsbay kingsbayperiscope.jacksonville.com Thursday, April 4, 2013


USS Alaska earns Ney


Navy photo
The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) earned the
2013 Navy Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial Awards for outstanding food service
in the Submarine Category.


Firefighter


garners


honors


Kings Bay's Capt. Tom
Middleton recognized
by VFW, state, Region
By MC2 Cory Rose
Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public
Affairs
One Kings Bay firefighter and
Emergency Services provider was
honored as the Veterans of Foreign
Wars State of Georgia EMS Pro-
vider of the Year, the Southeast Re-
gion EMS Provider of the Year, the
Southeast Region fire officer of the
year and the De-
partment of the
Navy EMS Pro-
vider of the Year.
Plus, he
earned three
lifesaving
awards.
Naval Subma-
Middleton rine Base Kings
Bay Fire Depart-
ment Capt. Tom Middleton, recipi-
ent of the awards, said his chief and
assistant chiefs in the department
put people in for that kind of rec-
ognition.
"It is based on what you have
done, the care that you have pro-
vided, and the way that you have
conducted yourself in emergency
situations," Middleton said. "They
keep a record of accomplishments
and ways that people have con-
tributed to the department over
the year. That gets submitted for
awards."
Middleton has been a firefighter
and EMS provider since 1999.
He said he was surprised and
humbled to receive the awards.
"The day that I received the
awards, it's not like everything
stopped," he said. "I probably had
more work to do that day than any
other day since I have been here.
"It is really great to be honored
by people that are your peers and
chiefs in this profession. None of
us that do this are ever going to be
rich, so what your name is means
everything. If you make a bad
name for yourself, then it will stay
with you forever'."
Kings Bay Fire Department As-
sistant Fire Chief Kim Maxwell said
Middleton was deserving of the
honors.
"Captain Middleton's swift
analysis and quick actions, during
these situations, lead to their suc-
cessful conclusion in each case,'
Maxwell said. "I am proud having
him part of our team here at Kings
Bay Fire and Emergency Services."
Not one person can do the job
of a firefighter or EMS provider by
See Honors, Page 5


Mess decks past inspection
as best in submarine force
By Kathy Adams
NAVSUP Office of Corporate Communications
Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus an-
nounced the 2013 winners of the Navy
Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial Awards
for outstanding food service, March 25.
USS Alaska (SSBN 732), homeported at
Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, earned
first-place in the Submarine Category.
"High quality food prepared fresh daily
by Culinary Specialists is one of the big-
gest morale boosters the Navy provides,"'
said Commander, Naval Supply Systems
Command, Rear Adm. Mark Heinrich.
"More scratch cooking, updated menus
and increased on-the-job training for Cu-


linary Specialists are defining the future of
Navy food service."'
These annual awards, co-sponsored
by the International Food Service Execu-
tives Association, encourage excellence in
Navy Food Service programs with the ob-
jective of improving the quality of life for

See Ney, Page 5


Stevens salutes CPOs


From Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy


1978 KINGSBAY GA- 2013 A message from the Master Chief Petty Officer
of the Navy:
"Fellow Chief Petty Officers, on April Ist, the
U.S. Navy Chief's mess will celebrate 120 years of
the United States Chief Petty Officer. We are not
only celebrating another year of chiefs serving
the Navy; we are celebrating everything it means
to be the Chief.
"Our anchors are the symbol of a culture Stevens
and a way of life. Since 1893, chiefs have been
charged with the responsibility of leading Sailors to be the best in
1 the world, ready to carry out our navy's mission when the nation
calls. We welcome that responsibility and lead with honor, cour-
Kings Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation age, and commitment.
35th anniversary "As chiefs, it's important to remember that we must be 'all in, 'all
annithe time' because being a chief petty officer is not for the weak of
Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay will celebrate its 35th heartorlazyofmindandbody.
anniversary May 22 and 23. This logo was designed by Kings "Happy birthday shipmates! I truly appreciate your leadership
Bay Morale, Welfare and Recreation to help mark the event, and the hard work you do every day."
Very Respectfully, MCPON Mike D. Stevens


Little to North Korea: 'dial temperature down'


By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service


The world cannot afford a miscalcula-
tion when dealing with North Korea, Pen-
tagon Press Secretary George Little told
CNN March 28.
North Korea's flouting of international
agreements has made that nation a pariah.
Recent rhetoric emanating from Pyong-
yang has increased tensions on the Korean
Peninsula and in the region, and this needs
to stop, Little said.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has


ratcheted up the rhetoric since taking
power after his father died. North Korea
has tested long-range rockets, launched
a satellite into orbit and tested nuclear
weapons all in defiance of its pledged
word to the United Nations.
And, North Korea continues to escalate
the war of words by saying the 1953 armi-
stice between North Korea and the United
Nations is null and void. Kim has threat-
ened to attack local, regional and interna-
tional targets.
Little emphasized that the United States
stands shoulder-to-shoulder with its South


Korean ally.
"I'm not going to speculate on what we
may or may not do;'," Little said. "Our desire
is peace and stability on the Korean Penin-
sula. The North Koreans have two choices.
They can choose the path of peace or they
can choose the path
of provocation. One is Check us out Online!
better than the other
for everyone involved, "
including the North
Korean military and


See Little, Page 3


kingsbayperiscope.com


THE




2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


Deadline for scholarship


Military special ed meeting April 11
A Military Special Education Town Hall
Meeting will be 6 to 8 p.m., Thursday, April 11
at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Youth
Center. Child and Youth Education Services
is looking for 15 to 20 active duty exceptional
families willing to meet with installation ser-
vice providers to share insights into their
relocation experiences. For more informa-
tion, phone Kings Bay School Liaison Officer
Clainetta Jefferson at (912) 573-8986 or e-mail
clainetta.jefferson@navy.mil.

NMCRS Stroller Strut April 13
A Stroller Strut, benefitting the Navy-Marine
Corps Relief Society, will be 9 to 11 a.m., April
13, at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fit-
ness Center outdoor track. The event includes
door prizes for registered walkers, a stroller
decoration competition and prizes for most
laps walked. Registration is $5. Registration
forms are available at the Fitness Complex and
the NMCRS.

Coast Guard at League April 11
The Coast Guard will be honored at the next
dinner meeting of the Camden-Kings Bay
Council of the U.S. Navy League, at 6 p.m.,
Thursday, April 11. Coast Guard Night will
feature Lt. Cmdr. Matt Baer, commanding of-
ficer, representing Maritime Safety & Security
Team 91108; Lt. Cmdr. Tom Evans, executive
officer, representing the Maritime Force Pro-
tection Unit; Lt. j.g. Adam Miller, command-
ing officer, Coast Guard Cutter Sea Dog (WPB
87373); and, CWO Ian Christian, commanding
officer, representing the USCGC Sea Dragon
(WPB 87367). The general public is invited, at
the Kings Bay Conference Center. The cost to
attend is $25 per person. All attendees must
RSVP and pay by Monday, April 8. Mail the at-
tendees, along with a check, made payable to
"Camden-Kings Bay Navy League, to Cheryl
Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S, St. Marys, Ga.,
31558. Complete information on the meeting
can be found on the council Web site, zwww.
kingsbaynavyleague.org/.

Woodbine Duathlon to be April 6
The Fellowship of Christian Athletes and
Camden Cycling Club's first annual Woodbine
Duathlon is a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run,
for high-school ages and older at 8 a.m., April
6, at the Woodbine ball fields at Georgia Route
110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration
is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To regis-
ter, visit active.com prior to April 1.

Balfour Beatty offers scholarships
Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is
offering scholarships for the 2013-2014 aca-
demic year to high school and undergradu-
ate students of military members residing in
family housing. Scholarships are valued up
to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger
for exceptional submissions. The application
deadline is April 15. The application details
and requirements can be found at www.bb-
communitiesfoundation.org.

Kings Bay VITA help ongoing
The IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance,
VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings
Bay's hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday at the Naval Legal Services Office.

NMCRS seeks part-time nurse
Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is seeking
a part-time Visiting Nurse at the office in Kings
Bay. Duties are one-to-one with patients, teach-
ing health info/providing resource information
and support to Navy and Marine Corps families,
including mom/babies, retirees and combat
veterans. Current RN license from Georgia, cur-
rent CPR certification or ability to obtain within
3 months of employment, valid driver's license,
current automobile insurance, good driving re-
cord and reliable transportation needed. Start-
ing annual salary is $20,515 plus benefits. In-
terested parties may obtain an application and
application addendum by visiting www.nmcrs.
org/employ or call the NMCRS Kings Bay Of-
fice at (912) 573-3928 or visit at 926 USS James
Madison Road, Bldg 1032.

Suggestions for The Periscope?
Do you see an event on base you think deserves
coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by
calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or
e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.







K I N 5 E A Y 6 E O R I A

NSB Kings Bay Commanding Officer
Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr.
NSB Kings Bay Executive Officer
Cmdr. Jeff Pafford
NSB Kings Bay Command Master Chief
CMDCM Randy Huckaba
NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Officer
Scott Bassett


NSB Kings Bay Public Affairs Office staff
MCCS Anthony C. Casullo, MC2 Cory Rose
Editor
Bill Wesselhoff 573-4719, periscopekb@comcast.net


From the Georgia Department of Labor

The Kings Bay Employer Commit-
tee has set a deadline of 4:30 p.m.,
Monday, April 22, for students who
live in Camden County to apply for
two $500 college scholarships.
The funding for the scholarships
will come from an endowment fund
established in 2005 in memory of
the late Tracy L. Foreman, who died
in 2003. Foreman was an employ-
ment marketing representative at
the Kings Bay Career Center.
Under the endowment fund,
the scholarships will be granted
to graduating seniors, including
homeschoolers, who live in Camden
County and are entering their fresh-
man year at an accredited institu-
tion of higher education.
In addition to attending school,


applicants must also be working
part-time for a minimum of 15 hours
per week. The scholarships are non-
renewable and not based on finan-
cial need.
To qualify for the scholarships,
applicants must submit an applica-
tion, school records, test scores, and
a two-to-three page essay.
The theme of the essay is how to
use education and training to de-
velop or support a new business or
industry in the Kings Bay area.
Scholarship recipients will be se-
lected by the employer committee's
scholarship subcommittee.
Questions should be directed to


s April 22

Rachel Baldwin, a scholarship sub-
committee member, at rbaldwin@
camden.kl2.ga.us or call her at
(912) 729-4790.
All documents must be submitted
by the 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 22,
deadline to be considered.
Applications for the scholarships
are available at the Georgia Depart-
ment of Labor's Kings Bay Career
Center, at 406 Osborne St. in St.
Marys. For additional information,
contact Faith Copeland-Pittman at
the career center at (912) 673-6942.
Employer committees are groups
of local business representatives
who establish and maintain working
relationships between employers
and GDOL career centers.
The Kings Bay Employer Commit-
tee works with the Kings Bay Career
Center.


Re-enlistment bonuses updated


From Chief of Naval Personnel, Public
Affairs

Navy announced updates to the
Selective Re-enlistment Bonus
award plan, March 26 in NAVADMIN
077/13. The Selective Re-enlistment
Bonus provides incentives to Sailors
with critical skills and experience to
stay Navy.
SRB rewards Sailors who attain
special training in skills most need-
ed in the fleet, and helps meet criti-
cal skill re-enlistment benchmarks
and enhance Navy's ability to size,
shape and stabilize manning. Award
levels are adjusted as reenlistment
requirements for specific ratings
and skill sets are met.
The NAVADMIN is an update


to the 76 skill/zone combinations
detailed in NAVADMIN 273/12 re-
leased last September.
Changes to September's list in NA-
VADMIN 077/13 include reductions
for eight skills, elimination of seven
skills, addition of 18 skills, and in-
creases to 42 award levels.
"The Navy needs to retain Sailors
with these critical skills to ensure
we remain mission ready," said Rear
Adm. Tony Kurta, director, military
personnel plans and policy. "We ad-
just SRB levels to provide incentive
to Sailors with high demand skills


to re-enlist while remaining within
budget constraints."
This SRB update message marks
the first significant expansion in the
number of eligible skills in recent
years, according to Kurta.
Sailors should consult NAVAD-
MIN 077/13 to determine their SRB
eligibility and award level.
The increased award levels are ef-
fective immediately and decreased
levels are effective 30 days from the
release of the NAVADMIN.
Eligible Sailors desiring SRB re-
enlistment are encouraged to work
with their command career coun-
selors, command master chiefs, and
chain of command to discuss timing
of re-enlistment and procedures well
before their EAOS.


Courage theme for Navy's SAAM


From Chief of Naval Personnel Public
Affairs Office

The Navy announced the 2013
Sexual Assault Awareness Month
theme of Courage and issued guid-
ance to focus efforts on awareness
and prevention of sexual violence in
NAVADMIN 075/13 released March
25.
The Navy's theme for the month is
"Courage" and will support the De-
partment of Defense's theme of "We
own it ... we'll solve it ... together."
The goal is to empower com-
mands to take ownership of this
problem.
"Navy's recognition of SAAM
2013 is a component of our efforts
to build a resilient Navy community
and will use the theme of Courage
to build the tactics for this year's
campaign," said Vice Adm. Scott R.
Van Buskirk, chief of naval person-
nel. "Weekly themes will underscore
the courage it takes to intervene
when Shipmates see inappropriate
behaviors, as well as the courage to
step forward as a victim to seek help,
the courage of Shipmates to support
victims to make them feel safe in
their units and the courage neces-
sary to do the right thing both for
yourself and your shipmates."
Each week, the Navy will highlight
a subtheme courage to learn,
courage to prevent, courage to inter-
vene, courage to support and cour-
age to commit.
"Navy installations and com-
mands around the world will be
organizing activities to raise aware-
ness of sexual assault throughout
the month" Van Buskirk said. "All
units are encouraged to participate
and promote SAAM events. This
year, we are also encouraging Sail-
ors to participate in a video contest
to give them the chance to provide
a fresh look at how to combat this
problem. It provides Sailors an op-
portunity for personal involvement
in communicating key messages."
Sailors can submit individual and


team videos by mail or by uploading
them to the FTP site through April
19.
Criteria for evaluating entries will
include storytelling ability, original-
ity, creativity and technical quality.
The contest is open to active duty,
Reserve and full-time-support Sail-
ors.
The winning submission will be
broadcast on Direct-to-Sailor Tele-
vision and provided to the American
Forces Network and Pentagon chan-
nel.
Contest rules and procedures are
posted at www.sapr.navy.mil.


Sexual Assault Prevention and Re-
sponse is an important element of
the readiness area of the 21st Cen-
tury Sailor and Marine initiative,
which consolidates a set of objec-
tives and policies, new and exist-
ing, to maximize Sailor and Marine
personal readiness, build resiliency
and hone the most combat-effective
force in the history of the Depart-
ment.
The Department of the Navy is
working aggressively to prevent sex-
ual assaults, to support sexual as-
sault victims and to hold offenders
accountable.


The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized newspaper published weekly on Thursday for forces afloat, tenant commands, base military
personnel and civilian employees of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga.
The editorial content of this newspaper is prepared, edited and provided by the public affairs office. News items and photos must be
submitted by noon Thursday, seven days prior to publication. Event "briefs" must be submitted by noon Friday, six days prior to publica-
tion. The public affairs office, code CM4, is in building 1063. News ideas and questions can be directed to the editor by calling 573-4714
or 573-4719, or fax materials to 573-4717. All materials are subject to editing.
The Kings Bay Periscope is an authorized publication for members of the military service. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the of-
ficial views of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof.
The appearance of advertising in the publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department
of Defense, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, or The Florida Times-Union of the products advertised. Advertisers are responsible for ac-
curacy of ads contained herein.
Everything advertised in the publication shall be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,
gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other nonmerit factor of purchaser, user, or
patrons.
The Kings Bay Periscope is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm, in no way connected with the Department of Defense,
or the U.S. Navy, under exclusive contract with the U.S. Navy. The circulation is 10,000.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Florida Times-Union, 1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL, 32202.
The Kings Bay Periscope is a registered trademark of the United States of America.
Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to:
Kings Bay Periscope
Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher
1 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 359-4168
Advertising Sales
(904) 359-4336 (800) 472-6397, Ext. 4336 FAX (904) 366-6230
LeAnn Hirschman, Territory Sales Representative
(904) 655-1200


L Navy Personnel
I




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 3


Clinic


adding


PCMs


By Naval Branch Health Clinic
Kings Bay Public Affairs

Naval Branch Health
Clinic Kings Bay now has
primary care managers
available for TRICARE
Prime enrollment to ac-
tive duty family members
who live within a 30-min-
ute drive.
NBHC Kings Bay
uniquely offers its en-
rolled patients the Medi-
cal Home Port approach,
with PCMs leading co-
ordinated care teams to
meet patients' preventive,
routine and urgent care
needs.
"People come from all
over the nation to see us.
You get the highest quality
care and best outcomes,
right here at Naval Hospi-
tal Jacksonville, including
our branch health clinics,"
said Capt. Gayle Shaffer,
Naval Hospital Jackson-
ville commanding officer.
"Our command's team
of 2,500 military, civilian
and contract staff dedi-
cate themselves to taking
care of our nation's heroes
- past, present, future -
and their families. And we
understand and appreci-
ate your service."
Critical to this approach
to care, each of the 57,000
patients with a PCM at
the hospital or a branch
health clinic belongs to a
Medical Home Port care
team, the Navy's approach
to the nationwide "medi-
cal home" model of care.
Medical Home Port
places the patient in the
center of a collaborative
team of caregivers, from
doctors and nurses to case
managers, led by their
PCM. The patient and
team work together for a
coordinated, whole-per-
son approach to health.
"Our PCMs physi-
cians, physician assistants
PBW


Little


From Page 1

the North Korean people."
South Korea is hosting
a joint military exercise
now. Following North
Korea's saber rattling, nu-
clear-capable B-52 Stra-
tofortress and B-2 Spirit
bombers have participat-
ed in the maneuvers.
Kim has said North


Korea is targeting U.S.
bases in South Korea and
said its tube- and rocket-
launched artillery can
range Seoul a city of 20
million.
Meanwhile, the United
States is maintaining a so-
ber, calm, cool, collected
demeanor.
"We hope to avoid mis-
calculation," Little added.
"We think we can. The
North Koreans simply
need to dial the tempera-
ture down."


Navy photo by Jacob Sippel
Active-duty family member Sarah Fogerty gets her pulse taken by one of Naval
Hospital Jacksonville's primary care managers, Lt. Singh Mohenish. NH Jacksonville
uniquely offers its enrolled patients the Medical Home Port approach, with PCMs
leading coordinated care teams to meet patients' preventive, routine and urgent


care needs.

and nurse practitioners
- not only have the same
education and training as
their private-sector col-
leagues, they also have ex-
perience on battlefields, at
sea and on humanitarian
and disaster-relief mis-
sions," Shaffer said. "We
have PCMs offering pri-
mary care for the entire
family, from birth through
retirement."'
Patients enrolled with a
PCM at NBHC Kings Bay
can communicate with
their Medical Home Port
Black Team or Maroon
Team on non-urgent is-
sues using Medical Home
Port Online secure e-mail
to request appointments,
lab results or medication
refills. Register for Medi-
cal Home Port Online on
the command's Web site
at www.med.navy.mil/
sites/navalhospitaljax or
at www.relayhealth.com.
To make appointments,
call Central Appointments
at (800) 529-4677.
NBHC Kings Bay offers
enrolled patients a "one
stop shop" experience,
with multiple services on-
site, such as pharmacy,
laboratory and radiology.
And the command uses
an electronic health re-
cord system that supports
safety and communica-


tion among providers.
Patients also have ac-
cess to the hospital's 30-
plus primary and specialty
clinical areas, from allergy
to wellness.
Patients can see some
of the region's finest and
most highly-trained sur-
geons, including two of
only seven fellowship-
trained arthroplasty (joint
replacement) surgeons
in North Florida. What's
more, NH Jacksonville is
the first hospital on Flor-
ida's First Coast, military
or civilian, to earn Baby
Friendly certification from
the World Health Organi-
zation and UNICEF.
Case managers coordi-
nate care for patients with
multiple, complex condi-
tions. Free classes include
wellness, pregnancy and
parenting, and support for
deployers and their fam-
ily members. Specialty
centers include diabetes,
nutrition, breast care and
deployment health.
TRICARE Prime mem-
bers with a PCM in the
network can request a
PCM at NBHC Kings Bay
by completing a PCM
Change Form at the clin-
ic's TRICARE Service Cen-
ter or Health Benefits Ad-
visors.
NBHC Kings Bay is one


of NH Jacksonville's six
health care facilities lo-
cated across Florida and
Georgia. Of NH Jackson-
ville's patient population
- 215,000 active and re-
tired sailors, soldiers, Ma-
rines, airmen, guardsmen
and their families more
than 57,000 are enrolled
with a primary care man-
ager at one of its facilities.
To find out more about
NBHC Kings Bay, visit
the command Web site at
www.med.navy.mil/sites/
NavalHospitalJax, like the
Facebook page at www.
facebook/NavalHospi-
talJacksonville, follow on
Twitter at www.twitter.
com/NHJax and view the
YouTube channel at www.
youtube.com/user/Naval-
HospitalJax.
Sign up for e-mail up-
dates at nhjaxconnect@
med.navy.mil.


Sunday
8 c0 n Confessions
9 o m Cctholli Mcss
10 10 c m Religious Fcith For motion
(Cotholic
10 l ci m Adult Bible Study
10 30 ci m Piotestont Divine Service
Monday-Wednesday and Friday
11 1 5 c m Cothclic Moss
Wednesday
6 30 p in Rite of Chiistion Infitiction Adults
Saturday
J Confessions
5 ) m Cotholic: MOss





D R F^ ^IMPROVING
CURING
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DIABETES,
A CFC participant. Provided as a public service,


I0s a :ois ra c 1 0 -5 1 35 0




4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


1nr


Andrew Tipton, of the Sale a Life Tour, operates the software for the drunk-dri ing simulator.


CM3 jakola Richardson, CBMLU-202, drives the simulator while being observed bk Tipton, a senior manager. The simulator gale Sailors at Naval Submarine Base
Kings Ba\ an opportunity\ to experience how driving while intoxicated significantly\ affects their abili\ to safehl operate a motor vehicle.


A video is shown as part of the alcohol awareness program.


Tiplon speaks about the negative effects of drinking and dri ing.


A casket reminds those of what could happen.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 5


Recovery slow for Soldiers with invisible wounds


By Elaine San-
chez Brooke
Army Medical Center Public
Affairs

Army Spc. Kevin Wear
was riding in an armored
vehicle in Afghanistan last
summer when a roadside
bomb exploded, tear-
ing the vehicle into three
pieces and killing three of
the five passengers inside.
But Wear remembers
nothing of that incident or
anything that happened a
few weeks prior. The blast
injured his leg and caused
a traumatic brain injury
that left him in a coma for
about a week and a half.
"I woke up in San An-
tonio;' he said, referring
to Brooke Army Medical
Center, "and was in an
amnesia state for a month
or so."
Nearly a year later, Wear
still is coming to terms
with the aftermath of his
TBI. He struggles with
short- and long-term
memory, but has learned
"tricks," such as asso-
ciation and rhyming, that
help him get by.
"Sometimes I have trou-
ble, but I play it off," he
said in an interview at the
BAMC Warrior Transition
Battalion headquarters.
"All five of my kids be-
lieve I'm Superman the
toughest, strongest guy in
the world. I just want to
keep that as long as I can.
I don't want to feel differ-
ent or less."'
Wear is one of the more


Ney


From Page 1

Navy personnel.
First-place winners and
runner up commands will
be presented their awards
on station by designated
officials.
The 2013 Ney winners
include:
* Submarine
Category First Place:
USS Alaska (SSBN
732). Runner Up: USS
Maine (SSBN 741).
* Small Afloat
Category First Place:
USS Reuben James (FFG
57). Runner Up: USS Robert
G. Bradley (FFG 49).
* Medium Afloat
Category First Place:
USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG
54). Runner Up: USS
Stockdale (DDG 106).
* Large Afloat
Category First Place: USS
Wasp (LHD 1). Runner
Up: USS Boxer (LHD 4)
* Aircraft Carrier
Category First Place: USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN
75). Runner Up: USS John
C. Stennis (CVN 74).
* Continental U.S.
General Mess catego-
ry Large General Mess
Category First Place:
Naval Air Station Oceana,


than 266,000 military
members who suffered
a TBI from 2000 to 2012,
according to Brainline-
military.org. Additionally,
each year, a reported 1.7
million civilian brain in-
juries occur in the United
States.
TBI is defined as a dis-
ruption of function in the
brain from an external
force, such as a car acci-
dent or, as in Wear's case,
an explosion. Brain inju-
ries range in severity from
a mild TBI, also known as
a concussion, to a severe
injury that involves an ex-
tended period of uncon-
sciousness or amnesia.
Symptoms of a TBI
typically are divided into
three basic categories, ex-
plained Dr. Jan Kennedy,
a neuropsychologist and
senior scientific director
for the Defense and Vet-
erans Brain Injury Center,
Department of Neurol-
ogy, San Antonio Military
Medical Center. These in-
clude cognitive, such as
issues with memory and
attention; emotional, such
as depression, anxiety and
irritability; and physiolog-
ical, including headaches,
dizziness and problems
sleeping.
Army Spc. Rizaldy DeJe-
sus refers to TBI as an
"invisible wound" that's
difficult for others to un-
derstand. The Army medic
was injured in Afghani-
stan in July 2011 while on
a convoy delivering sup-
plies to a forward operat-


L


Courtesy photo
Army Spc. Kevin Wear talks on the radio while deployed in Afghanistan. Wear suf-
fered a brain injury when the armored vehicle he was riding in hit a roadside bomb
in August 2012.


ing base. The convoy was
moving along a narrow
hillside road when an ex-
plosion knocked the ve-
hicle DeJesus was riding
in down a two-story cliff.
Dejesus woke up in
Germany with a fractured
ankle and back, dislocated
hip, and a TBI. Through
individual and group ther-
apy he's come a long way
since, he said, but still has
trouble with his memory
and is easily irritated. "It's
a long process of healing,"
he said. "I see myself im-
proving slowly and am
thankful the Army has a
really good program for
TBI."
On the battlefield, sol-


\ 1 i -,I. 1 I . ..h ..

Helping children
Capt. Har\e\ Guffe\, commanding officer, Natal
Submarine Base Kings Ba\, signs the Court
Appointed Special Ad ocate Proclamation. CASA
is a national organization that helps abused and
neglected children find a better home.


Va. Runner Up: Naval Air
Station Jacksonville, Fla.
* Small General Mess
Category First Place: Naval
Base Kitsap, Wash. Runner
Up: Naval Fleet Activities
Yokosuka, Japan.
The Navy's more than
7,300 CSs are deployed


around the globe and feed
on average of 92.5 million
wholesome and nutritious
meals per year, ensuring
the Navy's fighting forces
operate at peak perfor-
mance and are ready to
respond to threats world-
wide.


diers who experience a
potentially concussive
event, such as feeling
dazed after an explosion,
must undergo a medical
evaluation and a mini-
mum rest period. Experts
are on hand in theater to
identify and treat service
members, and to refer
them to a higher level of
care if needed.
More than 90 percent of
those with a TBI will fully
recover; however, recov-
ery hinges on the severity
and location of the injury,
Kennedy explained. In all
cases, experts agree that
a patient's best course of
action is to seek care as
quickly as possible, since


Honors


From Page 1

themselves, he said. They
need the help of the men
and women around them
to perform at the level of
excellence.
"I couldn't have gained
any of those awards with-
out the people that I work
with every day," Middle-
ton said. "Everything that


rest is a vital component
in concussive recovery.
Education is another vi-
tal component, Kennedy
noted, and the Army is
working to raise aware-
ness about brain injuries,
including prevention, di-
agnosis and treatment.
According to the Office of
the Surgeon General, the
Army has invested more
than $800 million in re-
search and development
activities to better identify
and treat brain injuries.
At BAMC, several neuro-
imaging studies are under
way to improve diagnostic
and detection capability,
Kennedy said, and experts
at the TBI Clinic here are

I have been recognized
for has been a group ef-
fort. Everything that we
have done here has been a
group effort.
Middleton said doing
the job was easy for him,
but it wasn't easy on my
wife and children.
"You have to love your
job and have the support
of your family in order to
be the best that you can in
what you do every day," he
said. "I couldn't do this job
without the support of my


looking at cognitive reha-
bilitation's benefit for ser-
vice members who have
suffered a mild TBI.
Leaders also are work-
ing to combat the stigma
that some service mem-
bers attach to seeking
care. They encourage
battle buddies and family
members to keep an eye
out for any changes fol-
lowing a head injury and
to encourage soldiers to
seek care.
Army Sgt. Edward Ma-
tayka said he doesn't want
to be treated differently
because his brain "got rat-
tled." The Vermont Nation-
al Guard medic lost both
legs and suffered a spinal
injury, back and facial frac-
tures, a TBI and a stroke
after a roadside bomb blew
up his vehicle in Afghani-
stan in July 2010.
Having a brain injury
"doesn't mean you're bro-
ken," he said. "You just
have to learn mechanisms
to deal with it and to deal
with the different way you
may have to process stuff.
I'm still the same person."
Wear said he gets frus-
trated at times, particular-
ly when he forgets a name
or how to spell a word,
but doesn't let that deter
him. He practices memory
tricks and studies words
up to two hours a night to
speed his recovery.
"I don't want people to
think any differently about
me," he said. As a dad and
as a soldier, "I feel like
there's a lot more I can do."

wife and my kids."'
Not only has Middleton
won numerous awards, but
the Kings Bay Fire Depart-
ment has received three
Regional Fire and Emer-
gency Services Awards,
two VFW State Awards,
the Navy-wide F&ES EMS
Provider of the Year Award.
The department also has
nine recipients of the Navy
F&ES Live Saving Award
and 16 recipients of Navy
F&ES Special Achievement
Awards.


Military Recruitment Job Fair
Approximately 8oo jobs are available in law enforcement
across the State of Georgia ranging from Administration to
Probation Officers to Correctional Officers to Engineers,
Counselors and many more!


GeO
The GEO Group, Inc.




http://


Join us on
April 17th
from loam-2pm

National Guard Armory
Hwy 144 East
Glennville, Ga 30427


Register for this event at:
Iwww.surveymonkey.com/s/militaryjobfair


113th Submarine Birthday 2Bal
-O:NoRJ'NG WTHE TX\E"'N-DED UVMTERSEA XFAMILy OUR
FOU NDAO'TON^ Of S T'R1'.7j'Tj

3Hyatt 'Regency of Jacksonviffe
20 Aprif 2013




Ticket Info:


E-6 and Junior $40 per person
E-7 and Senior S50 per person
Command Leadership (CO/XO/COB/CMC) $60 per person
Unaccompanied Spouses $40 per person
VADM Michael J. Connor, Commander U.S. Submarine Forces, will be the guest speaker
Cash or check made payable to "Submarine Ball"


Order of Eventa


- Cocktails
- Ceremony
- Dinner
- Da.(ing


Rail Information
Menu: Petite Filet Mignon
Grilled Chicken


Attire:
Military


-Dinner Dress Blue
-Dinner Dress Blue
Jacket


Civilian -Black Tie

Contact your Command Sub Ball Representative or C.MC.
Ticket sales end March 29th 2013

Hotel Accommodations at the Hyatt Regency:
Must Say "U.S. Navy Kings Bay Submarine Ball" for discounted rate.


Ticket POC: ETC Gilby (912) 573-3731


Under the FY'13

Continuing Resolution Act

the following facilities will be

changing their hours
effective 12:01 am Monday, March 18, 2013, until further notice.

Big EZ Gaming Zone/Liberty Center
OPEN
Wednesday Sunday 11 a.m. 9 p.m.

Big EZ Billiard/Movie/Sports Zones
OPEN
Monday Thursday 11 a.m. 11 p.m.
Friday 11 a.m. 11 p.m.
Saturday 12 noon 12 midnight
Sunday 12 noon 11 p.m.
Holidays 12 noon 8 p.m
Fitness Complex
OPEN
Monday Friday 5 a.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. 7 p.m.
Sunday 12 6 p.m.

Pool Complex
OPEN for Lap Swim
Monday Friday 5 8:30 a.m.
11 a.m. 1 p.m.
OPEN for Recreational Swimming May 25 September 2
Tuesday Saturday 12 6 p.m.*
Sunday 1 6 p.m.*
*August 3 September 2* Weekends ONLY




6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


Stress management
covered at workshop
Events, schedules, daily pres-
sure and many other items can
cause undo stress in your life.
Stress may or may not be good
for your health depending on
how you manage that stress.
This workshop is slated for 1 to
4 p.m., April 18. Pre-registration
is required. Call 573-4512 for
details.

Anger management
seminar April 24
Anger is not an effective meth-
od for getting what you want and
is often a smoke screen for other
emotions. This workshop is slat-
ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24.
It can help you focus on iden-
tifying the feelings anger hides
and explore behaviors helpful
in resolving primary issues. Pre-
registration is required. Call 573-
4512 for details.

Parenting classes
offered on Mondays
Are you frustrated with your
children? Would you like sug-
gestions on how to stop temper
tantrums or how to get your teen
to complete chores without ask-
ing them 14 times? We believe
parents are the experts on their
children. But, children don't
come with a manual! So, some-
times you need help to figure
out what to do with them. Meet
with the parenting class from
9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April
8, 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in
this six-week class is ongoing.
Attendees must complete all six
weeks in order to receive a cer-
tificate. A minimum of six par-
ticipants is needed in order for
a new class to start. Registration
required at 573-4512.

Reconnect: Marriage
enrichment workshop
The Fleet and Family Support
Center Kings Bay, in coordina-
tion with Chaplains Religious
Enrichment Operations, is
hosting Reconnect: One-
Day Marriage Enrichment
Workshop. Reconnect is
designed to enhance and sup-
port the ability of a couple to
get away from the distractions
of everyday life in order to
improve their marital relation-
ship. Activities are designed
to increase a couple's ability to
understand one another better
and communicate on a more
intimate level. This class is 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To regis-
ter call 573-4513.

Expectant Family
Workshop coming
Expectant Families can receive
training on second Wednesday
of every other month to ease the
adjustment to a newborn baby.
Information will be provided
about WIC, Navy Marine Corps
Relief Society and various other
benefits and services available
to expectant parents, along
with answers to your questions.
Frequent breaks offered for the
comfort of expectant moms.
The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3
p.m., April 11. Registration is
required. Call 573-4512.

Resume writing skills
class upcoming
This class explores resume
writing for today's job mar-




Spas Servies
(912) 676-3636
H ia i IIw I UrV Mi-ha


*THE HOST (PG131
1:15 4:25 7:00 9:40
*TYLER PERRY'S
TEMPTATION (PG13)
2:15 5:00 6:45 7:45 9:15 10:15
*G.I. JOE: RETALIATION 3D (PG13)
2:00 7:20
*6.1. JOE: RETALIATION 2D (PG13j
4:45 10:00
*THE CROODS 3D (PG)
12:45 3:00 7:30
*THE CROODS 2D (PG)
1:45 5:15 9:45
*ADMISSION (PG13)
1:50 4:40 7:25 10:05
*OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)
1:30 4:35 7:10 9:55
THE CALL (R)
1:00 3:10 5:25 7:40 9:50
OZ THE GREAT &
POWERFUL (PG)
1:10 4:20 7:05 9:50
THE INCREDIBLE
BURT WONDERSTONE (PG13)
4:15
*Pass Restricted


ket. Resume items including
skills, experience, education
and values as well as simple,
effective and easy to use resume
formats that get job inter-
views. Part-time, full-time or
permanent positions matters
not, this workshop is for you.
This program will assist the job
seeker in completing a prod-
uct that will "get them in the
door." The workshop is sched-
uled at the Fleet and Family
Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m.,
April 8. Registration is highly
recommended, as class is lim-
ited to 20 seats. For more infor-
mation, call 573-4513.

Military Resumes
3-part series will help
This three-part series of
one-hour sessions walks par-
ticipants through the practical
and creative aspects of applying
military experience to build a
successful document for a post-
military job search. Participants
should bring a copy of his or
her Verification of Military
Experience and Training, at
least three evaluations and
information on any licenses or
certifications held. Optional
documents are award letters
and transcripts. This workshop
is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and
30 and May 7. Registration is
required. For more information,
call 573-4513.

Job search workshop
scheduled for April 17
A job search workshop will be
10 a.m. to noon, April 17. It pro-
vides an overview of local and
national employment trends and
recommends strategies to expand
your job search network. Open to
active duty, retired, reserve and
separating military and family
members of relocating civil ser-
vice personnel. Registration is


required, call 573-4513.


New Moms and Dads
Support Group to meet
A New Mom's and Dad's
Support Group will meet every
other Tuesday at the Fleet and
Family Support Center through-
out the month. This workshop is
scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon,
April 9 and 16. This workshop is
an opportunity to share experi-
ences, meet and gain support
from others, and exchange new
ideas. To register, call 573-4512.

Paying for College
program upcoming
This two-hour program is an
interactive program designed to
inform participants on sources
of funding for higher educa-
tion, focusing on financial aid
resources, college savings plans
and tax incentives. This training
is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April
23. Registration is required. For
more information call 573-9783.

Transition GPS
class upcoming
Transition GPS is a seminar
for those separating, retiring
or contemplating leaving the
military. The five day seminar
provides information on ben-
efits, job search skills, employ-
ment resources, resume writing,
interviewing and other skills.
Spouses are encouraged to
attend. Separation Transition
GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April
15 to 17. You must be registered
by Command Career Counselor.
For more information, call 573-
4513.

Smooth Move Workshop
scheduled for April 16
Smooth Move Workshops
are designed to help person-
nel with military relocations


and transfers. Areas covered
include transportation, travel
pay, allowances, and important
forms and documents, housing
referral office and relocation
services. All service members
and their spouses are encour-
aged to attend six months before
their transfer date. Due to lim-
ited seating, please do not bring
children. The workshop will be
2 to 4 p.m., April 16. For more
information, call 573-4513.

Million Dollar Sailor
program upcoming
The Million Dollar Sailor
Program is personal wealth
building for sailors and their
families. This course assists
those attending on how to navi-
gate successfully through finan-
cial challenges that accompany
them. This training was created
to specifically combat the most
common financial issues fac-
ing Sailors today. It will provide
you with financial management
skills that can be used over their
lifetime. This training is sched-
uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25
and 26. Registration is recom-
mended. For more information
call 573-9783.

Deployment Return
and Reunion class set
This workshop addresses the
challenges of deployment and
offers tools and techniques to
managing the cycle of deploy-
ment those challenges. It also
prepares family members for
reunion so that problems will
be minimized and the positive
aspects of reunion can be maxi-
mized. Topics include expec-
tations, communication and
financial awareness, and hints
for a happy homecoming. The
class is 10 a.m. to noon, April
10. For more information or to
register, call 573-4513.


Command Financial
Specialist class offered
A five-day training course
will be offered for prospective
Command Financial Specialists.
All CFS must be nominated by
their Command. Registration
is open to personnel E-6 and
above who are financially stable,
with at least one year left before
PRD from their commands.
This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
April 29 to May 3. Registration is
required. For more information,
call 573-9783.

Ombudsman Assembly
Meeting April 22
The Ombudsman Assembly
Meetingwillbe held for all OMB,
COs, XOs, CMCs and COB's
at the Kings Bay Community
Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For
more information, contact at
573-4513.

Ten Steps to a Federal
job examined
Gain information on the fed-
eral employment process, sala-
ries and benefits. Learn how to
interpret job announcements
and determine whether you are
eligible to apply. Attendees will
be provided guidelines, informa-
tion, samples and tips on com-
pleting the electronic Federal
resume. This class is from 9 a.m.
to noon, April 12. Registration
required by calling 573-4513.

Survivors Benefit Plan
program April 17
The survivor Benefit Plan is
a program that provides basic
information on the key provi-
sions of the Survivor Benefit
Plan. This information will assist
service members and their
spouses in making informed
decisions about SBP's role
in their retirement plan. This
workshop is scheduled for 2 to
4 p.m., April 17. Registration is
required. For more information
call 573-4513.

Fleet and Family
offers classes on site
FFSC will take most of its regu-
lar workshops on the road if a
unit can furnish a conference
room or classroom and guaran-
tee a minimum of five partici-
pants. Additionally, person-
nel will tailor presentations to
cover a unit's General Military
Training requirements when
those requirements dealwith hu-
man resources and social issues.
Counselors also can create a pre-
sentation in response to a unit's
area of special concerns. Person-
nel are available to participate
within areas of expertise in the
indoctrination of newly assigned
personnel and family members
of active duty personnel.

Department of Veterans
Affairs visits base
A Department of Veterans
Affairs representative for Kings
Bay is in the office from 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Thursdays.
Appointments are required.
Service members wishing to par-
ticipate in the Benefits Delivery
at Discharge program should be
within 60 to 180 days of discharge
or retirement and be available
for an exam by the VA. To set up
an appointment, call Katherine
Fernandez at 573-4506.


A New Day of Possibilities.

Every Day!


New friends and new things to do can create a
new sense of belonging. This is what residents find at
our Senior Care Centers. We provide our residents
all the care they need, while helping them enjoy life
through activities, games and an active social life.

If you would like to learn more or take
a tour of one of our Senior Care Centers,
please call 912-466-2144.





SOUTHEAST GEORGIA
HEALTH SYSTEM
SENIOR CARE CENTERS

805 Dilworth Street St. Marys, GA 31558
912-882-4281
2611 Wildwood Drive Brunswick, GA 31520
912-265-8528
sghs.org
Southeast Georgia Health System is a tobacco-free organization.




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4,2013 7



Morae efr and Rceton happening


The annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club is Saturday, April 6.



Grand Outing golf April


The annual Grand Outing at
Trident Lakes Golf Club begins
with a shotgun start at 1 p.m.,
Saturday, April 6. Format is two-
person team with six holes Cap-
tain's Choice, six holes Alternate
Shot and six holes Best Ball. Reg-
istration and lunch provided at
11 a.m. Cost is
$25 for Trident
Lakes Golf
Club members,
$30 for military
and $35 for guests and civil-
ians, which includes golf, cart,
lunch and prizes. Prizes will be
awarded for first- and second-
place and other prizes on course
throughout play. Outing extras
include pig roast with all the fix-
ings, Putting Challenge on the
Practice Green, Chip 'N' Chal-
lenge on the Practice Green,
two Longest Drive Contests and
Closest to the Pin on the course.
For more information, call Pro
Shop at (912) 573-8475.
U Spring Break Fever at
Rack-N-Roll Lanes Spring


I


Break is coming and Rack-N-
Roll Lanes is ready. From 1 to
5 p.m., through Friday, April
5 all games and shoes are 50
cents for all guests, 18 years old
and younger. Also, Tuesday and
Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., enjoy
the all you can bowl for only $10
a person. Call
Rack-N-Roll
Lanes now for
more informa-
tion at (912)
573-9492.
* Kidsfest 2013 April is
Child Abuse Prevention Month
and Month of the Military Child
so MWR is Celebrating Children
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April
13 at the Under the Pines Park
& Tennis Courts. Giant inflata-
bles, face painting, Fun Zones,
costume characters, photo
ops, cake walk, arts and crafts,
and youth demonstrations by
Crooked River State Park and
Paks Karate. Food will be avail-
able for purchase. Call (912)
573-4564 for more information.


* Movie Under the
Saturday, April 20 at di
8 p.m., at Under the P
and Tennis Courts e
admission with the fea
sentation showing Ri
Guardians (PG). Bring
lawn chairs and blank
Bay Domino's has a Pi
Deal for the evening
Any Way You Want It"
For more information
movie call, (912) 573-4
EHours of Operation
ing for MWR Under t
Continuing Resolut
- The following fac
be changing their ho
tive 12:01 a.m. Monday
18, until further notic
Gaming Zone/Libert
will be open Wednesda
Sunday 11 a.m. to 9
EZ Billiard/Movie/Spo
will be open Monday
Thursday, 11 a.m. to
Friday 11 a.m. to
Saturday noon to
Sunday noon to 11


holidays noon to 8 p.m.; Fitness
Complex will be open Monday
through Friday 5 a.m. to 8 p.m.,
Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and
Sunday noon to 6 p.m.; the Pool
Complex will be open for lap
swim Monday through Friday 5
to 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Navy photo ; the Pool Complex will open for
recreational swimming May 25
through Sept. 2 and will be open
Tuesday through Saturday noon
to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 6 p.m.
Starting Aug. 3 through Sept. 2, it
will be open weekends only.
Disney on Ice Tickets
Stars are on sale now at Kings Bay
usk, about Information, Tickets and Travel.
Pines Park A special offer for military fami-
njoy free lies, $13 tickets to select perfor-
ature pre- mances of Dare to Dream at the
ise of the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
your own Arena. Military/DoD discounts
;ets. Kings are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
zza Movie April 5,11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.,


of "Large
$10 each.
about the
4564.
ns chang-
the FY'13
tion Act
ilities will
urs effec-
ay, March
:e: Big EZ
y Center
ay through
p.m.; Big
irts Zones
y through
11 p.m.,
11 p.m.,
midnight,
p.m. and


Awareness


From Page 6

update to Department of De-
fense policies.
The Sexual Assault Prevention
and Response Program, for the
military community, continues
to support victims and commu-
nity agencies.
The month of April is a time
for people to remember and
honor those who have been
victims of sexual assault. This
includes direct victims as well


Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5
p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more
information call (912) 573-8888.
* Tae Kwon Do It's at the
Fitness Complex on Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m.
for 7 year olds and under, 6:15
to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds
and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds
to adult. For more information,
call the fitness complex at (912)
573-3990.
* Free Bowling Wednesdays
- 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays
at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active
duty, reservists and retirees can
enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental
is $2. Need more information?
Call (912) 573-9492.
* Game on Rack-N-Roll
Lanes gaming room has skee-
ball, basketball and more
games. Save your tickets for
prizes. For more information,
call (912) 573-9492.


as secondary victims, such as
friends and family of the victim,
police/law enforcement, and
victim advocates.
Take a moment to think of
how many people are affected
by the crime of sexual assault
each year. Always remember
that courage and hope is at the
core of every victim and every
survivor.
For more information on sex-
ual assault or to contact a victim
advocate, call SafeHelpline at
(877) 995-524 or on-call Victim
Advocate Kings Bay at (912) 674-
6827 or log onto SafeHelpline.
org.


I N sB I us dabou kpid




8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4,2013


Marine Corps image
Suicide Charley is the only Company in the Marine
Corps to hold two guidon.



Suicide Charley


legend lives on


By Cpl. William Jackson
Marine Corps Air Ground
Combat Center

The lore of Suicide Char-
ley began in 1942 with one
of the most well known
Marines in the Corps.
Lt. Col. Chesty Puller
was as-
3-" \ signed
*, the task
of set-
ting up
a de-
fensive
perim-
eter
around
Puller H e n -
d er -
son Field in Guadalcanal.
Charley Co., 1st Battalion,
7th Marine Regiment, had
dug in and was flanked by
Baker Co. on the left and
Animal Co. on the right.
In the distance, a mass of
Japanese soldiers waited
to strike.
On October 24, at about
10 p.m., three Japanese
regiments and a portion of
a brigade breached their
perimeter.
The Marines of Charley
Co. received the brunt of
the attack but held their
ground despite a terrible
loss of their own.
The next day the defen-
sive line was still intact
while the Japanese licked
their wounds.
After the onslaught, a
flag made of a white, silk
parachute flew over Char-
ley Co.'s area bearing a
skull and crossbones with
the words "Suicide Char-
ley" written underneath.
"When I checked in all
I heard about was the tra-
dition of Suicide Charley,"
said Sgt. Cody Waldroup,
assaultman, section lead-
er, 1/7. "They take it very
seriously and it's some-
thing to be proud of. You
don't see it in a lot of units.
In Suicide, there's not a lot
of chest pumping when it
comes to being the best,
it's more of a quite pro-
fessionalism. It doesn't
matter what you've done.
When you're a part of Sui-
cide Charley, you have the
reputation to uphold:'


The guidon was not
seen again until the battle
for Peleliu in 1944. Dur-
ing one particular phase
of the battle, a replica flag
of the original skull and
crossbones appeared to
inspire the Marines.
From that day on, the
flag was used as a moti-
vational tool for war torn
Marines.
"It's kind of crazy to
think about what you're
upholding and the tradi-
tion you're carrying on
for the WWII veterans,'
said Sgt. Jesse Rodriguez,
mortars section leader,
1/7. "It's exhilarating and
humbling at the same
time. Not many things can
compare to that tradition
you uphold for that spe-
cific guidon. It makes you
feel like you have to earn
your place to walk behind
that guidon."
A sense of pride embod-
ies the Marines of Charley
Co. because they know the
Marines before them nev-
er stopped regardless of
how bad a situation was.
"I first learned about
Suicide Charley when I
was at The Basic School,"
said 1st Lt. Deven Ravel,
weapons platoon com-
mander, 1/7. "My staff
platoon commander was
a platoon commander
when he was with Suicide
Charley. I looked up to his
professionalism. It made
me want to know more
about Suicide Charley and
be a part of it:'
The guidon exists be-
cause of the men who
shed blood on the battle-
fields of Guadalcanal and
Peleliu. Their memory
lives on in the minds of the
Marines today that carry
the name Suicide Charley
into battle.
"Just like Sgt. Waldroup,
I came from another unit,"
said Staff Sgt. Carl Ther-
rien, platoon sergeant,
1/7. "Everybody has their
own traditions but com-
ing to Suicide Charley,
it's something extra. It's
something special that I
hold dear and I have to
make sure that (the tradi-
tions) continue on.:


Navy photo by MCC Keith W. DeVinney
A P-3C Orion helped in the Mediterranean Sea rescue.



U.S., Italy, France


form rescue team


From Commander, U.S. Naval
Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th
Fleet Public Affairs
Naval Forces Europe-
Africa Personnel Recov-
ery team, aircrewmen
assigned to Commander,
Task Force 67, along with
the French navy and Ital-
ian coast guard assisted
in a rescue of approxi-
mately 40 people adrift in
a 15-meter inflatable boat
in the Mediterranean Sea,
35 miles north of the Liby-
an coast, March 27.
The international mari-
time force responded to
the request for support to
help locate and assist the
distressed vessel.
"A French ship initially
spotted the craft off the
coast of Libya and con-
tacted the maritime res-


cue coordination cen-
ter in Rome," said Bruce
Townsend, Personnel
Recovery team member.
"Because of our relation-
ship with the Italians and
international agreements,
our expertise is often
called upon to help save
lives when distress calls
are heard and response
time is critical:'
Once the search area
was determined, the Per-
sonnel Recovery staff gave
coordinates to CTF-67,
which launched a P-3C
maritime patrol aircraft to
search the area and locate
the craft.
The P-3 crew helped co-
ordinate with an Italian
tugboat to embark the ves-
sel and bring the people
ashore safely.


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I




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 9


Ex-Guardian's final


hull section removed


By MC3 Kelby Sanders
Commander U.S. Seventh Fleet,
Public Affairs

Navy and contracted
salvage personnel em-
barked onboard the Navy
-contracted crane vessel
M/V Jascon 25 completed
on March 30 the removal
of the grounded mine
countermeasures ship ex-
Guardian from the Tubba-
taha Reef.
The final section of the
hull, the stern section,
which weighed approxi-
mately 250 tons, was safely
lifted from the reef.
"As the hull has been
removed, the team is now
shifting their effort to col-
lecting minor debris that
remains on the reef. We
also have a collaborative
team from the U.S. and the


Philippines beginning to
assess the condition of the
reef," said Matthews.
Since Guardian's
grounding, the Navy has
been working meticulous-
ly to salvage any reusable
equipment and remove
any potentially harmful
materials including petro-
leum-based products, hu-
man wastewater and other
wreckage debris.
"Every salvage opera-
tion presents unique chal-
lenges. It has been difficult
to extract the Guardian
without causing further
damage to the reef, but
the U.S. Navy and SMIT
salvage team with sup-
port from other compa-
nies and the government
of the Philippines have
really done a superb job. I
could not be more proud,"'


said Supervisor of Salvage,
Capt. Mark Matthews.
No fuel has leaked since
the grounding and all of
the approximately 15,000
gallons aboard Guardian
were safely transferred off
the ship in the early days of
the salvage operation. We
continue to work closely
with the Philippine Coast
Guard, Navy and Tubba-
taha Reef Park Rangers,
and we are grateful for the
support we have received
to remove Guardian and
minimize further damage
to the reef," said Matthews.
Along with the Jascon
25, the USNS Safeguard
(T-ARS 50), the SMIT Bor-
neo, the Trabajador, the
Intrepid and the Archon
Tide remain on scene sup-
porting the cleanup op-
eration.


Navy photo by MOL Kelby Sanders
The U.S. Navy contracted crane vessel M/V Jascon 25 removes the stern section
from the mine countermeasure ship ex-Guardian (MCM 5), which ran aground on
the Tubbataha Reef Jan. 17, and places it onto the barge Seabridge. The removal of
the stern section completed the removal of the Guardian from the reef.


Unmanned plane tested


By MC3 Sabrina Fine
Navy Public Affairs Support
Element East
San Antonio-class am-
phibious transport dock
USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19)
launched a RQ-21A Small
Tactical Unmanned Air
System recently, for its
first flight at sea.
The STUAS completed
four fly-bys around the
ship before recovering
with the STUAS Recovery
System, a cable apparatus
the aircraft latches to for
recovery.
The STUAS completed
three months of land-
based trial flights aboard
Naval Air Warfare Center
in China Lake, Calif., be-
fore launching from a San
Antonio-class amphibious
landing dock ship.
"This is a significant
event because the program
is getting ready to achieve
a major acquisition mile-
stone," said Gregory Oliver,
Naval Air Systems Com-
mand lead test engineer.
"This testing we are doing
supports the ability to con-
tinue on with the develop-
ment phase before a pro-
duction phase:'
The Mesa Verde hosted
members of the STUAS
team from the company,
Insitu, that built the air-
craft and from NAVAIR
during the sea trials.
"They helped us out, we
helped them out, and we
made a great team;'," said
Aviation Boatswain's Mate
3rd Class Travis Starr.
The successful launch
required the ship's crew


Navy photo by MC3 Sabrina Fine
Members of the RQ-21A Small Tactical Unmanned
Air System test team transport the RQ-21A across
the flight deck of the amphibious transport dock USS
Mesa Verde (LPD 19) after its first flight at sea.


and the STUAS team to co-
ordinate with each other
for launch and recovery.
"Some challenges were
getting the air space we
needed and making sure
we could get proper wind
conditions for launch and
recovery," Oliver said.
Other circumstances
needed to be considered
while flying at sea as op-
posed to on land.
"We learned a lot about
its handling qualities and
how it flies around the
ship," Oliver said.
The initial installation
took months to plan and
install.
"There was a lot of pre-
paring that had to be done
for ship integration;' said
Lt. Cmdr. Kyle Matthew,
STUAS detachment officer
in charge, project officer,
and U.S. naval test pilot.
"The biggest parts were to
install and integrate the


Ground Control Station
into the ship infrastruc-
ture, which included in-
stalling various antennas
onto the ship's deck and
masts."
Next, the team had to
find a secure and safe
place for the launch and
recovery system as well
as train the crew how to
move and emplace it, said
Matthew.
"The launch and recov-
ery equipment were never
on a ship before, so we
didn't know if they were
going to be able to make
the angles up, the ramps
and the turns;'," Starr said.
The flight was a success
and a learning experience
for both the ship's crew
and NAVAIR.
NAVAIR has a goal for
STUAS flight first from
large LPD ships, and then
possibly smaller ships in
the fleet.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 11


Baseball's starting, but does anybody care?


Wen I was a kid, baseball was the biggest sport.
Teachers brought TVs to school so we could
watch the World Series. It was like a holiday.
Then football and other sports started passing it up. A


players strike that canceled the World Series in 1994 and
scandals with performance enhancing drugs helped lose
more fans. I wanted to find out what people's three favor-
ite sports were to watch. But, I also wanted to find out


what they think about baseball. I actually was surprised
by the support for baseball in this survey. I also was sur-
prised that nobody said they liked NASCAR, which is one
of the most-watched sports today.


Ensign Tyler Turpin
USS Rhode Island Gold
Eagle River, Wisc.
"Football, basketball and
soccer. Baseball's been
dying. I haven't watched a
game in a couple years."


MM2 Matt Stegall
USS Wyoming Gold
Barnesville, Ga.
"Football, probably
baseball and hockey.
I'm a Braves fan."


Shawnie Anderson
Family member
Brooklyn, N.Y.
"Baseball, football and
tennis. My favorite team is
the Red Sox. I'm looking
forward to them getting
where they need to get to."


MT3 Christopher Held
Trident Training Facility
Livermore, Calif.
"Lacrosse, hockey and
football. I like baseball,
but I can't watch it on TV.
Going to games is fun."


HN Isaiah Edwards
Branch Health Clinic
Sumter, S.C.
"Basketball, football and
soccer. Baseball's fun
to play, but I don't like
watching it."


ET2 Julian Jennings
USS Tennessee Blue
Baltimore
"Football, basketball and
probably soccer. I don't
really don't watch
baseball too much. I get
bored watching it. "


DARPA focus on Big Data


DARPA graphic
As computers have improved, growing storage and processing capacities have pro-
vided new and powerful ways to gain insight into the world by sifting through the
infinite quantities of data available.


From the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency

The Defense Advanced Research Proj-
ects Agency held a multi-program per-
former meeting for researchers to hear
presentations on the latest innovations
and promising approaches in the area of
Big Data and data analytics.
Speakers during the day-long event
included representatives from the White
House, FBI, universities from across the
country and leading private sector com-
panies focused on the potential efficien-
cies and advantages that can be gained in
Big Data, a technology phenomenon that
has arisen over the past 30 years.
As computers have improved, growing
storage and processing capacities have
provided new and powerful ways to gain
insight into the world by sifting through
the infinite quantities of data available.
But this insight, discoverable in previ-
ouslv unseen patterns and trends within


these phenomenally large data sets, can
be hard to detect without new analytic
tools that can comb through the informa-
tion and highlight points of interest.
Recognizing the benefits to govern-
ment in March of 2012, President Barack
Obama encouraged advances in data an-
alytics by launching a Big Data Research
and Development Initiative that commits
six Federal departments and agencies to
advancing the science of data analysis.
As part of this, DARPA's XDATA pro-
gram was launched to create tools to as-
similate and process mountains of data
and provide visualization tools to allow
users to analyze trends and glean value
from the data.
"The challenge is processing and inter-
acting with that data because there is so
much of it," DARPA Director Arati Prab-
hakar said "If we can develop the com-
putational tools, scalable algorithms and
intuitive user interfaces, the implications
reach far beyond DoD as well."'




12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


New campaign's aim for drinking responsibly


From Navy Personnel Command
Public Affairs

The Navy launched a
new campaign April 1 in
honor of National Alcohol
Awareness Month called
Keep What You've Earned,
designed to encourage re-
sponsible drinking among
Sailors by focusing on the
accomplishments in their
Navy careers.
"Being an advocate
for responsible drinking
is not only a leadership
responsibility, it is a re-
sponsibility of every Sailor
in the fleet," said Chief
of Naval Personnel and
Total Force Fleet Master
Chief Petty Officer April
Beldo. "Together we have
reduced the number of
alcohol related incidents
and DUIs by almost half
over the last five years. By


Navy photo by MC1 Julie Matyascik
Charlie Ross, Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program counselor, and Jennifer
Dolehite, Fleet Forces Alcohol and Drug Control Officer demonstrate how to
use the Alcohol Detection Device during a Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor/
Urinalysis Program Coordinator forum at Naval Station Norfolk.


drinking responsibly, you
can continue to help bring
these numbers down and
make a difference in fleet
readiness."
According to Dorice Fa-
vorite, director of the Navy
Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Prevention program, Sail-
ors drink primarily be-
cause of stress related to
the workplace, their fami-
lies and life changes.
"From boot camp to
advancement exams, job
training and deployments,
the Keep What You've
Earned campaign recog-
nizes these challenges
and encourages Sailors to
drink responsibly to main-
tain their successful ca-
reers," Favorite said.
To address alcohol use
from all angles, the new
campaign actively engag-
es alcohol abuse person-


nel, Navy leaders, local
communities and Sailors
as advocates for respon-
sible drinking.
"Our Sailors are excited
about this campaign's
launch because they were
a part of its development,"
said Cmdr. Jay Clark, com-
manding officer of the
guided-missile destroyer
USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).
Sailors from Roosevelt
participated in a photo
shoot to be used in post-
ers and other print materi-
als, then in an review of the
products to see if they reso-
nated with young Sailors.
"We talk about responsi-
ble alcohol use constantly
aboard Roosevelt, but it
was nice to have the Navy
include our Sailors in the
development of something
that affects them and their
careers," Clark said.


DOD sexual assault policy updated


By Nick Simeone
American Forces Press Service

The Department of De-
fense released updated
policies and procedures
aimed at combating sex-
ual assaults in the military
and improving care for
victims, March 28.
Senior defense officials
said the updated policies
and procedures provide a
framework that improves
safety for sexual assault
victims, standardizes vic-
tim-assistance services
across the force, enhances
prevention efforts and
provides victims added
confidence to come for-
ward to report assaults
and seek treatment.
"Today's release of an
updated policy directive
underscores the depart-
ment's commitment to
combating sexual assault
on every level within the
military," said Army Maj.
Gen. Gary S. Patton, direc-
tor of DOD's Sexual As-
sault Prevention and Re-
sponse Office.
SAPRO officials said
the policy changes came
about through a coordi-
nated effort among the
services, the National
Guard Bureau, the DOD
inspector general, mili-
tary healthcare providers,
chaplains and the entire
DOD community to im-
prove every aspect of the
department's response to
sexual assault.
"We have thousands of
victims in the armed forc-
es," Air Force Col. Alan R.
Metzler, SAPRO's deputy
director, said in an inter-
view with American Forc-
es Press Service. "We need


Navy photo by MC2 Leonard Adams Jr.
Sailors participate in Sexual Assault Prevention and Response training in the hangar
bay of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).


to make sure that we pre-
vent sexual assault from
happening, and when it
does, provide a response
system that can care for
people and hold people
accountable so we can get
the perpetrators out of the
armed forces."
The updated policies
incorporate expedited
transfers for victims, es-
tablish a hotline for crisis
intervention, and require
additional training as well
as new, uniform standards
for care givers.
"We have worked with
the national certification
body and codified into our
policy that every victim
advocate, every sexual as-


sault response coordina-
tor have a level of training
and competence and na-
tional certification so that
they are providing victims
the best quality care," Met-
zler said.
Senior Pentagon offi-
cials emphasize that the
department has a zero-
tolerance policy for sexual
assault.
In recent weeks, Patton
has met with Capitol Hill
lawmakers to discuss the
department's response
to sexual assault, empha-
sizing that the Pentagon
needs to do more to com-
bat the crime while wel-
coming input from out-
side groups.


A goal of the new poli-
cies and procedures is to
encourage sexual assault
victims to have confi-
dence in the system and to
come forward and report
crimes, which Metzler ac-
knowledged are "vastly
under reported."
"The department takes
this seriously, that when
a victim tells us that they
have been sexually as-
saulted, we will believe
them," he said. "We will
protect their privacy. They
will be able to have help
and care because we un-
derstand the nature of this
crime and we want them
to come forward to get
help."


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 13


WW II nurses struggled as prisoners of Japanese


From Naval Heritage and
History Command, Adapted
from Dorothy Still Danner:
Reminiscences of a Nurse POW.

I never had any child-
hood dreams of being a
nurse. I thought I wanted
to be a dress designer, but
along came the depres-
sion.
I became a nurse be-
cause my mother liked
nursing and the LA Coun-
ty General Hospital paid
the nurses a little stipend.
She took me there and the
next thing I knew I was a
student nurse.
I really loved nursing
and found it a very satisfy-
ing profession.
That was in 1932 and
I was 18 years old. After
graduating from nursing
school I worked in two
hospitals before joining
the Navy in 1937.
At that time, there were
only 400 nurses in the
Navy. I really didn't expect
to be hired so I was really
surprised when I got my
orders to go to the San Di-
ego Naval Hospital for a
physical. The next thing I
knew I was in the Navy.
My first assignment was
at Balboa Hospital in San
Diego. Oh, it was beauti-
ful. From the pink build-
ing sitting up on the hill,
you could look down over
the harbor and see all
those Navy ships out there
and feel very important as
part of Uncle Sam's Navy.
In 1939 I was sent to the
Canacao Naval Hospital in
the Philippines. I traveled
across the Pacific on the
[transport USS] Hender-
son [AP-1]. It was a festive
trip.
The Philippines was not
quite as spectacular as Ha-
waii. I became very fond
of the base there anyway.
The Navy Yard was just
across Manila Bay about
a half mile away. It was a
very active social life.
There were always par-
ties and, of course, the


nurses got involved along
with everybody else. Our
social concerns were put
on the back burner when
the dependents were sent
home around the first of
1941.
While we heard about
the rape of Nanking, no-
body thought the Japs
would be silly enough to
try and do anything to Un-
cle Sam.
War Pearl Harbor
shocked me as it did ev-
eryone else. I and the oth-
er nurses were awakened
in the middle of the night
and told that Pearl Harbor
had been hit. We were sent
to the hospital as soon as
we got dressed.
Since the hospital was
right in the target zone,
we sent all the ambula-
tory patients back to duty
and the rest to Manila. Ar-
rangements were made to
admit the patients to what
had been a dependents
ward at the Sternberg
Army Hospital.
On Wednesday the
10th, the Navy Yard was
bombed. Itwas wiped out.
This raid lasted about an
hour.
After the raid, we rushed
to the hospital, and pa-
tients were all over the
place. There were Filipino
women, children, and
men and our own people
from the Navy Yard.
It was really a shocking
scene.
The power to the hospi-
tal was knocked out. It was
a pretty hectic afternoon.
Triage was impossible.
You just tried to find out
which were the worst ones
to go to surgery and so on.

On December 31, the
Army evacuated al the
Army patients on a hos-
pital ship and took them
to Australia. Meanwhile,
the Army was retreating
toward Bataan to make a
stand there.
The military declared
Manila an open city and


west-point.org photo
Women prisoners of war wash their hair in a camp in the Philippines.


retreated, but the medical
personnel remained.
On 2 January, the Japa-
nese came into Manila,. At
first the Japanese were not
hostile and mostly left us
alone. But then they start-
ed taking quinine from us.
Then they took our beds
and mattresses.
They also began to slap
around and beat up the
men. But they ignored us,
the nurses.
When the Japanese
came they rounded up all
the Allied civilians and
sent them to the Univer-
sity of Santo Tomas. I was
sent to Santo Tomas on
March 8, 1942. The medi-
cal facilities there were
still lacking.
Soon Santo Tomas be-
came too crowded as the
Japanese kept bringing
people in. They decided
to move part of the camp
out of Manila. Therefore,
they selected a site near
the town of Los Banos to
house some of the over-
flow.
In May 1943, the Japa-
nese sent 800 men to Los
Banos to set up the camp.
The Japanese took a plot of
about 55 or 60 acres and


put a barbed wire fence
around it. Our hospital
was a small 25-bed unit.
The nurses lived in a dor-
mitory that had plenty
of space two or three
nurses in a room.
At Los Banos our first or-
der of business was to get
our 25-bed hospital func-
tioning. Life itself was not
that bad. People had the
opportunity to exercise, to
go out and cut wood, and
do chores that needed to
be done to keep the com-
munity going. People had
recordings they played at
the bandstand. And they
had baseball games. It was
really country club living
compared to the other
camps.
While food was not
plentiful, at least at this
time, starvation was not
a problem. Since we lived
in an old agricultural col-
lege we had limited access
to meat. We had carabao
mainly, and some pigs. We
also had a garden in which
we grew mostly eggplants
and camotes, a sort of
sweet potato.
Of course, there was
rice as usual and mongo
beans. Duck eggs were oc-


casionally available.
Life began to change in
late 1943 when the Japa-
nese military took over the
camps. Before, the camps
had been run by Japanese
civilian administrators.
But now there was a sup-
ply officer, Lt. [Sakaadi]
Konishi who had made
life miserable for the in-
ternees in Santo Tomas .
He apparently wanted to
starve the internees.
He came to Los Banos
in 1944 to make life miser-
able for us too. By March
1944, the whole spirit at
Los Banos changed. There
was no more country club
living. The camp just kind
of fell apart and the food
situation began to deterio-
rate.
The nurses were moved
into a much smaller apart-
ment in tight quarters.
However, Eldene Paige
and I moved into the bar-
racks across the street
from the hospital which
gave a little more space.
Living conditions for
the others also worsened.
The Japanese cut off the
south end of the camp and
crowded the internees
into the remaining por-


tion.
By this time, the Ameri-
cans had invaded the
Philippines, so as life got
worse for the Japanese,
they made life worse for
us. We were only getting
two meals a day, skimpy
meals at that. We mainly
had rice, diluted to a pasty
lugao.
There was practically
no meat in the stew; it
was very watery. And, of
course, we used to have
coconut milk, but the co-
conuts had gotten so ex-
pensive they were no lon-
ger available.
We began to lose weight.
It looked like Christ-
mas 1944 would be very
gloomy, but a songfest
by the priests and sis-
ters livened things up On
Christmas Eve they had a
midnight mass and prac-
tically the whole camp
turned out.
It was the most spectac-
ular mass I've ever seen.
There were no gifts in-
volved on Christmas Day,
just spirit of friendliness
between people. I had
more meaning then ever
before.
It was a beautiful Christ-
mas!
On January 9, 1945,
American troops landed
at Lingayen Gulf. The Jap-
anese awakened us in the
middle of the night and
told us they were leaving.
MacArthur's troops came
down toward Manila and
on February 3rd liberated
Santo Tomas. After learn-
ing about Los Banos, Ma-
cArthur assigned the 11th
Airborne Division to res-
cue the in ternees.
[MacArthur had good
evidence the Japanese
would soon execute the
Los Banos prisoners.] The
rescue plan was compli-
cated because it was out of
the ordinary.
Thus far, the Americans
had only liberated prison-

See POW, Page 16


Ballplayer was OSS agent


From CIA.com

Morris "Moe" Berg,
a professional baseball
player who also served his
country as an intelligence
officer, lived a life many
can only dream of.
A true Renaissance
man, Berg graduated from
Princeton University,
passed the New York State
bar exam and learned
eight languages.
After graduating from
college in 1923, Moe
played 15 seasons of ma-
jor-league baseball as a
shortstop, catcher and
coach.
Berg's entrance into the
field of intelligence began
when he, Babe Ruth, Lou
Gehrig and other baseball
greats formed an all-star
team and traveled to Ja-
pan in the mid-1930s for
exhibition games.
Proficient in Japanese,
Berg talked his way into
one of the tallest buildings
in Tokyo.
He climbed to the roof-


t o p
alone
a n d
used a
movie
cam -
era to
film the
capital Berg
city's
ship -
yards.
Reportedly, the U.S.
used Berg's footage to
plan bombing raids over
Tokyo in World War II.
Following the attack on
Pearl Harbor in 1941, Berg
initially joined the White
House's new Office of In-
ter-American Affairs but
left for the Office of Strate-
gic Services in 1943.
He became a paramili-
tary officer and carried
out various intelligence
operations in Europe, in-
cluding parachuting into
Yugoslavia to evaluate re-
sistance groups there.
By 1945 Berg had been
tasked to determine
whether Nazi Germany


was close to having a nu-
clear weapon. Using his
language skills and charm,
he managed to locate and
chat with Werner Heisen-
berg, a top physicist in the
Third Reich.
Berg accurately deter-
mined that the answer
was "no."
Berg stayed with the
OSS until it dissolved in
1945.
Afterward, he served on
the staff of NATO's Adviso-
ry Group for Aeronautical
Research and Develop-
ment.
"Maybe I'm not in the
Cooperstown Baseball
Hall of Fame like so many
of my baseball buddies,
but I'm happy I had the
chance to play pro ball
and am especially proud
of my contributions to my
country," Berg said, look-
ing back on his career.
"Perhaps I could not hit
like Babe Ruth. But I spoke
more languages than he
did."
Berg died in 1972.


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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


Thursday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled bacon
Sausage Patties
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Minestrone Soup
Chicken Parmesan
Meat Sauce
Boiled Spaghetti
Paprika Potatoes
Steamed Broccoli
Italian Kidney Beans
* Speed Line
Chicken Pattie Sandwich
Philly Cheese Steak Sand-
wich
Grilled Pepper and Onions
Baked beans
Chili
Cheese Sauce
Sandwich Bar
Cold Cub Sandwich
Dinner
Cream of Broccoli Soup
Fried Catfish
Braised Pork Chops
Mashed Potatoes
Chicken Gravy
Tossed Green Rice
Fried Okra
Simmered Carrots

Friday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Waffles
Grilled Bacon
Sausage Gravy
Biscuits
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
New England Clam Chowder
Barbecue Chicken
Tempura Battered Fish
French Fries
Baked Mac and Cheese
Green Bean Almadine
Simmered Succotash
* Speed Line
Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger


Hot Dogs
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
Asian Stir Fry Soup
Sweet and Sour Pork
Oriental Pepper Steak
Fried Rice
Steamed Rice
Chinese Mixed Vegetables
Egg Rolls

Saturday
Brunch
Logging Soup
Fried Chicken Tenders
Corn Dogs
Potatoes O'Brien
Mixed Vegetables
Oven Fried Bacon
Waffles
Omelets to Order
Eggs to Order
Dinner
Minestrone Soup
Pizza
Wings
French Fries
Baked Beans

Sunday
Brunch
Chicken Noodle Soup
Cannonball Sandwich
Grilled Polish Sausage
French Fries
Grilled Peppers and Onions
Oven Fried Bacon
Grilled Sausage Patties
Dinner
Asparagus Cheese Soup
Roast Prime Rib
Fried Shrimp
Rosemary Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Simmered Carrots
Corn on the Cob

Monday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled Bacon
Fresh Fruit Salad
Breakfast Burritos
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Corn Chowder
Country fried steak
Cream gravy
Baked Fish
Mashed Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Simmered Peas and Carrots
Louisiana Squash
* Speed Line
Pizza
Chicken Wings
Potato Bar
Dinner
Vegetable Soup
Baked Ham with Honey Glaze
Roast Turkey
Mashed Potatoes
Turkey Gravy
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Cajun Style Black-Eyed Peas
Southern Style Greens


Grilled Cheeseburger
Grilled Hamburger
French Fries
Baked Beans
Burger Bar
Dinner
Beef Rice Soup
Hot and Spicy Chicken
Beef Stew
Steamed Rice
Simmered Egg Noodles
Yellow Squash
Steamed Green Beans


Tuesday
Breakfast
Cream of Wheat
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Waffles
Grilled Bacon
Buttermilk Biscuits
Sausage Gravy
Cottage fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Twice Baked Potato Soup
Pot Roast
Chicken Cordon Blue
Brown Gravy
Wild Rich
Au Gratin Potatoes
Mixed Vegetables
Simmered Cauliflower
* Speed Line
Chicken Tacos
Beef Enchiladas
Spanish Rice
Refired Beans
Taco Bar
Dinner
Minestrone Soup
Baked Italian Sausage
Meat Sauce
Marinara Sauce
Alfredo Sauce
Sauteed clams
Pasta
Steamed Broccoli
Callico Corn

Wednesday
Breakfast
Grits
Soft/Hard Cooked Eggs
Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
Pancakes
Grilled Bacon
Corned Beef Hash
Hash Brown Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Gumbo
Fishwich
Grilled Chicken Breast
Steamed Rice
Mashed Potatoes
Chicken Gravy
Pinto Beans
Mixed Vegetables
* Speed Line
Corn Dogs


r . M
Thursday
Breakfast
Rolled Oats


Eggs to Order
Omelets to Order
French Toast
Grilled bacon
Sausage Patties
Cottage Fried Potatoes
Lunch
* Regular Line
Chicken Noodle Soup
Fried Shrimp
Creole Macaroni
Franconia Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Simmered Carrots
Steamed Peas
* Speed Line
Chicken Pattie Sandwich
Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich
Grilled Pepper and Onions
Baked Beans
Chili
Cheese Sauce
Sandwich Bar
Cold Cut Sandwich
Dinner
Cheddar Cheese Soup
Beef Stroganoff
Fried Catfish
Mashed Potatoes and Gravy
Buttered Egg Noodles
Seasoned Corn
Herbed Broccoli

Galley hours
Monday through Friday
Breakfast 6 to 7:30 a.m.
Lunch 11:15a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Weekends and holidays
No Breakfast Served!


Brunch -10:45 am. to 12:15 p.m.
Dinner 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
All breakfasts and brunches
include cereal, instant
oatmeal or grits, juice bar,
pastry bar, yogurt.
All meals served for lunch
and dinner also feature the
Healthy Choice Salad Bar and
various dessert items.
Menu items are subject to
change.


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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013


Naval History and Heritage Command photograph
Code breaking by Naval Intelligence led to the sinking of four Japanese aircraft
carriers, including Hiryu, at the Battle of Midway in 1942.



Intel celebrates birthday


From Office of Naval
Intelligence Public Affairs

Office of Naval Intelli-
gence personnel paused
to mark a milestone for
America's longest-serving
intelligence agency dur-
ing a ceremony for the
131st anniversary of ONI's
establishment, March 22.
Presiding at the event,
Rear Adm. Samuel J. Cox,
commander, ONI praised
the command's intelli-
gence professionals for
their long record of ac-
complishments. He said
the ceremony offered an
opportunity to celebrate
the shared experiences of
everyone who participat-
ed in some way to naval
intelligence. Cox said the
achievements include the
sacrifices, hardships and
all the great work that have
built the legacy that has
been handed down over
the years.
Seventeen civilian and
military awards were pre-
sented at the ceremony
during which Cox lauded
ONI's civilians for pro-
viding the long-term,
in-depth expertise that
he said has always been
critical to successful intel-


ligence
pro -
duc-
tion.
Cox
noted
his -
torical
exam- Rochefort
ples of
strong
relationships between
commander and intelli-
gence officer.
"When Julius Caesar es-
tablished the first military
intelligence organization,
he was very clear that 'the
spy reports to me,' "he said.
The death last October
of retired Rear Adm. Don-
ald Showers marked the
end of an era in naval in-
telligence, Cox said.
As a junior officer,
Showers played an impor-
tant role in the World War
II Battle of Midway as one
of the Navy's Station Hypo
code breakers at Pearl
Harbor who warned Fleet
Adm. Chester Nimitz that
a Japanese attack was im-
minent.
Under the command
of Cmdr. James Roche-
fort, then-Ensign Showers
helped predict the Japa-
nese navy's moves.


"That bond of trust in
intelligence was present
at the Battle of Midway,
and it was the key factor in
Nimitz being able to take
the proper action based on
intelligence,";' Cox said. "I
would argue that that rela-
tionship between the mili-
tary intelligence personnel
and the commander held
true through the Cold War,
through today, and is still
the fundamental issue of
what this is all about.
"Our primary purpose
today is to provide recog-
nition and honor to some
of our stellar performers
at ONI, both military and
civilian, who are building
on the legacy of all that
came before. In the mili-
tary, we roll in and out,
back and forth, and the
way you achieve the long
dwell time on the target is
through our civilian ana-
lysts.
"I would actually argue
that in our particular case,
these (civilian) analysts
who have been working
the targets for 20, 30 years
in some cases, (are) the
main battery of ONI, and
that's what makes this or-
ganization really work," he
said.


POW


From Page 13

ers in their line of advance.
But a Los Banos rescue
meant going far behind
enemy lines to rescue a
little over 3,000 people.
Paratroopers themselves
were to be dropped over
Los Banos and attack in
conjunction with infantry
who would come ashore
in amtracs (amphibious
vehicles) from a nearby
lake. These amtracs would
then evacuate many of the
civilians.
The raiders already had
a map of what the camp
was like given to them by
an escapee, Pete Miles.
Miles and the Filipino
guerrillas would act as
scouts and guides for the
troops. The plan was to
sneak up behind all the
guard houses in the camp
and at the specific mo-
ment everything would
happen at once.
We didn't know the res-
cue was going to happen,
so we were all feeling pret-
ty low.
I was on duty that night.
There was a newborn
baby and I was trying to


feed her with what little
powdered milk was left.
The mother could hardly
nurse the baby. She hadn't
had enough nourishment
herself.
It was just about 7 in the
morning [23 Feb. 1945]. 1
had the baby in my arms
when I noticed smoke
signals going up. Nobody
paid any attention to
them. Then, all of a sud-
den we saw a formation
of aircraft coming over. As
the paratroopers started
jumping out, the guerril-
las and soldiers around
the guard houses began
killing the Japanese there.
Then the amtracs came
in, crashing through the
swali-covered fence near
the front gate. I was hold-
ing the baby and covering
her ears so that the noise
wouldn't affect her.
An amtrac pulled up
in front of the hospital
and the American troops
jumped out.
Oh, we never saw any-
thing so handsome in our
lives. These fellows were
in camouflage uniforms
wearing a new kind of
helmet, not those little tin
pan things we were used
to seeing. And they looked
so healthy and so lively.
The firing was mostly


over in about 15 minutes
but it took awhile to evac-
uate the internees. In fact,
the American troops actu-
ally had to set fire to the
barracks to get the intern-
ees moving. Eventually,
the troops were able to get
about 1,500 people on the
amtracs and the rest over-
land, I left on an amtrac in
the second wave.
Remarkably, I think
there were only two sol-
diers killed and one in-
ternee injured. This whole
thing went off with just the
most amazing precision
that you could imagine.
[In retaliation for the raid,
the Japanese murdered
1,500 inhabitants of the
nearby town of Los Banos.
For this and other crimes,
Lt. Konishi was later tried
as a war criminal and ex-
ecuted.]
After being liberated
from Los Banos, we were
flown to Leyte. We were
taken to Admiral Kinkaid's
[VADM Thomas C. Kinkaid
was Commander, 7th
Fleet and Southwest Pa-
cific Force] headquarters,
where we ate dinner with
the Admiral. They served
us beautiful steaks, which
of course we couldn't eat
because our stomachs had
shrunk so much.


National Archieves
Gen. Douglas MacArthur wades ashore during initial landings at Leyte, Phillipines,
in 1944. Many POWs were soon liberated.


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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 17


Periscope
KINGS BAY. GEORGIA


PLACE YOUR MILITARY CLASSIFIED AD


CLASSIFIED INDEX


BY PHONE
Mon. Thurs.
Fri. 7:30 a.m.
TOLL FREE
BY FAX


366-6300
7:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
- 5:30 p.m.
800-258-4637
904-359-4180


IN PERSON
Many people prefer to place classified in person
and some classified categories require prepayment.
For your convenience, we welcome you to place your
classified ad at The Florida limes-Union from 7:30
a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at One Riverside
Avenue (at the foot of the Acosta Bridge).
Deadlines

Thursday Tue, Noon Tue, 11 a.m.
Please note: Fax deadlines are one hour earlier.
Holiday and Legal deadlines vary and will be sup-
plied upon request. Cancellation and correction
deadlines are the same as placement deadlines.


CANCELLATIONS, CHANGES & BILLING
Ad Errors Please read your ad on the first day of publication. We accept responsibility for only the first incorrect
insertion and only the charge for the ad space in error. Please call 366-6300 immediately for prompt correction
and billing adjustments.
Ad Cancellation Normal advertising deadlines apply for cancellation. When cancelling your ad, a cancellation
number will be issued. Retain this number for verification. Call 366-6300.
Billing Inquiries Call the Billing Customer Service Department at 359-4324. To answer questions about
payments or credit limits, call the Credit Department at 359-4214.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Advertising copy is subject to approval by the Publisher who reserves the right to edit, reject or classify all
advertisements under appropriate headings. Copy should be checked for errors by the advertiser on the first day of
publication. Credit for Publisher errors will be allowed for the first insertion for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the Publisher shall not be liable for any omission of advertisements ordered to be
published, nor for any general, special or consequential damages. Advertising language must comply with Federal,
State or local laws regarding the prohibition of discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations.
Standard abbreviations are acceptable; however, the first word of each ad may not be abbreviated.


t The anchor indicates the ad is a FREE Fleet Market Ad placed by military personnel.


Auctions


Employment


Real Estate for Rent


Financial


Merchandise


Transportation


SS 904-366-6300

ONLINE
Classified line ads are online at jaxairnews.com
FREE online advertising!
Your Classified in-column ad automatically appears
online at no additional charge.


Happy Ads
Lost and Found
Clubs and Organizations
Rides/Travel
Notices
Personals
Dating and
Entertainment

W Notices


Center for Physical Therapy
is closing their office at
3716 Univ. Blvd S. #4 as of
April 4, 2013. Records can
be picked up at this address.


W Nassau County

STATE OF FLORIDA
NASSAU COUNTY
BELL RIVER WATERFRONT
MINIMUM BID $408,000
20.09 +/- acre parcel with multiple
buildings. For complete terms,
call Lisa Kremer (850)245-2746
BID #BPLA2013-004
Bid deadline is 10:00 AM, EST,
March 28, 2013
Sold by quitclaim deed
"AS IS" WHERE IS"



Apartments Furnished
Apartments Unfurnished
Condominiums
Retirement Communities
Homes Furnished
Homes Unfurnished
Manufactured Homes
Mobile Home Lots
Roommates
Rooms to Rent
Beach Home Rentals
Beach/Vacation/Resorts
Storage/Mini-Lockers
Management/Rental Services
Wanted to Rent
St. Johns Apartments Furnished
St. Johns Apartments Unfur-
nished
St. Johns Condominiums
St. Johns Duplex
Townhomes
St. Johns Retirement Com-
munities
St. Johns Houses Furnished
St. Johns Houses
Unfurnished
St. Johns Mobile Home/Lot
Rental
St. Johns Lots
St. Johns Roommates
St. Johns Rooms to Rent
St. Johns Oceanfront/Waterfront
St. Johns Vacation Rental
St. Johns Storage/
Mini-Lockers
St Johns Wanted to Rent

W Rooms to Rent

ARLINGTON/W'side/N'side Furn,
ph, TV, w/d, $100-$130 wk 838-4587
Northside nr bus route furn. rm, ch&a w/d
$125wk empl verif/bkgrd 672-5337, 219-3902

"W Storage/Mini-Lockers

KINGSLAND
SELF STORAGE
FREE! Unload Service
Military Discount
1st Month FREE








Commercial/Industrial
For Sale
Commercial /Industrial
For Rent
Businesses For Sale
Office Space For Sale
Office Space For Rent
Retail For Sale
Retail For Rent
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Sale
St. Johns Commercial/
Industrial For Rent
St. Johns Businesses
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Sale
St. Johns Office Space
For Rent
St. Johns Retail For Sale
St. Johns Retail For Rent


-E


Business Opportunities
Distributionships/
Franchises
Ficticious Names
Financial Services
Money to Lend/Borrow
Mortgages Bought/Sold

SFinancial Services

BE PREPARED
ObamaCare will effect every single
American, but few know what the
2700 page law says or how it will
impact their finances and lives. If
you don't want to be caught off
guard by the coming changes and
how this new law will effect Medi-
care, Medicaid, Doctors, Business
Owners, and Senior Citizens, ioin us
for this free informative meeting.
Thursday, April 18th 11am-12pm
7791 Belfort Parkway Jax, FI 32256
(located in Irg Conf.Rm at Pinnacle
Insur.&Financial Bldg)Complimen-
tary lunch provided by Chik Fil A.
E-mail:paulepaulpent.com or
CallPaul Pent &Associates to reserve
seat, directions and details. 904-460-1100


-E


Private Instruction
Schools
Specialty Training/
Events




Job Fairs
Resume Services
Accounting/Bookkeeping
Advertising/Media
Architecture/Interior
Design/Graphics Design
Automotive Sales/Service
Aviation
Civil Service/Government/
Public Administration
Computer Hardware/
Software/Programming
Construction
Customer Service
Dental
Domestic Services/
Caregiving
Delivery Driver
Education/Teaching/
Training
Engineering
Entertainment
Executive/Management
Finance/Investment
General Employment
Hotel/Hospitality/Tourism
Industrial Trades
Insurance
Landscaping/Grounds
Maintenance
Law Enforcement/
Security/Safety
Legal
Maintenance/Janitorial
Services
Management/Professional
Marketing
Mechanics
Medical/Health Care
Marine/Trade
Nurses/Nurses Aides
Office/Clerical/
Administration
Part-Time
Personal Services/Beauty
Real Estate/Property
Management
Recreation/Sports/Fitness
Restaurant/Bar/Club/
Food/Beverages
Retail
Sales
Science/Research
Social Services/Counseling
Technical Support
Telemarketing
Transportation
Warehouse/Inventory
Work at Home
Positions Wanted

'q General Employment

CALL CENTER AGENTS
Earn $10-14/hour. Work from home.
Inbound calls. Must have PC,
high-speed internet, and a headset.
Call M-F 8-6pm 904-328-1257.
To apply: www.nmecareers.com


1W Child Care

ORANGE PARK LICENSED
CHILD CARE Birth-12yrs.
\'---CPR, First Aide. Nationally
"Accredited" Military Dis-
count 904-278-8780 Linda's Daycare


*7.8 Billion
1 he canomic Impact of thi
military in Nortiha Florioda
and Southemat Georgla i
LOCal bu sns benefit from the military and hlllan pe.s l who
., what your bud.. ha. s to offer by adve..rIsng in o or all of

.- i *' - ..

4


*mi iMin


AC, Heating, Fuel
Antiques
Appliances
Arts & Crafts
Auctions
Building Supplies
Business/Office Equipment
Clothes
Collectibles
Computer
Craft/Thrift Stores
Electronics
Estate Sales
Farm/Planting
Fruits/Vegetables
Furniture/Household
Garage Sales
Garden/Lawn
Hot Tubs/Spas
Jewelry/Watches
Kid's Stuff
Machinery & Tools
Medical
Miscellaneous Merchandise
Musical Merchandise
Photography
Portable Buildings
Public Sales
Sporting Goods
Tickets
Trailers
Wanted to Buy or Trade

W Appliances


Appliances, buy, sell, trade & repair
W/Ds, Refrigs., stove, $85-up wrnty.
Man- Sun. 9-7. Delivery 904-695-1412


KENMORE STOVE
Almond color $75. Avail. 3/7/13
Call 904-573-0134


Support
your military
newspaper.

Periscope


'VF Auctions


PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION
Sat April 6, 9AM
8483 New Kings Rd, Jax, FL
(3) '09 Ford250 w/Service Bodies,
(4) '08 Chevy 2500 W/Service Bodies,
(2) '07 Ford F150 Ext Cab LWB,
Pontoon Boats, Fork Lifts, Dump
Trailers, '70 Chevy CST 1500
LWB, Tractors, 2011 Denali 33'
Travel Trailer NICE!
Restaurant Equipment, Much
Much More! Consignments
Accepted until Thurs 4-4,
Cash, Cks, Visa/MC
10% Buyer's Premium,
Preview: Fri. April 5,9-4
ELROD AUCTIONS
AB 1698 904-699-7067
www.elrodauctions.com

PUBLIC AUCTION
Restaurant Equipment
Thursday, April 11th, 11AM
1801 W. 1st. St. (SR46)
Sanford, Florida
Great selection of late model new &
used equipment, furniture and
supplies for all aspects of the food
service industry. Full service
restaurants, Pizzerias, Deli &
Sandwich shops, Bar & Lounge,
Bakery, Ice Cream, BBQ, Coffee
Shops, Caterers, Convenience
stores, etc. 100's of items.
Inspect: Wed., April 10th,
9am-Spm & 9am day of sale.
Terms: cash, cashier check, MC,
Visa, Disc, 13% buyers premium,
3% discount for cash or qualified
checks. For details, map & photos
go to auctionzip.com enter
auctioneer I D#21770
D.M. Dennett & Assoc.
"AUCTIONEERS" 407-322-1464
FI. Lic. au 293/au4541ab154

W Estate Sales

B. LANGSTON'S PRESENTS
MANDARIN MANIA!
Waterford, Royal Doulton, Military,
china, glass, linens, tools, Records,
electronics, 5311 Chicora Dr.
Thurs/Frl/Sat 9-5. blangston.com

Furniture I Household

4 Furniture wanted-Ashley
Furn. Urbandale Nightstand
model number B433-92 will pay
-cash in need of one.
904-534-0376
PIANO $500; Round Table 40"
diameter & 4 chairs $125.
lCall 264-1996


SGarden I Lawn

RIVER BIRCH TREE 9', 3
trunks, attractive peeling
bark. I bought too many. In
container $125. 904-268-2482

Medical





Misc. Merchandise

SBED DIVIDER for a small
size pickup. Like new. Metal
3 tier adjustable. $30.
904-268-2482
CARPET indoor/outdoor
approx. 6' 10" xl' 10". Beige
w/gray. Rated for high traffic.
New $70. 904-268-2482

Sporting Goods















Adopt a Pet
Pets & Supplies
Livestock & Supplies
Animals Wanted

Pets and Supplies

ENGLISH BULLDOG AKC
PUPPIES $2500-$3000. 904-252-5275
French Bulldog Puppies for sale,
10 weeks old, 2 Males and 1 female,
Shots, house broken, healthy, $700.
ianemiller230@aol.com 904-384-9572
Labrador Retriever White AKC
Pups Ready to Go NOW 912-258-0746


MOTIO N
HELHCR.DUAIO.MLOMN


Military Tuition Assistance Program
$1,000 military tuition assistance available, plus all registration fees waived.


At Concorde, we believe education should lead
to employment. Our training programs are short,
affordable, and handson, providing the education
needed to succeed in the rewarding healthcare field.
Concorde offers a variety of diploma and
associate degree programs for some of
today's fastest-growing healthcare careers.
* ACCSC Accredited
* Graduate Employment
Assistance
* VA benefits for eligible
veteransA
* Financial aid available to
those who qualify e


In addition to the education benefits that you
receive, Concorde is now offering tuition
assistance that can be used while you are on
active duty or after you leave the service.
All service branches are eligible
* Active duty, active guard, and reserves
* Honorable and general discharge veterans
* Military spouses of active duty,
active guard, reserves, and veterans
* Children and step-children of active duty,
active guard, reserves, and veterans up
to the age of 24

Open House April 11 & 13!
888.516.7198 | concorde4me.com


I E OCAIN e9 y .I


[-IIrlon I


Aviation
Boats
Sailboats
Boat Dockage & Rentals
Marine Equipment
& Supplies
RV Rentals
RV's & Suppliers
Motorcycles & Mini Bikes
Auto Brokers
Auto Parts
Antiques/Classics
Automobiles
Trucks/Trailers/SUVs
Vans/Buses
$2000 or Less
Commercial Vehicles
Misc. Auto
Autos/Trucks Wanted
Auto Rent/Lease

S Boats

1996 JOHNSON OUTBOARD
iMOTOR 88hp recently rebuilt
runs perfect, no corrosion,
stainless propeller $1800firm.
Jim 904-248-8378

4 1997 SEASPORT 20' C/C 140hp
Suzuki S/S Prop Bimini Hum-
tlmin Bird Fish Finder, many
extras, $9,000obo. 904-505-7455

2003 SEA RAY BOWRIDER,
75.5hrs, Mercrulser 3.04cyl
eng., perfect cond., comes
w/bow & cockpit covers, bimini
top, AM/FM/CD, skiing tube,
loaded, Asking $10,500obo.
912-467-8159


'Wr RVs and Supplies

5th Wheel 3 Slides Sleep 4
Show Model Extras, 1 owner
lexc cond., negotbl w/F250 Die-
sel equipt. 904-771-7295


Motorcycles/Mini Bikes

4 2006 HONDA 750 Shadow Shaft
Drive 7600mi's, owner 81,
t $3600. Always garaged. Looks
new 904-278-9777

2007 YAMAHA FV6 owner,
exc. running cond., never
tLtwrecked, blu e, many
upgrades, $4500obo-trade.
904-370-9952

LIKE NEW-HARLEY 883
Limited Edition-6800mi's,
tJt house kept, $4700. 904-557-3818


W" Automobiles

2000 CHEVY VAN VENTURE
BARGAINI! 6cyl, Adr, trailer
hitch, exc. cond., mileage
--11,126. $3350. 904-772-0489


Trucks / Trailers / SUVs


FORD F150 SUPERCAB 4dr Good
motor, transmission $4500 cash.
Coial after 5. 904-802-1239


Support
your military
newspaper.

The best bagain
in town.
For Classified Advertising,
call 904-366-6300,
or 1-800-258-4637.

0IIrNews


Navy

Classified

Ads


THE FLEET

M ARKET Rank/Grade: Work Phone# Organization: Date Submitted:
Name(please print): Signature:
ADVERTISING 1. Free advertising in the Fleet Market is restricted to active duty and retired military 7. Additional readership in other publications can be arranged for a nominal fee by
R U L ES personnel (or their dependents) and civilian employees assigned to the Mayport calling 1-800-2584637 (toll free), or enclosing your phone number.
PlI fll t Naval Station. 8. Faxed ads will be accepted at 904-366-6230, however, they must be completed
Please fill out this 2. Advertising in the Fleet Market is a free service provided by the publisher to on an original form.
form in black or help qualified personnel dispose of unwanted personal articles. Service ads Select the number of weeks ad is to run: 0 1 wk J 2 wks 0 3 wks 0 4 wks
blue ink. such as sharing rides to work or on leave, announcing lost and found items, and garage
sales will be accepted. ADS PERTAINING TO GUN SALES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ANIMAL To renew your ad after the allotted time, you must re-submit your ad to The Mirror.
OR PET ADS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED IF THE ANIMALS ARE OFFERED FREE. CHILD CARE NOTE: (1) This form must be clipped (not tom) along the outside border. (2) No
DEADLINES PROVIDERS CANNOT DISCRIMINATE.REAL ESTATEADS WILL BE UMITED TO ANNOUNCEMENT more than one word (or abbreviation for one word) per block. (3) Only two free
OF HOMES FOR SALE OR RENT BY QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT CHANGE OF ads per family, per week. (4) Select the category for the ad by referring to the
STATION (PCS) OR OFFICIALLY REASSIGNED" ORDERS. REAL ESTATE ADS MUST CONTAIN Classified Index.
rTH E ONE OF THOSE STATEMENTS IN THE BODY OF THE AD- OTHERWISE THEY WILL BE BILLED.
E I n3. All information requested must be included and readable. All ads should be
written independent of other information contained on this form.
M IRROR 4. Ads received after the above time will run in the following week's issue. Category:
5. Completed forms should be delivered or mailed to the Fleet Market, The
Periscope, Public Affairs Office, Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, GA 31547, or "P eri s c o n e
Noon to The Periscope, One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville, FL 32202
6. Ads appearing to be in the promotion of a business or which do not meet the n s A
Friday above requirements will be billed. The publisher reserves the right to omit any
or all ads. One Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville FL 32202

4 4 ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 I 11 II II = 1 1 1 Jl


I


0 1 qlllllm I qlllllw I I


F -I,


I i


. I -


I Real Estate for Sale Services I


I-CommercialRelEsat et/Aial


I




18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday,


Together, our communities of service members and

their families, and your business, can spell SUCCESS.


Not only will your business benefit while the families

are stationed here, many military families retire to the

area, with the tri-base area being one of the most

sought-after assignments in the U.S. Navy.

To advertise, or to find out more information,

please call 904.359.4168.





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DEALER DIRECTORY




TOLST YA m

PLAS CAq S ~ 9


0
BUICK

KEY BUICK-GMC
4660 Southside Blvd.
642-6060
NIMNICHTl
BUICK-GMC
11503 PhillipsHwy
685-8820




CLAUDE NOLAN CADILLAC
4700 Southside Blvd.




NIMNICHT CHEVY
1550 Cassat Ave.
904-647-4220
www.nimnichtchevy.com
JERRY HAMM CHEV
3494 Philips Hwy.
398-3036
www.jerryhamm.comr

RON ANDERSON
CHEVROLET BUICK GMC
464054 State Rd. 200
Yulee,FI32097
904-261-6821

CHRYSE--R


ATLANTIC CHRYSLER
www.atlanicjeep.com
2330 US1 South
3544421
JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A & BAYMEADOWS.
493-0000
RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com
ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd.
777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com


ATLANTIC DODGE
www.atlantiqeep.com
2330 US1 South 354-4421
JCOSONI.E CHMSIMR
JEPDODGE
9A & Baymeadows 493-0000

ORANGE PARK CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd. 777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com

RICK EFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fern Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com




MUL CUKFOUMiCURYif
1-95 N. Exit 129 (Yulee)
225-3673
MIKE SHAD FORD
At The Avenues
10720 Philips Hwy.
904-292-3325
MIKE DAVIDSON FORD
AT REGENCY
9650 Atlantic Blvd. 725-3060
MIKE SHAD FORD
OF ORANGE PARK
7700 Blanding Blvd. 77-3673

aMC

NIMNICIrT GMC
11503 Phillips Hwy 685-8820





DUVAL HONDA
1325 Cassat Ave. 899-1900
LOU SOBH HONDA
OF THE AVENUES
11333 Phillips Hwy. 370-1300


KEY HYUNDAI
4660 Southside Blvd.
642-6060






ATLANTIC JEEP
www.atlanticjeep.com
2330 US 1 South
354-4421

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER
JEEP DODGE
9A& BAYMEADOWS.
493-0000

RICK KEFFER
1-95 Exit 373, Fem Bch.
1-800-228-7454
www.rickkeffer.com

ORANGE PARK
CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
7233 Blanding Blvd.
777-5500
www.orangeparkdodge.com





KIA OF ORANGE PARK
6373 Blanding Blvd.
771-6078




NORTH FLORIDA
LINCOLN
4620 Southside Blvd.
642-4100

MIKE SHAD FORD
LINCOLN
7700 Blanding Blvd.
777-3673


KEITH PIERSON TOYOTA
6501 Youngerman Circlde.
771-9100

ERNIE PALMER TOYOTA
1310CassatAve. 389-4561


O'STEEN VOLKSWAGEN
VSIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODAY!
904-322-5100
TOM BUSH VOLKSWAGEN
VISIT TOMBUSHVW.COM
904-725-0911


O'STEEN VOLVO
www.osteenvolvo.com
396-5486


AUTO LINE
A Family owned
Business
autolinepreowned.com
2126 Mayport Rd, Alanic
Beach
904-242-8000
AUTOS
BEACH BLVD.
AUTOMOTIVE
Family Owned Since 19867
beachblvdautomohve.com
6833 Beach Blvd.
724-3511


WESTSIDE
PRE-OWNED
SUPERSTORE
1672 Cassat Ave.
904-384-6561
www.westsidedodge.net

O'STEEN VW
CERTIRED
PRE-OWNED
CENTER
VISIT OSTEENVW.COM
TODAY!
904-322-5100


WORLD IMPORTS
CERTIRED
PRE-OWNED
AUTO CENTER
www.worldimportsusa.com
11650 BEACH BLVD.
99-9992


SUPPORT
YOUR LOCAL
DEALERSHIPS
BY SHOPPING
LOCALLY.
READ DRIVE
EVERY
SATURDAY IN
THE
TIMES-UNION
OR GO TO
DRIVEJACKSONVILLE.COM

FOR GREAT
LOCAL DEALS.
LET'S SHOP
LOCAL!


I I I 11423739




THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013 19




20 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, April 4, 2013
S.ANN5


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5253 HWY. EAST ST. MARYS, GA


* 912-571-7711


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