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The Kings Bay periscope ( 03-14-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00292

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00292


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PAGE 1

Senior ocers seek exibility in budget cutting proceduree senior ocers from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force asked Congress for more spending exibility March 5, so they can maintain military readiness as the sequesters across-the-board budget cuts take eect. Army Chief of Sta Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Na val Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos and Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Mark A. Welsh III testied about 2013 military con struction before the House Appropria tions Subcommittee for Mili tary Construction and Veteran Aairs. Odierno told committee members that sequester and the continuing resolution, combined, threaten grave and immediate impacts to Army readiness that could extend well beyond this year. e continuing resolution prohibits new starts to military construction projects. Until the Army receives an appropriations measure with new start authority, we cannot initiate 102 military construc tion projects that are scheduled for award in 35 states, Odierno said. He said sequester cuts will translate into about 100,000 fa cility work orders per month that will not be done. Greenert said the continu ing resolution poses challenges for the Navy because it holds spending at 2012 levels. But this scal year, we are implementing a new defense strategy, and that emphasizes readiness over capacity, he said. So as a result, we currently have about $3.7 billion more in our investment accounts than we requested, and we currently have $4.6 billion less in our op erations accounts than we requested. at means the Navy is out of Up Periscope Where would you go in a time machine? Page 9 Military Saves FFSC, MWR teach values to students Page 4 Travel Fair Annual expo March 15 at conference center Page 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Strategic Command impactede U.S. Strategic Command can execute its full mission responsibilities today, but the impacts of scal uncertainty and declining resources in the next six months or a year could change that, Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler said March 5. Testifying here before the House Armed Services Committee, the Stratcom com mander characterized the impacts as an avalanche that will start slowly inside Strat com and then accelerate as momentum builds. What will happen is that as the service chiefs have struggled with how to apply these various nancial rules that theyve been given, they have had to take cuts that eventually are going to impact us. Flying hours, for example, Kehler said. Military leadership asks Congress for scal help Rucinski, Walters earn SUBLANT Junior Sailor of the Year; Scott, Zirk in running for Senior Sailore 2012 Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced March 6. e 2012 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer First Class William E. Cox. Petty Of cer First Class Jared A. Leary was recognized as the Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. Both Junior Sailor of the Year winners are stationed onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e 2012 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year is Petty Ocer Second Class Nicholas G. Rucinski. Petty Ocer Sec ond Class Austin M. Walters is the SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. e winners were recognized by Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, during a luncheon held at the Vista Point Center, Naval Station Norfolk. As the undersea arm of the Navy, our submarine community is a unique small force signicantly impacting all maritime missions, Connor said. No successful force is without engaged Sailors fully fo cused in their roles as warghters. Today, we are in the company of such Sailors, our sea and shore Sailors of the Year. ese young Sail ors have demonstrated the expertise, discipline, and initiative to become the decisive and capable leaders of our submarine force for the next decade or more. e submarine force is in good hands as it continues dominance of the undersea domain. Rucinski is a submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine Kings Bay Sailors honored Running of the Green Hagel, Karzai meetNew DoD boss in conference with Afghan presidentAfter his rst meeting with Afghanistans president as head of the U.S. military March 10, Defense Secretary Chuck Ha gel said the encounter featured clear, direct conversation. e sec retary and President Hamid Karzai met for dis cussions and dinner at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. NATO International Security Assis tance Force commander Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., U.S. Ambassador James B. Cun ningham and other senior U.S. ocials also attended. In a speech earlier, Karzai seemed to suggest the United States and the Taliban were conspiring to keep the level of violence in Afghanistan high to ensure the continued presence of U.S. troops there beyond 2014. Unless Congress acts to end sequestra tion, furloughs for Defense Department civilian employees can begin April 26, the departments comptroller said March 11 in Washington. Robert F. Hale discussed the furlough planning process with a Pentagon audience. e comptroller also took questions sent in via Facebook and Twitter. DOD is the only agency in the government that has to notify Congress when it wants to impose furloughs. Ocials did that Feb. 20. ere is a 45-day waiting period after we submit that notication before furloughs can start, Hale said. e department asked commands to identify civilians who would be excepted from furloughs. at information is back in the Pentagon, Hale said, and ocials are reviewing the recommendations. eir goal is to complete that review by March 15, he added. After notifying Congress, the department began legally required bargaining with unions. About a dozen unions have nation al consultation rights, Hale said, and local commanders are in the process of notifying several local unions. e unions, in this case, dont have the right to bargain not to do the furloughs, he said. ey do have the right to bargain how they are implemented. If Congress does not act on sequestration, later this month the department will send Civilian furloughs could begin in April

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A green card is evidence of an individual or a resident aliens lawful permanent resident status in the United States. Obtaining a green card is not au tomatic and not everyone is eligible to obtain a green card. e process can be long and ex pensive. Certain relatives of LPRs or U.S. Citizens are eligible to obtain a green card. e following questions will help determine an individuals eligibility: Where is the relative located? If the relative is located outside the U.S., they may have to go through Consular Processing, which includes filing an I-130 (Petition for an Alien Relative) and work ing with the National Visa Center. For relatives that are located in the U.S., they may be eligible to do an Adjustment of Status Application. Has an I-130 application been led? Petitioners (the LPR or USC) need to le a petition in order to prove their relatives eligibility to obtain a green card. e petition is treated like a placeholder in line. Only a certain number of immi grants are able to obtain a green card per year. ere are dierent quotas based on a persons country of origin and their relationship to the petitioner. e Visa Bulletin lists the current wait times for individu als seeking a green card. Spouses and Children of LPRs and brothers and sisters of USCs have to wait in line before they are eligible to apply to adjust status; that is why they have to le the I-130 and wait their turn before they can le addi tional paperwork. Spouses, minor children and Parents of USCs; however, are considered Immediate Relatives, meaning they do not need to wait in line. ese individuals, provided they are already in the U.S., are eligible to le for a green card right away. If the I-130 has not previously been led, it can be led concurrently with the adjustment of status application package. How did the relative enter the U.S.? If the relative entered the U.S. illegally, without inspection, then unfortunately, they are unable to apply for a green card at this time (stay tuned for new legisla tion). ey may be eligible to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals giving them work authori zation if certain conditions are met.2 If a relative entered with a visa, but overstayed the visa, then they are eligible to adjust status if they are married to a USC. It is important to remember that individuals coming across the bor der apply for a visa or permission to enter the country. If someone obtains a visitor visa, they are stating that their intent is to make a short visit to the US, not get married. If a LPR or USC is seeking to get married to a foreign national who travels frequently in and out of the country, they should seek immigra tion advice, and look into apply ing for a anc(e) visa. When the anc(e) is ready to get married, he/she will enter the U.S. using the anc(e) visa. Using a tourist visa to come into the U.S. with the intent to get mar ried can be considered Immigration fraud and may be grounds for de portation. Has the relative done anything to make them ineligible to apply to the U.S? Has the relative been convicted of/arrested for any crimes? Was the relative ever stopped at the border, deported, or removed? Did the relative after entering the country illegally ever leave the country? Has the relative ever put him/herself out as being a USC, such as registering to vote? If there are any doubts as to an individuals eligibility, an attorney should be sought before continu ing with the application process. Individuals should collect certied court records, arrest records, etc. and bring them to the attorney to review. Individuals who are unsure of what records exist against them should get an FBI background check and/or submit a G-649 Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act request to USCIS. Assuming everything is good to go, the Petitioner can move forward with the Adjustment of Status Appli cation Process. A concurrent package would in clude the following: I-130 Petition for Alien Relative Copy of Petitioners Passports biographical page Copy of marriage certicate and any divorce decrees (if applying for a spouse) Copy of Beneciarys birth cer ticate G-325A Biographic Information for the Petitioner G-325A Biographic Information for the Beneciary Passport photo of Petitioner Passport photo of Beneciary Evidence of bona de marriage (if applying for a spouse). [is can include joint bank statements, health insurance cards, leases showing both partys names, copy of drivers license showing relation ship, assortment of photos docu menting relationship and marriage, etc.] $420 check made out to U.S. Department of Homeland Security I-485 Application To Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status Color copy of Beneficiarys Passports biographical page Copy of Beneciarys Passports entry stamps Copy of Beneciarys nonimmi grant visa Copy of I-94 form (front and back) $1,070 check made out to U.S. Department of Homeland Security I-693 Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (completed by a USCIS civil sur geon sealed in an envelope) I-864 Adavit of Support Copy of Petitioners IRS tax return transcript for the last 3 years Copies of Petitioners leave and earning statements for the last 6 months I-765 Application for Employment Document I-131 Application for Travel Document (Advance Parole) Form G1145 E-Notication of Application/Petition Acceptance All forms are available electroniTHEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB power outage March 15ere will be a scheduled power outage that will aect many areas of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at about 8:30 a.m., March 15. Areas that lose electricity should be back to normal operations within 15 minutes. e power out age is necessary for the Public Works Depart ment to test emergency back-up generators.Chapel sets Holy Week servicese Holy Week calendar, March 23 through 31, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Cha pel includes the following Protestant services: 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday; 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 31, Resurrection Sunday. Catholic services: 5 p.m., Saturday, March 23, Vigil of Palm Sunday; 9 a.m., Sun day, March 24, Palm Sunday Mass; 6 p.m., ursday, March 28, Mass of Lords Supper; noon, Friday, March 29, Liturgy of the Lords Passion, 10 p.m., Saturday, March 30, Easter Vigil; 9 a.m. Sunday, March 31, Mass of Resur rection.e Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association has more than $3,000 in grant money available to non-prot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas. KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic non-prot organization for the general benet of the submarine and local communities. e Community grants are available by applica tion for local non-prot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measur able results, contribute to the communities vitality and create meaningful, transformative change. Special consideration is given to proj ects that benet local areas in Camden County and North Florida. e grant application dead line is April 1. For more information or an ap plication, e-mail kbsosagrants@yahoo.com or visit on Facebook at Kings Bay SOSA. Special Agent Mel Grin of Naval Criminal Investigative Service Kings Bay will be the guest speaker at the March 19 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Dinner is $20. RSVP by March 15 with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Clubs rst annual Woodbine Duathlon is a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and older at 8 a.m., April 6, at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To regis ter, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergradu ate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bb communitiesfoundation.org. e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will have a Confederate Garrison 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, March 16 and 17. Parking is $6 per vehicle, en trance fee is $2. For more information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www.oridastateparks. org.Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Status a factor in getting green card Judge Advocate When closing out a service mem bers account after death, the De fense Finance and Accounting Ser vice will follow a standard order of precedence if there is no benecia ry designated on the account. ere should be a beneciary listed on the account in order to pre clude any ambiguity of who should receive the nal pay benets. To ensure there is a designated beneciary listed on the service members account, check the back side of the retiree account statement that has been sent out in paper form in the past, usually at the end of the year past or any time a change has been made to the account, e.g. pay raise, allotment change, etc. Also, it is available electronically at the DFAS MyPay Web site at mypay.dfas.mil/mypay.aspx. e order of precedence that DFAS follows in the case of no designated beneciary is surviving spouse, followed by children and their de scendants, father and mother of the deceased in equal parts, legal rep resentative and nally a person entitled under the law of the deceased retirees domicile. While this order of precedence might be what the service member had in mind, a designated benecia ry would specify who was to receive the nal pay benets. DFAS and order of beneciaries Finance & Accounting Naval Hospital Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clin ics, including Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax. e guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact informa tion for all clinical departments at the hospital and branch health clinics. is includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpatient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medicine, TRICARE and education al classes. To nd out more, visit the com mand Web site atwww.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twit ter at www. twitter. com/ NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube. com/ user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Patient Guide now at branch clinic Branch Health Clinic 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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e Players plans military events In 2009, e Players created a Military Appre ciation platform designed to express gratitude and support for the men and women who serve in the United States military. e program has grown year after year and continues to serve thousands of mili tary families each year. Military Appreciation components are: Complimentary admis sion to e Players for all active duty, reserve and retired military personnel and their dependents e Patriots Outpost, an all-inclusive hospitality venue for all military guests Military Appreciation Day, Wednesday of the tournament week with a special ceremony and concert at the clubhouse Other special events, in cluding a military job fair and Operation Shower, a baby shower for expecting military spouses e Players celebrates military members and their families by designat ing Wednesday of tournament week as Military Ap preciation Day. After the conclusion of the Wednes day practice round, the Players hosts a ceremony on the back lawn of the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse to pay tribute to the men, women and their families who serve, or have served our nation. e Military Appreciation Ceremony is hosted by PGA Tour Commis sioner Tim Finchem and includes military pageant ry, a yover and remarks by a PGA Tour player and military dignitary. e event concludes with a concert by a special mu sical Guest. Past musical guests have been Tim Mc Graw, Darius Rucker and Luke Bryan. With the signicant mil itary presence in North east Florida, this day has grown in appeal. More than 10,000 people at tended e Players Mili tary Appreciation Day in 2012. On Saturday, May 4, e Players once again will partner with Operation Shower to host a group baby shower for 30 mili tary moms-to-be whose husbands are deployed. e event will feature Op erations Showers signa ture Showers-In-A-Box, gifts of high-quality products for the moms and ba bies that were provided by sponsors and donors. In addition to clothing, dia pers and essential items for baby, gifts also often include cribs and bed ding, car seats, strollers and more. On Sunday, May 5, e Players will partner with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition to wel come active duty, reserve, retired military, veterans and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass to partici pate in the second Mili tary Job Fair. e event is free to participants and will feature area compa nies with opening hiring opportunities, as well as educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling and resume assistance. e 2013 Military Job Fair will be in e Turn hospitality venue at the 18th green of e Players Stadium Course. Fifty companies will be invited to participate this year, double the number from the inaugural event in 2012. Located between the 16th and 18th fairways, the Patriots Outpost is a 5,000-square-foot, airconditioned venue that is reserved entirely for mili tary guests and their fami lies. e venue provides spectacular views of golf and complimentary food and drink to all those who visit throughout tournament week. In 2012, more than 12,000 military guests en joyed the Patriots Out post. Patriots Outpost is made possible through the support of local companies and individuals who partner with e Players to help provide this private hospitality venue for military families. During Play ers week, Patriots Outpost often hoses special events to honor the military. cally online at USCIS.gov. It is important to check the site regularly to ensure that you have the most current version of the forms and to get up to date fee information and ling addresses. After ling, USCIS will send a receipt notice. e notice has a case number that can be used to check the applications status online. Servicemembers may call (888) 247-4645 for ad ditional information and/ or request that their ap plication be expedited, in exigent circumstances such as deployment. Should you have any questions regarding any part of the adjustment of status application process, please contact your near est legal assistance oce.Green THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 Children learn to save money Story and photos by Valerie Temple Child and Youth Program Lead Program assistant, MWR Youth CenterIn celebration of Military Saves Week, Feb. 25 to March 1, Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay partnered with the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Youth Center to host nancial events during the week. Monday, Feb. 25, FFSC members stopped by the Youth Center to read One Cent, Two Cent, Old Cent, New Cent to students in kindergarten through second grade. Third through fth graders played Money Jeopardy! The week concluded with a Carnival March 1. Children earned tickets a number of dierent ways over a two-week period, from completing chores at home to answering money trivia at the Youth Center. Tickets were cashed in for participation bracelets at the Carni val. Carnival activities included a bounce house, bingo, Angry Birds, Plinko and a Dr. Suess Quiz Bowl. Coon candy, popcorn and prizes completed the afternoon of fun. Sixty children and 15 parents aended. The goal of the Carnival was to teach children how money is earned, saving money and spending it wisely. Morale, Welfare and Recreation & Fleet and Family Support Centers Military Saves Week Carnival

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 5 We did discuss those comments, the secretary said, responding to a re porters question about his meeting with Karzai. I told the president it was not true that the United States was unilaterally working with the Taliban in trying to negotiate anything. Any negotiation with the Taliban to build peace and political consensus in Afghanistan must come from the Afghan govern ment, Hagel said. Obviously, the United States will support eorts, if they are led by the Afghans, to come to some possible resolution, if that eventually evolves, he added. Later in his comments, Hagel acknowledged that when a nation would think of engaging an enemy theyre still at war with, its dicult. But he added that he always has believed its wise for na tions to engage with and reach out to each other. at doesnt mean you are prepared to negotiate; it may never get to that point, he said. But I think its far preferable to war. Hagels rst visit to Af ghanistan as secretary has been eventful. March 9, his rst full day there, he attended a brieng within earshot of a deadly blast near the defense ministry that killed nine Afghan ci vilians and injured at least 14 others. ose in attendance reported they could hear the explosion clearly, though they didnt imme diately know the source. March 10, a scheduled Karzai-Hagel news con ference was called o, and Hagels planned visits to the Defense and Interior ministers at their respec tive headquarters were shifted to an ISAF instal lation. U.S. ocials said secu rity considerations led to moving the ministerial meetings to ISAF facilities and cancelling the news conference. A statement from the presidential palace said the media event was cancelled because of schedule pressures. Hagel secretary appeared unfazed by those events. When you spend 48 hours in Afghanistan or anywhere else thats too dangerous, he told reporters, you recognize the complications that ex ist every day. e solution to those complications may be imperfect, Hagel said, but we should always be mindful of the higher pur pose of what were doing and why. Its easy in a war zone to get focused on issues of the day, week or month, Hagel said. While the metrics of the moment are good guideposts, the secretary added, weve got to keep in mind the larger con text of where weve been, what weve accomplished and where were going with the big issues.From 2008 to now, the secretary said, he has seen dramatic changes in Afghanistan and a renewed commit ment from both NATO and Afghan leaders. Hagel said that, coupled with his great faith in U.S. military leaders and diplomats in Afghanistan, tells him were on the right path, and I think we will meet these transition dates. Hagel met separately this afternoon with Af ghan Defense Minister Bismullah Khan Moham madi and Interior Minister Ghulam Mujtaba Patang. e secretary also visited the Kabul Military Train ing Center. USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Blue), home ported in Kings Bay. Born in Greensboro, N.C., the 25-year-old is a 2006 graduate of Manseld Summitt High School in Manseld, Texas, and joined the Navy in March 2008. He also is the Commander, Submarine Group Ten Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. is whole experience was incredible, Rucinski said. I could not have done it without the support and work ethic of my shipmates. ey got me to where I am today. I have been privileged to be led by some great chiefs who believed in me and gave me the chance to lead. However, I am most happy for my wife to be present with me as it was her support that pushed every step of the way. I am grateful to be able to share this moment with her. Walters is an enlisted sur face warfare electricians mate assigned to the Trident Ret Facility in Kings Bay. A native of Pensacola, Fla., he is a 2000 graduate of Pensacola Catho lic High School, and joined the Navy in April 2004. Walters also is CSG10 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. I am really in awe and some shock having been selected from this group of excellent Sailors, he said. It is a great accom plishment and a career acceler ator for me, as I can use this as a springboard in making rst class and chief. But I wouldnt be here without the support of my ship mates and civilian counterparts in my workshop. ey have led me down the right path in giving the Navy 100 percent of my full potential and dedication. e other candidates for Se nior Sea Sailor and Senior Shore Sailor of the year were Petty O cer First Class Derrick C. Scott and Petty Ocer First Class Jason B. Zirk, respectively. Scott is a submarine-qualied yeoman assigned to the Ohioclass ballistic-missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (Gold), home ported in Kings Bay. e 36-year-old Sailor is from Columbus, Ohio, is a 1995 graduate of Miin High School and joined the Navy also in 1995. He also is the CSG10 Senior Sea Sailor of the Year. Zirk is a submarine-qualied sonar technician assigned to Commander, Submarine Squad ron Twenty in Kings Bay. A native of Blacksburg, Va., he rst enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in June 1997 and completed a tour in Iraq before enlisting in the Navy in Au gust 2005. He is the CSG10 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. Cox, a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack subma rine USS Montpelier (SSN 765), home ported in Norfolk, Va. e Denton, Texas native, graduated from Ryan High School in May 2001, and joined the Navy in September 2001. He is also the Commander, Submarine Group Two Senior Sea Sailor of the Year, headquartered in Groton, Conn. It is an honor to be selected, Cox said. But the recognition is not just for me, it is also for my chain-of-command and my shipmates, as they were respon sible in allowing me to make it this far. I never expected to re ceive this type of recognition, but the selection shows that hard work and maintaining high standards can yield great results. I appreciate the mentorship and leadership that my chain-ofcommand invested in me, and also the hard work from all my shipmates. Hopefully, this ca reer milestone will help me in my pursuit of advancement to chief petty ocer. Leary is a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied ma chinists mate assigned to the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department, New London, Conn. Born in New Orleans, the 27-year-old Sailor is a 2003 grad uate of Kenwood High School in Clarksville, Tenn., and joined the Navy, April 27, 2004. He is the CSG2 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. is selection is the culmi nation of a signicant amount of hard work by myself, friends, and family to ensure I maintained the excellence and high est level of professionalism, Leary said. Without the expe rience and technical expertise of my shipmates, and without the trust, pride and honor instilled in me by my leadership, this recognition would not be possible. So this is not an individual award, but a recognition for a team of expert leaders and professional Sailors who al lowed me to succeed through my career. e selection process has been incredibly humbling, as you nd yourself surrounded by the best and brightest in your craft. As the Senior Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year, Cox and Leary will represent SUBLANT in the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Sailor of the Year competition. e USFFC competition will be held later in March with oth er Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet sea winner from that competition will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet shore winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations com petition in Washington, D.C Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, stated he was impressed with the military bearing, pro fessionalism, and etiquette ex hibited by this special group of enlisted submariners. Submariners comprise a small elite force providing even a larger contribution to the mar itime security mission of our Navy team, Saunders said. e SUBLANT Sailors who partici pated in this years Sailor of the Year competition embody the warghting spirit of all undersea warriors. During the last sev eral days it has been an honor to meet them and their fami lies. I am condent this group of young warriors will provide a foundation of strength that will enable the submarine force to continue our dominance of the undersea domain. ey all have a very bright future. e other candidate for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Mark A. Frank, while Petty Ocer Sec ond Class Antwan M. Haywood was the other Junior Shore Sailor of the year. Frank is a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack subma rine USS Springeld (SSN 761), home ported in Groton, Conn. Born in West Branch, Mich., the 23-year-old Sailor is a 2007 grad uate of Cape Fear High School in Fayetteville, N.C., and joined the Navy, April 27, 2008. He is the CSG2 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. Haywood is a submarinequalied sonar technician as signed on the sta of Com mander, Submarine Group Two, headquartered in Groton, Conn. e 27-year-old Sailor is a na tive of Stockton, Ca., graduat ing from Lincoln High School in June 2005 and enlisting in the Navy in July 2005. He is CSG2 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. Testing time SOY Hagel

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balance, he said, and this unbalance is made worse in our operations account because of sequestration. e Navy is now reduc ing its presence in every theater and halting train ing for next years deploy ments, Greenert said. If Congress passes an authorizations bill or new continuing resolution that allows the services to move money between ac counts, he said, the Navy would rst be able to restore the training and maintenance and [also] keep a carrier strike group and an amphibious ready group in the Middle East and the Pacic through next scal year. If Congress awards the department enough funding, Greenert added, the Navy will restore the rest of this years planned de ployments, training and maintenance. He told members Navy funding constraints have over the last two months caused $600 million in lost ship, aircraft and facility maintenance and train ing, and we also missed some program management. In March, Greenert said, the Navy will miss more than $1.2 billion of main tenance and operations because were deferring planned activity. ese are lost opportunities, many of them, and these will increase each month as we go on a continuing resolution. Under sequester and the continuing resolution, the Navy was compelled to stop almost all of our fa cility renovation and modernization, he said. Our ability to continue operat ing forward is constrained because of that. Amos said all the Marine Corps 37 military con struction projects planned for scal 2013 and totaling $716 million are halted. Additionally, we have been forced to halt con struction plans on hangars for the F-35 in Beau fort, South Carolina, as well as road improvements aboard our major installations designed to correct safety deciencies, Amos said. ese projects are ready to begin today. Without appro priations or the authori ties for new starts, we are forced to defer to future years budget, causing a ripple eect which will no doubt signicantly impact our modernization and our sustainment eorts. Amos noted that in three rounds of recent congressional testimony, hed spoken about the combined eects of the existing continuing reso lution and sequestration. In the near term, what the Air Force is going to try to do is take their y ing hours in the bomber force, for example, in such a way as to make sure that our crews that are nuclear certied will remain so for as long as possible, the general explained. If unaddressed, he said, such issues will persist and the impacts will begin to be felt in Strategic Com mand. Stratcoms broad range of missions include strategic deterrence, space operations, cyberspace operations, joint electronic warfare, global strike, missile defense, combat ing weapons of mass destruction, analysis and tar geting, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, or ISR. In an uncertain and complex world, Kehler said, Stratcom remains focused on conducting the missions that are most critical to protecting the nations core national se curity interests. Many regions of the world remain volatile, and increasing economic and information connections mean regional issues can quickly have global conse quences, he said. Events over the past year in Syria, North Korea, Iran, China and elsewhere validate this perspective, he told the panel. Fiscal uncertainty is adding other unique chal lenges, Kehler said. Not only are the additional sequestration reductions steep, but the law allows little exibility in how to apply them. Were also working from a continu ing resolution while tran sitioning contingency needs to the base budget. Kehler said he is most concerned about the im pact of nancial uncertain ty on Stratcoms people. Uniformed and nonuniformed members alike have managed the eects of sustained high-stress combat deployment and operational tempos, he said, adding, ey will ingly take personal risk for their country but they are fearful of taking nancial risk for their families. Hiring restrictions, salary freezes and the likeli hood of unpaid furloughs are especially troubling to Stratcoms civilians, who make up about 60 percent of the Stratcom headquar ters sta, the general said. ey hold key leader ship positions, they rep resent critical expertise and they represent much of the essential workforce that provides crucial func tions like intelligence, maintenance and sustain ment, Kehler noted.StrategicCongress Navy Adventures Unleashed! letters to the excepted employees and propose furloughs for the rest, Hale said. ere is a seven-day pe riod for people to reply to their letters, followed by a 30-day waiting period. At the end of that peri od, we can send decisions of furloughs, and those furloughs can start, he said. When the formal notice is sent, civilian employees have the right to appeal to the Merit Systems Protec tion Board. Weve never done this, Hale said, and I hope we never do. Its not quite clear what this appeal right will be, but the ap peal right is there. If Congress does not act, civilian employees will be furloughed without pay for 22 days one day a week through the Sept. 30 end of the scal year. For aected civilian employees, this amounts to a 20 percent cut in pay from the beginning of furloughs through the end of the s cal year.Furlough 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, March 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., March 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 to 11 a.m., March 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current informa tion on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated col lection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 18 to 21. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 19 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 26. For more information, call 5734513. Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resourc es. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, March 28. Registration is required. Call 573-4513. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Financial Specialists THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 7

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I agree, its too scary on taking a chance with the future. If I knew for sure I would land on the bridge of the Starship Enterprise with Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock, I would go to the future. But Id probably end up with a collar around my neck in a bad scene from Planet of the Apes. Id like to go back to northern Illinois in the 1890s and see how my grandparents grew up. My earli est memories of them are when they were in their late 50s or so. I never knew my great-grandparents, but Id like to see them too, in a much simpler, agrarian world before electricity and internal combustion engines and all the things that came along with them. Debbie Jimenez Family member Brookyln, N.Y. Id go back to my child hood. The future is too scary. MM1 Corbyn Quick USS Tennessee Blue Hazelton, Kan. Id go back to see the Wild West, the shootout at the OK Corral. Amy Rice Family member Waverly, N.Y. Ive always had a fascina tion with the Roaring 20s and Prohibition. MT3 Dillon Jackson Trident Training Facility Imperial Beach, Calif. I would want to witness the Battle of the Bulge, the last great German offensive. Chief of the Boat Robert Brimley USS Tennessee Blue Little Rock, Ark. Id go back to my high school days. MT3 Brian Walters Trident Training Facility Madison, Ind. Id go to Virginia during the American Civil War. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak held talks at the PentagonMarch 1 on is suesincluding Syria and Iran, Pentagon Press Sec retary George Little said. It was Hagels rst meet ing with a foreign counter part since he took oce as Secretary of Defense. During the meeting with Barak, Hagel expressed his strong commitment to Israels security, including maintaining Israels qualitative military edge and continued U.S. support for missile and rocket defense systems in spite of scal constraints, Little said. Hagel and Barak agreed that the United States-Is raeli defense relationship has never been stronger, Little said, and that both nations will continue their close cooperation. e two leaders also dis cussed the range of shared security interests including the need for the Syrian re gime to maintain control over chemical and biologi cal weapons in their country, Little said, noting the leaders pledged to contin ue U.S.-Israel contingency planning to counter that potential threat. Regarding Iran, Hagel told Barak that President Barack Obama is committed to preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, with all options on the table, Little said. Little said Hagel also stated that the United States continues to be lieve there is still time to address this issue through diplomacy, but that the window is closing. Hagel noted that he and the Israeli defense minis ter have had an outstand ing working relationship, dating back to Baraks days as Israels Prime Min ister, Little said. Hagel also thanked Barak for his kind words at the American Israel Public Aairs Committee policy conference, Little said. And, Hagel expressed his desire to visit Israel soon.Hagel meets with Israelis THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information North Korea talks war North Korea has threat ened to nullify the armistice that ended the 1950 to 53 Korean War. e North Korean rhetoric appears to be in response to threatened United Nations sanc tions that may be put in place following the Feb. 12 North Korean test of a nuclear weapon, DOD of cials said. e North Korean Cen tral News Agency quoted ocials in the North say ing the threat is because the United States and South Korea are holding annual military exercises. North Korea will achieve nothing by threats or provocations, which will only further isolate North Korea and under mine international eorts to ensure peace and stability in Northeast Asia, said Army Lt. Col. Cathy Wilkinson, a Pentagon spokeswoman. She said the two exercis es Key Resolve and Foal Eagle are annual train ing exercises designed to increase alliance readi ness to defend South Ko rea, protect the region and maintain stability on the Korean Peninsula. ese exercises are de fensive in nature, Wilkin son said. ere is nothing provocative, unusual, or threatening about these exercises. e North Korean military command said, When the war exercises turn into their main phase after March 11, the Korean War armistice agreement that has existed in its name only, will come to an end. North Korea has also been developing a long-range ICBM. U.S. commanders nd the North Korean steps deeply troubling. We have been involved with the review of our plans and our posture related to North Korea, particularly weve been working very hard with Pacic Command and Northern Command regarding our ballis tic missile defense posture and our ballistic missile defense approach, said Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command. Kehler testied before the House Armed Services Committee. e commander of U.S Pacic Command, Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, also testied before the committee. Locklear said the new North Korean dic tator, Kim Jong Un, must realize that carrying on this way will be unsuccessful. In the end, this is not in the best interest of the people of North Korea, where the average citizen gets about 800 calories a day, Locklear said. ey spent more money on the missile launch in one day, and they could have fed their entire nation for one month. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 11

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e 23rd Annual Southeast Military Travel Fair and Expo is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, March 15 inside Bldg. 1039, featuring complimentary food samples by US Foods, more than 50 displays and vendors, give-a-ways and lots of door prizes including a Kindle Fire HD, iPAD2 with 16G Wi only and a grand prize of a 40-inch HD/LED TV. Winners need not be present to win. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is open for Mens, Womens and Co-ed League Softball leagues. Play begins March 18. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Hours of Operations changing for MWR Under the FY Continuing Resolution Act e following facilities will be changing their hours eec tive 12:01 a.m. Monday, March 18, until further notice: Big EZ Gaming Zone/Liberty Center will be open Wednesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Big EZ Billiard/Movie/ Sports Zones will be open Monday through ursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday noon to mid night, Sunday noon to 11 p.m. and holidays noon to 8 p.m.; Fitness Complex will be open Monday through Friday 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m.; the Pool Complex will be open for lap swim Monday through Friday 5 to 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ; the Pool Complex will open for recreational swimming May 25 through Sept. 2 and will be open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 6 p.m. Starting Aug. 3 through Sept. 2, it will be open weekends only. Spring Break Fever at RackN-Roll Lanes Spring Break is coming and Rack-N-Roll Lanes is ready. From 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, April 1 through Friday, April 5 all games and shoes are 50 cents for all guests, 18 years old and younger. Also, Tuesday and ursday from 5 to 9 p.m., enjoy the all you can bowl for only $10 a person. Call Rack-NRoll Lanes now for more infor mation at (912) 573-9492. Intramural Greybeard Basketball Registration is open. e captains meet ing is at 5 p.m., April 3 in the Fitness Complex Classroom. League begins play April 9 with a Tuesday/Wednesday Lunchtime League. For more detailed information, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Movie Under e Stars Its back at dusk, about 6 p.m., Saturday, March 16 with Wreck It Ralph shown at the Youth Center ballfields with free admission. Bring your lawn chairs, blankets and your own snacks as none will be sold at this event. For more informa tion, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Sports Average Joes Bowling League Registrations now for this 6 p.m., Tuesday night league, with twoperson teams. League fees cover shoes, and lanes for entire sea son. e league starts Tuesday, March 12. Fees $50. eres a captains meeting at 5 p.m., March 5 inside KB Finnegans Irish Pub. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military fami lies, $13 tickets to select perfor mances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kinder garten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, sin gle/dual military, wounded/ fallen warriors and indi vidual augmentees, March 18 for active duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not includ ing holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earn ings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth cer ticate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/ dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must pro vide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Marchs free movies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Journey to the Center of the Earth March 16 and 17, Rise of the Guardians March 23 and 24, and Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Travel Fair & Expo March 15 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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Joint POW/MIA Ac counting Command, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hick am, conducted forensic analysis on remains of two Sailors found in the gun turret of the Civil War-era ironclad ship, USS Moni tor who are to be interred March 8 at Arlington National Cemetery. Sixteen Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 o Cape Hat teras, N.C. during a storm. In an attempt to recover the USS Monitors gun tur ret in 2002, the remains of the two Sailors were dis covered and sent to JPAC for possible identication. Once the remains arrived at JPAC, the mission to identify the two Sailors who lost their lives more than 150 years ago began. Forensic anthropologist Robert Mann, direc tor of the Forensic Science Academy for JPAC, was assigned to do the skeletal analysis. e Monitor Sailors were really very unusual for us; water recoveries rst of all are not that com mon for us, Mann said. To recover remains from the bottom of the ocean that sat there for 150 years is really phenomenal. What I would like peo ple to know is that were here, and committed to the ideal of bringing home our fallen, stated U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Danang McKay, JPAC command senior enlisted leader. It doesnt matter if that happened during World War II or it happens in future conicts, we will always be here. Well bring you home. Other JPAC sta mem bers who took part in the identication process in cluded a dentist who ana lyzed the teeth from the remains, with the intent to cross reference them with any dental records that they might be able to nd. Our mission is to send out teams, McKay said. Its a multiphase mission where we do investigations, recovery and identication of fallen warriors from our nations past conicts. ere are a lot of challenges when you are trying to identify someone, es pecially when youre just dealing with skeletal re mains. If you think about how you recognize some body, and how we identify people, they identify them by visual examinations, Mann said. Look at the face or nger prints, well we dont have nger prints after 150 years. We dont have faces, we have bones and teeth. One of the challenges faced was the amount of available records from the Civil War-era and when the Monitor sank in 1862. Were talking 150 years and from the Civil War. e records are not that good and we dont have the dental X-rays. We dont have DNA samples from everybody missing and family members miss ing, we dont have all 16 individuals who are miss ing, this really is a dicult job, explained Mann. Due to the conditions and elements the remains were exposed to during the last 150 years, Mann and other JPAC sta members were faced with more challenges in their attempts to identify the two Sailors. e rst major step in identifying the Sailors re mains was a desalination process, which removed the salt from the bones. e remains were also covered in rust, coal and sediments from the ocean, all of which have to be re moved before the identi cation process can begin. is process alone lasted several months. Once the bones were cleaned, Mann was able to examine the remains and establish biological pro les of the two Sailors. From the bones and teeth, we examine them visually. I can tell the individuals age, their race, their sex, how tall they were, any kind of injuries they may have had during their life time, their oral health and any kind of dis tinguishing features they may have, Mann said. ose are the things that can help us identify them. e biological proles concluded that the Sailors were both white males, one was 17 to 24 years old; the other was in his 30s. Both Sailors stood about 5 foot 7 inches tall. With the biological proles established, Mann was able to create a short list of possible identities based o of the age, race and height of the Sailors remains, and narrow down the identities by comparing them to the 14 other Sailors. We narrowed down the 16 individuals that were missing from the Moni tor, down to about six, ex plained Mann. Due to the limited num ber of records and lack of dental X-rays from the Monitor, the next step in attempting to identify the fallen Sailors is through DNA testing. Genealogists have been able to determine possible descendants for 10 families of the 16 missing Sailors. What were going to hope for is we may still nd ancestors of the oth er missing Sailors, said Mann. If that happens we can get DNA samples from them, then we may be able to exclude the oth er 15 Sailors, we may end up with a match. We may end up with one or both of these Sailors [identities]. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 12 that the remains recovered from the Moni tor will be interred in Ar lington National Cemetery on March 8. e date was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hamp ton Roads 151 years ago. e importance of re covering a fallen warrior is to let the nation know that the United States has made a commitment that once weve put someone it harms way, and they are either missing or killed in action, that we have a resolve to go back and re turn them back to their families, McKay said. Although the interment ceremony for the two recovered Sailors will be held in March, the search for their identity will con tinue. We will never give up trying to identify these Sailors, Mann said. McKay also expressed the importance of JPACs role to future service members, and their fami lies and to those who are currently serving today. It gives the family clo sure, and I think it gives the war ghter a sense of comfort to know that no matter what happens, the nation has not forgotten them and will return them back home with honor, McKay said. e Navy will honor Monitor Sailors with a graveside interment cer emony at Arlington Na tional Cemetery for the remains of the two unknown Sailors. All 16 Sailors will be memorialized on a group marker in section 46 of the cemetery, which is be tween the amphitheater and the USS Main Mast memorial. e Navy honored two unknown Sailors, found inside the sunken USS Monitor during an expedi tion to recover artifacts in 2002, with an interment ceremony at Arlington Na tional Cemetery, March 8. Special guests at the cer emony included Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Kath ryn Sullivan and James McPherson, Professor of American History, Emeritus, Princeton University. Mabus spoke on the sacrice the Sailors made during the Civil War and the importance of honor ing the crew who paved the way for the modern Navy. is ceremony also honors every individual who ever put to sea in de fense of our country, Ma bus said. From the Mar blehead men who rowed Washington across the Delaware, to these brave souls, to those who serve today in nuclear-powered carriers and submarines, Sailors have always been the same; they are at heart risk-takers, willing, even eager, to brave the un known to peer past distant horizons. e date for the cer emony was chosen to recognize an historic day in naval history, the day Monitor arrived in Hampton Roads before its famous battle with Con federate iron clad CSS Vir ginia which took place 151 years ago March 9, 1962. Known as the Battle of Hampton Roads, it was the rst ght between two ironed-armored ships. Al though the battle ended in a draw, Monitor fullled her orders to protect the Union ship Minnesota. is was one of the most important naval battles in history, one of those rare occasions when technology raced ahead of our understanding of how to fully employ it, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, director of Naval History and Heritage Command. e battle between USS Monitor and the CSS Vir ginia will always serve as an anchor point for U.S. naval history. e Monitor would only serve until Dec. 31, 1862 when she sank near Cape Hatteras, o the coast of North Carolina. She remained sunken for 112 years until the wreckage was discovered in 1974 and was desig nated the nations rst national marine sanctuary. In 2002, during an expe dition to recover the ships gun turret, the remains of two Sailors were discov ered and transported to the Joint POW/MIA Ac counting Command. During Sullivans re marks to the more than 200 who attended the chapel service, she read a letter written by Dr. Gren ville Weeks, the surgeon aboard the Monitor, which expressed his feelings on losing the sunken ship and his devotion to ensure she is remembered by fu ture generations. Just as the crew of the Monitor fought tirelessly to keep their old-time knight in armor aoat that day, so have many worked tirelessly since her loss to fulll Dr. Weeks commitment to the ship, and her crew and to the 16 souls who were lost that night, Sullivan said. To day we take another som ber step, laying two of her Sailors to rest in the hal lowed ground of Arlington National Cemetery. As we do so, let us all rearm our own commitment, to forever remember the work of the Monitor and to ensure her story is told to our childrens children. With the help of facial reconstruction created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Louisiana State Universitys Forensic An thropology and Computer Enhancement Services Laboratory, JPAC continues to search for the iden tity of the two Sailors. In keeping with the Navys tradition to honor a service members nal resting place, possible descendants of 30 family members from 10 dier ent families, conrmed through a biological pro le created by JPAC, were invited to take part in the ceremony. Its amazing what they went through and what we have today, and its a blessing to be here to pay nal tribute to the [service members] who have given their lives to help us have a better life, said Jamie Nicklis, descendant of Ja cob Nicklis, one of the 16 Sailors honored during the ceremony. It was a beautiful service that they provided for us and we are very thankful for the gov ernment and our country and for all the families here today. e unknown Sailors and 14 other crew mem bers who died as the Mon itor sank will be memori alized on a group marker in section 46 of the cem etery. MWR Sports Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to register is March 29. Class is limited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon regis tration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introduc tory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 fam ily members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contractors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more informa tion, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retir ees can enjoy free bowl ing. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492.MWR Monitor Sailors buriedJPAC does study, tests on crewmembers remains THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 13

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Senior ocers seek exibility in budget cutting proceduree senior ocers from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force asked Congress for more spending exibility March 5, so they can maintain military readiness as the sequesters across-the-board budget cuts take eect. Army Chief of Sta Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos and Air Force Chief of Sta Gen. Mark A. Welsh III testied about 2013 military construction before the House Appropria tions Subcommittee for Military Construction and Veteran Aairs. Odierno told committee members that sequester and the continuing resolution, combined, threaten grave and immediate impacts to Army readiness that could extend well beyond this year. e continuing resolution prohibits new starts to military construction projects. Until the Army receives an appropriations measure with new start authority, we cannot initiate 102 military construction projects that are scheduled for award in 35 states, Odierno said. He said sequester cuts will translate into about 100,000 facility work orders per month that will not be done. Greenert said the continuing resolution poses challenges for the Navy because it holds spending at 2012 levels. But this scal year, we are implementing a new defense strategy, and that emphasizes readiness over capacity, he said. So as a result, we currently have about $3.7 billion more in our investment accounts than we requested, and we currently have $4.6 billion less in our operations accounts than we requested. at means the Navy is out of Up Periscope Where would you go in a time machine? Page 9 Military Saves FFSC, MWR teach values to students Page 4 Travel Fair Annual expo March 15 at conference center Page 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Strategic Command impactede U.S. Strategic Command can execute its full mission responsibilities today, but the impacts of scal uncertainty and declining resources in the next six months or a year could change that, Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler said March 5. Testifying here before the House Armed Services Committee, the Stratcom commander characterized the impacts as an avalanche that will start slowly inside Stratcom and then accelerate as momentum builds. What will happen is that as the service chiefs have struggled with how to apply these various nancial rules that theyve been given, they have had to take cuts that eventually are going to impact us. Flying hours, for example, Kehler said. Military leadership asks Congress for scal help Rucinski, Walters earn SUBLANT Junior Sailor of the Year; Scott, Zirk in running for Senior Sailore 2012 Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic Senior and Junior Sailors of the Year were announced March 6. e 2012 SUBLANT Senior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer First Class William E. Cox. Petty Ofcer First Class Jared A. Leary was recognized as the Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. Both Junior Sailor of the Year winners are stationed onboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e 2012 SUBLANT Junior Sea Sailor of the Year is Petty Ocer Second Class Nicholas G. Rucinski. Petty Ocer Second Class Austin M. Walters is the SUBLANT Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. e winners were recognized by Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic, during a luncheon held at the Vista Point Center, Naval Station Norfolk. As the undersea arm of the Navy, our submarine community is a unique small force signicantly impacting all maritime missions, Connor said. No successful force is without engaged Sailors fully focused in their roles as warghters. Today, we are in the company of such Sailors, our sea and shore Sailors of the Year. ese young Sailors have demonstrated the expertise, discipline, and initiative to become the decisive and capable leaders of our submarine force for the next decade or more. e submarine force is in good hands as it continues dominance of the undersea domain. Rucinski is a submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine Kings Bay Sailors honored Running of the Green Hagel, Karzai meetNew DoD boss in conference with Afghan presidentAfter his rst meeting with Afghanistans president as head of the U.S. military March 10, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said the encounter featured clear, direct conversation. e secretary and President Hamid Karzai met for discussions and dinner at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. NATO International Security Assistance Force commander Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., U.S. Ambassador James B. Cunningham and other senior U.S. ocials also attended. In a speech earlier, Karzai seemed to suggest the United States and the Taliban were conspiring to keep the level of violence in Afghanistan high to ensure the continued presence of U.S. troops there beyond 2014. Unless Congress acts to end sequestration, furloughs for Defense Department civilian employees can begin April 26, the departments comptroller said March 11 in Washington. Robert F. Hale discussed the furlough planning process with a Pentagon audience. e comptroller also took questions sent in via Facebook and Twitter. DOD is the only agency in the government that has to notify Congress when it wants to impose furloughs. Ocials did that Feb. 20. ere is a 45-day waiting period after we submit that notication before furloughs can start, Hale said. e department asked commands to identify civilians who would be excepted from furloughs. at information is back in the Pentagon, Hale said, and ocials are reviewing the recommendations. eir goal is to complete that review by March 15, he added. After notifying Congress, the department began legally required bargaining with unions. About a dozen unions have national consultation rights, Hale said, and local commanders are in the process of notifying several local unions. e unions, in this case, dont have the right to bargain not to do the furloughs, he said. ey do have the right to bargain how they are implemented. If Congress does not act on sequestration, later this month the department will send Civilian furloughs could begin in April

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A green card is evidence of an individual or a resident aliens lawful permanent resident status in the United States. Obtaining a green card is not automatic and not everyone is eligible to obtain a green card. e process can be long and expensive. Certain relatives of LPRs or U.S. Citizens are eligible to obtain a green card. e following questions will help determine an individuals eligibility: Where is the relative located? If the relative is located outside the U.S., they may have to go through Consular Processing, which includes filing an I-130 (Petition for an Alien Relative) and work ing with the National Visa Center. For relatives that are located in the U.S., they may be eligible to do an Adjustment of Status Application. Has an I-130 application been led? Petitioners (the LPR or USC) need to le a petition in order to prove their relatives eligibility to obtain a green card. e petition is treated like a placeholder in line. Only a certain number of immi grants are able to obtain a green card per year. ere are dierent quotas based on a persons country of origin and their relationship to the petitioner. e Visa Bulletin lists the current wait times for individuals seeking a green card. Spouses and Children of LPRs and brothers and sisters of USCs have to wait in line before they are eligible to apply to adjust status; that is why they have to le the I-130 and wait their turn before they can le additional paperwork. Spouses, minor children and Parents of USCs; however, are considered Immediate Relatives, meaning they do not need to wait in line. ese individuals, provided they are already in the U.S., are eligible to le for a green card right away. If the I-130 has not previously been led, it can be led concurrently with the adjustment of status application package. How did the relative enter the U.S.? If the relative entered the U.S. illegally, without inspection, then unfortunately, they are unable to apply for a green card at this time (stay tuned for new legisla tion). ey may be eligible to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals giving them work authorization if certain conditions are met.2 If a relative entered with a visa, but overstayed the visa, then they are eligible to adjust status if they are married to a USC. It is important to remember that individuals coming across the border apply for a visa or permission to enter the country. If someone obtains a visitor visa, they are stating that their intent is to make a short visit to the US, not get married. If a LPR or USC is seeking to get married to a foreign national who travels frequently in and out of the country, they should seek immigration advice, and look into applying for a anc(e) visa. When the anc(e) is ready to get married, he/she will enter the U.S. using the anc(e) visa. Using a tourist visa to come into the U.S. with the intent to get married can be considered Immigration fraud and may be grounds for deportation. Has the relative done anything to make them ineligible to apply to the U.S? Has the relative been convicted of/arrested for any crimes? Was the relative ever stopped at the border, deported, or removed? Did the relative after entering the country illegally ever leave the country? Has the relative ever put him/herself out as being a USC, such as registering to vote? If there are any doubts as to an individuals eligibility, an attorney should be sought before continuing with the application process. Individuals should collect certied court records, arrest records, etc. and bring them to the attorney to review. Individuals who are unsure of what records exist against them should get an FBI background check and/or submit a G-649 Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act request to USCIS. Assuming everything is good to go, the Petitioner can move forward with the Adjustment of Status Application Process. A concurrent package would include the following: I-130 Petition for Alien Relative Copy of Petitioners Passports biographical page Copy of marriage certicate and any divorce decrees (if applying for a spouse) Copy of Beneciarys birth certicate G-325A Biographic Information for the Petitioner G-325A Biographic Information for the Beneciary Passport photo of Petitioner Passport photo of Beneciary Evidence of bona de marriage (if applying for a spouse). [is can include joint bank statements, health insurance cards, leases showing both partys names, copy of drivers license showing relationship, assortment of photos documenting relationship and marriage, etc.] $420 check made out to U.S. Department of Homeland Security I-485 Application To Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status Color copy of Beneficiarys Passports biographical page Copy of Beneciarys Passports entry stamps Copy of Beneciarys nonimmigrant visa Copy of I-94 form (front and back) $1,070 check made out to U.S. Department of Homeland Security I-693 Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record (completed by a USCIS civil surgeon sealed in an envelope) I-864 Adavit of Support Copy of Petitioners IRS tax return transcript for the last 3 years Copies of Petitioners leave and earning statements for the last 6 months I-765 Application for Employment Document I-131 Application for Travel Document (Advance Parole) Form G1145 E-Notication of Application/Petition Acceptance All forms are available electroniTHEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. NSB power outage March 15ere will be a scheduled power outage that will aect many areas of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at about 8:30 a.m., March 15. Areas that lose electricity should be back to normal operations within 15 minutes. e power outage is necessary for the Public Works Department to test emergency back-up generators.Chapel sets Holy Week servicese Holy Week calendar, March 23 through 31, at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel includes the following Protestant services: 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday; 10:30 a.m., Sunday, March 31, Resurrection Sunday. Catholic services: 5 p.m., Saturday, March 23, Vigil of Palm Sunday; 9 a.m., Sunday, March 24, Palm Sunday Mass; 6 p.m., ursday, March 28, Mass of Lords Supper; noon, Friday, March 29, Liturgy of the Lords Passion, 10 p.m., Saturday, March 30, Easter Vigil; 9 a.m. Sunday, March 31, Mass of Resurrection.e Kings Bay Submarine Ocers Spouses Association has more than $3,000 in grant money available to non-prot organizations in the Kings Bay and North Florida areas. KBSOSA exists as a social and philanthropic non-prot organization for the general benet of the submarine and local communities. e Community grants are available by application for local non-prot organizations needing assistance with projects that produce measurable results, contribute to the communities vitality and create meaningful, transformative change. Special consideration is given to projects that benet local areas in Camden County and North Florida. e grant application deadline is April 1. For more information or an application, e-mail kbsosagrants@yahoo.com or visit on Facebook at Kings Bay SOSA. Special Agent Mel Grin of Naval Criminal Investigative Service Kings Bay will be the guest speaker at the March 19 dinner meeting of the Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Dinner is $20. RSVP by March 15 with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Clubs rst annual Woodbine Duathlon is a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and older at 8 a.m., April 6, at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To register, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will have a Confederate Garrison 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, March 16 and 17. Parking is $6 per vehicle, en trance fee is $2. For more information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www.oridastateparks. org.Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Status a factor in getting green card Judge Advocate When closing out a service members account after death, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service will follow a standard order of precedence if there is no beneciary designated on the account. ere should be a beneciary listed on the account in order to preclude any ambiguity of who should receive the nal pay benets. To ensure there is a designated beneciary listed on the service members account, check the backside of the retiree account statement that has been sent out in paper form in the past, usually at the end of the year past or any time a change has been made to the account, e.g. pay raise, allotment change, etc. Also, it is available electronically at the DFAS MyPay Web site at mypay.dfas.mil/mypay.aspx. e order of precedence that DFAS follows in the case of no designated beneciary is surviving spouse, followed by children and their descendants, father and mother of the deceased in equal parts, legal representative and nally a person entitled under the law of the deceased retirees domicile. While this order of precedence might be what the service member had in mind, a designated beneciary would specify who was to receive the nal pay benets. DFAS and order of beneciaries Finance & Accounting Naval Hospital Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics, including Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/ sites/navalhospitaljax. e guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact informa tion for all clinical departments at the hospital and branch health clinics. is includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpatient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medicine, TRICARE and educational classes. To nd out more, visit the command Web site atwww.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www. twitter. com/ NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube. com/ user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Patient Guide now at branch clinic Branch Health Clinic 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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e Players plans military events In 2009, e Players created a Military Appreciation platform designed to express gratitude and support for the men and women who serve in the United States military. e program has grown year after year and continues to serve thousands of military families each year. Military Appreciation components are: Complimentary admission to e Players for all active duty, reserve and retired military personnel and their dependents e Patriots Outpost, an all-inclusive hospitality venue for all military guests Military Appreciation Day, Wednesday of the tournament week with a special ceremony and concert at the clubhouse Other special events, including a military job fair and Operation Shower, a baby shower for expecting military spouses e Players celebrates military members and their families by designating Wednesday of tournament week as Military Appreciation Day. After the conclusion of the Wednesday practice round, the Players hosts a ceremony on the back lawn of the TPC Sawgrass Clubhouse to pay tribute to the men, women and their families who serve, or have served our nation. e Military Appreciation Ceremony is hosted by PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem and includes military pageantry, a yover and remarks by a PGA Tour player and military dignitary. e event concludes with a concert by a special musical Guest. Past musical guests have been Tim McGraw, Darius Rucker and Luke Bryan. With the signicant military presence in Northeast Florida, this day has grown in appeal. More than 10,000 people attended e Players Military Appreciation Day in 2012. On Saturday, May 4, e Players once again will partner with Operation Shower to host a group baby shower for 30 military moms-to-be whose husbands are deployed. e event will feature Operations Showers signature Showers-In-A-Box, gifts of high-quality products for the moms and babies that were provided by sponsors and donors. In addition to clothing, diapers and essential items for baby, gifts also often include cribs and bedding, car seats, strollers and more. On Sunday, May 5, e Players will partner with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition to welcome active duty, reserve, retired military, veterans and military spouses to TPC Sawgrass to participate in the second Military Job Fair. e event is free to participants and will feature area companies with opening hiring opportunities, as well as educational institutions with veterans programs, career counseling and resume assistance. e 2013 Military Job Fair will be in e Turn hospitality venue at the 18th green of e Players Stadium Course. Fifty companies will be invited to participate this year, double the number from the inaugural event in 2012. Located between the 16th and 18th fairways, the Patriots Outpost is a 5,000-square-foot, airconditioned venue that is reserved entirely for military guests and their families. e venue provides spectacular views of golf and complimentary food and drink to all those who visit throughout tournament week. In 2012, more than 12,000 military guests enjoyed the Patriots Outpost. Patriots Outpost is made possible through the support of local companies and individuals who partner with e Players to help provide this private hospitality venue for military families. During Players week, Patriots Outpost often hoses special events to honor the military. cally online at USCIS.gov. It is important to check the site regularly to ensure that you have the most current version of the forms and to get up to date fee information and ling addresses. After ling, USCIS will send a receipt notice. e notice has a case number that can be used to check the applications status online. Servicemembers may call (888) 247-4645 for additional information and/ or request that their application be expedited, in exigent circumstances such as deployment. Should you have any questions regarding any part of the adjustment of status application process, please contact your nearest legal assistance oce.Green THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 Children learn to save money Story and photos by Valerie Temple Child and Youth Program Lead Program assistant, MWR Youth CenterIn celebration of Military Saves Week, Feb. 25 to March 1, Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay partnered with the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Youth Center to host nancial events during the week. Monday, Feb. 25, FFSC members stopped by the Youth Center to read One Cent, Two Cent, Old Cent, New Cent to students in kindergarten through second grade. Third through fth graders played Money Jeopardy! The week concluded with a Carnival March 1. Children earned tickets a number of dierent ways over a two-week period, from completing chores at home to answering money trivia at the Youth Center. Tickets were cashed in for participation bracelets at the Carnival. Carnival activities included a bounce house, bingo, Angry Birds, Plinko and a Dr. Suess Quiz Bowl. Coon candy, popcorn and prizes completed the afternoon of fun. Sixty children and 15 parents aended. The goal of the Carnival was to teach children how money is earned, saving money and spending it wisely. Morale, Welfare and Recreation & Fleet and Family Support Centers Military Saves Week Carnival

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 5 We did discuss those comments, the secretary said, responding to a re porters question about his meeting with Karzai. I told the president it was not true that the United States was unilaterally working with the Taliban in trying to negotiate anything. Any negotiation with the Taliban to build peace and political consensus in Afghanistan must come from the Afghan government, Hagel said. Obviously, the United States will support eorts, if they are led by the Afghans, to come to some possible resolution, if that eventually evolves, he added. Later in his comments, Hagel acknowledged that when a nation would think of engaging an enemy theyre still at war with, its dicult. But he added that he always has believed its wise for nations to engage with and reach out to each other. at doesnt mean you are prepared to negotiate; it may never get to that point, he said. But I think its far preferable to war. Hagels rst visit to Afghanistan as secretary has been eventful. March 9, his rst full day there, he attended a brieng within earshot of a deadly blast near the defense ministry that killed nine Afghan civilians and injured at least 14 others. ose in attendance reported they could hear the explosion clearly, though they didnt immediately know the source. March 10, a scheduled Karzai-Hagel news conference was called o, and Hagels planned visits to the Defense and Interior ministers at their respective headquarters were shifted to an ISAF installation. U.S. ocials said security considerations led to moving the ministerial meetings to ISAF facilities and cancelling the news conference. A statement from the presidential palace said the media event was cancelled because of schedule pressures. Hagel secretary appeared unfazed by those events. When you spend 48 hours in Afghanistan or anywhere else thats too dangerous, he told reporters, you recognize the complications that exist every day. e solution to those complications may be imperfect, Hagel said, but we should always be mindful of the higher purpose of what were doing and why. Its easy in a war zone to get focused on issues of the day, week or month, Hagel said. While the metrics of the moment are good guideposts, the secretary added, weve got to keep in mind the larger context of where weve been, what weve accomplished and where were going with the big issues.From 2008 to now, the secretary said, he has seen dramatic changes in Afghanistan and a renewed commitment from both NATO and Afghan leaders. Hagel said that, coupled with his great faith in U.S. military leaders and diplomats in Afghanistan, tells him were on the right path, and I think we will meet these transition dates. Hagel met separately this afternoon with Afghan Defense Minister Bismullah Khan Mohammadi and Interior Minister Ghulam Mujtaba Patang. e secretary also visited the Kabul Military Training Center. USS Alaska (SSBN 732) (Blue), home ported in Kings Bay. Born in Greensboro, N.C., the 25-year-old is a 2006 graduate of Manseld Summitt High School in Manseld, Texas, and joined the Navy in March 2008. He also is the Commander, Submarine Group Ten Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. is whole experience was incredible, Rucinski said. I could not have done it without the support and work ethic of my shipmates. ey got me to where I am today. I have been privileged to be led by some great chiefs who believed in me and gave me the chance to lead. However, I am most happy for my wife to be present with me as it was her support that pushed every step of the way. I am grateful to be able to share this moment with her. Walters is an enlisted surface warfare electricians mate assigned to the Trident Ret Facility in Kings Bay. A native of Pensacola, Fla., he is a 2000 graduate of Pensacola Catholic High School, and joined the Navy in April 2004. Walters also is CSG10 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. I am really in awe and some shock having been selected from this group of excellent Sailors, he said. It is a great accomplishment and a career accelerator for me, as I can use this as a springboard in making rst class and chief. But I wouldnt be here without the support of my shipmates and civilian counterparts in my workshop. ey have led me down the right path in giving the Navy 100 percent of my full potential and dedication. e other candidates for Senior Sea Sailor and Senior Shore Sailor of the year were Petty Ocer First Class Derrick C. Scott and Petty Ocer First Class Jason B. Zirk, respectively. Scott is a submarine-qualied yeoman assigned to the Ohioclass ballistic-missile submarine USS Rhode Island (SSBN 740) (Gold), home ported in Kings Bay. e 36-year-old Sailor is from Columbus, Ohio, is a 1995 graduate of Miin High School and joined the Navy also in 1995. He also is the CSG10 Senior Sea Sailor of the Year. Zirk is a submarine-qualied sonar technician assigned to Commander, Submarine Squad ron Twenty in Kings Bay. A native of Blacksburg, Va., he rst enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in June 1997 and completed a tour in Iraq before enlisting in the Navy in Au gust 2005. He is the CSG10 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. Cox, a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack subma rine USS Montpelier (SSN 765), home ported in Norfolk, Va. e Denton, Texas native, graduated from Ryan High School in May 2001, and joined the Navy in September 2001. He is also the Commander, Submarine Group Two Senior Sea Sailor of the Year, headquartered in Groton, Conn. It is an honor to be selected, Cox said. But the recognition is not just for me, it is also for my chain-of-command and my shipmates, as they were responsible in allowing me to make it this far. I never expected to receive this type of recognition, but the selection shows that hard work and maintaining high standards can yield great results. I appreciate the mentorship and leadership that my chain-ofcommand invested in me, and also the hard work from all my shipmates. Hopefully, this career milestone will help me in my pursuit of advancement to chief petty ocer. Leary is a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department, New London, Conn. Born in New Orleans, the 27-year-old Sailor is a 2003 graduate of Kenwood High School in Clarksville, Tenn., and joined the Navy, April 27, 2004. He is the CSG2 Senior Shore Sailor of the Year. is selection is the culmination of a signicant amount of hard work by myself, friends, and family to ensure I maintained the excellence and highest level of professionalism, Leary said. Without the experience and technical expertise of my shipmates, and without the trust, pride and honor instilled in me by my leadership, this recognition would not be possible. So this is not an individual award, but a recognition for a team of expert leaders and professional Sailors who allowed me to succeed through my career. e selection process has been incredibly humbling, as you nd yourself surrounded by the best and brightest in your craft. As the Senior Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year, Cox and Leary will represent SUBLANT in the Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Sailor of the Year competition. e USFFC competition will be held later in March with other Atlantic Fleet type command winners. e Atlantic Fleet sea winner from that competition will be meritoriously advanced to chief petty ocer, while the Atlantic Fleet shore winner will enter the Chief of Naval Operations competition in Washington, D.C Force Master Chief Kirk Saunders, SUBLANT Force Master Chief, stated he was impressed with the military bearing, professionalism, and etiquette exhibited by this special group of enlisted submariners. Submariners comprise a small elite force providing even a larger contribution to the maritime security mission of our Navy team, Saunders said. e SUBLANT Sailors who participated in this years Sailor of the Year competition embody the warghting spirit of all undersea warriors. During the last several days it has been an honor to meet them and their families. I am condent this group of young warriors will provide a foundation of strength that will enable the submarine force to continue our dominance of the undersea domain. ey all have a very bright future. e other candidate for Junior Sea Sailor of the Year was Petty Ocer Second Class Mark A. Frank, while Petty Ocer Second Class Antwan M. Haywood was the other Junior Shore Sailor of the year. Frank is a nuclear-trained and submarine-qualied machinists mate assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Springeld (SSN 761), home ported in Groton, Conn. Born in West Branch, Mich., the 23-year-old Sailor is a 2007 graduate of Cape Fear High School in Fayetteville, N.C., and joined the Navy, April 27, 2008. He is the CSG2 Junior Sea Sailor of the Year. Haywood is a submarinequalied sonar technician assigned on the sta of Commander, Submarine Group Two, headquartered in Groton, Conn. e 27-year-old Sailor is a native of Stockton, Ca., graduating from Lincoln High School in June 2005 and enlisting in the Navy in July 2005. He is CSG2 Junior Shore Sailor of the Year. Testing time SOY Hagel

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balance, he said, and this unbalance is made worse in our operations account because of sequestration. e Navy is now reducing its presence in every theater and halting training for next years deployments, Greenert said. If Congress passes an authorizations bill or new continuing resolution that allows the services to move money between accounts, he said, the Navy would rst be able to restore the training and maintenance and [also] keep a carrier strike group and an amphibious ready group in the Middle East and the Pacic through next scal year. If Congress awards the department enough funding, Greenert added, the Navy will restore the rest of this years planned deployments, training and maintenance. He told members Navy funding constraints have over the last two months caused $600 million in lost ship, aircraft and facility maintenance and training, and we also missed some program management. In March, Greenert said, the Navy will miss more than $1.2 billion of maintenance and operations because were deferring planned activity. ese are lost opportunities, many of them, and these will increase each month as we go on a continuing resolution. Under sequester and the continuing resolution, the Navy was compelled to stop almost all of our facility renovation and modernization, he said. Our ability to continue operating forward is constrained because of that. Amos said all the Marine Corps 37 military construction projects planned for scal 2013 and totaling $716 million are halted. Additionally, we have been forced to halt construction plans on hangars for the F-35 in Beaufort, South Carolina, as well as road improvements aboard our major installations designed to correct safety deciencies, Amos said. ese projects are ready to begin today. Without appropriations or the authorities for new starts, we are forced to defer to future years budget, causing a ripple eect which will no doubt signicantly impact our modernization and our sustainment eorts. Amos noted that in three rounds of recent congressional testimony, hed spoken about the combined eects of the existing continuing resolution and sequestration. In the near term, what the Air Force is going to try to do is take their ying hours in the bomber force, for example, in such a way as to make sure that our crews that are nuclear certied will remain so for as long as possible, the general explained. If unaddressed, he said, such issues will persist and the impacts will begin to be felt in Strategic Command. Stratcoms broad range of missions include strategic deterrence, space operations, cyberspace operations, joint electronic warfare, global strike, missile defense, combating weapons of mass destruction, analysis and targeting, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, or ISR. In an uncertain and complex world, Kehler said, Stratcom remains focused on conducting the missions that are most critical to protecting the nations core national security interests. Many regions of the world remain volatile, and increasing economic and information connections mean regional issues can quickly have global consequences, he said. Events over the past year in Syria, North Korea, Iran, China and elsewhere validate this perspective, he told the panel. Fiscal uncertainty is adding other unique challenges, Kehler said. Not only are the additional sequestration reductions steep, but the law allows little exibility in how to apply them. Were also working from a continuing resolution while transitioning contingency needs to the base budget. Kehler said he is most concerned about the im pact of nancial uncertain ty on Stratcoms people. Uniformed and nonuniformed members alike have managed the eects of sustained high-stress combat deployment and operational tempos, he said, adding, ey willingly take personal risk for their country but they are fearful of taking nancial risk for their families. Hiring restrictions, salary freezes and the likelihood of unpaid furloughs are especially troubling to Stratcoms civilians, who make up about 60 percent of the Stratcom headquarters sta, the general said. ey hold key leadership positions, they represent critical expertise and they represent much of the essential workforce that provides crucial functions like intelligence, maintenance and sustainment, Kehler noted.StrategicCongress Navy Adventures Unleashed! letters to the excepted employees and propose furloughs for the rest, Hale said. ere is a seven-day period for people to reply to their letters, followed by a 30-day waiting period. At the end of that period, we can send decisions of furloughs, and those furloughs can start, he said. When the formal notice is sent, civilian employees have the right to appeal to the Merit Systems Protection Board. Weve never done this, Hale said, and I hope we never do. Its not quite clear what this appeal right will be, but the appeal right is there. If Congress does not act, civilian employees will be furloughed without pay for 22 days one day a week through the Sept. 30 end of the scal year. For aected civilian employees, this amounts to a 20 percent cut in pay from the beginning of furloughs through the end of the scal year.Furlough 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details. Are you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, March 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512. Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., March 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513. Gain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 to 11 a.m., March 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513. The command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 19 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 26. For more information, call 5734513. Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, March 28. Registration is required. Call 573-4513. A Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Financial Specialists THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 7

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I agree, its too scary on taking a chance with the future. If I knew for sure I would land on the bridge of the Starship Enterprise with Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock, I would go to the future. But Id probably end up with a collar around my neck in a bad scene from Planet of the Apes. Id like to go back to northern Illinois in the 1890s and see how my grandparents grew up. My earliest memories of them are when they were in their late 50s or so. I never knew my great-grandparents, but Id like to see them too, in a much simpler, agrarian world before electricity and internal combustion engines and all the things that came along with them. Debbie Jimenez Family member Brookyln, N.Y. Id go back to my childhood. The future is too scary. MM1 Corbyn Quick USS Tennessee Blue Hazelton, Kan. Id go back to see the Wild West, the shootout at the OK Corral. Amy Rice Family member Waverly, N.Y. Ive always had a fascina tion with the Roaring 20s and Prohibition. MT3 Dillon Jackson Trident Training Facility Imperial Beach, Calif. I would want to witness the Battle of the Bulge, the last great German offensive. Chief of the Boat Robert Brimley USS Tennessee Blue Little Rock, Ark. Id go back to my high school days. MT3 Brian Walters Trident Training Facility Madison, Ind. Id go to Virginia during the American Civil War. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak held talks at the PentagonMarch 1 on issuesincluding Syria and Iran, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. It was Hagels rst meeting with a foreign counterpart since he took oce as Secretary of Defense. During the meeting with Barak, Hagel expressed his strong commitment to Israels security, including maintaining Israels qualitative military edge and continued U.S. support for missile and rocket defense systems in spite of scal constraints, Little said. Hagel and Barak agreed that the United States-Israeli defense relationship has never been stronger, Little said, and that both nations will continue their close cooperation. e two leaders also dis cussed the range of shared security interests including the need for the Syrian re gime to maintain control over chemical and biologi cal weapons in their country, Little said, noting the leaders pledged to contin ue U.S.-Israel contingency planning to counter that potential threat. Regarding Iran, Hagel told Barak that President Barack Obama is committed to preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, with all options on the table, Little said. Little said Hagel also stated that the United States continues to believe there is still time to address this issue through diplomacy, but that the window is closing. Hagel noted that he and the Israeli defense minister have had an outstanding working relationship, dating back to Baraks days as Israels Prime Minister, Little said. Hagel also thanked Barak for his kind words at the American Israel Public Aairs Committee policy conference, Little said. And, Hagel expressed his desire to visit Israel soon.Hagel meets with Israelis THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information North Korea talks war North Korea has threatened to nullify the armistice that ended the 1950 to 53 Korean War. e North Korean rhetoric appears to be in response to threatened United Nations sanctions that may be put in place following the Feb. 12 North Korean test of a nuclear weapon, DOD ofcials said. e North Korean Central News Agency quoted ocials in the North saying the threat is because the United States and South Korea are holding annual military exercises. North Korea will achieve nothing by threats or provocations, which will only further isolate North Korea and undermine international eorts to ensure peace and stability in Northeast Asia, said Army Lt. Col. Cathy Wilkinson, a Pentagon spokeswoman. She said the two exercises Key Resolve and Foal Eagle are annual training exercises designed to increase alliance readiness to defend South Korea, protect the region and maintain stability on the Korean Peninsula. ese exercises are defensive in nature, Wilkinson said. ere is nothing provocative, unusual, or threatening about these exercises. e North Korean military command said, When the war exercises turn into their main phase after March 11, the Korean War armistice agreement that has existed in its name only, will come to an end. North Korea has also been developing a long-range ICBM. U.S. commanders nd the North Korean steps deeply troubling. We have been involved with the review of our plans and our posture related to North Korea, particularly weve been working very hard with Pacic Command and Northern Command regarding our ballis tic missile defense posture and our ballistic missile defense approach, said Air Force Gen. C. Robert Kehler, the commander of U.S. Strategic Command. Kehler testied before the House Armed Services Committee. e commander of U.S Pacic Command, Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, also testied before the committee. Locklear said the new North Korean dic tator, Kim Jong Un, must realize that carrying on this way will be unsuccessful. In the end, this is not in the best interest of the people of North Korea, where the average citizen gets about 800 calories a day, Locklear said. ey spent more money on the missile launch in one day, and they could have fed their entire nation for one month. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 11

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e 23rd Annual Southeast Military Travel Fair and Expo is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, March 15 inside Bldg. 1039, featuring complimentary food samples by US Foods, more than 50 displays and vendors, give-a-ways and lots of door prizes including a Kindle Fire HD, iPAD2 with 16G Wi only and a grand prize of a 40-inch HD/LED TV. Winners need not be present to win. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is open for Mens, Womens and Co-ed League Softball leagues. Play begins March 18. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Hours of Operations changing for MWR Under the FY Continuing Resolution Act e following facilities will be changing their hours eective 12:01 a.m. Monday, March 18, until further notice: Big EZ Gaming Zone/Liberty Center will be open Wednesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Big EZ Billiard/Movie/ Sports Zones will be open Monday through ursday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday noon to midnight, Sunday noon to 11 p.m. and holidays noon to 8 p.m.; Fitness Complex will be open Monday through Friday 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m.; the Pool Complex will be open for lap swim Monday through Friday 5 to 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ; the Pool Complex will open for recreational swimming May 25 through Sept. 2 and will be open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 to 6 p.m. Starting Aug. 3 through Sept. 2, it will be open weekends only. Spring Break Fever at RackN-Roll Lanes Spring Break is coming and Rack-N-Roll Lanes is ready. From 1 to 5 p.m., Monday, April 1 through Friday, April 5 all games and shoes are 50 cents for all guests, 18 years old and younger. Also, Tuesday and ursday from 5 to 9 p.m., enjoy the all you can bowl for only $10 a person. Call Rack-NRoll Lanes now for more information at (912) 573-9492. Intramural Greybeard Basketball Registration is open. e captains meet ing is at 5 p.m., April 3 in the Fitness Complex Classroom. League begins play April 9 with a Tuesday/Wednesday Lunchtime League. For more detailed information, call Intramural Sports at (912) 573-8908. Movie Under e Stars Its back at dusk, about 6 p.m., Saturday, March 16 with Wreck It Ralph shown at the Youth Center ballfields with free admission. Bring your lawn chairs, blankets and your own snacks as none will be sold at this event. For more information, call (912) 573-4564. Intramural Sports Average Joes Bowling League Registrations now for this 6 p.m., Tuesday night league, with twoperson teams. League fees cover shoes, and lanes for entire season. e league starts Tuesday, March 12. Fees $50. eres a captains meeting at 5 p.m., March 5 inside KB Finnegans Irish Pub. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military families, $13 tickets to select performances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergarten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/ fallen warriors and individual augmentees, March 18 for active duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/ dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Marchs free movies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Journey to the Center of the Earth March 16 and 17, Rise of the Guardians March 23 and 24, and Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Travel Fair & Expo March 15 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013

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Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, conducted forensic analysis on remains of two Sailors found in the gun turret of the Civil War-era ironclad ship, USS Monitor who are to be interred March 8 at Arlington National Cemetery. Sixteen Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 o Cape Hat teras, N.C. during a storm. In an attempt to recover the USS Monitors gun turret in 2002, the remains of the two Sailors were discovered and sent to JPAC for possible identication. Once the remains arrived at JPAC, the mission to identify the two Sailors who lost their lives more than 150 years ago began. Forensic anthropologist Robert Mann, director of the Forensic Science Academy for JPAC, was assigned to do the skeletal analysis. e Monitor Sailors were really very unusual for us; water recoveries rst of all are not that common for us, Mann said. To recover remains from the bottom of the ocean that sat there for 150 years is really phenomenal. What I would like peo ple to know is that were here, and committed to the ideal of bringing home our fallen, stated U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Danang McKay, JPAC command senior enlisted leader. It doesnt matter if that happened during World War II or it happens in future conicts, we will always be here. Well bring you home. Other JPAC sta members who took part in the identication process included a dentist who analyzed the teeth from the remains, with the intent to cross reference them with any dental records that they might be able to nd. Our mission is to send out teams, McKay said. Its a multiphase mission where we do investigations, recovery and identication of fallen warriors from our nations past conicts. ere are a lot of challenges when you are trying to identify someone, especially when youre just dealing with skeletal remains. If you think about how you recognize somebody, and how we identify people, they identify them by visual examinations, Mann said. Look at the face or nger prints, well we dont have nger prints after 150 years. We dont have faces, we have bones and teeth. One of the challenges faced was the amount of available records from the Civil War-era and when the Monitor sank in 1862. Were talking 150 years and from the Civil War. e records are not that good and we dont have the dental X-rays. We dont have DNA samples from everybody missing and family members missing, we dont have all 16 individuals who are missing, this really is a dicult job, explained Mann. Due to the conditions and elements the remains were exposed to during the last 150 years, Mann and other JPAC sta members were faced with more challenges in their attempts to identify the two Sailors. e rst major step in identifying the Sailors remains was a desalination process, which removed the salt from the bones. e remains were also covered in rust, coal and sediments from the ocean, all of which have to be removed before the identication process can begin. is process alone lasted several months. Once the bones were cleaned, Mann was able to examine the remains and establish biological proles of the two Sailors. From the bones and teeth, we examine them visually. I can tell the individuals age, their race, their sex, how tall they were, any kind of injuries they may have had during their life time, their oral health and any kind of distinguishing features they may have, Mann said. ose are the things that can help us identify them. e biological proles concluded that the Sailors were both white males, one was 17 to 24 years old; the other was in his 30s. Both Sailors stood about 5 foot 7 inches tall. With the biological proles established, Mann was able to create a short list of possible identities based o of the age, race and height of the Sailors remains, and narrow down the identities by comparing them to the 14 other Sailors. We narrowed down the 16 individuals that were missing from the Monitor, down to about six, explained Mann. Due to the limited number of records and lack of dental X-rays from the Monitor, the next step in attempting to identify the fallen Sailors is through DNA testing. Genealogists have been able to determine possible descendants for 10 families of the 16 missing Sailors. What were going to hope for is we may still nd ancestors of the other missing Sailors, said Mann. If that happens we can get DNA samples from them, then we may be able to exclude the other 15 Sailors, we may end up with a match. We may end up with one or both of these Sailors [identities]. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 12 that the remains recovered from the Monitor will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery on March 8. e date was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. e importance of recovering a fallen warrior is to let the nation know that the United States has made a commitment that once weve put someone it harms way, and they are either missing or killed in action, that we have a resolve to go back and return them back to their families, McKay said. Although the interment ceremony for the two recovered Sailors will be held in March, the search for their identity will continue. We will never give up trying to identify these Sailors, Mann said. McKay also expressed the importance of JPACs role to future service members, and their families and to those who are currently serving today. It gives the family closure, and I think it gives the war ghter a sense of comfort to know that no matter what happens, the nation has not forgotten them and will return them back home with honor, McKay said. e Navy will honor Monitor Sailors with a graveside interment ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery for the remains of the two unknown Sailors. All 16 Sailors will be memorialized on a group marker in section 46 of the cemetery, which is between the amphitheater and the USS Main Mast memorial. e Navy honored two unknown Sailors, found inside the sunken USS Monitor during an expedition to recover artifacts in 2002, with an interment ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery, March 8. Special guests at the ceremony included Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Kathryn Sullivan and James McPherson, Professor of American History, Emeritus, Princeton University. Mabus spoke on the sacrice the Sailors made during the Civil War and the importance of honor ing the crew who paved the way for the modern Navy. is ceremony also honors every individual who ever put to sea in defense of our country, Mabus said. From the Marblehead men who rowed Washington across the Delaware, to these brave souls, to those who serve today in nuclear-powered carriers and submarines, Sailors have always been the same; they are at heart risk-takers, willing, even eager, to brave the unknown to peer past distant horizons. e date for the ceremony was chosen to recognize an historic day in naval history, the day Monitor arrived in Hampton Roads before its famous battle with Confederate iron clad CSS Virginia which took place 151 years ago March 9, 1962. Known as the Battle of Hampton Roads, it was the rst ght between two ironed-armored ships. Although the battle ended in a draw, Monitor fullled her orders to protect the Union ship Minnesota. is was one of the most important naval battles in history, one of those rare occasions when technology raced ahead of our understanding of how to fully employ it, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, director of Naval History and Heritage Command. e battle between USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia will always serve as an anchor point for U.S. naval history. e Monitor would only serve until Dec. 31, 1862 when she sank near Cape Hatteras, o the coast of North Carolina. She remained sunken for 112 years until the wreckage was discovered in 1974 and was designated the nations rst national marine sanctuary. In 2002, during an expedition to recover the ships gun turret, the remains of two Sailors were discovered and transported to the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command. During Sullivans remarks to the more than 200 who attended the chapel service, she read a letter written by Dr. Grenville Weeks, the surgeon aboard the Monitor, which expressed his feelings on losing the sunken ship and his devotion to ensure she is remembered by future generations. Just as the crew of the Monitor fought tirelessly to keep their old-time knight in armor aoat that day, so have many worked tirelessly since her loss to fulll Dr. Weeks commitment to the ship, and her crew and to the 16 souls who were lost that night, Sullivan said. Today we take another somber step, laying two of her Sailors to rest in the hallowed ground of Arlington National Cemetery. As we do so, let us all rearm our own commitment, to forever remember the work of the Monitor and to ensure her story is told to our childrens children. With the help of facial reconstruction created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Louisiana State Universitys Forensic Anthropology and Computer Enhancement Services Laboratory, JPAC continues to search for the identity of the two Sailors. In keeping with the Navys tradition to honor a service members nal resting place, possible descendants of 30 family members from 10 dierent families, conrmed through a biological prole created by JPAC, were invited to take part in the ceremony. Its amazing what they went through and what we have today, and its a blessing to be here to pay nal tribute to the [service members] who have given their lives to help us have a better life, said Jamie Nicklis, descendant of Jacob Nicklis, one of the 16 Sailors honored during the ceremony. It was a beautiful service that they provided for us and we are very thankful for the government and our country and for all the families here today. e unknown Sailors and 14 other crew members who died as the Monitor sank will be memorialized on a group marker in section 46 of the cemetery. MWR Sports Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to register is March 29. Class is limited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the customer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon regis tration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sunscreen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introduc tory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 fam ily members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contractors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more informa tion, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492.MWR Monitor Sailors buriedJPAC does study, tests on crewmembers remains THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, March 14, 2013 13

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