<%BANNER%>

The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-28-2013 )

DARK ITEM
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00290

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00290


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Women Inspiring Innovation rough Imagination themee Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens His tory Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly en couraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagina tion: Celebrating Women in Sci ence, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics through programs, exhibits, publications, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pioneer in cludes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her na tion in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Na val Reserves and was commis sioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard faculty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recognized as a pioneer computer programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language, and for coining the term bug for computer malfunctions. Hopper was buried at Arling ton National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emer gency Service program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM elds as air trac controllers, cryp tologists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and translators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear community when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Am ber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the rst female unrestricted line ocers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as Dolphins. Today in the Navy, female of cers ll 10 percent of STEM positions, including engineer Up Periscope Military Saves Week ... what are you doing? Page 11 Photo ops New Kings Bay Senior Chiefs look at the fleet Page 4 Get moving Running of the Green March 7 at Kings Bay Page 15Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Reading program FridayKings Bay Child Development Center plans celebration e National Education As sociations Read Across America program is a year-round literacy project which encourages young and old to celebrate reading. All this week, the teachers and educational support profes sionals of the Kings Bay Child Development Center have been stress ing the im portance of pre-literacy and literacy skills. Some classrooms enjoyed eating green eggs and ham, while others had guest readers share childrens literature with students. To end this week of fun-lled activities, Texas A&M University intern Jessica Flores headed the Child Development Centers ef forts to host the Seussational Parade at 9:30 a.m., March 1. In addition to the Seussational Parade students will take part in the Readers Oath. Come on and join the fun. On NEAs Read Across America Day you are never too old, too wacky, or too wild to pick up a book and read with a child! Along with the many class room activities taking place across the nation, Wee Read Panetta noties Congress of DODs preparationsDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has notied Congress that the Defense Department is prepared to implement fur loughs for civilian personnel in response to the threat of seques tration. In a memo to all employ ees, Panetta vowed to continue working with Congress to avoid sequestra tion, which would add $470 billion to the $487 billion in defense spending cuts the department already is making over the next 10 years. If Congress cannot agree on an alternative decit reduc tion plan, the cuts go into eect March 1. Panetta and every other de fense leader have called the cuts dangerous. ey would come on top of cuts imposed by operating un der a continuing resolution. For scal year 2013, the eect will be further magnied, be cause the cuts must be done in the nal six months of the scal year, which ends Sept. 30. In the event of sequestration, we will do everything we can to be able to continue to perform our core mission of providing for the security of the United States, Panetta wrote in the memo, but there is no mistak NATOs follow-on mission includes training thru 2020e NATO secretary general Feb. 22 pledged a new and dierent NATO-led mission after 2014 in Afghanistan. Anders Fogh Rasmussen spoke to open the session of NATO and non-NATO troop-contributing nations in Brussels, Belgium, on the last day of a two-day NATO defense ministers meeting. e International Security Assistance Force mission in Afghanistan will end late in 2014, when Afghan forces will have as sumed security responsibility for their na tions people, he said. But our partner ship with Afghanistan will continue well be yond the end of transition, and the end of our ISAF mission. I am pleased that many partners have already oered to join us and are working with us to plan the new mission, Rasmussen added. NATO and its ISAF partner nations re main resolute in their support for a sov ereign, safe and secure Afghanistan, the secretary general said. In a news conference, Rasmussen not Afghanistan, aer the U.S. leaves Sequestration could delay redeploymente lack of an appropriations bill coupled with sequestration could eventually cause soldiers to be delayed in their redeployment home from Af ghanistan, the Armys top ocer said. Chief of Sta Gen. Ray Odierno, speaking Feb. 15 at the Brookings In stitution, explained that replacement forces to Afghanistan in 2014 could Civilian furloughs loom with sequestration Deep, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take eect March 1 would cause chaos for the Defense Department, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter said in a televised interview Feb. 21. Carter told Judy Woodru on PBS Newshour that the depart ment will do what it can to min imize dis ruptions should the cuts kick in, but it can do only Cuts will cause chaos Navy helps promote Womens History Month

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 e Navy initiated new measures to track and prevent cases of hazing, as announced in Naval Administra tive message 137/13, released Feb. 20. Hazing occurs when a service member causes another to be ex posed to cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful activities. Hazing can be physical, verbal, or psychological in nature. is behavior is contrary to the Navys core values of honor, cour age, and commitment, as expressed by Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. Hazing has no place within the Navys culture of dignity and respect for every Sailor, Van Buskirk said. It diminishes our Sailors trust in their shipmates, their unit and our orga nization, it aects readiness, and it will not be tolerated. It is the respon sibility of every Sailor and deckplate leader to both reject and report haz ing. e NAVADMIN establishes the Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention (OPNAV N137) as the lead entity for hazing policy and tracking substan tiated cases. Within each command, hazing is tracked by assigned command man aged equal opportunity program managers, equal opportunity advisors, and equal opportunity program managers, who will then work with commanding ocers to ensure timely reporting of incidents. Reporting procedures are out lined in the NAVADMIN. e Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention is work ing to expand the Military Equal Opportunity Network database to include tracking information on hazing incidents. MEONet is a standalone online web-based program that standard izes, tracks and reports adminis trative actions associated with the primary duties of EO advisors and CMEO program managers. Tracking substantiated hazing events is vital to determining the ex tent to which these events are occur ring and the nature of such events, as well as analyzing trends. Incidents of hazing will be re ported by the Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention to the Chief of Naval Per sonnel quarterly. e full Department of Navy policy on hazing can be found in SEC NAVINST 1610.2A. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Dolphin Auction set for March 2e 2013 Silver and Gold Dolphin Auction Wild Wild West will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the NSB Kings Bay gym. Tickets are $20 for E-& and above. e event raises funds for the Dolphin Scholarship fund. Reservations can be made through command contacts. For more information, contact Brigid Mills at (215) 990-8883 or brigidredmond@gmail.com.Woodbine Duathlon to be April 6e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Club will have the rst an nual Woodbine Duathlon, a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and younger at 8 a.m., April 6, starting at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To register, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergradu ate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bb communitiesfoundation.org. Motorcycle run funds Warriorse Armed Forces of America Motorcycle Clubs Second Annual Wounded Warrior Run will begin with registration from 3 to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the USS Bancroft Memo rial outside Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Franklin pass and ID gate. e event, which raises funds for Wounded Warriors, includes the ride, food, music and more. Cost is $10 per hand. For more information, call (912) 510-8494.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Golf fund-raiser to be March 9e second annual Camden House Golf Tournament, to raise funds for Camden House, which helps victims of domestic violence, starts at 9 a.m., Friday, March 9 at Osprey Cove Golf Club. Cost is $80 per person or $320 per four some. For more information or to register, visit www.camdenhousega.org or e-mail Paul Attner at ptatsn@aol.com.Fort Clinch event March 16, 17Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will have a Confederate Garrison 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, March 16 and 17. Parking is $6 per vehicle, en trance fee is $2. For more information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www.oridastateparks. org.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure percentage of body fat, thats accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Minimal form-tting clothing is required; ide ally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compres sion shorts and/or a lightweight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an ap pointment, call Health Promotion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237. Now hear this! Policy to report hazing gets update Personnel Moving is costly, and for service members, the cost of moving to a new duty station every few years can really add up. Navy Housings Rental Partner ship Program, better known as the RPP, helps service members and their families save money on their moving costs associated with rent ing a home. e RPP provides service members with an aordable alternative for o-base housing and defrays some of the costs incurred as a re sult of their relocation. Benets include reduced rents, reduced or no security deposits, and reduced or no application or admin istrative fees. Greater than 75 percent of our service members live in the com munity, and we are committed to providing them with services that meet their needs and help them save money, said Corky Vazquez, Navy Housing Program director. Local Navy Housing Service Center stas seek out desirable neighborhoods and homes and negotiate with land lords to enroll them in the RPP. Our Navy HSC stas are knowl edgeable of the community sur rounding their bases. ey are uniquely able to create and foster relationships with local landlords and property owners through the RPP, said Mike Bowlin, Navy Hous ing Services Program. Service members that take advantage of the RPP have condence that the property has Navy Housings seal of ap proval. In addition to meeting landlord requirements, every property must pass a safety inspection by the Navy HSC before being accepted into the RPP. All full-time active duty service members, married or single, eligible to receive Basic Allowance for Hous ing, are eligible to participate in the RPP. Service members cannot be re jected because of a poor credit his tory or score. e service members BAH is used to match the service member to ap propriate RPP properties; no addi tional income is needed to qualify. e RPP is operated at many Navy bases world wide. Service members are invited to contact their local Navy HSC to learn about availability of the RPP at their duty station by visiting Navy Housings Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil/Housing. For more information about the RPP, visit www.cnic.navy.mil/RRP.Navy Rental Partnership helps save Installations Nausea, vomiting, jaw pain, sweating and shortness of breath symptoms of the u or stress? Not a big deal? ink again. ese symptoms were exactly what 45-year-old Angela felt when she had a heart attack. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, claiming a life every minute. More women die of heart disease than from all forms of cancer combined. According to the American Heart Association, 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented by making the right choices for our hearts. What are the right choices? Health conditions and lifestyle choices can greatly aect the chance of developing heart disease. Preven tion starts with healthy alternatives. ere are many steps you can take to lower your risk of developing heart disease: maintain a healthy weight choose healthy meals and snacks exercise regularly dont smoke manage stress limit alcohol manage your cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure the single most significant risk factor for heart disease. Making positive changes in any one of these areas can make a deci sive dierence in your health. Start with one simple change, stick with it, and, when ready, add another change to support a hearthealthy lifestyle. Contact Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay Health Promotion and Wellness to get started at (912) 573-4237/8626. BHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. To nd out more about BHC Kings Bay visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/Naval HospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.you tube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil.Ways to keep your heart healthy Branch Health Clinic e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will host Vice Adm. Albert. J. Herberger USN (Ret.), chairman of the Navy Leagues National Advisory Council and the Merchant Marine and Maritime Aairs Committee, at its meeting and dinner, ursday, March 14, at the Magnolia Confer ence Center on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. A reception begins at 6 p.m. fol lowed by dinner at 7 p.m. Herberger will speak about the Marine Transportation System, which includes waterways, ports and their intermodal connections, vessels, vehicles and systems criti cal to maritime activity including the impact of the Panama Canal ex pansion on U.S. ports, dredging and marking river and harbor channels, marine terminal capacity, modern izing locks and dams, and the need for maritime research and develop ment consistent with keeping the U.S. as the worlds leading maritime and trading nation. e public is invited. Attendees must send advance dinner payment of $25 per person to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. e deadline to receive reser vations is Monday, March 11. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e names of all attendees should be sent to coordi nate base access. ere will be a silent dessert auc tion and other prizes, with proceeds to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. Anyone interested in donat ing a dessert for the auction should let Cheryl Aston know by e-mail to teacher1@tds.net. More informa tion is at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Navy League dinner hosts admiral Navy League Camden, a Rotary Club literacy program, invites parents to enroll children in the Dolly Parton Imagination Library. is 60 volume set of childrens books include classics such as e Little Engine at Could and more. Each month a new, carefully selected book will be mailed in your childs name directly to your home. Best of all it is a free gift. ere is no cost or obliga tion to your family. Children ages birth to ve who are residents of Camden County are eligible to enroll. Eight to ten weeks after your registra tion has been submitted, books will begin arriv ing at your home and will continue until your child turns ve or you move out of Camden County. For more information or to register for this reading series, visit usa.imagina tionlibrary.com/register_ my_child.php.Reading

PAGE 3

Feb. 14 shares another important celebration of love, National Donor Day. Heart-transplant recipient Roxanne Watsons son was given the heart of 23-yearold Coast Guardsman, Mi chael Bovill, after he was tragically killed in an oduty accident.You can consider me one of the lucky ones. I received a heart trans plant, though it took a long time before I could nd a doctor to verify that I in deed needed a new heart. I was in the midst of a successful career in retail, working as a general man ager for many stores. I began noticing glitch es in my health in 2003. It all started with faint ing episodes. But after 17 hospitalizations over two years time, diagnoses of Crohns disease and end less testing, I was told in 2008 that my heart was failing and I needed to go to Monteore Hospital for treatment. ere, I was immediately put in the advanced cardiac program. Although I did not have classic heart failure symp toms my most pro nounced symptom being a pain in the back my heart was indeed sick. Despite treatment for a year, I was told I needed a heart transplant and I was put on the transplant wait ing list. At that time it was a re lief to me, because I was so sick, but I was also scared when I thought about what could hap pen. I knew if there was any chance I was going to live, this is where I needed to be. I was told four times that a donor heart was avail able, and three times it didnt work out. e heart was either not a match or would not t my chest cav ity. My own heart was in such bad shape, doctors nally kept me in the hos pital. I was there for 78 days before my transplant coordinator called me on July 15, 2010, to tell me the transplant is on. e heart t and the op eration was a success. irteen days after the transplant I was home with my new heart and working on the house. By Christmas time I was dragging my son, Kellen, to buy sheetrock, crown molding and other materials I needed to renovate all eight rooms of my familys Spring Valley home. We built two home theaters and a 50s themed diner. I had decorated before, but never wanted to do all this work. I felt like my personality had changed. Later that year I was invited to an episode of Oprahs All-Stars, where I learned the name of my donor: 23-year-old Mi chael Blaine Bovill of Long Valley, N.J. Along with learning the identity of my heart donor, the show surprised me by bringing out Michaels family, triggering a tear fest in the studio. On that day I learned that my saving angel was a proud member of the U.S. Coast Guard. He also was a helicopter mechanic and a talented carpenter who helped his father, John, build the family home. He enjoyed coming home on leave to visit his family and friends. He loved hanging out with the Coasties from his station, his friends and fam ily. He showed joy in his daily routine and was an inspiration to everyone that had the privilege to know him. I will forever be thankful to him and his family for saving my life. Meeting the Bovill fam ily was truly special. ey are the most amazing fam ily. anks to their yes in their most desperate time, ve people, includ ing myself, had a second chance at life and all the recipients were there to say thank you to this awesome family. Nationally, there are some 115,000 people wait ing organ transplants. On average, 18 of them will die each day waiting for their transplant. More than 130 people are added to the national organ transplant waiting list every day. In Michaels honor, I have dedicated my life to increasing the number of registered organ donors, volunteering at the New York Organ Donor Net work, working to increase awareness for the critical need for organ donors to save lives. I encourage you to regis ter today to become an or gan donor, its easy and it saves lives. It saved mine. ank you Michael Blaine Bovill and all the members of Coast Guard, especially the Coasties at Coast Guard Station Eatons Neck. Guardians transplant saves life THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5 Military Saves Week be aected by a shortage of training dollars and be forced to delay their de ployment. Sequestration will mean an additional $500 billion in defense cuts, and shift ing funding for improvisedexplosive-device detection and electronic warfare equipment from overseas contingency operations budgets to service operations and maintenance budgets will mean an ad ditional $100 billion in cuts. Today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the s cal uncertainty resulting from the lack of predict ability in the budget cycles, Odierno said. Our countrys inability to put its scal house in order compromises the future of the joint force, the Army, and ultimately will impact our ability to provide se curity to our nation. e U.S. military is look ing now at a possible $1.3 trillion in defense cuts overall, Odierno said. Compounding cuts to defense budgets is the lack of a conrmed budget for the services the mili tary is operating now on a continuing resolution, which is how Congress funds the government if it has not passed an appro priations bill. A continuing resolution makes military planning dicult. Right now, Odierno said, the continuing resolution has created a mismatch of funds that doesnt leave enough in the operations and maintenance accounts. eres a $6 billion shortfall there compared to what the Army needs, and sequestration will add another $5.4 billion to that shortfall. Operations and mainte nance funding allows the Army to train, so a short fall in those funds means that fewer soldiers will be able to train for Iraq and Afghanistan. Were funding, totally, Afghanistan. Were going to fund, totally, Korea, and sustain the readiness level in Korea, Odierno said. What that means is the rest of the forces that are now back in the United States will not be able to train. ey will be able to do very small-level, squadlevel training. ey will not be able to do platoon-level, company-level, battalionlevel training back at their installations. ey will not be able to go out to combat training centers, which is what provides them the nal readiness certication at the battalion and bri gade level. e general said the forces that are slated next to go to Afghanistan are going to be ready to go, insofar as training and equipping is concerned. What my concern is, the ones who come after them, they will now be be hind, he said. What that means for the forces in Afghanistan in 2014 is that they might have to wait to redeploy while the follow-on forc es are readied for their deployment. Earlier this week Odierno told Congress as much, saying he oered two options to lawmakers on how to keep forces in Afghanistan. If I cant make them up quickly, I then have to send forces that arent ready, or I have to extend forces that are already there, he said. atll be a decision I have to make as we get closer. We will continue to try to divert money so we do not have to extend people in Af ghanistan. e Armys share of de fense cuts could mean the loss of civilian employees at Army depots where warravaged combat equipment is reset and made serviceable again for sol dier training and deploy ment to combat zones. Odierno said looming budget cuts will mean smaller depots and a drop in the civilian workforce. at translates directly into a backlog of equip ment to be reset, includ ing the equipment that still needs to be reset from Iraq, and equipment com ing out of Afghanistan right now. e general said that due to those backlogs, its expected that delivery of that reset equipment could be delayed by two to three years, with some being de livered as late as 2016. Unfortunately, not hav ing that critical combat equipment available tanks and helicopters and infantry ghting vehicles, for instance means that soldiers who need to train on it wont be able to train. Additionally, that equip ment wont be ready for deployment if the Army is called upon to ght again. We have not predicted very well when we will use forces, Odierno said. When the [Berlin] Wall came down in Europe, people said, is is it, we dont need [the Army] anymore. But then a year later, we are deploying to the deserts of Kuwait. en we went into Soma lia. en somewhere in there we had Panama, and Just Cause. Right now, Odierno said, the Army has a fairly high level of readiness. But that will change soon, for both soldier readiness and equipment readiness. When the time comes, unexpectedly, for soldiers to deploy, he said, emergency funding will not be enough to provide soldiers the readiness they need to ght successfully. It slowly degrades, Odierno said of military readiness. So over the next six or seven months, if you are not taking care of your equipment, if you are not training, you degrade that readiness. And you cant just recover that readiness by money. It takes time. Paying for people sol diers takes up about 48 percent of the Armys budget. Cuts to the bud get means a reduction in the number of soldiers the Army will have in its ranks. e Army already is reducing the number of soldiers in its ranks by about 88,000. Sequestration could bring the loss of an additional 100,000 soldiers across the active force and the reserve com ponents, Odierno said. In all, about 190,000 soldiers will have to be cut, though the general believes it will be more than that. My guess, in the end, itll be over 200,000 soldiers we will have to take out of the active duty, Army National Guard, and U.S. Army Re serve, he said. at cut will mean a loss of force structure, he said. It will cost the Army a 40-percent reduction in brigade combat teams, when its all done. A smaller Army means a loss of ability to inuence and deter conict, the general said. If the Army gets too small, you lose your abil ity to deter conict, Odierno said. My concern is you have people who miscalculate, he said. Almost every great war weve been into, or great regional conict, has been based on a huge miscalculation by somebody. And what I worry about is we will cause peo ple to miscalculate, which will then cause us to have to get involved. Odierno said that with out sequestration, the Army may drop below 490,000 soldiers, some thing he said is doable, if managed correctly to avoid loss of skill and ca pability. But some of the num bers I hear are too small. I do worry that the capabil ity will be much less than we need, Odierno said. I think there is a certain lev el of capability that I need to have, that I would pro pose to the President and the chairmen and others that we have to have in order to sustain our capa bilities in order to respond globally. Cutting the force that deep, Odierno said, will have to be done carefully and across all compo nents of the Army. Odierno said he doesnt want to force soldiers out of the service, but at some point, some of that might happen. Odierno said his goal is to do the large majority of force cuts by attrition. But personnel boards that make other cuts might have to come into the mix at some point. ere will have to be some boards that we con duct that we maybe ask people to retire earlier than they might want, he said. And there might be some boards that tell us we need some ocers and some senior noncommis sioned ocers to leave. But we will try to minimize that as much as we can. ing that the rigid nature of the cuts forced upon this department, and their scale, will result in a seri ous erosion of readiness across the force. Panetta and DOD lead ers long have expressed deep concern about the direct impact sequestra tion will have on military personnel, civilian employees and families. Flexibility in sequestration is limited, the sec retary said in his memo, noting that while military personnel are exempt from direct impact, servic es on bases will deterio rate, and families may feel the pinch in other ways. Civilian employees will be furloughed if seques tration is triggered. Deputy Defense Sec retary Ashton B. Carter said last week that civilian employees could lose 20 percent of their normal in come through September. I can assure you that, if we have to implement furloughs, all aected em ployees will be provided at least 30 days notice prior to executing a furlough, and your benets will be protected to the maxi mum extent possible, Pa netta wrote. DOD will work to ensure furloughs are executed in a consistent and appropriate manner, Panetta said, and Pentagon ocials also will continue work with employee unions. Our most important asset at the department is our world-class person nel, Panetta wrote. You are ghting every day to keep our country strong and secure, and rest as sured that the leaders of this department will con tinue to ght with you and for you.FurloughDelay

PAGE 6

A long line of men in uniform lunge from one end of a eld to another, twisting their torsos with a dynamic warm-up in anticipation of physical exertion. Although this could be a scene from any Marines physical training session, these warriors were not preparing to take the eld of battle, but the eld of play at the 2013 NFL Pro Bowl. Marines and service members from all other branches took part in the pregame and halftime show here at Aloha Sta dium, Jan. 27, where they showed support for the players, fans and those watching at home. After opening honors with the Hawaii state song and music by Train jointservice troops marched on the eld in service uniforms, followed by a joint-service color guard presenting Old Glory for the playing of e StarSpangled Banner. Marines assisted with logistical tasks, such as stage assembly, that made the event possible. Were out here for ev eryone who appreciates the military, show them that were here for them, said Cpl. Charles Vallero, a military policeman with Marine Corps Base Ha waiis Provost Marshals Oce. Its important because a lot of military members grew up watch ing football. Even though the Ma rines contributed to im prove this all-star session of Americas most popular sport, the players had a dierent aspect of military service that they were ap preciative for. (NFL players) have the utmost respect for (our mil itary), what they do for us on a day-to-day basis, sac ricing their lives, leaving their families and [especial ly] kids to go away and serve our country, said Washing ton Redskins linebacker Lorenzo Alexander. Its amazing what they do. Im out here playing football, hitting folks, but I could never take a bullet or shoot people and all that type of stu. ey do an awesome job protecting our country and we love them for what they do. Along with their families, Marines and other servicemembers who re cently returned from de ployment were invited onto the eld and gratefully welcomed home dur ing the halftime show. Some Marines then had the opportunity to meet their favorite players who epitomize a certain shared foundation of being a Ma rine and playing football teamwork. (Football) is all about teamwork, when people work together as a team, you can achieve the ulti mate goal, same as a de ployment, Vallero said. You work together as a team and come back home safe. Marine Corps partners with NFL at Pro Bowl Packers, Texans visit USS BushFootball players from the National Football Leagues Green Bay Packers and Houston Texans visited the aircraft carrier, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), to tour the ship and watch the Super Bowl, Feb. 3. e ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation and Navy Entertainment worked together to set up the event. Navy Entertainment has arranged visits like this for many years, but for some of the NFL play ers this was the rst time landing aboard a Navy vessel. so much. We dont have a lot of exibility, and we dont have a lot of time in that regard, Carter said. A sequestration mechanism in budget law requires DOD to cut $46 billion in spending from March 1 until the Sept. 30 end of the scal year unless Congress comes up with an alternative that would stop sequestration from triggering. is comes on top of $487 billion in defense spend ing reductions already programmed over 10 years, and Pentagon ocials have noted that operating under con tinuing resolutions in the absence of a scal year budget complicates matters. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta notied Congress that the department is preparing to place almost all of its 800,000 civilian employees on unpaid furlough for one day a week through the rest of the scal year. ese are not faceless bureaucrats who simply shue paper, Carter said. ey repair our ships. ey maintain our aircraft, Carter said. ats who these people are, and 44 per cent of them are veterans. Its a terrible thing to have to deprive them of some of their income. If sequestration triggers, operations and maintenance the primary funding that ensures readiness will be particularly aected. e department will ensure units deploying to Afghanistan will receive the training need ed to succeed. But this will rob other units readying for other missions, Carter said. ats just a mathematical fact of doing sequester, he added. is is very damaging to national security. In planning for sequestration, the Navy already has postponed sending an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf to join one already there, to ensure there will be enough ready carriers to dispatch to other critical areas if required. In everything we do, were really trying to keep on protecting the country and delivering the defense under these circumstances, Carter said.Chaos 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 7

Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7

PAGE 8

ing duty ocers and in formation warfare profes sionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 percent of the cryptology and intel ligence community and 21 percent of operational ratings, including aviation warfare systems operators and sonar technicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and aoat, serving in various STEM related elds. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Re servists are serving in the Navy. ey make up 17.3 per cent of the force and make indispensable contributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civil ians. e current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female ag ocers, 67 female senior executive service members, 56 female command master chiefs, and six fe male command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highest-ranking female of cers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle How ard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a surface warfare ocer, was one of the rst women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third com mander, Navy Expedition ary Combat Command. Howard also a surface warfare ocer, was the rst African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the rst African-American woman to receive a third star in ag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and former commanding ocer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 ight hours in Navy aircraft. e top three highestranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortlo, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys rst female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education eet master chief later this month. e Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its se niormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steanie Easter, executive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Oce, is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for dening aordable and sustainable fth-generation strike aircraft. ed that while the alliance plans a follow-on mission in Afghanistan, it also is focused on maintaining and building on the capabilities it has gained through two decades of operations from Kosovo to Afghanistan to Libya. Over the next decade, NATO must preserve and pass on those skills, he said, as our biggest op eration comes closer to completion. e secretary general said the alliance has ad opted the connected forces initiative to expand education and training and enhance exercises. NATOs goal for the ini tiative, he said, is to hold more ambitious military training exercises, with a broader range of scenarios, more often. e initiative will include a comprehensive training plan out to 2020, to make sure that our ex ercises are coherent, comprehensive, and cover the full range of alliance mis sions, Rasmussen said. It will include, in 2015, a major live exercise that is, one involving signicant numbers of deployed forces, not just command and sta units. e NATO Response Force will be the core of the connected forces ini tiative, he said. And we will build on its exercises for example, by including the battalion which the United States government has pledged to rotate through Europe for precisely this purpose, and by building in more contributions from other allies and partners, Ras mussen said. is will make the response force a cooperation school, as well as a quick-reaction tool an immediate re source, but also an invest ment in the future, he added. Rasmussen said NATO also is working to use its common funding, which comes from member nations budgets, for highpriority missions that include training, rapid response, and improving intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capa bilities. Over the coming months, we will make those improvements so that every dollar and ev ery euro we spend is well spent, he said. e secretary general acknowledged that mul tinational cooperation doesnt solve all of NATOs problems and is not a re sponse to all of its chal lenges. We also need a su cient level of defense in vestment, he said. And thats my major concern that if cuts continue, it will damage severely our ability to meet and ad dress the future security challenges. NATO ocials said they are discussing a pro posal to maintain Afghan army and police forces at 352,000 combined members after 2014, when a previous plan had called for reducing the number to some 240,000. Let me stress that no nal decisions have been made, the secretary general said at the news con ference. But I can con rm that its one of the ideas that is being consid ered. I feel condent that we will be able to nance Afghan security forces of that size. e international community has pledged to help in nancing those forces, he added, because a security force of that size goes well beyond the nancial capacity of the Af ghan government. Rasmussen said NATO alone should not bear the cost for Afghan forces. is is actually a respon sibility for the whole of the international community, he said. And that has been conrmed at international conferences.Women NATO 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 9

Active Packer players, Ryan Taylor, Jarrett Bush and Greg Van Roten, re tired Packers Ahman Green and William Henderson, along with the Texans Taylor T.J. Yates, were own on to the ship in a C-2 Greyhound from the Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40. When I was invited to come out here I was very excited, Yates said. Com ing to the ship is a oncein-a-lifetime experience, especially landing on the ight deck. It was wild how fast the plane stopped. During their time on board, the football players toured the ship, observed ight operations, con ducted a meet-and-greet with the crew and watch Super Bowl XLVII in the hangar bay with Sailors. On a day that they could have been home with their family and friends enjoy ing the Super Bowl they came out to enjoy it with Sailors, said Ships Ser viceman 2nd Class Farrah K. Glover. ey were sociable and excited about being out here, and its nice to be appreciated. I think they were awesome. During their time on the ship, the athletes ex pressed gratitude for all service members sacric es and noted that without them, they would not be able to play their sport. You see movies, you see documentaries; but when you come out here you get to see how cool and interesting it is and how its normal for everyone here like football is for us, Green said. For these Sailors, it is just another day. George H.W. Bush is conducting training and carrier qualications in the Atlantic Ocean. Packers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Pirates Cove menus First littoral ship deploys in MarchDuring a media availability Feb. 21, Navy ocials an nounced the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its rst deployment March 1. is milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued eet testing and the introduction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identied by these studies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and eet enterprises of the Navy, Greenert said. e output of the council is intended to assist in maxi mizing the expansive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in global eet opera tions for the joint warghter. I am condent we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. is council will continue to unify our eorts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful eet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission packages that address capability gaps in the areas of surface war fare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine war fare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be re congured to perform one of those three distinct mis sions in a short period of time. Freedoms deployment will demonstrate her opera tional capabilities, and allow the LCS Council to evalu ate crew rotation and maintenance plans. e ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, participate in international exhibi tions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 11

Its Military Saves Week, and I am all about saving money. I bundle my phone and computer and cut my cable. Living alone, I dont turn my air conditioner on until late June or early July and turn it off in late August. I havent turned my heat on in seven years. I refinanced my house last year to lower my payments. I visit three supermarkets to get the best in sales, buy-one-get-ones, store-brand pricing and using coupons. My favorite beer is whatever has the lowest on-sale price. I only order off the dollar menu, unless I have coupons. I almost always bring my lunch to work. I used to think I was cheap. But my daughter told me Im simply cost efficient.Kaitlan Barron Family member New Baltimore, Mich. I make my husband work overtime. ET2 Zack Mosier USS Alaska Blue Dowagiac, Mich. I use coupons. Bill Joiner Retired Navy Colquitt, Ga. I planned before I retired. One of the best things to do is participate in the Thrift Savings Plan. Tina Love Family member Rockville, Md. I cut corners where we can with coupons. ET3 Matthew Schenk USS Alaska Blue Eagle, Idaho I budget. ITS2 Paul Trimble Trident Refit Facility Pensacola, Fla. I let my wife do the shop ping and budgeting. That saves money. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 12 that remains recov ered from the USS Monitor will be interred in Arling ton National Cemetery. A ceremony will be held March 8 to honor the two unknown Sailors. e specic date of the interment was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. ese may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington, Ma bus said. Its important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reect upon the signicant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy. e Brooklyn-built Monitor, the nations rst ironclad warship. Commissioned Feb. 25, 1862, the Monitor fought in the rst battle between two ironclads when it engaged CSS Virginia in the Battle of Hampton Roads March 9, 1862. e battle marked the rst time ironarmored ships clashed in naval warfare and sig naled the end of the era of wooden ships. ough the Monitors confrontation with the Virginia ended in a draw, the Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk-area. Months later, 16 Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 in a storm o Cape Hatteras, N.C. e wreck was discovered in 1974 was designated the nations rst national marine sanctuary, managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Starting in 1998, the Navy, NOAA and the Mariners Museum in Newport News, Va., began working together to recov er artifacts from Monitor. During the summer of 2002, while attempting to Sailors Arlington-bound THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar March 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, March 4, 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered March 6 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. March 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for March 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., March 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recom mends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil ser vice personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Two Transition GPS classes upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 4 to 8. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 25 to 29. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting March 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., March 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 to 11 a.m., March 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current informa tion on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated col lection and maintenance of sex ual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will repre sent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 18 to 21. Registration is required by call ing 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 19 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 26. For more information, call 5734513. Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 13

culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resourc es. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, March 28. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 11 and 12. For more information and to regis ter call 573-4513.Family Care Plan trains coordinatorsFFSC is offering a training for all command-designated Family Care Plan coordinators 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., March 6. For more information or to register for this training, contact 5734513. Deadline for registration is March 1.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., March 13. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Command Return and Reunion training scheduledThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 4 p.m., March 6. Registration recom mended, call 573-4513.Couples Money Management upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial communication. It requires both spous es to attend. This training will be held 2 to 4 p.m. March 13 Registration is required, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC Todays Marines saluted the uncommon valor of yesterdays Marines Feb. 22 as members of Head quarters and Service Bat talion, Headquarters Marine Corps, Henderson Hall, marked the 68th an niversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima, Japan by participating in a wreath laying ceremony at the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Va. We honor our past and present, said H & S Bn. Sgt. Maj. Craig D. Cress man, who along with H & S Bn. Commanding Ocer Col. Ira M. Cheatham and James P. Donovan, Marine Corps War Memo rial Foundation founder and president placed the wreath at the memorial. Donovan said that the wreath was laid in honor of not only the Marines who died on Iwo, but for all who have died since the establishment of the Corps in 1775. Following months of air and naval bombardment, Marines invaded Iwo Jima Feb. 19, 1945. e volcanic island, located about 660 miles south of Tokyo, was being used as an aireld by Japanese forces. Japanese ghter planes were intercepting American B29s, as well as attacking U.S. airelds on Mariana, from their airelds on Iwo. e ag raising atop Mount Suribachi took place Feb. 23, 1943, ve days after the battle be gan. Joe Rosenthal, an Associated Press photographer, took the famous photograph of Marine Cpls. Harlon Block, Rene Gagnon and Ira Hayes, Sgt. Michael Strank and Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class John Bradley raising the ag. Strank, Sousley and Block were killed before the battle for Iwo Jima ended March 16, 1945. Rosenthals iconic photo was wired around the world and printed in countless newspapers across the United States and was used as the mod el for the memorial locat ed at Arlington National Cemetery. e concept [for the memorial] started ve days after the ag raising on Iwo Jima, noted Donovan. Approximately 70,000 Marines and 18,000 Japa nese soldiers took part in the battle. In the 36 days of ghting on the island, nearly 7,000 Marines were killed and another 20,000 were wounded. For Marines, the memo rial is a place they can visit to remember the fallen. Master Sgt. William J. Dixon of H & S Bn., who participated in the cere mony said, I will retire in July, but I will continue to come back here. recover the ships 150-ton gun turret, Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. JPAC, with the assis tance of the Navy Casu alty Oce and NOAA, conducted a comprehensive eort to identify the remains of the unknown Sailors, to include timedemanding and detailed genealogical research. Given the age of the re mains, eorts to identify them were unsuccessful. However, JPAC was able to narrow down possible descendents of the un known Sailors to 30 family members from 10 dier ent families. e decision to lay these heroes to rest in Arlington, honors not only these two men but all those who died the night Monitor sank and reminds us, that the sacri ces made a hundred and fty years ago, will never be forgotten by this na tion, said David Alberg, Superintendent of NOAAs Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.MonitorMarines salute Iwo Jima fallen THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

PAGE 14

Apollo 13 astronaut and Mississippi native Fred Haise visited the Navy De partment of Defense Su percomputing Resource Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss., Feb. 15, for a tour of the centers three new supercomputers. All of the systems are named after NASA astro nauts who have served in the Navy, including Haise who trained as a naval aviator. e two other systems are named for retired Navy Cmdr. Susan Still Kilrain, a naval aviator and space shuttle pilot, and retired Navy Capt. Eugene Cer nan, a naval aviator and the last man to step foot on the moon. Today, we are proud to recognize the contribu tions of an iconic American and native Missis sippian, said Dr. William H. Burnett, deputy com mander and technical di rector of the Commander Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command at Stennis Space Center. Just as Fred Haise has made a great impact on the state, the Navy and the nation, so will the su percomputer named after him. e IBM iDataPlex sys tems were installed in the fall of 2012 and became operational in January. e Navy DSRC assists in delivering wind, wave and other oceanographic forecasts to the Navy eet. It is one of ve Defense Department supercomputer centers that Navy, Army and Air Force scien tists and researchers use to design tools and weap ons systems that support DoDs global mission. e new systems have tripled the supercomput ing capability of the DSRC, already one of the most powerful supercomputer centers within the De fense Department. e fact that Im here today was dependent on computers, Haise said. We went to the moon on one tenth of a megabyte [of memory]. For four days we had no computer on board at all. at was the springboard of what is happening today in the computer world. e DSRCs current su percomputing capacity is 866 trillion oating point operations (teraops) a second. One hundred high school students with handheld calculators would take nearly 317 years to perform the number of calculations a one teraop-rated computer can accomplish in one second-and almost 275,000 years to perform what the new Navy DSRC supercomputers will be capable of every second. e DSRC is expected to increase its capacity to approximately 5,200 teraops by 2016. Haise completed Navy ight training in 1954 and served as a U.S. Marine Corps ghter pilot and also served in the U.S. Air Force. His career with NASA spanned 20 years. He ew as the lunar module pilot for NASAs Apollo 13 space mission and as backup lunar mod ule pilot for Apollo 8 and 11 and backup spacecraft commander for Apollo 16. e Navy DSRC is a part of the Department of De fense High Performance Computing Modernization Program. For 19 years, the Navy DSRC has been recognized as one of the top 15 most capable supercom puting facilities in the world. MCPON visits NAS Jax Master Chief Petty Of cer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens completed a three-day trip to Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Base Guantanamo Bay Cuba Feb. 15. MCPON participated in CPO 365 events, toured base facilities, took the opportunity to discuss the focus areas of his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative, and answered questions about new uniforms, budget cuts, Family Readiness Group, the Performance to Serve program, and de ployments during basewide all hands calls. CPO 365, a year-long development and training for First Class Petty O cers, was rst introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It includes two phases, the rst of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all First Class Petty Ocers will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 is so impor tant for the future devel opment of our First Class Petty Ocers, Stevens said. I believe that if youre going to lead the fu ture force of our Navy that you must be armed with the best opportunities to succeed. CPO 365 is designed to develop leaders through a combination of mentor ship, practical experience and training. I view this training as our most creative avenue to productively engage Chiefs with petty ocers and junior ocers, and to form enduring relationships characterized by mu tual respect, Stevens said. MCPON talked about the importance of eec tive leadership during a CPO 365 training session in GTMO. As you go through CPO 365, you will become a more eective leader, he said. If everything we do starts and stops with lead ership, then every Sailor will benet from a more eective leader. He also discussed the value of the Navys leading petty ocers. We must have exceptional leading petty o cers, because you are one of the critical components to the engine that makes the Navy run, Stevens said. Many Sailors showed concern about the loom ing scal environment. MCPON recognized the challenges the Navy is currently facing, but asked that Sailors focus on con trolling what we own. It is easy to become distracted by things that are beyond our control, Stevens said. He also reminded Sail ors of the things they do own and control; such as technical training, admin istrative production, and the execution of orders. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becoming and remaining physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually sound, he said. Apollos Haise visits center 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 15

e Navy Adventures Unleasheds Running of the Green starts at 7 a.m., ursday, March 7 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Individuals and commands are encouraged to step-up their physical readiness with this 5K/3K walk. For more in formation contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for mens, womens and coed league softball leagues. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m., March 13, inside the Fitness Complex. Play begins March 18. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Intramural Sports Average Joes Bowling League Registrations now for this 6 p.m., Tuesday night league, with twoperson teams. League fees cover shoes, and lanes for entire sea son. e league starts Tuesday, March 12. Fees $50. eres a captains meeting at 5 p.m., March 5 inside KB Finnegans Irish Pub. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military fami lies, $13 tickets to select perfor mances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its at Trident Lakes Golf Clubwith a 4 p.m. shotgun start March 9. Cost is $35 per person. Nine holes in daylight, dinner/ drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-dark balls. Cost includes golf, dinner, priz es and two glow balls. Call (912) 573-8475 now for reservations. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to register is March 29. Class is lim ited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the cus tomer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sun screen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergar ten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual aug mentees, March 18 for ac tive duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Wreck It Ralph March 2 and 3, Monsters, Inc. March 9 and 10, Journey to the Center of the Earth March 16 and 17, Rise of the Guardians March 23 and 24, and Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest informa tion, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Running of the Green March 7 MWR Intramural Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 17

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

PAGE 18

18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 19

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 THE PERISCOPE NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013



PAGE 1

Women Inspiring Innovation rough Imagination themee Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens History Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics through programs, exhibits, publications, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pioneer includes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her nation in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Naval Reserves and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard faculty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recognized as a pioneer computer programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language, and for coining the term bug for computer malfunctions. Hopper was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM elds as air trac controllers, cryptologists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and translators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear community when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Amber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the rst female unrestricted line ocers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as Dolphins. Today in the Navy, female ofcers ll 10 percent of STEM positions, including engineer Up Periscope Military Saves Week ... what are you doing? Page 11 Photo ops New Kings Bay Senior Chiefs look at the fleet Page 4 Get moving Running of the Green March 7 at Kings Bay Page 15Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Reading program FridayKings Bay Child Development Center plans celebration e National Education Associations Read Across America program is a year-round literacy project which encourages young and old to celebrate reading. All this week, the teachers and educational support professionals of the Kings Bay Child Development Center have been stressing the importance of pre-literacy and literacy skills. Some classrooms enjoyed eating green eggs and ham, while others had guest readers share childrens literature with students. To end this week of fun-lled activities, Texas A&M University intern Jessica Flores headed the Child Development Centers efforts to host the Seussational Parade at 9:30 a.m., March 1. In addition to the Seussational Parade students will take part in the Readers Oath. Come on and join the fun. On NEAs Read Across America Day you are never too old, too wacky, or too wild to pick up a book and read with a child! Along with the many classroom activities taking place across the nation, Wee Read Panetta noties Congress of DODs preparationsDefense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has notied Congress that the Defense Department is prepared to implement furloughs for civilian personnel in response to the threat of sequestration. In a memo to all employees, Panetta vowed to continue working with Congress to avoid sequestra tion, which would add $470 billion to the $487 billion in defense spending cuts the department already is making over the next 10 years. If Congress cannot agree on an alternative decit reduction plan, the cuts go into eect March 1. Panetta and every other defense leader have called the cuts dangerous. ey would come on top of cuts imposed by operating under a continuing resolution. For scal year 2013, the eect will be further magnied, because the cuts must be done in the nal six months of the scal year, which ends Sept. 30. In the event of sequestration, we will do everything we can to be able to continue to perform our core mission of providing for the security of the United States, Panetta wrote in the memo, but there is no mistakNATOs follow-on mission includes training thru 2020e NATO secretary general Feb. 22 pledged a new and dierent NATO-led mission after 2014 in Afghanistan. Anders Fogh Rasmussen spoke to open the session of NATO and non-NATO troop-contributing nations in Brussels, Belgium, on the last day of a two-day NATO defense ministers meeting. e International Security Assistance Force mission in Afghanistan will end late in 2014, when Afghan forces will have assumed security responsibility for their nations people, he said. But our partnership with Afghanistan will continue well beyond the end of transition, and the end of our ISAF mission. I am pleased that many partners have already oered to join us and are working with us to plan the new mission, Rasmussen added. NATO and its ISAF partner nations remain resolute in their support for a sovereign, safe and secure Afghanistan, the secretary general said. In a news conference, Rasmussen notAfghanistan, aer the U.S. leaves Sequestration could delay redeploymente lack of an appropriations bill coupled with sequestration could eventually cause soldiers to be delayed in their redeployment home from Afghanistan, the Armys top ocer said. Chief of Sta Gen. Ray Odierno, speaking Feb. 15 at the Brookings Institution, explained that replacement forces to Afghanistan in 2014 could Civilian furloughs loom with sequestration Deep, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take eect March 1 would cause chaos for the Defense Department, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter said in a televised interview Feb. 21. Carter told Judy Woodru on PBS Newshour that the depart ment will do what it can to minimize disruptions should the cuts kick in, but it can do only Cuts will cause chaos Navy helps promote Womens History Month

PAGE 2

2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 e Navy initiated new measures to track and prevent cases of hazing, as announced in Naval Administrative message 137/13, released Feb. 20. Hazing occurs when a service member causes another to be exposed to cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful activities. Hazing can be physical, verbal, or psychological in nature. is behavior is contrary to the Navys core values of honor, courage, and commitment, as expressed by Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of Naval Personnel. Hazing has no place within the Navys culture of dignity and respect for every Sailor, Van Buskirk said. It diminishes our Sailors trust in their shipmates, their unit and our organization, it aects readiness, and it will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and deckplate leader to both reject and report hazing. e NAVADMIN establishes the Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention (OPNAV N137) as the lead entity for hazing policy and tracking substantiated cases. Within each command, hazing is tracked by assigned command managed equal opportunity program managers, equal opportunity advisors, and equal opportunity program managers, who will then work with commanding ocers to ensure timely reporting of incidents. Reporting procedures are outlined in the NAVADMIN. e Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention is working to expand the Military Equal Opportunity Network database to include tracking information on hazing incidents. MEONet is a standalone online web-based program that standardizes, tracks and reports administrative actions associated with the primary duties of EO advisors and CMEO program managers. Tracking substantiated hazing events is vital to determining the extent to which these events are occurring and the nature of such events, as well as analyzing trends. Incidents of hazing will be reported by the Navy Oce of Hazing Prevention to the Chief of Naval Personnel quarterly. e full Department of Navy policy on hazing can be found in SECNAVINST 1610.2A. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Dolphin Auction set for March 2e 2013 Silver and Gold Dolphin Auction Wild Wild West will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the NSB Kings Bay gym. Tickets are $20 for E-& and above. e event raises funds for the Dolphin Scholarship fund. Reservations can be made through command contacts. For more information, contact Brigid Mills at (215) 990-8883 or brigidredmond@gmail.com.Woodbine Duathlon to be April 6e Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Camden Cycling Club will have the rst annual Woodbine Duathlon, a 3.4k run/20k bike ride/5k run, for high-school ages and younger at 8 a.m., April 6, starting at the Woodbine ball elds at Georgia Route 110 and Lang Avenue, Woodbine. Registration is $40 before March 22 and $45 after. To register, visit active.com prior to April 1.Balfour Beatty offers scholarshipsBalfour Beatty Communities Foundation is oering scholarships for the 2013-2014 academic year to high school and undergraduate students of military members residing in family housing. Scholarships are valued up to $2,500 with the possibility of being larger for exceptional submissions. e application deadline is April 15. e application details and requirements can be found at www.bbcommunitiesfoundation.org. Motorcycle run funds Warriorse Armed Forces of America Motorcycle Clubs Second Annual Wounded Warrior Run will begin with registration from 3 to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the USS Bancroft Memo rial outside Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Franklin pass and ID gate. e event, which raises funds for Wounded Warriors, includes the ride, food, music and more. Cost is $10 per hand. For more information, call (912) 510-8494.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce. Golf fund-raiser to be March 9e second annual Camden House Golf Tournament, to raise funds for Camden House, which helps victims of domestic violence, starts at 9 a.m., Friday, March 9 at Osprey Cove Golf Club. Cost is $80 per person or $320 per four some. For more information or to register, visit www.camdenhousega.org or e-mail Paul Attner at ptatsn@aol.com.Fort Clinch event March 16, 17Fort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will have a Confederate Garrison 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, March 16 and 17. Parking is $6 per vehicle, en trance fee is $2. For more information, call (904) 277-7274 or visit www.oridastateparks. org.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure percentage of body fat, thats accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Minimal form-tting clothing is required; ide ally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compres sion shorts and/or a lightweight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an ap pointment, call Health Promotion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237. Now hear this! Policy to report hazing gets update Personnel Moving is costly, and for service members, the cost of moving to a new duty station every few years can really add up. Navy Housings Rental Partnership Program, better known as the RPP, helps service members and their families save money on their moving costs associated with renting a home. e RPP provides service members with an aordable alternative for o-base housing and defrays some of the costs incurred as a result of their relocation. Benets include reduced rents, reduced or no security deposits, and reduced or no application or administrative fees. Greater than 75 percent of our service members live in the community, and we are committed to providing them with services that meet their needs and help them save money, said Corky Vazquez, Navy Housing Program director. Local Navy Housing Service Center stas seek out desirable neighborhoods and homes and negotiate with landlords to enroll them in the RPP. Our Navy HSC stas are knowledgeable of the community surrounding their bases. ey are uniquely able to create and foster relationships with local landlords and property owners through the RPP, said Mike Bowlin, Navy Housing Services Program. Service members that take advantage of the RPP have condence that the property has Navy Housings seal of approval. In addition to meeting landlord requirements, every property must pass a safety inspection by the Navy HSC before being accepted into the RPP. All full-time active duty service members, married or single, eligible to receive Basic Allowance for Housing, are eligible to participate in the RPP. Service members cannot be rejected because of a poor credit history or score. e service members BAH is used to match the service member to appropriate RPP properties; no additional income is needed to qualify. e RPP is operated at many Navy bases world wide. Service members are invited to contact their local Navy HSC to learn about availability of the RPP at their duty station by visiting Navy Housings Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil/Housing. For more information about the RPP, visit www.cnic.navy.mil/RRP.Navy Rental Partnership helps save Installations Nausea, vomiting, jaw pain, sweating and shortness of breath symptoms of the u or stress? Not a big deal? ink again. ese symptoms were exactly what 45-year-old Angela felt when she had a heart attack. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, claiming a life every minute. More women die of heart disease than from all forms of cancer combined. According to the American Heart Association, 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented by making the right choices for our hearts. What are the right choices? Health conditions and lifestyle choices can greatly aect the chance of developing heart disease. Prevention starts with healthy alternatives. ere are many steps you can take to lower your risk of developing heart disease: maintain a healthy weight choose healthy meals and snacks exercise regularly dont smoke manage stress limit alcohol manage your cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure the single most significant risk factor for heart disease. Making positive changes in any one of these areas can make a decisive dierence in your health. Start with one simple change, stick with it, and, when ready, add another change to support a hearthealthy lifestyle. Contact Naval Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay Health Promotion and Wellness to get started at (912) 573-4237/8626. BHC Kings Bay is one of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles six health care facilities located across Florida and Georgia. To nd out more about BHC Kings Bay visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/Naval HospitalJax, like the Facebook page at www.facebook/NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax. Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil.Ways to keep your heart healthy Branch Health Clinic e Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States will host Vice Adm. Albert. J. Herberger USN (Ret.), chairman of the Navy Leagues National Advisory Council and the Merchant Marine and Maritime Aairs Committee, at its meeting and dinner, ursday, March 14, at the Magnolia Conference Center on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. A reception begins at 6 p.m. followed by dinner at 7 p.m. Herberger will speak about the Marine Transportation System, which includes waterways, ports and their intermodal connections, vessels, vehicles and systems critical to maritime activity including the impact of the Panama Canal expansion on U.S. ports, dredging and marking river and harbor channels, marine terminal capacity, modernizing locks and dams, and the need for maritime research and development consistent with keeping the U.S. as the worlds leading maritime and trading nation. e public is invited. Attendees must send advance dinner payment of $25 per person to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. e deadline to receive reservations is Monday, March 11. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League. e names of all attendees should be sent to coordinate base access. ere will be a silent dessert auction and other prizes, with proceeds to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps. Anyone interested in donating a dessert for the auction should let Cheryl Aston know by e-mail to teacher1@tds.net. More information is at kingsbaynavyleague.org/.Navy League dinner hosts admiral Navy League Camden, a Rotary Club literacy program, invites parents to enroll children in the Dolly Parton Imagination Library. is 60 volume set of childrens books include classics such as e Little Engine at Could and more. Each month a new, carefully selected book will be mailed in your childs name directly to your home. Best of all it is a free gift. ere is no cost or obligation to your family. Children ages birth to ve who are residents of Camden County are eligible to enroll. Eight to ten weeks after your registration has been submitted, books will begin arriving at your home and will continue until your child turns ve or you move out of Camden County. For more information or to register for this reading series, visit usa.imaginationlibrary.com/register_ my_child.php.Reading

PAGE 3

Feb. 14 shares another important celebration of love, National Donor Day. Heart-transplant recipient Roxanne Watsons son was given the heart of 23-yearold Coast Guardsman, Michael Bovill, after he was tragically killed in an oduty accident.You can consider me one of the lucky ones. I received a heart transplant, though it took a long time before I could nd a doctor to verify that I indeed needed a new heart. I was in the midst of a successful career in retail, working as a general manager for many stores. I began noticing glitches in my health in 2003. It all started with fainting episodes. But after 17 hospitalizations over two years time, diagnoses of Crohns disease and endless testing, I was told in 2008 that my heart was failing and I needed to go to Monteore Hospital for treatment. ere, I was immediately put in the advanced cardiac program. Although I did not have classic heart failure symptoms my most pronounced symptom being a pain in the back my heart was indeed sick. Despite treatment for a year, I was told I needed a heart transplant and I was put on the transplant waiting list. At that time it was a relief to me, because I was so sick, but I was also scared when I thought about what could happen. I knew if there was any chance I was going to live, this is where I needed to be. I was told four times that a donor heart was available, and three times it didnt work out. e heart was either not a match or would not t my chest cavity. My own heart was in such bad shape, doctors nally kept me in the hospital. I was there for 78 days before my transplant coordinator called me on July 15, 2010, to tell me the transplant is on. e heart t and the operation was a success. irteen days after the transplant I was home with my new heart and working on the house. By Christmas time I was dragging my son, Kellen, to buy sheetrock, crown molding and other materials I needed to renovate all eight rooms of my familys Spring Valley home. We built two home theaters and a 50s themed diner. I had decorated before, but never wanted to do all this work. I felt like my personality had changed. Later that year I was invited to an episode of Oprahs All-Stars, where I learned the name of my donor: 23-year-old Michael Blaine Bovill of Long Valley, N.J. Along with learning the identity of my heart donor, the show surprised me by bringing out Michaels family, triggering a tear fest in the studio. On that day I learned that my saving angel was a proud member of the U.S. Coast Guard. He also was a helicopter mechanic and a talented carpenter who helped his father, John, build the family home. He enjoyed coming home on leave to visit his family and friends. He loved hanging out with the Coasties from his station, his friends and family. He showed joy in his daily routine and was an inspiration to everyone that had the privilege to know him. I will forever be thankful to him and his family for saving my life. Meeting the Bovill family was truly special. ey are the most amazing family. anks to their yes in their most desperate time, ve people, including myself, had a second chance at life and all the recipients were there to say thank you to this awesome family. Nationally, there are some 115,000 people waiting organ transplants. On average, 18 of them will die each day waiting for their transplant. More than 130 people are added to the national organ transplant waiting list every day. In Michaels honor, I have dedicated my life to increasing the number of registered organ donors, volunteering at the New York Organ Donor Network, working to increase awareness for the critical need for organ donors to save lives. I encourage you to register today to become an organ donor, its easy and it saves lives. It saved mine. ank you Michael Blaine Bovill and all the members of Coast Guard, especially the Coasties at Coast Guard Station Eatons Neck. Guardians transplant saves life THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 5

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5 Military Saves Week be aected by a shortage of training dollars and be forced to delay their deployment. Sequestration will mean an additional $500 billion in defense cuts, and shift ing funding for improvisedexplosive-device detection and electronic warfare equipment from overseas contingency operations budgets to service operations and maintenance budgets will mean an ad ditional $100 billion in cuts. Today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the scal uncertainty resulting from the lack of predictability in the budget cycles, Odierno said. Our countrys inability to put its scal house in order compromises the future of the joint force, the Army, and ultimately will impact our ability to provide security to our nation. e U.S. military is looking now at a possible $1.3 trillion in defense cuts overall, Odierno said. Compounding cuts to defense budgets is the lack of a conrmed budget for the services the military is operating now on a continuing resolution, which is how Congress funds the government if it has not passed an appropriations bill. A continuing resolution makes military planning dicult. Right now, Odierno said, the continuing resolution has created a mismatch of funds that doesnt leave enough in the operations and maintenance accounts. eres a $6 billion shortfall there compared to what the Army needs, and sequestration will add another $5.4 billion to that shortfall. Operations and maintenance funding allows the Army to train, so a shortfall in those funds means that fewer soldiers will be able to train for Iraq and Afghanistan. Were funding, totally, Afghanistan. Were going to fund, totally, Korea, and sustain the readiness level in Korea, Odierno said. What that means is the rest of the forces that are now back in the United States will not be able to train. ey will be able to do very small-level, squadlevel training. ey will not be able to do platoon-level, company-level, battalionlevel training back at their installations. ey will not be able to go out to combat training centers, which is what provides them the nal readiness certication at the battalion and bri gade level. e general said the forces that are slated next to go to Afghanistan are going to be ready to go, insofar as training and equipping is concerned. What my concern is, the ones who come after them, they will now be behind, he said. What that means for the forces in Afghanistan in 2014 is that they might have to wait to redeploy while the follow-on forces are readied for their deployment. Earlier this week Odierno told Congress as much, saying he oered two options to lawmakers on how to keep forces in Afghanistan. If I cant make them up quickly, I then have to send forces that arent ready, or I have to extend forces that are already there, he said. atll be a decision I have to make as we get closer. We will continue to try to divert money so we do not have to extend people in Afghanistan. e Armys share of defense cuts could mean the loss of civilian employees at Army depots where warravaged combat equipment is reset and made serviceable again for soldier training and deployment to combat zones. Odierno said looming budget cuts will mean smaller depots and a drop in the civilian workforce. at translates directly into a backlog of equipment to be reset, including the equipment that still needs to be reset from Iraq, and equipment coming out of Afghanistan right now. e general said that due to those backlogs, its expected that delivery of that reset equipment could be delayed by two to three years, with some being de livered as late as 2016. Unfortunately, not having that critical combat equipment available tanks and helicopters and infantry ghting vehicles, for instance means that soldiers who need to train on it wont be able to train. Additionally, that equipment wont be ready for deployment if the Army is called upon to ght again. We have not predicted very well when we will use forces, Odierno said. When the [Berlin] Wall came down in Europe, people said, is is it, we dont need [the Army] anymore. But then a year later, we are deploying to the deserts of Kuwait. en we went into Somalia. en somewhere in there we had Panama, and Just Cause. Right now, Odierno said, the Army has a fairly high level of readiness. But that will change soon, for both soldier readiness and equipment readiness. When the time comes, unexpectedly, for soldiers to deploy, he said, emergency funding will not be enough to provide soldiers the readiness they need to ght successfully. It slowly degrades, Odierno said of military readiness. So over the next six or seven months, if you are not taking care of your equipment, if you are not training, you degrade that readiness. And you cant just recover that readiness by money. It takes time. Paying for people soldiers takes up about 48 percent of the Armys budget. Cuts to the budget means a reduction in the number of soldiers the Army will have in its ranks. e Army already is reducing the number of soldiers in its ranks by about 88,000. Sequestration could bring the loss of an additional 100,000 soldiers across the active force and the reserve components, Odierno said. In all, about 190,000 soldiers will have to be cut, though the general believes it will be more than that. My guess, in the end, itll be over 200,000 soldiers we will have to take out of the active duty, Army National Guard, and U.S. Army Re serve, he said. at cut will mean a loss of force structure, he said. It will cost the Army a 40-percent reduction in brigade combat teams, when its all done. A smaller Army means a loss of ability to inuence and deter conict, the general said. If the Army gets too small, you lose your ability to deter conict, Odierno said. My concern is you have people who miscalculate, he said. Almost every great war weve been into, or great regional conict, has been based on a huge miscalculation by somebody. And what I worry about is we will cause people to miscalculate, which will then cause us to have to get involved. Odierno said that without sequestration, the Army may drop below 490,000 soldiers, something he said is doable, if managed correctly to avoid loss of skill and capability. But some of the numbers I hear are too small. I do worry that the capability will be much less than we need, Odierno said. I think there is a certain level of capability that I need to have, that I would propose to the President and the chairmen and others that we have to have in order to sustain our capabilities in order to respond globally. Cutting the force that deep, Odierno said, will have to be done carefully and across all components of the Army. Odierno said he doesnt want to force soldiers out of the service, but at some point, some of that might happen. Odierno said his goal is to do the large majority of force cuts by attrition. But personnel boards that make other cuts might have to come into the mix at some point. ere will have to be some boards that we conduct that we maybe ask people to retire earlier than they might want, he said. And there might be some boards that tell us we need some ocers and some senior noncommissioned ocers to leave. But we will try to minimize that as much as we can. ing that the rigid nature of the cuts forced upon this department, and their scale, will result in a serious erosion of readiness across the force. Panetta and DOD leaders long have expressed deep concern about the direct impact sequestration will have on military personnel, civilian employees and families. Flexibility in sequestration is limited, the secretary said in his memo, noting that while military personnel are exempt from direct impact, services on bases will deteriorate, and families may feel the pinch in other ways. Civilian employees will be furloughed if sequestration is triggered. Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter said last week that civilian employees could lose 20 percent of their normal income through September. I can assure you that, if we have to implement furloughs, all aected employees will be provided at least 30 days notice prior to executing a furlough, and your benets will be protected to the maximum extent possible, Panetta wrote. DOD will work to ensure furloughs are executed in a consistent and appropriate manner, Panetta said, and Pentagon ocials also will continue work with employee unions. Our most important asset at the department is our world-class personnel, Panetta wrote. You are ghting every day to keep our country strong and secure, and rest assured that the leaders of this department will continue to ght with you and for you.FurloughDelay

PAGE 6

A long line of men in uniform lunge from one end of a eld to another, twisting their torsos with a dynamic warm-up in anticipation of physical exertion. Although this could be a scene from any Marines physical training session, these warriors were not preparing to take the eld of battle, but the eld of play at the 2013 NFL Pro Bowl. Marines and servicemembers from all other branches took part in the pregame and halftime show here at Aloha Stadium, Jan. 27, where they showed support for the players, fans and those watching at home. After opening honors with the Hawaii state song and music by Train jointservice troops marched on the eld in service uniforms, followed by a joint-service color guard presenting Old Glory for the playing of e StarSpangled Banner. Marines assisted with logistical tasks, such as stage assembly, that made the event possible. Were out here for everyone who appreciates the military, show them that were here for them, said Cpl. Charles Vallero, a military policeman with Marine Corps Base Hawaiis Provost Marshals Oce. Its important because a lot of military members grew up watching football. Even though the Marines contributed to improve this all-star session of Americas most popular sport, the players had a dierent aspect of military service that they were appreciative for. (NFL players) have the utmost respect for (our mil itary), what they do for us on a day-to-day basis, sac ricing their lives, leaving their families and [especial ly] kids to go away and serve our country, said Washing ton Redskins linebacker Lorenzo Alexander. Its amazing what they do. Im out here playing football, hitting folks, but I could never take a bullet or shoot people and all that type of stu. ey do an awesome job protecting our country and we love them for what they do. Along with their families, Marines and other servicemembers who recently returned from deployment were invited onto the eld and gratefully welcomed home during the halftime show. Some Marines then had the opportunity to meet their favorite players who epitomize a certain shared foundation of being a Marine and playing football teamwork. (Football) is all about teamwork, when people work together as a team, you can achieve the ultimate goal, same as a deployment, Vallero said. You work together as a team and come back home safe. Marine Corps partners with NFL at Pro Bowl Packers, Texans visit USS BushFootball players from the National Football Leagues Green Bay Packers and Houston Texans visited the aircraft carrier, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), to tour the ship and watch the Super Bowl, Feb. 3. e ships Morale, Welfare and Recreation and Navy Entertainment worked together to set up the event. Navy Entertainment has arranged visits like this for many years, but for some of the NFL players this was the rst time landing aboard a Navy vessel. so much. We dont have a lot of exibility, and we dont have a lot of time in that regard, Carter said. A sequestration mechanism in budget law requires DOD to cut $46 billion in spending from March 1 until the Sept. 30 end of the scal year unless Congress comes up with an alternative that would stop sequestration from triggering. is comes on top of $487 billion in defense spending reductions already programmed over 10 years, and Pentagon ocials have noted that operating under continuing resolutions in the absence of a scal year budget complicates matters. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta notied Congress that the department is preparing to place almost all of its 800,000 civilian employees on unpaid furlough for one day a week through the rest of the scal year. ese are not faceless bureaucrats who simply shue paper, Carter said. ey repair our ships. ey maintain our aircraft, Carter said. ats who these people are, and 44 percent of them are veterans. Its a terrible thing to have to deprive them of some of their income. If sequestration triggers, operations and maintenance the primary funding that ensures readiness will be particularly aected. e department will ensure units deploying to Afghanistan will receive the training needed to succeed. But this will rob other units readying for other missions, Carter said. ats just a mathematical fact of doing sequester, he added. is is very damaging to national security. In planning for sequestration, the Navy already has postponed sending an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf to join one already there, to ensure there will be enough ready carriers to dispatch to other critical areas if required. In everything we do, were really trying to keep on protecting the country and delivering the defense under these circumstances, Carter said.Chaos 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 7

Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7

PAGE 8

ing duty ocers and information warfare professionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 percent of the cryptology and intelligence community and 21 percent of operational ratings, including aviation warfare systems operators and sonar technicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and aoat, serving in various STEM related elds. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Reservists are serving in the Navy. ey make up 17.3 percent of the force and make indispensable contributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civilians. e current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female ag ocers, 67 female senior executive service members, 56 female command master chiefs, and six female command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highest-ranking female ofcers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a surface warfare ocer, was one of the rst women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Howard also a surface warfare ocer, was the rst African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the rst African-American woman to receive a third star in ag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and former commanding ocer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 ight hours in Navy aircraft. e top three highestranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortlo, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys rst female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education eet master chief later this month. e Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its seniormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steanie Easter, executive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Oce, is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for dening aordable and sustainable fth-generation strike aircraft. ed that while the alliance plans a follow-on mission in Afghanistan, it also is focused on maintaining and building on the capabilities it has gained through two decades of operations from Kosovo to Afghanistan to Libya. Over the next decade, NATO must preserve and pass on those skills, he said, as our biggest operation comes closer to completion. e secretary general said the alliance has adopted the connected forces initiative to expand education and training and enhance exercises. NATOs goal for the initiative, he said, is to hold more ambitious military training exercises, with a broader range of scenarios, more often. e initiative will include a comprehensive training plan out to 2020, to make sure that our exercises are coherent, comprehensive, and cover the full range of alliance missions, Rasmussen said. It will include, in 2015, a major live exercise that is, one involving signicant numbers of deployed forces, not just command and sta units. e NATO Response Force will be the core of the connected forces initiative, he said. And we will build on its exercises for example, by including the battalion which the United States government has pledged to rotate through Europe for precisely this purpose, and by building in more contributions from other allies and partners, Rasmussen said. is will make the response force a cooperation school, as well as a quick-reaction tool an immediate resource, but also an investment in the future, he added. Rasmussen said NATO also is working to use its common funding, which comes from member nations budgets, for highpriority missions that include training, rapid response, and improving intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. Over the coming months, we will make those improvements so that every dollar and every euro we spend is well spent, he said. e secretary general acknowledged that multinational cooperation doesnt solve all of NATOs problems and is not a response to all of its challenges. We also need a sucient level of defense investment, he said. And thats my major concern that if cuts continue, it will damage severely our ability to meet and address the future security challenges. NATO ocials said they are discussing a proposal to maintain Afghan army and police forces at 352,000 combined members after 2014, when a previous plan had called for reducing the number to some 240,000. Let me stress that no nal decisions have been made, the secretary general said at the news conference. But I can conrm that its one of the ideas that is being considered. I feel condent that we will be able to nance Afghan security forces of that size. e international community has pledged to help in nancing those forces, he added, because a security force of that size goes well beyond the nancial capacity of the Afghan government. Rasmussen said NATO alone should not bear the cost for Afghan forces. is is actually a responsibility for the whole of the international community, he said. And that has been conrmed at international conferences.Women NATO 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 9

Active Packer players, Ryan Taylor, Jarrett Bush and Greg Van Roten, retired Packers Ahman Green and William Henderson, along with the Texans Taylor T.J. Yates, were own on to the ship in a C-2 Greyhound from the Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40. When I was invited to come out here I was very excited, Yates said. Coming to the ship is a oncein-a-lifetime experience, especially landing on the ight deck. It was wild how fast the plane stopped. During their time on board, the football players toured the ship, observed ight operations, conducted a meet-and-greet with the crew and watch Super Bowl XLVII in the hangar bay with Sailors. On a day that they could have been home with their family and friends enjoying the Super Bowl they came out to enjoy it with Sailors, said Ships Serviceman 2nd Class Farrah K. Glover. ey were sociable and excited about being out here, and its nice to be appreciated. I think they were awesome. During their time on the ship, the athletes expressed gratitude for all service members sacrices and noted that without them, they would not be able to play their sport. You see movies, you see documentaries; but when you come out here you get to see how cool and interesting it is and how its normal for everyone here like football is for us, Green said. For these Sailors, it is just another day. George H.W. Bush is conducting training and carrier qualications in the Atlantic Ocean. Packers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Pirates Cove menus First littoral ship deploys in MarchDuring a media availability Feb. 21, Navy ocials announced the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its rst deployment March 1. is milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued eet testing and the introduction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identied by these studies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and eet enterprises of the Navy, Greenert said. e output of the council is intended to assist in maximizing the expansive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in global eet operations for the joint warghter. I am condent we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. is council will continue to unify our eorts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful eet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission packages that address capability gaps in the areas of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be recongured to perform one of those three distinct missions in a short period of time. Freedoms deployment will demonstrate her operational capabilities, and allow the LCS Council to evaluate crew rotation and maintenance plans. e ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, participate in international exhibitions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 11

Its Military Saves Week, and I am all about saving money. I bundle my phone and computer and cut my cable. Living alone, I dont turn my air conditioner on until late June or early July and turn it off in late August. I havent turned my heat on in seven years. I refinanced my house last year to lower my payments. I visit three supermarkets to get the best in sales, buy-one-get-ones, store-brand pricing and using coupons. My favorite beer is whatever has the lowest on-sale price. I only order off the dollar menu, unless I have coupons. I almost always bring my lunch to work. I used to think I was cheap. But my daughter told me Im simply cost efficient.Kaitlan Barron Family member New Baltimore, Mich. I make my husband work overtime. ET2 Zack Mosier USS Alaska Blue Dowagiac, Mich. I use coupons. Bill Joiner Retired Navy Colquitt, Ga. I planned before I retired. One of the best things to do is participate in the Thrift Savings Plan. Tina Love Family member Rockville, Md. I cut corners where we can with coupons. ET3 Matthew Schenk USS Alaska Blue Eagle, Idaho I budget. ITS2 Paul Trimble Trident Refit Facility Pensacola, Fla. I let my wife do the shopping and budgeting. That saves money. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Feb. 12 that remains recov ered from the USS Monitor will be interred in Arling ton National Cemetery. A ceremony will be held March 8 to honor the two unknown Sailors. e specic date of the interment was chosen to honor Monitors role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago. ese may very well be the last Navy personnel from the Civil War to be buried at Arlington, Ma bus said. Its important we honor these brave men and all they represent as we reect upon the signicant role Monitor and her crew had in setting the course for our modern Navy. e Brooklyn-built Monitor, the nations rst ironclad warship. Commissioned Feb. 25, 1862, the Monitor fought in the rst battle between two ironclads when it engaged CSS Virginia in the Battle of Hampton Roads March 9, 1862. e battle marked the rst time ironarmored ships clashed in naval warfare and signaled the end of the era of wooden ships. ough the Monitors confrontation with the Virginia ended in a draw, the Monitor prevented the Virginia from gaining control of Hampton Roads and thus preserved the Federal blockade of the Norfolk-area. Months later, 16 Sailors were lost when the Monitor sank Dec. 31, 1862 in a storm o Cape Hatteras, N.C. e wreck was discovered in 1974 was designated the nations rst national marine sanctuary, managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Starting in 1998, the Navy, NOAA and the Mariners Museum in Newport News, Va., began working together to recover artifacts from Monitor. During the summer of 2002, while attempting to Sailors Arlington-bound THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., March 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar March 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, March 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, March 4, 11, 18 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered March 6 The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. March 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Job search workshop scheduled for March 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., March 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, March 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Two Transition GPS classes upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 4 to 8. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 25 to 29. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting March 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., March 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 to 11 a.m., March 20. Registration required by calling 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 18 to 21. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 19 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., March 26. For more information, call 5734513. Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military Fleet & Family Support Center workshops 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 13

culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, March 28. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energiz ing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 11 and 12. For more information and to register call 573-4513.Family Care Plan trains coordinatorsFFSC is offering a training for all command-designated Family Care Plan coordinators 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., March 6. For more information or to register for this training, contact 5734513. Deadline for registration is March 1.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., March 13. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to par ticipate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Command Return and Reunion training scheduledThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 1 to 4 p.m., March 6. Registration recom mended, call 573-4513.Couples Money Management upcomingThis workshop provides couples money management skills, understanding budget conflicts and creating a foundation for productive financial communication. It requires both spouses to attend. This training will be held 2 to 4 p.m. March 13 Registration is required, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC Todays Marines saluted the uncommon valor of yesterdays Marines Feb. 22 as members of Headquarters and Service Battalion, Headquarters Marine Corps, Henderson Hall, marked the 68th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima, Japan by participating in a wreath laying ceremony at the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Va. We honor our past and present, said H & S Bn. Sgt. Maj. Craig D. Cressman, who along with H & S Bn. Commanding Ocer Col. Ira M. Cheatham and James P. Donovan, Marine Corps War Memorial Foundation founder and president placed the wreath at the memorial. Donovan said that the wreath was laid in honor of not only the Marines who died on Iwo, but for all who have died since the establishment of the Corps in 1775. Following months of air and naval bombardment, Marines invaded Iwo Jima Feb. 19, 1945. e volcanic island, located about 660 miles south of Tokyo, was being used as an aireld by Japanese forces. Japanese ghter planes were intercepting American B29s, as well as attacking U.S. airelds on Mariana, from their airelds on Iwo. e ag raising atop Mount Suribachi took place Feb. 23, 1943, ve days after the battle began. Joe Rosenthal, an Associated Press photographer, took the famous photograph of Marine Cpls. Harlon Block, Rene Gagnon and Ira Hayes, Sgt. Michael Strank and Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class John Bradley raising the ag. Strank, Sousley and Block were killed before the battle for Iwo Jima ended March 16, 1945. Rosenthals iconic photo was wired around the world and printed in countless newspapers across the United States and was used as the model for the memorial located at Arlington National Cemetery. e concept [for the memorial] started ve days after the ag raising on Iwo Jima, noted Donovan. Approximately 70,000 Marines and 18,000 Japanese soldiers took part in the battle. In the 36 days of ghting on the island, nearly 7,000 Marines were killed and another 20,000 were wounded. For Marines, the memorial is a place they can visit to remember the fallen. Master Sgt. William J. Dixon of H & S Bn., who participated in the ceremony said, I will retire in July, but I will continue to come back here. recover the ships 150-ton gun turret, Navy divers discovered human remains inside the turret. JPAC, with the assistance of the Navy Casualty Oce and NOAA, conducted a comprehensive eort to identify the remains of the unknown Sailors, to include timedemanding and detailed genealogical research. Given the age of the remains, eorts to identify them were unsuccessful. However, JPAC was able to narrow down possible descendents of the unknown Sailors to 30 family members from 10 dierent families. e decision to lay these heroes to rest in Arlington, honors not only these two men but all those who died the night Monitor sank and reminds us, that the sacrices made a hundred and fty years ago, will never be forgotten by this nation, said David Alberg, Superintendent of NOAAs Monitor National Marine Sanctuary.MonitorMarines salute Iwo Jima fallen THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

PAGE 14

Apollo 13 astronaut and Mississippi native Fred Haise visited the Navy Department of Defense Supercomputing Resource Center at Stennis Space Center, Miss., Feb. 15, for a tour of the centers three new supercomputers. All of the systems are named after NASA astronauts who have served in the Navy, including Haise who trained as a naval aviator. e two other systems are named for retired Navy Cmdr. Susan Still Kilrain, a naval aviator and space shuttle pilot, and retired Navy Capt. Eugene Cernan, a naval aviator and the last man to step foot on the moon. Today, we are proud to recognize the contributions of an iconic American and native Mississippian, said Dr. William H. Burnett, deputy commander and technical director of the Commander Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command at Stennis Space Center. Just as Fred Haise has made a great impact on the state, the Navy and the nation, so will the supercomputer named after him. e IBM iDataPlex systems were installed in the fall of 2012 and became operational in January. e Navy DSRC assists in delivering wind, wave and other oceanographic forecasts to the Navy eet. It is one of ve Defense Department supercomputer centers that Navy, Army and Air Force scientists and researchers use to design tools and weapons systems that support DoDs global mission. e new systems have tripled the supercomputing capability of the DSRC, already one of the most powerful supercomputer centers within the Defense Department. e fact that Im here today was dependent on computers, Haise said. We went to the moon on one tenth of a megabyte [of memory]. For four days we had no computer on board at all. at was the springboard of what is happening today in the computer world. e DSRCs current supercomputing capacity is 866 trillion oating point operations (teraops) a second. One hundred high school students with handheld calculators would take nearly 317 years to perform the number of calculations a one teraop-rated computer can accomplish in one second-and almost 275,000 years to perform what the new Navy DSRC supercomputers will be capable of every second. e DSRC is expected to increase its capacity to approximately 5,200 teraops by 2016. Haise completed Navy ight training in 1954 and served as a U.S. Marine Corps ghter pilot and also served in the U.S. Air Force. His career with NASA spanned 20 years. He ew as the lunar module pilot for NASAs Apollo 13 space mission and as backup lunar module pilot for Apollo 8 and 11 and backup spacecraft commander for Apollo 16. e Navy DSRC is a part of the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Program. For 19 years, the Navy DSRC has been recognized as one of the top 15 most capable supercomputing facilities in the world. MCPON visits NAS Jax Master Chief Petty Ofcer of the Navy Mike D. Stevens completed a three-day trip to Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Base Guantanamo Bay Cuba Feb. 15. MCPON participated in CPO 365 events, toured base facilities, took the opportunity to discuss the focus areas of his Zeroing in on Excellence initiative, and answered questions about new uniforms, budget cuts, Family Readiness Group, the Performance to Serve program, and deployments during basewide all hands calls. CPO 365, a year-long development and training for First Class Petty Ocers, was rst introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It includes two phases, the rst of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all First Class Petty Ocers will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 is so important for the future development of our First Class Petty Ocers, Stevens said. I believe that if youre going to lead the future force of our Navy that you must be armed with the best opportunities to succeed. CPO 365 is designed to develop leaders through a combination of mentorship, practical experience and training. I view this training as our most creative avenue to productively engage Chiefs with petty ocers and junior ocers, and to form enduring relationships characterized by mu tual respect, Stevens said. MCPON talked about the importance of eective leadership during a CPO 365 training session in GTMO. As you go through CPO 365, you will become a more eective leader, he said. If everything we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benet from a more eective leader. He also discussed the value of the Navys leading petty ocers. We must have exceptional leading petty o cers, because you are one of the critical components to the engine that makes the Navy run, Stevens said. Many Sailors showed concern about the looming scal environment. MCPON recognized the challenges the Navy is currently facing, but asked that Sailors focus on controlling what we own. It is easy to become distracted by things that are beyond our control, Stevens said. He also reminded Sailors of the things they do own and control; such as technical training, administrative production, and the execution of orders. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becoming and remaining physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually sound, he said. Apollos Haise visits center 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 15

e Navy Adventures Unleasheds Running of the Green starts at 7 a.m., ursday, March 7 at Trident Lakes Golf Club. Individuals and commands are encouraged to step-up their physical readiness with this 5K/3K walk. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Intramural Spring Softball League Registration is now open for mens, womens and coed league softball leagues. A captains meeting is at 5 p.m., March 13, inside the Fitness Complex. Play begins March 18. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Intramural Sports Average Joes Bowling League Registrations now for this 6 p.m., Tuesday night league, with twoperson teams. League fees cover shoes, and lanes for entire season. e league starts Tuesday, March 12. Fees $50. eres a captains meeting at 5 p.m., March 5 inside KB Finnegans Irish Pub. For more information call (912) 573-8908. Disney on Ice Tickets are on sale now at Kings Bay Information, Tickets and Travel. A special offer for military families, $13 tickets to select performances of Dare to Dream at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. Military/DoD discounts are available at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 6 and 1 and 5 p.m., Sunday, April 7. For more information call (912) 573-8888. Night Glow Golf Tournament Its at Trident Lakes Golf Clubwith a 4 p.m. shotgun start March 9. Cost is $35 per person. Nine holes in daylight, dinner/ drinks and nine holes in the dark with glow-in-dark balls. Cost includes golf, dinner, prizes and two glow balls. Call (912) 573-8475 now for reservations. Lifeguard Training Course Its 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., April 1 to 5, at the Kings Bay Pool at the Fitness Complex. Deadline to register is March 29. Class is limited to first 20 to register. Must register in person at the cus tomer service counter inside the Fitness Complex. Cost is $175 per person. Classes restricted to ages 15 and up. Must be 15 by April 15. Payment is due upon registration. Bring your lunch, towel, goggles, swimsuit, sun screen and bug spray. Pre-test is 8 a.m., Monday, April 1. All candidates must pass the pre-test in order to continue the course. For more information call (912) 573-3001 or 3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more games. Save your tickets for prizes. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Spring Break Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergar ten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual aug mentees, March 18 for ac tive duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings statement or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be pro vided. Birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. Single/dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Wreck It Ralph March 2 and 3, Monsters, Inc. March 9 and 10, Journey to the Center of the Earth March 16 and 17, Rise of the Guardians March 23 and 24, and Tangled March 30 and 31. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Running of the Green March 7 MWR Intramural Sports THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 17

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

PAGE 18

18 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013

PAGE 19

THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 THE PERISCOPE NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 28, 2013