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The Kings Bay periscope ( 03-28-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00294

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00294


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Market yourself program April 2MOAAs Jim OKeefe presentation geared toward transition e Military Ocers Asso ciation of America presents its superb Marketing Yourself for a Second Career lecture at 8:30 a.m., April 2, at the Trident Training Facility auditorium onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is topshelf presentation is a great profes sional development opportu nity. Transition is, of course, ultimately a part of all military ca reers. erefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are con templating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior en listed member has reached the point of being in their own tran sition, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contem plating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare anyone for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great t for any commander, ocer or senior enlisted supervisor, from the most senior, to the most ju nior. e lecture will be given by Capt. Jim OKeefe, USN (Ret.), a deputy director of Transition Services on MOAAs national sta. e presentation, given annu ally at more than 150 military installations of all services world wide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-to-date, hardhitting and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive in formation on the retirement de cision itself, employer perceptions, your compeUSS Kearsarge (LHD 3) conducted a burial at sea for 11 Sailors, one Marine and one civilian, March 19. Burials at sea are a long-standing tradition in the Navy, in which the cremated remains of Sailors, Marines and family members are committed to the sea while the ship is un derway. Among the Sailors buried was Chief Avia tion Boatswains Mate omas Morrow IV. His son, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class omas J. Morrow V, is part of the ships crew and brought his fathers remains aboard Ke arsarge to include in the scheduled burials. I feel lucky to even be present because I know most family members never get to see it since they take place on a war ship while on deployment, Morrow said. It was what my father wanted, and it exceeded all of my expectations. USS Kearsarge command chaplains Lt. Cmdr. Ulysses L. Ubalde and Lt. Brett M. Sa bella, shared the honor of delivering prayers for those committed to the sea. Doing a burial at sea is an incredible honor, said Sabella. ese men and women served Chiefs, First Classes volunteer at Jax Ronald McDonald HouseChiefs and rst class petty ocers assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast conducted a volunteer project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 28. During the project, participants raked leaves and helped clean up the courtyard playground located at the center of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chronically ill and seriously injured children and their families. According to Culinary Specialist 1st Class Bran don Jiles, who coordinated the eort, the project served a dual pupose as both a community rela tions project and a team-building opportunity for CNRSE chiefs and rst classes. Obviously, a good relationship between the chiefs and the rst class mess is very important to a command on a number of dierent levels, Jiles said. Right now, its being emphasized more than ever with the MCPONs (Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy) guidance with the CPO (chief petty ocer) 365 program, but always its always been an important dynamic in the overall climate of a command. is project was a good way for us to improve upon this and support a good cause at the same time. Up Periscope Set for April Fools Day? Heres some tricks to try Page 9 Sgt. Major Marines enlisted leader tours NSB Kings Bay Page 5 Great day ... for the Irish and USS Alaska in Savannah Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com USS Rhode Island returning Region performs cleanup ree Marines assigned to Ocer Can didates School were killed in a shooting in cident at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., shortly after 10:30 p.m. on ursday, March 21. Notication of the next of kin for the de ceased Marines has been completed. Provided below are the names of the casualties: Lance Cpl. Sara Castromata, 19, of Oak ley, Calif., served as a warehouse clerk. She joined the Marine Corps in December 2011, and was promoted to her current rank in February 2013. Castromatas awards include the National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal. She had not deployed. Cpl. Jacob Wooley, 23, of Guntown, Miss., was a eld radio operator. He joined the Marine Corps in February 2010 and was promoted to his current rank in July 2012. Wooleys awards include the Navy Merito rious Unit Commendation, Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. He had not deployed. Sgt. Eusebio Lopez, 25, of Pacica, Calif., was a tactics instructor at the school, and his military occupational specialty was ma chine-gunner. He joined the Marine Corps in May 2006 and was promoted to his cur rent rank in July 2011. Lopezs awards in clude the Combat Action Ribbon, Navy Unit Commendation 3rd award, Navy Meritori ous Unit Commendation, Good Conduct Medal 2nd award, National Defense Service Commanders statement Following the fatal shootings on Marine Corps Base Quantico on March 21, the base commander held a press con ference at the Na tional Museum of the Marine Corps on March 22 at 7 a.m.ree killed in shootings at Quantico Son honors fathers legacy

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Transcript: Col.David W.Maxwell, MCB Quan tico base commander: Good morning. It has been a long night as we have begun to deal with the tremendous loss which we have suered last night. On behalf of Ma rine Corps Base Quantico and Ocer Candidates School I want to express my sincere condolences to the families, friends and fellow Marines of the three Marines we lost last night. Our thoughts and prayers are with them at this time. is is a tragic loss for our Marine Corps family. ursday evenings fatal shooting was conned to Taylor Hall, a single bar racks at Ocer Candidates School. e quick reaction of our Provost Marshals Oce and Prince William County police enabled us to assess the extent of the situation and to act quick ly to resolve it. e shooter, an ac tive duty male Marine, was pronounced dead of an apparent self-inicted gunshot wound by law enforcement at the scene. Two other victims, a male and female, both ac tive duty Marines, were pronounced dead at the scene. e three Marines involved in this incident were all permanent per sonnel assigned to Ocer Candidates School. All Candidates are safe and have been accounted for. Additionally, all other OCS personnel are accounted for as well. e identities of the victims will be with held for 24 hours until af ter primary next of kin no tication. At 10:30 p.m. a 9-1-1 call was received by the Provost Marshals Oce. Within ve minutes of no tication, authorities were on the scene. Authorities did not report hearing any shot or ring any shots. By 11 p.m. Quanticos security had been heightened and mass notication via the giant voice mass noti cation system began to pass instruction to base residents and employees. e safety of our Marines, civilian Marines and families aboard Quantico is paramount. At 2:30 a.m. restrictions were lifted and the base returned to normal operations. We ask for your pa tience as we conduct a thorough investigation into this incident. I antici pate a lengthy investigation and I do not antici pate being able to provide any further details of this incident until after we have conrmed the next of kin notication. Our base and unit chaplains are currently providing counseling ser vices to our Marines. e well-being of our Marines and families aboard Quantico is a priority. As we take care of our Marines and their families who are dealing with this tragedy, I would ask the support of our neighbors, and their thoughts and prayers as well for our Ma rines and families aboard Quantico. ank you and Semper Fi.Come on. Everyone who is reading this, tell the truth. You saw the title and in your mind you went there! In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it. You started singing that little ditty. In the song writ ten by Irving Berlin, what a talented writer! we hear about the grandest lady, told from a gentlemans point of view. e song shares his pride and is about how her beauty will be etched from a copper cylinder to a web of paper for all time, for all to see and agree. e Easter parade itself has a history. It is not just the title of a song and movie, but its history tells about parades of people wearing their Easter nery. For example, one of the oldest parades, along the Yonge Street, the main street in the heart of downtown Toronto, has occurred since the early 1900s. In a comparison of New York and Toronto fashions in the 1920s, pic tures can be found that describe the splendor of the ladies hats, dresses, coats, and mens suits were the grandest at the time. But this made me think. When was the rst Eas ter parade? I looked to the Holy Bible, and the story as reected in Mark 11:1-11 and its parallel story in Luke 19:2840 adds a few details for consider ation. Jesus and his ministry had been on what some would say unocial status until he paraded triumphant ly into downtown Jerusalem. Riding on a previously un-ridden colt was a kingly statement on its own. When the disciples take the colt claiming, e Lord has need of it, it sets Jesus up to be humble. He rides into town on the clothes of those who had worked diligently and sacriced, so that their Lord could ride on their Easter nery. eir cries exclaimed, Hosanna! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessed in the kingdom of our father David that comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest. If you are still with me, the point I am making is that just like the song of a man sung about his grand lady, so equally, I must sing out about Jesus and the First Easter Parade. It was a glorious moment and needs to be shared. Our cries for the Lord must be met with high praises for the moment. e parade is not about clothing or beautiful hats, but about the humble beginnings of our Godly King, who sacriced much and wanted the people, his people, to have hope. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chapel sets Holy Week servicese Holy Week calendar, March 23 through 31, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Cha pel includes the following Protestant services: 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday; 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 31, Resurrection Sunday. Catholic services: 5 p.m., Saturday, March 23, Vigil of Palm Sunday; 9 a.m., Sun day, March 24, Palm Sunday Mass; 6 p.m., ursday, March 28, Mass of Lords Supper; noon, Friday, March 29, Liturgy of the Lords Passion, 10 p.m., Saturday, March 30, Easter Vigil; 9 a.m. Sunday, March 31, Mass of Resur rection.NMCRS Stroller Strut April 13A Stroller Strut, benetting the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 13, at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fit ness Center outdoor track. e event includes door prizes for registered walkers, a stroller decoration competition and prizes for most laps walked. Registration is $5. Registration forms are available at the Fitness Complex and the NMCRS>e Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association has more than $3,000 in grant money available to non-prot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas. KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic non-prot organization for the general benet of the submarine and local communities. e Community grants are available by applica tion for local non-prot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measur able results, contribute to the communities vitality and create meaningful, transformative change. Special consideration is given to proj ects that benet local areas in Camden County and North Florida. e grant application dead line is April 1. For more information or an ap plication, e-mail kbsosagrants@yahoo.com or visit on Facebook at Kings Bay SOSA. e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Clubs rst annual Woodbine Duathlon is a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and older at 8 a.m., April 6, at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To regis ter, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergradu ate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bb communitiesfoundation.org. e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. e Navy Exhange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualied students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. e next drawing will be held at the end of Feb ruary. Any eligible full-time student that has a Bgrade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reserv ists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services.Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! oughts on the rst Easter Parade Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay Chapel Sailors and Marines in the Na tion Capitol Region attended the Navy-Marine Corps Ball at the Washington Hilton Hotel to raise funds for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, March 23. NMCRS is a private, nonprot emergency relief organization which provides temporary assis tance to active and retired Sailors, Marines and their families. e organization provides support for basic living expenses, emergency travel and funeral expenses along with other needs. Special guests in attendance were Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos, President of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief So ciety Steve Abbot, the 2013 Navy Marine Corps Ball Committee Chair Josi Hunt and guest speak er, 2012 Paralympics Gold Medal ist Lt. Bradley Snyder. is year we are going to talk about our legacy. Its really about today, Greenert said. Our kids are getting it done today on de ployment, building their own leg acy, taking their own brush and painting our future. During his speech to the audience, Snyder recounted his jour ney to the 2012 Paralympics in London, and how it felt to win a Gold Medal one year to the day he was injured in Afghanistan. ats what I was thinking about at that moment, the com munity I am involved in with the military, the EOD community and the Navy and Marine Corps com munity that we are all a part of, Snyder said. I felt very lucky to have that love and support from all of those people. During the ceremony Amos ex pressed his gratitude for the nonprot organization and spoke on the importance of the charity to Sailors and Marines in need. When [the CNO] and I travel around America and we talk to dierent organizations that help us and help our services, the only one that we can really talk about to promote is this one, Amos said. It is no mistake that our forefathers said that this one is pretty important. In order to raise money for the charity, attendees were able to participate in a silent auction. Items available during the auc tion included autographed sports memorabilia, an Annapolis Sunset Cruise and tickets to professional sporting events. e rst Navy-Marine Corps Ball was held in 1914 with gov ernment, diplomatic and society leaders of that era in attendance. Since then, the ball has raised millions of dollars for NMCRS, helping Sailors and Marines with nancial and emergency assis tance.NMCRS gets support during ball NMCRS Medal, Afghanistan Cam paign Medal, Iraq Cam paign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon 4th award. He had deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and in sup port of Operation Endur ing Freedom. NCIS has identied Sgt. Lopez as the alleged shooter. e three Marines were pronounced dead at the scene by law enforce ment personnel. We send our prayers and condolences to the families, fellow Marines and friends of the Marines who were lost in this tragic incident, said Col. David W. Maxwell, commander, Marine Corps Base Quantico. Our priority is to take care of and support all of those who are aected by this loss. e incident remains under investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.QuanticoStatement 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Volunteer of Month tition, resumes, cover let ters, job search, network ing, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and impor tant transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcome. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures com panion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an indepth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information or to register, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.FFSCTeen summer jobs open Morale. Welfare and Recreation/Child & Youth Program Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay is ac cepting Teen Employment Program Recreation Aide candidate applications for summer employment. e closing date to ap ply is April 3. Selections will be made through an interview process. To apply, ll out a Teen Employment Program Application available at MWR Human Resources, Building 1039. For more information, call (912) 573-8572/4583. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 5 Sgt. Major of the Marine Corps tours Kings Bay Volunteer eorts like this are huge for us, said Cat McCarroll, the houses event and marketing man ager. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small sta, so we depend almost entirely on the community and volunteer groups that come in and help with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. eyre what keeps this house running. e house is located about a block away from Nemours Childrens Clinic on Jacksonvilles South bank, where most of the children receive treatment. Its services cut out the cost of long-term hotel lodging, making medical treatment more readily available for nanciallychallenged families, although families and individuals of all nancial backgrounds are welcome to stay. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, they are not turned away if they can not make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has provided services for an average of more than 1,000 families each year. For us, this is a small contribution, but it means so much to the center and its really the least we can do, said Chief Legalman Lucia Abreu, who volunteered. I see it as part of our duty to our community to give back what we can. e house operates solely on donations from the local community and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military, McCarroll said. e military is great because they obviously have the heart and desire to make a dierence, she said. Logistically, you cant beat it because they come in and get the job done and the results are amazing. McCarroll said those ef forts are appreciated not only by the houses sta, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their eect on the families. A lot of families real ize they are enlisted, and for service members to take the time to do this demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through, she said. Additionally, McCar roll said there are always plenty of opportunities for other commands to par ticipate in volunteer projects at the house. ere is no short age of ways to volunteer, whether you want to help decorate for the holidays, do arts and crafts, or get your hands dirty and pull weeds, there is really no limit to the ways you can impact the families and every eort is appreciated. Region their country honorably and deserved to have an equally honorable burial. It was my privilege to be a part of giving this nal act of respect for those who made the choice to serve their country. Following a prayer, each box of remains was individ ually committed to the sea, while Amazing Grace was played on the bagpipes. I was very honored to be asked to play at the burial at sea, said Elec tronics Technician 1st Class Carl Reams, who played the bagpipes for the ceremony. To honor those who had gone be fore me; this is my contri bution to them. e ceremony conclud ed with a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps .Legacy

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Events, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., April 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. offered April 3 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. April 3. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512. The Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordina tion with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and sup port the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relation ship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To regis ter call 573-4513. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 11. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. This class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., April 8. Registration is highly recommended, as class is lim ited to 20 seats. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Military Resumes This three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. scheduled for April 17A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, April 17. It pro vides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 2, 9 and 16. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. For more information, call 573-4513. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783. Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783. Unmanaged conflict has caused many hardships in the workplace and at home. It can cause people to suffer, missions to fail and families to separate. Conflict is inevitable. This work shop helps people manage conflict by examining their attitudes and behaviors when faced with conflicting situations, practic ing skills that prevent conflict from escalating and working with others to solve problems, allowing people to grow, mis sions to succeed and families to strengthen. This class is 2 to 3 p.m., April 3. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, April 10. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, April 12. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provi sions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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USS Guardian being scraped Naval Sea System Commands Super visor of Salvage and Diving continues to support operations to remove and dismantle USS Guardian (MCM-5) from a reef in the Tubbataha Reef National Park, Philippines, March 21. Guardian ran aground on the coral reef Jan. 17, while transiting the Sulu Sea. After the initial grounding, strong winds pushed Guardian parallel to the reef and further aground causing ooding and structural damage which pre vented reoating of the vessel or remov al of the ship intact. e removal of Guardian from the reef requires thorough planning, and operating in an environment 80 miles from the nearest port presents many challenges, said Capt. Mark Matthews, supervisor of salvage and diving. e environment on board Guardian re quires constant vigilance. We brief safety every morning, are cognizant of the risks involved with working in severely damaged ship spaces and strive to minimize injury to personnel at all times. SUPSALV is using two heavy lift cranes to conduct the salvage. JASCON 25, a pipe-laying construction vessel, is the primary salvage platform and is able to position itself within 40 meters of Guardian and operate her crane without the need to set anchors to prevent fur ther damage to the coral reefs. e second crane, Smit Borneo, ar rived on site in February and supports the loading of salvaged sections onto an ocean-going barge for transport to a shore facility. Operations are expected to continue into April 2013, until the ship has been removed and the reef cleared of any re maining debris. workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. Registration is required. For more infor mation call 573-4513. This two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-9783. FFSC will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resourc es and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the in doctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs repre sentative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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When my father said something and he had been a Marine and the Corps was one of the loves of his life it was The Word, and you could chisel it in stone. There were no questions. There was no debate. There was simply The Word, and thats how it was and how it was going to be. My brother says our father wasnt always right, but Im not so sure. So when I awoke one morning to my fathers cry of, My god, theres a foot of snow on the ground, I jumped out of bed and ran for the window. The sky was blue, the sun was out and the grass was green. Birds chirped. As I turned away from the window in surprise, he said, April fool. MTSN Harrison Freemanwalsch Trident Training Facility Toccoa, Ga. Ive been flipping up the windshield wipers on my friends cars PO2 A.J. Kuhl Maritime Force Protection Unit Schenectady, N.Y. Put glitter in the air vents of a car. Chris Garthwaite Family member Port Allegheny, Pa. My husband called his mother and told her our baby was born April 1 and then said, April fools. MA2 Nicole McLawhorn Security Force Battalion Bradford, Pa. My husband Saran Wrapped the toilet seat. Jamie Johnson Family member Jacksonville, Fla. The only one I know is people saying theyre pregnant. Pfc. Sean Bartolowitz Security Force Battalion Pittsburgh Tape the handle on the little spray nozzle on the sink, and when someone turns the water on, it squirts them. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Tennessee departing Navy Lodge helps in PCS When traveling on permanent change of station orders, stay at a Navy Lodge. Navy Lodges pro vide military guests value with room rates at an average of 45 percent below comparable civil ian hotels. Guests also can rest easy knowing Navy Lodges provide high standards with industry recognized and award winning guest service and cleanliness. Come stay at Navy Lodge Kings Bay during your next PCS move, said Linda Bird, Navy Lodge general manager. We oer spacious rooms, a safe environment and amenities that allow you to eat in your room, THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 9

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e annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club begins with a shotgun start at 1 p.m., Saturday, April 6. Format is two-per son team with six holes Captains Choice, six holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for rstand second-place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Put ting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the course. For more information, call Pro Shop at (912) 573-8475. MWR Teen Summer Employment Program MWR is looking for appli cants starting March 20 through April 3. Applications can be picked up at the Kings Bay Youth Center and on the Department of Labor GA Web site. Employment dates are from May 17 to Aug. 8. All teens, 15 years to 18 years still in high school are eligible. Youth must be 15 years old before April 1. If selected, mandatory training ses sions will be given such as Child Abuse Recognition, First Aid and CPR, Customer Service Training and ESAMS computer trainings. For more detailed information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Spring Break Fever at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Spring Break is coming and RackN-Roll Lanes is ready. From 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, April 1 through Friday, April 5 all games and shoes are 50 cents for all guests, 18 years old and younger. Also, Tuesday and Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., enjoy the all you can bowl for only $10 a person. Call RackN-Roll Lanes now for more information at (912) 573-9492. Hours of Operations changing for MWR Under the FY Continuing Resolution Act e following facilities will be chang ing their hours eective 12:01 a.m. Monday, March 18, until further notice: Big EZ Gaming Zone/Liberty Center will be open Wednesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Big EZ Billiard/Movie/ Sports Zones will be open Monday through ursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday noon to midnight, Sunday noon to 11 p.m. and holidays noon to 8 p.m.; Fitness Complex will be open Monday through Friday 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m.; the Pool Complex will be open for lap swim Monday through Friday 5 to 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ; the Pool Complex will open for recreational swimming May 25 through Sept. 2 and will be open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 6 p.m. Starting Aug. 3 through Sept. 2, it will be open weekends only. Intramural Greybeard Basketball Registration is open. e captains meeting is at 5 p.m., April 3 in the Fitness Complex Classroom. League begins play April 9 with a Tuesday/Wednesday Lunch-time League. For more detailed information, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military fami lies, $13 tickets to select performances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to regis ter is March 29. Class is limited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergar ten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center started March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual aug mentees, March 18 for ac tive duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Marchs free movies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Spring camp signup Just for kids Liberty call Grand Outing golf April 6 all at a savings. Plus, most Navy Lodges accept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Navy Lodges oer spa cious rooms or family suites, perfect for a fam ily on a PCS move. Suites include full kitchenette with dishwasher while ex tended stay rooms feature two queen beds and a full kitchenette with dishwasher. Every Navy Lodge guest room oers free WiFi, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Guest laundry facilities are available on site and breakfast is oered daily in the lobby. To make a reservation, call 1-800-NAVY-INN, (800-628-9466) 24 hours a day, seven days a week or visit www.navy-lodge.com.Lodge 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Navy College information College Funding More than you have time forIn case you have not heard, there is more education mon ey available to the active duty member that they have time to use. But you dont believe me yet, so lets look at the facts... Navy USCG USMC Current TA $4,000/year $4,500 $4,500 Current PELL Grant $5,500/year $5,500/year $5,500/year Total $9,500/year $10,000 $10,000 Approx. Class $$/hour $250/HS $250/HS $250/HS Approx. hour/class 3 3 3 Approx. class costs $750/class $750/class $750/class Reasonable classes/semester 2-3 2-3 2-3 Semesters/year 3 3 3 Classes/year 6-9 6-9 6-9 Approx. $$ available/year $9,500 $10,000 $8,500 Class cost/year $4,500-$6,750 $4,500-$6,750 $4,500-$6,750 Approx. $$ left over $2,750-$5,000 $3,250-$5,500 $3,250-$5,500 But wait ... theres more: We havent touched GI Bill, scholarships, budgeting for classes or MYCAA for spouses. We havent talked how to shop for schools to maximize your Navy school college credit. We havent even talked about your degree and how to spend your education time best. But you say theres more to consider and youre right, but con sider this... Are these approximate costs ...yes. Do some people take more classes per year ... yes. Are there cheaper alternatives, CLEP, cheap books, less expen sive classes, etc. ... yes. Should you plan out your entire year to ID what money is need ed and when ... yes. Do certain types of funding (PELL, TA, etc.) change ... yes. Should you focus on maximizing the funding that is available today ... yes. Can the Navy College Ofce help you maximize all options ... yes. How do you get what you need and only spend the time and money you need to? Come to the Navy College Ofce today. Walkin or send us an e-mail to make an appointment for you and your spouse. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 Veterans Moving For ward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs. Among the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Na thans journey from birth, through his puppy days and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. e series is written by assistance dog in training Nathan with help from his human handler, Paul Bollea and Veterans Moving Forwards Tina Tallman. My Veterans Moving Forward training as a ser vice dog includes many steps. It takes a progres sion of experiences to help me gain the skills and sensitivity I will need to support my future veteran partner. ats why, after spend ing 18 months or so with a primary puppy raiser and handler, its important to work with advanced trainers and handlers who help ne tune my basic skills and round out other as pects of my training and socialization that are needed to partner with a veteran. So, it came as no sur prise in January that I moved to the home of my second puppy raiser and handler Paul. ough it was bittersweet for me to leave behind my rst puppy raiser after so many great months together, knowing that I had gradu ated to the next level of training was such a thrill because it meant that Im that much closer to nd ing my veteran partner. You see, for some time now Ive been a little bit envious. You may remember me speaking of my littermate in previous blogs. My sis ter Lori found her veteran partner last fall. Since No vember, Lori has been the assistance dog of Marine Corps Sgt. Kelsey Smith a combat veteran suer ing from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other challenges. Lori has helped her vet eran partner in his recov ery and in dealing with all the day-to-day tasks that many people take for granted. My littermate is attuned to her veterans needs at work, at home and now in public too. Loris veteran was not comfortable in public before Lori joined him. Now, that I have moved on to advanced training, Im going to be meeting veteran candidates too. But before I meet my future partner, theres still work to be done. My new handler is mak ing sure Im ready to deal with all of the things you humans take for granted such as going to the post oce and grocery store, attending church services and many other public events. He really knows a lot about dogs because he has trained many puppies for blind humans, and he is very, very picky. He knows that I have seen plenty of oce buildings and airplanes and fancy places, so now hes showing me more of the places where I might go and doing more of the things that I might do with my veteran partner. ough my handler has taken me to the Pentagon, the Government Account ability Oce and a winery, most of our days together have been spent learning new everyday routines. One new routine I love is a daily mile-and-a-half family walk with my hu mans dog, Davis. We see other dogs in the neigh borhood, squirrels, chil dren and all sorts of things. My human reminds me not to sni, not to pull and to always lets go. He is so happy when I follow his commands-which are most of the time. Plus, Ive gotten into great shape with all the regular exercise. On Sundays I attend mass I usually fall asleep during the homily, but the pastor doesnt mind and we make our weekly trip to Wegmans grocery store, my noses favorite place. I stay close to my handler as people ask to pet me and my handler tells them about Veterans Moving Forward and how I am in training to become a veterans as sistance dog. During the week, my hu man takes me to a bunch of normal places. And, because he is retired, my human has time to pack a lot of on-the-go training and hands-on lessons into each outing. Its a lot harder than go ing to work in an oce, but I know this intensive training is making me a better assistance dog for a veteran. Plus, it makes me more condent every day. ere are many other new places Ive visited in recent weeks. And, some of the things Ive learned really tug at my heart. You see, every week I accompany my handler to his cancer infusion treat ment, some humans call it chemo. I stand by while my handler is hooked up to all kinds of tubes and machines. ere are many others like him there. e patients look for me each week. I let them pet me and, hopefully, make their days a little bit brighter. I also have been to the oncologist, the cancer doctor, also known as a nephrologist, plus the kidney doctor, cancer support group meetings, the dentist, the orthodon tist and a place where my handler has to get poked with needles that take his blood out and he does, you know what, to give the nurses his urine. I watch everything very closely to make sure my human is OK. Ive learned a lot about doctors and nurses and medical places that I nev er knew before. Whats even better, the doctors and nurses and other patients always want to have me come back. I guess that means Im doing the right thing. e humans in my Vet erans Moving Forward family believe that any vet eran who might need me will be seeing the doctor or going to support groups more often than the aver age human. My handler says I know when a human is not well and needs me by his or her side. He says my sensitivity and the comfort I provide will be very important to my future veteran partner. Sometimes we go to an outside dog trainer where I show o what I have learned. Its like a test. Other times I attend of cial training classes held by Veterans Moving For ward. Its at these sessions that I get to work with all the other service dogs in training, even those silly new puppies. More importantly, its also where Ive gotten to meet veterans from each of the military services. ese men and women all need a service dog. Right now I am getting to know a veteran whom I really like a lot. He is a very tall Army combat veteran. Because they say he is recovering from both physical and mental wounds of war, I think he needs a partner just like me. Cant wait to see what the future holds in store. I know my namesake, Petty Ocer ird Class Nathan Nate Bruckenthal, is proud of how far Ive come. I hope to show the Bruckenthal family, my handler and trainer fami lies, my canine family, my Veterans Moving For ward family and my Coast Guard family the many things I can do to help a veteran move forward with his life. Life of a Service Dog Part 6 Nathan undergoes pre-placement training

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Market yourself program April 2MOAAs Jim OKeefe presentation geared toward transition e Military Ocers Association of America presents its superb Marketing Yourself for a Second Career lecture at 8:30 a.m., April 2, at the Trident Training Facility auditorium onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. is topshelf presentation is a great professional development opportunity. Transition is, of course, ultimately a part of all military careers. erefore, the lecture is perfect for those who are contemplating retirement in one to ve years. However, it doesnt stop there. Regardless of whether any particular ocer or senior enlisted member has reached the point of being in their own transition, they should be educated about the process in order to mentor and counsel those who work for them and are contemplating or going through their transitions. is executive summary presentation can prepare anyone for that role as well as many multi-day programs. Simply stated, its a great t for any commander, ocer or senior enlisted supervisor, from the most senior, to the most junior. e lecture will be given by Capt. Jim OKeefe, USN (Ret.), a deputy director of Transition Services on MOAAs national sta. e presentation, given annually at more than 150 military installations of all services worldwide, is universally praised by audiences as, up-to-date, hardhitting and sharply focused a must see. It includes comprehensive in formation on the retirement de cision itself, employer perceptions, your compeUSS Kearsarge (LHD 3) conducted a burial at sea for 11 Sailors, one Marine and one civilian, March 19. Burials at sea are a long-standing tradition in the Navy, in which the cremated remains of Sailors, Marines and family members are committed to the sea while the ship is underway. Among the Sailors buried was Chief Aviation Boatswains Mate omas Morrow IV. His son, Aviation Boatswains Mate 3rd Class omas J. Morrow V, is part of the ships crew and brought his fathers remains aboard Kearsarge to include in the scheduled burials. I feel lucky to even be present because I know most family members never get to see it since they take place on a war ship while on deployment, Morrow said. It was what my father wanted, and it exceeded all of my expectations. USS Kearsarge command chaplains Lt. Cmdr. Ulysses L. Ubalde and Lt. Brett M. Sabella, shared the honor of delivering prayers for those committed to the sea. Doing a burial at sea is an incredible honor, said Sabella. ese men and women served Chiefs, First Classes volunteer at Jax Ronald McDonald HouseChiefs and rst class petty ocers assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast conducted a volunteer project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 28. During the project, participants raked leaves and helped clean up the courtyard playground located at the center of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chronically ill and seriously injured children and their families. According to Culinary Specialist 1st Class Brandon Jiles, who coordinated the eort, the project served a dual pupose as both a community relations project and a team-building opportunity for CNRSE chiefs and rst classes. Obviously, a good relationship between the chiefs and the rst class mess is very important to a command on a number of dierent levels, Jiles said. Right now, its being emphasized more than ever with the MCPONs (Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy) guidance with the CPO (chief petty ocer) 365 program, but always its always been an important dynamic in the overall climate of a command. is project was a good way for us to improve upon this and support a good cause at the same time. Up Periscope Set for April Fools Day? Heres some tricks to try Page 9 Sgt. Major Marines enlisted leader tours NSB Kings Bay Page 5 Great day ... for the Irish and USS Alaska in Savannah Page 4 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com USS Rhode Island returning Region performs cleanup ree Marines assigned to Ocer Candidates School were killed in a shooting incident at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., shortly after 10:30 p.m. on ursday, March 21. Notication of the next of kin for the deceased Marines has been completed. Provided below are the names of the casualties: Lance Cpl. Sara Castromata, 19, of Oakley, Calif., served as a warehouse clerk. She joined the Marine Corps in December 2011, and was promoted to her current rank in February 2013. Castromatas awards include the National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal. She had not deployed. Cpl. Jacob Wooley, 23, of Guntown, Miss., was a eld radio operator. He joined the Marine Corps in February 2010 and was promoted to his current rank in July 2012. Wooleys awards include the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. He had not deployed. Sgt. Eusebio Lopez, 25, of Pacica, Calif., was a tactics instructor at the school, and his military occupational specialty was machine-gunner. He joined the Marine Corps in May 2006 and was promoted to his current rank in July 2011. Lopezs awards include the Combat Action Ribbon, Navy Unit Commendation 3rd award, Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Good Conduct Medal 2nd award, National Defense Service Commanders statement Following the fatal shootings on Marine Corps Base Quantico on March 21, the base commander held a press conference at the National Museum of the Marine Corps on March 22 at 7 a.m.ree killed in shootings at Quantico Son honors fathers legacy

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Transcript: Col.David W.Maxwell, MCB Quantico base commander: Good morning. It has been a long night as we have begun to deal with the tremendous loss which we have suered last night. On behalf of Marine Corps Base Quantico and Ocer Candidates School I want to express my sincere condolences to the families, friends and fellow Marines of the three Marines we lost last night. Our thoughts and prayers are with them at this time. is is a tragic loss for our Marine Corps family. ursday evenings fatal shooting was conned to Taylor Hall, a single barracks at Ocer Candidates School. e quick reaction of our Provost Marshals Oce and Prince William County police enabled us to assess the extent of the situation and to act quickly to resolve it. e shooter, an active duty male Marine, was pronounced dead of an apparent self-inicted gunshot wound by law enforcement at the scene. Two other victims, a male and female, both active duty Marines, were pronounced dead at the scene. e three Marines involved in this incident were all permanent personnel assigned to Ocer Candidates School. All Candidates are safe and have been accounted for. Additionally, all other OCS personnel are accounted for as well. e identities of the victims will be withheld for 24 hours until after primary next of kin notication. At 10:30 p.m. a 9-1-1 call was received by the Provost Marshals Oce. Within ve minutes of notication, authorities were on the scene. Authorities did not report hearing any shot or ring any shots. By 11 p.m. Quanticos security had been heightened and mass notication via the giant voice mass notication system began to pass instruction to base residents and employees. e safety of our Marines, civilian Marines and families aboard Quantico is paramount. At 2:30 a.m. restrictions were lifted and the base returned to normal operations. We ask for your patience as we conduct a thorough investigation into this incident. I anticipate a lengthy investigation and I do not anticipate being able to provide any further details of this incident until after we have conrmed the next of kin notication. Our base and unit chaplains are currently providing counseling services to our Marines. e well-being of our Marines and families aboard Quantico is a priority. As we take care of our Marines and their families who are dealing with this tragedy, I would ask the support of our neighbors, and their thoughts and prayers as well for our Marines and families aboard Quantico. ank you and Semper Fi.Come on. Everyone who is reading this, tell the truth. You saw the title and in your mind you went there! In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it. You started singing that little ditty. In the song written by Irving Berlin, what a talented writer! we hear about the grandest lady, told from a gentlemans point of view. e song shares his pride and is about how her beauty will be etched from a copper cylinder to a web of paper for all time, for all to see and agree. e Easter parade itself has a history. It is not just the title of a song and movie, but its history tells about parades of people wearing their Easter nery. For example, one of the oldest parades, along the Yonge Street, the main street in the heart of downtown Toronto, has occurred since the early 1900s. In a comparison of New York and Toronto fashions in the 1920s, pictures can be found that describe the splendor of the ladies hats, dresses, coats, and mens suits were the grandest at the time. But this made me think. When was the rst Easter parade? I looked to the Holy Bible, and the story as reected in Mark 11:1-11 and its parallel story in Luke 19:2840 adds a few details for consideration. Jesus and his ministry had been on what some would say unocial status until he paraded triumphantly into downtown Jerusalem. Riding on a previously un-ridden colt was a kingly statement on its own. When the disciples take the colt claiming, e Lord has need of it, it sets Jesus up to be humble. He rides into town on the clothes of those who had worked diligently and sacriced, so that their Lord could ride on their Easter nery. eir cries exclaimed, Hosanna! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessed in the kingdom of our father David that comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest. If you are still with me, the point I am making is that just like the song of a man sung about his grand lady, so equally, I must sing out about Jesus and the First Easter Parade. It was a glorious moment and needs to be shared. Our cries for the Lord must be met with high praises for the moment. e parade is not about clothing or beautiful hats, but about the humble beginnings of our Godly King, who sacriced much and wanted the people, his people, to have hope. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Chapel sets Holy Week servicese Holy Week calendar, March 23 through 31, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel includes the following Protestant services: 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday; 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 31, Resurrection Sunday. Catholic services: 5 p.m., Saturday, March 23, Vigil of Palm Sunday; 9 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday Mass; 6 p.m., ursday, March 28, Mass of Lords Supper; noon, Friday, March 29, Liturgy of the Lords Passion, 10 p.m., Saturday, March 30, Easter Vigil; 9 a.m. Sunday, March 31, Mass of Resurrection.NMCRS Stroller Strut April 13A Stroller Strut, benetting the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, will be 9 to 11 a.m., April 13, at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fitness Center outdoor track. e event includes door prizes for registered walkers, a stroller decoration competition and prizes for most laps walked. Registration is $5. Registration forms are available at the Fitness Complex and the NMCRS>e Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association has more than $3,000 in grant money available to non-prot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas. KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic non-prot organization for the general benet of the submarine and local communities. e Community grants are available by application for local non-prot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create meaningful, transformative change. Special consideration is given to projects that benet local areas in Camden County and North Florida. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or an application, e-mail kbsosagrants@yahoo.com or visit on Facebook at Kings Bay SOSA. e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Clubs rst annual Woodbine Duathlon is a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and older at 8 a.m., April 6, at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To register, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. e Navy Exhange wants to help its custom ers nance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualied students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. e next drawing will be held at the end of Feb ruary. Any eligible full-time student that has a Bgrade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reserv ists and military retirees enrolled in rst through 12th grade. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade av erage. en ll out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX products and services.Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! oughts on the rst Easter Parade Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay Chapel Sailors and Marines in the Nation Capitol Region attended the Navy-Marine Corps Ball at the Washington Hilton Hotel to raise funds for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, March 23. NMCRS is a private, nonprot emergency relief organization which provides temporary assistance to active and retired Sailors, Marines and their families. e organization provides support for basic living expenses, emergency travel and funeral expenses along with other needs. Special guests in attendance were Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos, President of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Steve Abbot, the 2013 Navy Marine Corps Ball Committee Chair Josi Hunt and guest speaker, 2012 Paralympics Gold Medalist Lt. Bradley Snyder. is year we are going to talk about our legacy. Its really about today, Greenert said. Our kids are getting it done today on deployment, building their own legacy, taking their own brush and painting our future. During his speech to the audience, Snyder recounted his journey to the 2012 Paralympics in London, and how it felt to win a Gold Medal one year to the day he was injured in Afghanistan. ats what I was thinking about at that moment, the community I am involved in with the military, the EOD community and the Navy and Marine Corps community that we are all a part of, Snyder said. I felt very lucky to have that love and support from all of those people. During the ceremony Amos expressed his gratitude for the nonprot organization and spoke on the importance of the charity to Sailors and Marines in need. When [the CNO] and I travel around America and we talk to dierent organizations that help us and help our services, the only one that we can really talk about to promote is this one, Amos said. It is no mistake that our forefathers said that this one is pretty important. In order to raise money for the charity, attendees were able to participate in a silent auction. Items available during the auc tion included autographed sports memorabilia, an Annapolis Sunset Cruise and tickets to professional sporting events. e rst Navy-Marine Corps Ball was held in 1914 with government, diplomatic and society leaders of that era in attendance. Since then, the ball has raised millions of dollars for NMCRS, helping Sailors and Marines with nancial and emergency assistance.NMCRS gets support during ball NMCRS Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon 4th award. He had deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. NCIS has identied Sgt. Lopez as the alleged shooter. e three Marines were pronounced dead at the scene by law enforcement personnel. We send our prayers and condolences to the families, fellow Marines and friends of the Marines who were lost in this tragic incident, said Col. David W. Maxwell, commander, Marine Corps Base Quantico. Our priority is to take care of and support all of those who are aected by this loss. e incident remains under investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.QuanticoStatement 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Volunteer of Month tition, resumes, cover let ters, job search, network ing, career fairs, interview techniques, salary negotiation, benets packages, the current job market and other relevant and impor tant transition topics. e presentation is geared toward ocers and senior enlisted, but those of all ranks are welcome. Spouses are encouraged to attend as well. All who attend will receive a free copy of the lectures companion book, also titled Marketing Yourself for a Second Career. It is an indepth, all-in-one resource for the transition process. For more information or to register, call the Fleet and Family Support Center at (912) 573-4513.FFSCTeen summer jobs open Morale. Welfare and Recreation/Child & Youth Program Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is accepting Teen Employment Program Recreation Aide candidate applications for summer employment. e closing date to apply is April 3. Selections will be made through an interview process. To apply, ll out a Teen Employment Program Application available at MWR Human Resources, Building 1039. For more information, call (912) 573-8572/4583. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 5 Sgt. Major of the Marine Corps tours Kings Bay Volunteer eorts like this are huge for us, said Cat McCarroll, the houses event and marketing manager. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small sta, so we depend almost entirely on the community and volunteer groups that come in and help with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. eyre what keeps this house running. e house is located about a block away from Nemours Childrens Clinic on Jacksonvilles South bank, where most of the children receive treatment. Its services cut out the cost of long-term hotel lodging, making medical treatment more readily available for nanciallychallenged families, although families and individuals of all nancial backgrounds are welcome to stay. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, they are not turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has provided services for an average of more than 1,000 families each year. For us, this is a small contribution, but it means so much to the center and its really the least we can do, said Chief Legalman Lucia Abreu, who volunteered. I see it as part of our duty to our community to give back what we can. e house operates solely on donations from the local community and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military, McCarroll said. e military is great because they obviously have the heart and desire to make a dierence, she said. Logistically, you cant beat it because they come in and get the job done and the results are amazing. McCarroll said those efforts are appreciated not only by the houses sta, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their eect on the families. A lot of families realize they are enlisted, and for service members to take the time to do this demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through, she said. Additionally, McCarroll said there are always plenty of opportunities for other commands to participate in volunteer projects at the house. ere is no shortage of ways to volunteer, whether you want to help decorate for the holidays, do arts and crafts, or get your hands dirty and pull weeds, there is really no limit to the ways you can impact the families and every eort is appreciated. Region their country honorably and deserved to have an equally honorable burial. It was my privilege to be a part of giving this nal act of respect for those who made the choice to serve their country. Following a prayer, each box of remains was individ ually committed to the sea, while Amazing Grace was played on the bagpipes. I was very honored to be asked to play at the burial at sea, said Electronics Technician 1st Class Carl Reams, who played the bagpipes for the ceremony. To honor those who had gone before me; this is my contribution to them. e ceremony concluded with a 21-gun salute and the playing of Taps .Legacy

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Events, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., April 18. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, April 24. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, April 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. offered April 3 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. April 3. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512. The Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: OneDay Marriage Enrichment Workshop. Reconnect is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to understand one another better and communicate on a more intimate level. This class is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26. To register call 573-4513. Expectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 11. Registration is required. Call 573-4512. This class explores resume writing for todays job mar ket. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job inter views. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a prod uct that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., April 8. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes This three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., April 23 and 30 and May 7. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513. scheduled for April 17A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, April 17. It pro vides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, April 2, 9 and 16. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 15 to 17. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., April 16. For more information, call 573-4513. The Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25 and 26. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783. Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 29 to May 3. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-9783. Unmanaged conflict has caused many hardships in the workplace and at home. It can cause people to suffer, missions to fail and families to separate. Conflict is inevitable. This workshop helps people manage conflict by examining their attitudes and behaviors when faced with conflicting situations, practic ing skills that prevent conflict from escalating and working with others to solve problems, allowing people to grow, missions to succeed and families to strengthen. This class is 2 to 3 p.m., April 3. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., April 22. For more information, contact at 573-4513. This workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, April 10. For more information or to register, call 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, April 12. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist service members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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USS Guardian being scraped Naval Sea System Commands Supervisor of Salvage and Diving continues to support operations to remove and dismantle USS Guardian (MCM-5) from a reef in the Tubbataha Reef National Park, Philippines, March 21. Guardian ran aground on the coral reef Jan. 17, while transiting the Sulu Sea. After the initial grounding, strong winds pushed Guardian parallel to the reef and further aground causing ooding and structural damage which prevented reoating of the vessel or removal of the ship intact. e removal of Guardian from the reef requires thorough planning, and operating in an environment 80 miles from the nearest port presents many challenges, said Capt. Mark Matthews, supervisor of salvage and diving. e environment on board Guardian requires constant vigilance. We brief safety every morning, are cognizant of the risks involved with working in severely damaged ship spaces and strive to minimize injury to personnel at all times. SUPSALV is using two heavy lift cranes to conduct the salvage. JASCON 25, a pipe-laying construction vessel, is the primary salvage platform and is able to position itself within 40 meters of Guardian and operate her crane without the need to set anchors to prevent further damage to the coral reefs. e second crane, Smit Borneo, arrived on site in February and supports the loading of salvaged sections onto an ocean-going barge for transport to a shore facility. Operations are expected to continue into April 2013, until the ship has been removed and the reef cleared of any remaining debris. workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., April 17. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. This two-hour program is an interactive program designed to inform participants on sources of funding for higher educa tion, focusing on financial aid resources, college savings plans and tax incentives. This training is scheduled 2 to 4 p.m., April 23. Registration is required. For more information call 573-9783. FFSC will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resourc es and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the in doctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs repre sentative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 7

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Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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When my father said something and he had been a Marine and the Corps was one of the loves of his life it was The Word, and you could chisel it in stone. There were no questions. There was no debate. There was simply The Word, and thats how it was and how it was going to be. My brother says our father wasnt always right, but Im not so sure. So when I awoke one morning to my fathers cry of, My god, theres a foot of snow on the ground, I jumped out of bed and ran for the window. The sky was blue, the sun was out and the grass was green. Birds chirped. As I turned away from the window in surprise, he said, April fool. MTSN Harrison Freemanwalsch Trident Training Facility Toccoa, Ga. Ive been flipping up the windshield wipers on my friends cars. PO2 A.J. Kuhl Maritime Force Protection Unit Schenectady, N.Y. Put glitter in the air vents of a car. Chris Garthwaite Family member Port Allegheny, Pa. My husband called his mother and told her our baby was born April 1 and then said, April fools. MA2 Nicole McLawhorn Security Force Battalion Bradford, Pa. My husband Saran Wrapped the toilet seat. Jamie Johnson Family member Jacksonville, Fla. The only one I know is people saying theyre pregnant. Pfc. Sean Bartolowitz Security Force Battalion Pittsburgh Tape the handle on the little spray nozzle on the sink, and when someone turns the water on, it squirts them. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho USS Tennessee departing Navy Lodge helps in PCS When traveling on permanent change of station orders, stay at a Navy Lodge. Navy Lodges provide military guests value with room rates at an average of 45 percent below comparable civilian hotels. Guests also can rest easy knowing Navy Lodges provide high standards with industry recognized and award winning guest service and cleanliness. Come stay at Navy Lodge Kings Bay during your next PCS move, said Linda Bird, Navy Lodge general manager. We oer spacious rooms, a safe environment and amenities that allow you to eat in your room, THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 9

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e annual Grand Outing at Trident Lakes Golf Club begins with a shotgun start at 1 p.m., Saturday, April 6. Format is two-person team with six holes Captains Choice, six holes Alternate Shot and six holes Best Ball. Registration and lunch provided at 11 a.m. Cost is $25 for Trident Lakes Golf Club members, $30 for military and $35 for guests and civilians, which includes golf, cart, lunch and prizes. Prizes will be awarded for rstand second-place and other prizes on course throughout play. Outing extras include pig roast with all the xings, Putting Challenge on the Practice Green, Chip N Challenge on the Practice Green, two Longest Drive Contests and Closest to the Pin on the course. For more information, call Pro Shop at (912) 573-8475. MWR Teen Summer Employment Program MWR is looking for appli cants starting March 20 through April 3. Applications can be picked up at the Kings Bay Youth Center and on the Department of Labor GA Web site. Employment dates are from May 17 to Aug. 8. All teens, 15 years to 18 years still in high school are eligible. Youth must be 15 years old before April 1. If selected, mandatory training sessions will be given such as Child Abuse Recognition, First Aid and CPR, Customer Service Training and ESAMS computer trainings. For more detailed information, call the Youth Center at (912) 573-2380. Spring Break Fever at Rack-N-Roll Lanes Spring Break is coming and RackN-Roll Lanes is ready. From 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, April 1 through Friday, April 5 all games and shoes are 50 cents for all guests, 18 years old and younger. Also, Tuesday and Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m., enjoy the all you can bowl for only $10 a person. Call RackN-Roll Lanes now for more information at (912) 573-9492. Hours of Operations changing for MWR Under the FY Continuing Resolution Act e following facilities will be chang ing their hours eective 12:01 a.m. Monday, March 18, until further notice: Big EZ Gaming Zone/Liberty Center will be open Wednesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Big EZ Billiard/Movie/ Sports Zones will be open Monday through ursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday noon to midnight, Sunday noon to 11 p.m. and holidays noon to 8 p.m.; Fitness Complex will be open Monday through Friday 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m.; the Pool Complex will be open for lap swim Monday through Friday 5 to 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ; the Pool Complex will open for recreational swimming May 25 through Sept. 2 and will be open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 6 p.m. Starting Aug. 3 through Sept. 2, it will be open weekends only. Intramural Greybeard Basketball Registration is open. e captains meeting is at 5 p.m., April 3 in the Fitness Complex Classroom. League begins play April 9 with a Tuesday/Wednesday Lunch-time League. For more detailed information, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military fami lies, $13 tickets to select performances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to regis ter is March 29. Class is limited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergar ten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center started March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual aug mentees, March 18 for ac tive duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Marchs free movies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Spring camp signup Just for kids Liberty call Grand Outing golf April 6 all at a savings. Plus, most Navy Lodges accept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Navy Lodges oer spacious rooms or family suites, perfect for a family on a PCS move. Suites include full kitchenette with dishwasher while extended stay rooms feature two queen beds and a full kitchenette with dishwasher. Every Navy Lodge guest room oers free WiFi, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Guest laundry facilities are available on site and breakfast is oered daily in the lobby. To make a reservation, call 1-800-NAVY-INN, (800-628-9466) 24 hours a day, seven days a week or visit www.navy-lodge.com.Lodge 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Navy College information College Funding More than you have time forIn case you have not heard, there is more education mon ey available to the active duty member that they have time to use. But you dont believe me yet, so lets look at the facts... Navy USCG USMC Current TA $4,000/year $4,500 $4,500 Current PELL Grant $5,500/year $5,500/year $5,500/year Total $9,500/year $10,000 $10,000 Approx. Class $$/hour $250/HS $250/HS $250/HS Approx. hour/class 3 3 3 Approx. class costs $750/class $750/class $750/class Reasonable classes/semester 2-3 2-3 2-3 Semesters/year 3 3 3 Classes/year 6-9 6-9 6-9 Approx. $$ available/year $9,500 $10,000 $8,500 Class cost/year $4,500-$6,750 $4,500-$6,750 $4,500-$6,750 Approx. $$ left over $2,750-$5,000 $3,250-$5,500 $3,250-$5,500 But wait ... theres more: We havent touched GI Bill, scholarships, budgeting for classes or MYCAA for spouses. We havent talked how to shop for schools to maximize your Navy school college credit. We havent even talked about your degree and how to spend your education time best. But you say theres more to consider and youre right, but consider this... Are these approximate costs ...yes. Do some people take more classes per year ... yes. Are there cheaper alternatives, CLEP, cheap books, less expensive classes, etc. ... yes. Should you plan out your entire year to ID what money is needed and when ... yes. Do certain types of funding (PELL, TA, etc.) change ... yes. Should you focus on maximizing the funding that is available today ... yes. Can the Navy College Ofce help you maximize all options ... yes. How do you get what you need and only spend the time and money you need to? Come to the Navy College Ofce today. Walkin or send us an e-mail to make an appointment for you and your spouse. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 11

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12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 28, 2013 Veterans Moving Forward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs. Among the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy days and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. e series is written by assistance dog in training Nathan with help from his human handler, Paul Bollea and Veterans Moving Forwards Tina Tallman. My Veterans Moving Forward training as a service dog includes many steps. It takes a progression of experiences to help me gain the skills and sensitivity I will need to support my future veteran partner. ats why, after spending 18 months or so with a primary puppy raiser and handler, its important to work with advanced trainers and handlers who help ne tune my basic skills and round out other aspects of my training and socialization that are needed to partner with a veteran. So, it came as no surprise in January that I moved to the home of my second puppy raiser and handler Paul. ough it was bittersweet for me to leave behind my rst puppy raiser after so many great months together, knowing that I had graduated to the next level of training was such a thrill because it meant that Im that much closer to nding my veteran partner. You see, for some time now Ive been a little bit envious. You may remember me speaking of my littermate in previous blogs. My sister Lori found her veteran partner last fall. Since November, Lori has been the assistance dog of Marine Corps Sgt. Kelsey Smith a combat veteran suering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other challenges. Lori has helped her veteran partner in his recovery and in dealing with all the day-to-day tasks that many people take for granted. My littermate is attuned to her veterans needs at work, at home and now in public too. Loris veteran was not comfortable in public before Lori joined him. Now, that I have moved on to advanced training, Im going to be meeting veteran candidates too. But before I meet my future partner, theres still work to be done. My new handler is making sure Im ready to deal with all of the things you humans take for granted such as going to the post oce and grocery store, attending church services and many other public events. He really knows a lot about dogs because he has trained many puppies for blind humans, and he is very, very picky. He knows that I have seen plenty of oce buildings and airplanes and fancy places, so now hes showing me more of the places where I might go and doing more of the things that I might do with my veteran partner. ough my handler has taken me to the Pentagon, the Government Accountability Oce and a winery, most of our days together have been spent learning new everyday routines. One new routine I love is a daily mile-and-a-half family walk with my humans dog, Davis. We see other dogs in the neighborhood, squirrels, children and all sorts of things. My human reminds me not to sni, not to pull and to always lets go. He is so happy when I follow his commands-which are most of the time. Plus, Ive gotten into great shape with all the regular exercise. On Sundays I attend mass I usually fall asleep during the homily, but the pastor doesnt mind and we make our weekly trip to Wegmans grocery store, my noses favorite place. I stay close to my handler as people ask to pet me and my handler tells them about Veterans Moving Forward and how I am in training to become a veterans assistance dog. During the week, my human takes me to a bunch of normal places. And, because he is retired, my human has time to pack a lot of on-the-go training and hands-on lessons into each outing. Its a lot harder than going to work in an oce, but I know this intensive training is making me a better assistance dog for a veteran. Plus, it makes me more condent every day. ere are many other new places Ive visited in recent weeks. And, some of the things Ive learned really tug at my heart. You see, every week I accompany my handler to his cancer infusion treatment, some humans call it chemo. I stand by while my handler is hooked up to all kinds of tubes and machines. ere are many others like him there. e patients look for me each week. I let them pet me and, hopefully, make their days a little bit brighter. I also have been to the oncologist, the cancer doctor, also known as a nephrologist, plus the kidney doctor, cancer support group meetings, the dentist, the orthodontist and a place where my handler has to get poked with needles that take his blood out and he does, you know what, to give the nurses his urine. I watch everything very closely to make sure my human is OK. Ive learned a lot about doctors and nurses and medical places that I never knew before. Whats even better, the doctors and nurses and other patients always want to have me come back. I guess that means Im doing the right thing. e humans in my Veterans Moving Forward family believe that any veteran who might need me will be seeing the doctor or going to support groups more often than the average human. My handler says I know when a human is not well and needs me by his or her side. He says my sensitivity and the comfort I provide will be very important to my future veteran partner. Sometimes we go to an outside dog trainer where I show o what I have learned. Its like a test. Other times I attend ofcial training classes held by Veterans Moving Forward. Its at these sessions that I get to work with all the other service dogs in training, even those silly new puppies. More importantly, its also where Ive gotten to meet veterans from each of the military services. ese men and women all need a service dog. Right now I am getting to know a veteran whom I really like a lot. He is a very tall Army combat veteran. Because they say he is recovering from both physical and mental wounds of war, I think he needs a partner just like me. Cant wait to see what the future holds in store. I know my namesake, Petty Ocer ird Class Nathan Nate Bruckenthal, is proud of how far Ive come. I hope to show the Bruckenthal family, my handler and trainer families, my canine family, my Veterans Moving Forward family and my Coast Guard family the many things I can do to help a veteran move forward with his life. Life of a Service Dog Part 6 Nathan undergoes pre-placement training

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