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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-14-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00288

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00288


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Up Periscope Who are you sending valentines to? Page 9 College tour Kings Bay area students visit four campuses Page 4 Home Port Connect to branch clinic via e-mail Page 3 Navy salutes Black History Lessons in scal responsibility set for Feb. 25 to March 2 e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Sup port Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nan cial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the com munity to participate in Mili tary Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www. militarysaves. org/take-thepledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commitment to begin the journey toward financial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in personal nan cial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great oppor tunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more suc cessfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nan cial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, fam ily members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specic goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient Military Saves Week sets sea and anchor detail A noted author highlighted for Pentagon employees Feb. 4 an often-overlooked fact: the loyalty that emancipated slaves displayed toward the country that enslaved them in the days leading up to the end of the Civil War. Dr. Edward L. Ayers, president of the University of Rich mond, spoke at the Pentagon as part of the Defense De partments commemoration of African-American History Month. Ayers, a historian special izing in the Antebellum South and the author and editor of 12 books on the history of the southern United States, was invited to speak on the 150th anniversary of President Abra ham Lincolns signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, which ended slavery in states that had seceded from the Union during the Civil War and allowed blacks to serve in the Union Army and Navy. With the Emancipation African American Sailors have long, proud record As announced by NAVADMIN 009/13 released Jan. 16, the Navy joins the nation in celebrating the vibrant history and culture of African Ameri can and Black Sailors during African American/Black His tory Month throughout the month of February. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebra tion in 1976 to include the entire month of February. is year Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate and reect on the theme, At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: e Emancipa Rear Adm. Tofalo conducts tour of NSB Kings BayChilean submarine Simpson (SS-21) departed Naval Station Mayport to return to homeport in Talcahuano, Chile, Feb. 7, after taking part in the Diesel Electric Submarine Initiative, and CHILEMAR IV with the U.S. Navy. During the Mayport visit, crew mem bers from Simpson toured Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay with Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander of Submarine Group 10. DESI is a partnership that allows the United States and other partner navies to work together to train and test underwa ter warfare capabilities through engage ment tactics, weapon system tests and close encounter operations. is particular training evolution helps the American and Peruvian navies train their crews and test capabilities while helping foster bilateral cooperation and further improve joint interoperability. CHILEMAR is an annual bilateral exer -Chilean Sailors visit Obama unhappy with cutsDeep, across-the-board spending cuts slated to take eect March 1 in the absence of con gressional action could severely aect military readiness and should not happen, President Barack Obama said Feb. 8 during a farewell tribute to retiring Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta. And since we are now just weeks away from deep automatic cuts to federal spending, including de fense, let me say this: ere is no reason, no reason, for that to happen, Obama said. Putting our scal house in order calls for a balanced approach, not mas sive, indiscriminate cuts that could have a severe impact on our military preparedness. He called on both political parties to work together to avoid the automatic: solving prob lems, not trying to score points; doing right for the country, not for any particular political agen da; sustaining our economic recovery; balancing budgets; but also maintaining the nest military in history. Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Dolphin Auction set for March 2e 2013 Silver and Gold Dolphin Auction Wild Wild West will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the NSB Kings Bay gym. Tickets are $20 for E-& and above. e event raises funds for the Dolphin Scholarship fund. Reservations can be made through command contacts. For more information, contact Brigid Mills at (215) 990-8883 or brigidredmond@gmail.com.YC teens hold kids book drive e youth and teens of the Kings Bay Youth Center are having a childrens book drive as part of their Days of Service program honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teens are calling on members of the community to bring new and slightly used childrens books to the Youth Cen ter from now until Feb. 28. ey will be cleaned, sorted, packaged and distributed to various community and service organizations throughout Camden County. Teens interested in learn ing more about this and other events should contact Sharon Grant, Youth Center director at (912) 573-2380 or visit the MWR Facebook page at www.facebook.com/kingsbaymwr.MOAA installs officers Feb. 19e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association will have its new chap ter ocer instillation ceremony beginning with social hour at 5 :30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 19 at Os prey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. Cost of dinner is $30. Dress is mess dress, tuxedo or coat and tie. Guest speaker is Capt. Kelly Mc Dowell, deputy commander/chief of sta, Sub marine Group Ten. RSVP by Feb. 15 with Capt. Orren Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net.Washington memorial Feb. 17Sunday Feb. 17 St. Marys Masonic Lodge No. 109 will host a re-enactment of e George Washington Memorial Service. Citizens are encouraged to join us for this event at noon at the St. Marys Masonic Lodge, 205 Wheeler St., St. Marys, on the corner of Weed and Wheeler. Food will be served. e procession will start at 2:30 p.m., Fellowship at the hall will follow. For more information, call (912) 882-5226.NEX book signing this weekendAuthor J.D. Langford will have a book signing for his work Walk With Me Feb. 15, 16 and 17 at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exhange.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure percentage of body fat, thats accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Minimal form-tting clothing is required; ide ally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compres sion shorts and/or a lightweight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an ap pointment, call Health Promotion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Motorcycle run aids Wall causeABATE of Floridas Black Creek Chapter will have a Run for the Wall Feb. 23 to help fund bring ing the Moving Wall Vietnam veterans memorial to Green Cove Springs, Fla. e run begins with 9 a.m. registration at Middleburg VFW Post 8255, 2296 Aster Ave., Middleburg, Fla.. Kickstands up 10:30 a.m. Entry fee is $10 per rider and $5 per passenger. For more information, call Herb Hil derbrand at (904) 704-5501.County school buses add camerasCamden County Schools, in partnership with local law enforcement and municipalities, is combating motorists not obeying trac laws when children are loading and unloading school buses, by implementing the Cross Safe bus cam era system. Its designed to deter motorists from passing stopped school buses when ashing red lights, stop sign and child crossing gate are de ployed.Battle of Olustee Feb. 15 to 17e Civil War Battle of Olustee marks its 149th anniversary with 1,800 re-enactors 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Feb. 15 to 17 with battle re-enactments Saturday and Sunday. e site is on U.S. 90, 50 miles west of Jacksonville. For more information, call (877) 635-3655 or visit battleofolustee.org or www.oridastateparks/olustee Now hear this! Changes to how the Navy process es awards makes it easier for Sailors to conrm their personal decora tions and medals are reected in their Ocial Military Personnel File, ocials said recently. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reect ed in the Navy Department Awards Web Service and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award citations or certicates received directly from the member for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Re cords Management Policy Branch, Navy Personnel Command. Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certi cates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or certicate be add ed to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by visiting the U.S. Navy Awards web site at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is recorded in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or certicate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the ser vice members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN 38055-3130. Giger said if a Sailors award is not reected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the service mem bers OMPF. To resolve this conict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coordinator, since only NDAWS coordinators can enter ap proved awards into the NDAWS da tabase. e NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award cita tion/certicate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once and award is entered and reected in the database, the NDAWS coordinator will then submit the award citation or certicate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must submit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award citations or certicates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards Web site. It is important that only autho rized personal awards are reected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, Giger said. And ensuring only those award citations or certicates that are accurately re ecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors submitting a selection board pack age with an award citation or certi cate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will automatically have the award added to their OMPF. ose Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selection board has adjourned, said Giger. Sailors can access their OMPF anytime online for the most up-todate service record information by visiting BUPERS Online at https:// www.bol.navy.mil. For more information, read NA VADMIN 016/13, visit the NDAWS Web Page on the NPC Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/bu pers-npc/career/recordsmanage ment/pages/awddecormedal.aspx or call the NPC Customer Service Center at (866) 827-5672.Check your awards in your records Personnel Command e Navy relaunched its agship magazine, All Hands magazine, for Sailors and their families as an on line publication Feb. 11 at www. ah.mil. e new online version features stories, photos and videos about topics that are relevant to Sailors and their families. e magazine highlights Navy culture and heritage, and aims to be an informative and entertaining resource Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. All Hands magazine is a Web publication for Sailors by Sailors, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Navy chief of information. For almost 90 years, the print ver sion of All Hands magazine greeted Sailors everywhere. It started as a typewritten news bulletin, but over its lifespan it grew in style and stature. e Navy stopped printing a monthly version of the magazine in Dec. 2011. My intent is to bring that same sense of purpose and tradition for ward with this online magazine, Kirby said. e rst issue features stories about how sequestration and the continuing resolution will aect the Navy if they occur; recruit divi sion commander duty; changes to the Navys enlisted detailing process and more. Additionally, the Web site allows readers to comment and share con tent across various popular social media channels. According to its mission state ment, the goal of All Hands maga zine is to include articles, informa tion, imagery and videos that are relevant to Sailors and their families. It will explore issues that are of con cern to Sailors and provide information that Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. We are excited to see you con tribute your story in whatever for mat that may be, Kirby said. e Navy production division of the Defense Media Activity is pro ducing the magazine, but its editors are counting on contributions from across the eet. Readers can visit www.ah.mil for details on how to contribute.All Hands magazine goes online Defense Media e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase begian Feb. 7, and remain open until 5 a.m. Feb. 19 for Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the Web-based pro gram enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders nine to seven months from their projected rotation date. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with a November 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a September 2013 PRD. ese Sailors, with Fleet Ride/ Perform to Serve approval if applicable, may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career coun selor. e application phase is typically about 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command be fore making applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the de tailer. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selec tions rst; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers also must follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sail or requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, priori tized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Com mand and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. February PCS applications open Personnel Command

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Each of the 57,000 patients with a primary care manager at Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and its remaining branch health clinics in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport, belongs to a pri mary care team as part of Medical Home Port. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide medi cal home model of care. Medical Home Port places our patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers, from doctors to nurses to case managers, led by their pri mary care manager, said NH Jacksonville Direc tor for Medical Services Cmdr. Troy Borema. Our patients and their Medical Home Port teams work together for a coordinated, whole-person approach to health. is comprehensive approach is designed to meet the full range of pa tients health and wellness needs. Medical Home Port in creases continuity of care and the use of preventive services, which can lead to better outcomes for people with chronic conditions. It also reduces emergency room visits and hospital izations because the care teams provide urgent care, something that boosts both patient and sta sat isfaction. My Medical Home Port team keeps me current on my appointments, immunizations and blood checks that I need regular ly, said Patricia Wampler, a family medicine red team patient. Medical Home Port also oers a new way for pa tients and their care teams to connect, via Medical Home Port Online secure e-mail. Patients can e-mail their care team directly for non-urgent issues, like re questing an appointment, lab results or medication rells. And, patients can still call Central Appointments and After Hours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 5294677. To register and log onto Medical Home Port Online, patients can visit the commands Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax. NH Jacksonvilles Medi cal Home Port is seeking health care industry rec ognition from the National Committee for Quality As surance, the gold standard in the patient-centered medical home model. e application pro cess includes a site visit to evaluate continuous ad herence to multiple standards. Patientand familycentered care has always been at the core of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles delivery of health care, whether at our hospital or one of our branch health clinics, said Borema. Medical Home Port en hances this, oering in creased coordination and access to the highest quality care for our patients. NH Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To nd out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www. facebook/navalhospital jacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube.com/user/naval hospitaljax. Sign up for e-mail up dates at nhjaxconnect@ med.navy.mil Branch clinic adds Med Home PortSome factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, dur ing the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been se lected for orders. Sailors can learn more about CMS/ID from their CCC or access CMS/ID by selecting the CMS/ID link on the Navy Person nel Command Web site at www.npc.navy.mil.PCS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 5 U.S. and NATO lead ers congratulated Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen for a job well done as com mander of the alliances International Security As sistance Force and praised Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. as the strate gic leader needed for the next phase of the com mand, Feb. 10. At a ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, Allen passed Dunford the ags of the NATO command and of U.S. Forces Afghanistan. ere are 66,000 Ameri can service members in the country. e chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey was on hand and praised Allen as a coalition builder. Dunford is perfect to fol low Allen as the new com mander, Dempsey said. With 50 nations represented in the coalition to help the country, Allen said he is condent in vic tory. He remem bered the more than 560 ISAF person nel who were killed and the more than 5,500 who were wounded during his 19 months in command. e new commander kept his remarks short, but promised to keep up the momentum. Dunford will have his work cut out for him as he continues training Afghan forces and the movement of supplies and personnel out of the country ahead of the drawdown. And all this must be done in a way that allows a yet to be determined post NATO force to be ready to begin operations Jan. 1, 2015. Today is not about change, its about continuity, Dunford said. INSURV steadies big shipInspectors from the Board of Inspection and Survey were welcomed by the sta of Battleship Wisconsin (BB 64) prior to conducting a survey as part of a volunteer com munity relations project Jan. 25 in Norfolk, Va. After a storied history beginning in World War II, the battleship received its last ocial INSURV inspection in 1992, before becoming a oating mu seum on the James River. John Elliker, Battleship Wisconsin project man ager, said the city of Nor folk initially contacted INSURV to ask them about surveying the ship. What we want is for your grandkids grandkids to enjoy this ship in a meaningful way, and we cant do that if were constantly battling rust and deterioration, Elliker said. is is the beginning of a unique partnership be tween the active duty Navy and the city of Norfolk for the preservation of the battleship. Capt. Mark Metzger, INSURV director of craft and auxiliary force inspec tions, said the 15-man team was happy to volunteer to help the museum. e team spent the day getting a feel for the ship and looking for obvious safety discrepancies. Elliker said the report on the ndings will help them put together a detailed plan for opening up more spaces on the ship. At the end of the day Elliker said the preliminary results look promising. Metzger said this wont be INSURVs last visit to the ship. Elliker said there are a number of volunteer opportunities on the ship, either for individuals or groups. ey even have an adopt-a-spot program for groups who would like to take ownership of a par ticular space on the ship and bring it back to Navy standards. Trident Refit Facility 2012 honorees tion Proclamation and the March on Washington. African American Sail ors have a legacy of honor able service in every major armed conict since the Revolutionary War. African Americans continue to serve with distinction, now comprising more than 17 percent of the ac tive duty Navy total force end-strength. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African Ameri can Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the rst Af rican American graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He died May 22, 2012 af ter a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian workforce. Edna Young, the rst Af rican American woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the rst Afri can American woman to achieve the rank of chief petty ocer, also died in 2012. In 2012, Vice Adm. Michelle Janine Howard became the rst AfricanAmerican woman to re ceive a third star in ag rank within the Depart ment of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Howard is currently serving as deputy com mander for U.S. Fleet Forces Command. In 1999, she became the rst African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rush more (LSD 47). Immediately following this years celebration of African American/Black History Month, Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Edu cation and Training Com mand Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys rst female African American Fleet Master Chief. Beldo will become the Manpower, Person nel, Training and Educa tion Fleet Master Chief in March 2013. emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their fami lies current nancial con dition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and create an emergency savings, a future emergen cy wont become a nan cial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the De partment of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.SaveHistory cise between the U.S. and Chile, which is designed to demonstrate interoper ability between U.S. submarine rescue systems and Chilean submarines. e exercise promotes greater understanding and cooperation between the U.S. and Chile. During its three-month deployment, Simpson conducted training with both surface ships and air units. Shortly after Simpson arrived in May port, the submarine par ticipated in independent deployed certication ex ercises with various units from the USS KEARSARGE Amphibious Readiness Group. In January, the crew took part in CHILEMAR IV, which focused on the notication and localization phases of a bottomed, disabled submarine. Sev eral U.S. Atlantic Fleet air and surface units also participated in the exer cise, employing side-scan sonar, an undersea un manned vehicle, and sev eral P-3 Orion and SH-60 aircraft. Simpson then par ticipated in an anti-submarine warfare exercise with Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School, and excelled in its role in the Harry S. Truman Car rier Strike Group Compos ite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Tofalo, was at the clos ing ceremony for DESI, held aboard Mayport, and talked about the impor tance of such exercises. I was actually in the au dience when former U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead rolled out the cooperative strategy for 21st Century Sea Power, and Ill never forget his words where he stated, you cant surge trust, he said. Rather, it takes long term relationships, built upon interac tions like CHILEMAR and DESI, to foster the impor tant bond between our great nations,. Also attending the clos ing ceremony was Vice Almirante Jose Romero, commander naval opera tions of Chile, and talked about the importance of the U.S. Navy and Chilean navy continuing to work together. Exercises such as this will only continue to im prove the interoperability of our navies, which is im portant for our nations, Romero said. Commander Eduardo Torres, commanding of cer of Simpson, thanked his crew and Naval Station Mayport. To the crew of Simp son, thank you for your hard work, I would like to thank Naval Station Mayport for giving us the sup port we needed when we were in port, he said. It will take the sub marine a month traveling through the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Pacic Ocean to return to its homeport on the south ern tip of South America. Chilean Marine takes NATO Afghan command

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Presidents Dollar Days bowl ing is at Rack-N-Roll Lanes 1 to 5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 15 and Monday, Feb. 18, with $1 games and $1 shoe rental on these two days. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. MWR Golf Tournament starts with an 8:30 a.m. shot gun start Wednesday, Feb. 20 at Trident Lakes Golf Course. Its $26 per patron, which includes lunch and door prizes. Closest to pin and longest drive. Best ball format. All are welcome. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive spe cial code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Fireside Jam Session Its outside the Gaming Zone at 6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 21. Bring your instru ment and hang. Smores will be provided. Call (912) 573-4548 for more details.. The Harlem Ambassadors Theyre coming to Kings Bay, Wednesday, Feb. 27 at the Fitness Complex Basketball Courts. All tickets are $2, children 2 and under are free. Tickets available at ITT. Doors open at 5:20 p.m. with game time at 6 p.m. There will be food avail able for purchase. Get an autograph at 7:30 p.m. No video taping will be allowed during the perfor mance. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free twoweek introduc tory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your Feb. 24 Daytona 500 race tick ets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 5739492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fri days, except holidays, plus a Saturday sign-up 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, players must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and cannot turn 16 pri or to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reserv ists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 5738202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Spring Break Registration at the Youth Center Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergarten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual aug mentees, March 18 for active duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings state ment or pay stub for spon sor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certifi cate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/ dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must pro vide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Presidents Dollar Days soon MWR Sports 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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e Navy Marksman ship Team is looking for new members to partici pate in Navy and interservice rie and pistol matches. All active-duty and reserve Sailors are welcomed and encour aged to participate. Sailors receive lim ited small arms training as they process through Navy Individual Augmentee Training at various U.S. Army training centers, said Cmdr. Mick Glancey, USNMT ocer in charge. All Sailors serving IA/GSA tours are issued a service rie (M-16) or a service pistol (M9), some receive both prior to deployment. Small arms marksmanship is a basic fundamental skill set all our Sailors are re quired to possess. e USNMT is the leading proponent of small arms marksmanship and safety training for U.S. Navy personnel. Each year, the team conducts the U.S. Fleet (Atlantic and Pacic) Rie and Pistol Matches, where hun dreds of Sailors are trained in service rie and service pistol marksmanship. Sailors participating in eet matches represent their commands in individual and team events, earn marksmanship medals and badges, and qualify to stand armed watches aboard ships and at other commands. USNMT also conducts the annual All Navy (East and West) Rie and Pis tol Championships, in which the top 100 Sailors who have red qualifying scores in eet matches compete. As members of the rie and pistol teams, the top 20 Sailors from each coast represent the Navy in the annual Inter Service Rie and Pistol Matches where the best of the best come to compete from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. I/S Pistol Championships are held at Ft Ben ning, Ga., while the I/S Rie Championships are held at MCB Quantico, Va. e Civilian Marksmanship Programs National Rie and Pistol Matches and the National Rie As sociations National Rie and Pistol Champion ships are held at Camp Perry, Ohio. Both eet matches be gin with classroom and range training to familiar ize shooters of all skill lev els with safety and proper practices on the range as well as the fundamentals of marksmanship. en the shooting starts. ere are warm-up matches before the 1000-point rie matches red at distances of 200, 300 and 500 yards and the 1000 point pistol matches red one-handed from 25 and 50 yards. Competitors also shoot in both pistol and rie excellence-in-competi tion matches. EIC competitions are qualication matches in which com petitors earn leg points toward the Distinguished Marksman and the Dis tinguished Pistol Shot badges. We want to get the word out to everybody, Glancey said. We want more new shooters to come out and participate in the matches. Lt. Rich Ray, 2012 East Coast Match Director, reports is years theme is Train the new shooter! Sailors do not have to be experienced shooters to benet from competitive shooting-nor do they even need to own rearms. roughout the match season, Naval Sea Systems Command Crane Division provides an armorers van with match grade ries, pistols, ammunition, and a workshop where a group of veteran gunsmiths build and maintain these precision rearms for Navy shooters. ey even have all the small gear for matches like spotting scopes, shooting coats, mats, and folding stools used to carry gear up and down the 600-yard rie range. One common area of confusion for Sailors wanting to shoot is how to join the team. It couldnt be easier. e Navy Marks manship Team is not a commissioned unit of the Navy. It has no unit iden tication code and there are no billets. Team leadership is a collateral duty and team membership is entirely voluntary. e annual match an nouncement message and team details may be found at the team Web site www. usnst.org. Proclamation, Jan. 1, 1863, African-American men can ght for the United States, Ayers said. eyve been held at bay for two years, but with incredible loyalty to the nation that had betrayed them so badly, they come to the defense of the Unit ed States. But short of a military victory by the Union, that document would have been only words on pa per, it was the eort put forth by African-Ameri cans themselves to ensure emancipation by support ing the military that became just as pivotal as the proclamation itself, Ayers said. e controversy among historians is, was it selfemancipation?, the historian asked. Did the slaves free themselves? ey risked everything that they could to free themselves, but without the presence of the United States Army, there was nothing to free themselves with. During four years, from the rst shots at Fort Sum ter to the time the Civil War ended in 1865, some 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought on the side of the Union and for freedom. But the black struggle did not end there, Ayers said. e South was left in ruins by the war, and as history has shown, the legacy of slavery continued to haunt the nation for decades. is is the beginning of the story. is is the be ginning of America slowly becoming itself and fulll ing what it had promised, Ayers said, noting that this process would continue for the next 100 years as black Americans fought to fully gain their civil rights. Despite the struggle, Ayers pointed out, black Americans, especially those in the military, then as well as now, contin ued to show loyalty to the country that had long de nied them. Beginning with the 180,000 black soldiers and 20,000 black sailors, African-Americans have stepped forward to defend this country from the very rst hour that they were committed to, to today, Ayers said. e Emancipation Proc lamation is on display in the National Archives in the nations capital.Revisit Marksmen to compete THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 7

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Budget for Baby oered Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Kings Bay was pleased to assist SueBell Lewis and EM1 Gregory Lewis of the USS Rhode Island (Gold) in welcom ing the newest member of their family, one-month old Rowan Caleb Lewis. SueBell attended a oneon-one Budget for Baby session with a volunteer caseworker at NMCRS. She received a spending plan review, to help un derstand the sometimes hidden costs associated with growing a family, and also a layette for the new baby. In 2011 more than 6,400 families attended a Bud get for Baby Workshop, receiving a spending plan review and Layette which includes terry sleepers, handmade blankets, sheets, towels, and much more. SueBell and Rowan are pictured here in the Lay ette Room at the Kings Bay NMCRS oce. For more information regarding NMCRS B4B Workshops please call (912) 573-3928. Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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With women already provid ing direct support in special operations, ocials are studying how to open more positions that currently are open only to men, the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command said in Washington, D.C., Jan. 29. Special operations forces in clude a number of women with specialized language, cultural and special skills training, but Navy Adm. William H. McRaven acknowledged that Army Rangers, Navy SEALs and other door-kicking special operations units have never included women. Socom leaders have an op portunity over the next few years to assess how to open the commands ranks to women, McRaven said. I guarantee you, there will be females out there that will come to [basic underwater demolition/SEAL] training or be Rangers and will do a phenomenal job, he said.Ive sent a valentine to my granddaughter. I used to send my daughter valentines, but I figure now thats her husbands job, right? These are unconditionallove valentines. Im trying not to be too cynical now, but let me share this old valentine Ive held onto for some reason: Please come and let me love you. I dont ever want to be apart again. We are going to have such a wonderful life together. There has never been anything or anyone I wanted more than you. I love you forever and even after that. Sound good? This was from someone I once called my wife but now is merely a bad memory I call x-2. Forever and even after that lasted seven years.Lt. Gregory Price USS Tennessee Gold Lamar, S.C. My wife. She takes care of me and the family all the time and is a special lady. Beth Walker Contractor Eatontown, N.J. My husband and children, because I love them and theyre special. John Martin Retired Navy Cascade, West Va. My wife and grand daughters. I always get my wife flowers and stuff. Ellie Brown Navy Exchange employee Lemoore, Calif. My husband. Hes my sweetheart. MTSN Marcus Craig Trident Training Facility Owings Mills, Md. My mom. Shes always been supportive, especially because she was in the Navy as well. MA3 DeAngelo DuPree Security Force Battalion Atlanta Im sending a package to my mother and sisters. Theyve really been the backbone of this year for me and are most deserving. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Huff Women target spec ops duties THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information Thrift Savings Plan workshop Feb. 27The Thrift Savings Plan is an interactive workshop suit able for all service mem bers. It is designed to provide detailed information on the Thrift Savings Program and to help learners understand how TSP can contribute to finan cial security during retirement. This workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Feb. 27. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move is designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transportation, trav el pay, allowances, important forms and documents, hous ing referral office and reloca tion services. Service members and spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer. Plus, while attending the workshop, children ages 7 to 12 learn about relocation, how it affects them and what to look forward to. The workshop is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five-day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market including skills, experience, edu cation and values plus simple, effective and easy-to-use formats that get interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions, this workshop is for you. It assists job seekers in writing a resume that will get them in the door. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recommended, class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan pro vides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan, which assists ser vice members and spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retire ment plan. This workshop is 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Devel opment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to in crease a couples ability to bet ter understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and com munication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfac tion, closeness, and genuine ness in their marriage. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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e size and impact of Hurricane Sandy will be remembered for years to come and the signicance of the storm will not be lost to the Coast Guard civilian volunteers who were part of the Department of Homeland Securitys Surge Capacity Force. Following Hurricane Katrina, a need was rec ognized for the federal government to be more responsive in the immedi ate aftermath of a disaster. us, the surge capacity force was created. e surge capacity force, made up of federal employees, would augment a response when the scope of the incident exceeded the response capacity of the Federal Emergency Management Agencys existing disaster workforce. Beginning in 2011, Coast Guard civilian em ployees began to apply for selection to serve as vol unteers. Living near the coast like we do in North Caroli na and experiencing all the hurricanes and storms that we do, I have witnessed the volunteers and FEMA em ployees respond to coastal North Carolina and felt the need to return the help and assistance that we were so grateful to receive, said Donald Plymel, a volunteer out of the Aviation Lo gistics Center in Elizabeth City, N.C. Until Sandy, FEMA had not activated the Surge Capacity Force. Sandys damage was unprecedented, however, and soon volunteers were being called to action. Deploying for up to 45 days, federal employees from across the nation set out on a mission to help those impacted by the storm. e message from FEMA came in Friday afternoon, just as I was leaving for the day, said Annette Ambrosio, an organizational perfor mance consultant for the 8th Coast Guard District. I immediately made the plans to y in on Sunday and start the SCF ad venture. I was part of the rst wave of 400 and we were all trained as com munity relations special ists. Working for the Coast Guard, civilians dont of ten get a chance to work responses; it usually goes to active duty or reserve Coast Guard employees. I was honored to be a DHS volunteer. Other volunteers, such as Tim Sheer, retired master chief petty ocer of the Coast Guard and member of the National Maritime Center in Mar tinsburg, W. Va., were pri or military members. We were met by FEMA personnel and a whole lot of other people at the air port in Washington, D.C. said, Sheer. e group of us were loaded on a bus and driven to a training site. Ours was in Emmetsburg, Md., where the Emergency Management Institute is located. After three days of train ing, our group was sent to Fort Dix, N.J., where we were issued a laptop com puter, a remote access to ken, and mobile phone. We were then broken into teams of up to 10 people, assigned vans, and o we drove to New York. Working conditions were challenging, both mentally and physically. Along with civilian vol unteers from other DHS components, Coast Guard employees reached out as community relations vol unteers to provide food, water and shelter to Sandy survivors. Volunteers removed debris from homes and roads, provided assis tance to storm victims and helped restore the impact ed communities. Volunteers were housed on either the United States Training Ship Kennedy or the United States Training Ship Empire State, troop ships of the Navy and training vessels of the U.S. Maritime Service. Workers slept in nar row bunks stacked three high that embedded into the walls like cubbies. e bunks were in one of several berthing areas that could sleep dozens of people. Below were steel oors, and above were labyrinths of ducts and wiring. ey ate breakfast and dinner in a mess hall, served caf eteria-style on metal trays. e response continued over the holidays and de spite volunteers missing anksgiving with their own families, they said the stories of Sandy victims humbled them and made them grateful for their own families. I found my experience helping the people in Queens and in particular in the Rockaway Beach area to be extremely re warding. I learned a lot about what is required to assist those in need after a major disaster such as Hurricane Sandy, said omas Farr, a volunteer from the Pay and Pernnel Center. I was extremely impressed by how the people of New York pulled together to come back from Sandy. I was fortunate to work with a great team who had a single goal in mind do what ever we could to help no matter what the personal sacrice meant. I wish the folks back there the best and may God watch over them. Surge Capacity Force lends aid e service Library Press Display is now available through the Navy General Library Program and oers free access to more than 2,200 newspa pers from 97 countries in 54 languages. By logging onto the Navy Knowledge Online, either through user name and password or their Common Access Card, all Department of the Navy employees, Sailors, to include reservists, plus retir ees and their dependants can now have access to many of the worlds news papers in just a few clicks. Whether youre into world politics and for eign aairs, fashion or just want to catch up on whats happening in your hometown, this service is another great resource to help you ll your infor mation needs, said Nilya Carrato, program assistant for Navy General Library Program, And you dont have to pay any subscription fees. Once onto the Library Press Service site, which is found on the Navy eLibrary News section of NKO, users are then able to navigate through vari ous subject headings or geographical locations. From there they nd the newspaper or periodical theyre interested in read ing and read it as though theyre reading a traditional hardcopy newspa per. e newspapers even have hyperlinks embed ded that allow the user to jump through them with ease, Carrato said. e service can be used on all forms of digital devices, to include personal computers, tablets and smartphones, all thats needed is an internet connection and authorized access. Navy Library patrons may register for this and many of NGLPs services by logging into NKO at www.nko.navy.mil, click ing on the Reference heading in the upper right part of the screen. en click on e-Library news. Once on this NKO page Sailors and their families can explore the vast array of newspapers. Interested patrons are also encouraged to visit the YouTube tutorials for more information on how to nd and use the service on NKO. e Navy General Library Program has existed for nearly a century and is a service of Commander, Navy Installations Command. Navy links to online newspapers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 11

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Counterterrorism operations in Somalia and Yemen demonstrate the value of small-footprint approaches and building partner capacity, the Pentagons special operations chief said Jan. 30. Michael A. Sheehan, assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conict, spoke here about the threat of terror in those and other countries during remarks at the Na tional Defense Industrial Associations 24th Annual Special Operations and Low-intensity Conict Symposium, which ended Jan. 30. Sheehan pointed out the defense strategy released in January 2012 called for innovative, low-cost ap proaches in widely dis tributed counterterrorism eorts. In the year since that guidance was issued, such approaches have brought good results, he added. A year ago in Yemen, alQaida had taken over vast swaths of territory and was really threatening the state in Yemen, and also threatening to re-establish some capabilities that were very problematic, he said. Over the past year, weve made great progress in Yemen. With the support of U.S. special operations forces, he said, counterterror ef forts there have turned the corner. Somalia also shows progress over the past year, he said, with alShabaab, a terrorist group that controlled large parts of the country, pushed out of the major cities. ey havent gone away, he added. eyre a persistent group. [But] you can see in our strategies, our policies and programs in Yemen and Somalia, some of the components of how our strategy might look in the months and years ahead. Sheehan said while ter ror groups are known to spread and metastasize, the three traditional ar eas where al-Qaida is an entrenched threat are the moun tainous area between Pakistan and Af ghani stan, in Yemen, and in East Africa. ose three traditional areas have been and will continue to be areas of al-Qaida persistence, he said. Fortunately for us, weve been able to batter them in all of those three areas over the last 10 or 11 years with a great deal of success. e measure of success against terror groups is their inability to mount strategic attacks, Sheehan said. He credits constant pressure on al-Qaida with diminishing that organizations ability to train and equip terrorists. Some people say weve been a little bit lucky, with the underwear bomber and other incidents that havent quite gone right for al-Qaida, but Id say its more than luck, he said. Because we put more pressure on them around the world, because its more dicult for them to train and deploy op eratives, they make more mistakes. Sheehan said the failed May 1 bombing in New Yorks Times Square dem onstrated his point. Faizal Shazad, an American citi zen later sentenced to life in prison for the bombing attempt, failed, Sheehan said, because he was trained by the Pakistan Taliban. He couldnt get to al-Qaida. e bomb Shazad cre ated didnt work, and he had no network to sup port him, Sheehan said. He also wasnt a suicide bomber, the special oper ations chief noted. Why? Because he wasnt in those camps long enough to be indoctrinated. e factors that caused the attack to fail werent just luck, Sheehan said, but the result of enor mous pressure put on the organization, that pre vents them from planning, training and launching skilled operatives. Maintaining that pres sure against al-Qaida and similar groups is a task U.S. special operations forces and partner militar ies are focused on around the world, he said. If such groups nd sanctuary and a place where they can act with impunity, he warned, they can rebuild their stra tegic capability. New and evolving ter rorist threats are emerging in Syria and North Africa, Sheehan noted. In Syria, where Bashar Assads government forces and the people have bat tled for two years, Shee han said, the al-Nusra Front is very closely as sociated with al-Qaida and we believe they are trying to hijack [the] strug gles of the Syrian people and perhaps put their own agenda on a post-Assad Syria. In Africa, the Maghreb region along the Mediter ranean Sea and the Saha ran area of the Sahel are of major concern to us, he said. Libya, he added, is awash with weapons, while Mali was the scene of a Tuareg tribal rebellion that was hijacked by alQaida and other aliates, who gained control of an area about the size of Tex as in the countrys north. e French have had great initial success in pushing back al-Qaida advances in Mali, Shee han noted, but the whole northern part of the con tinent is seeing increased terrorist presence and involvement. All these groups share a similar al-Qaida narrative. In many ways, al-Qaida is seeking to rebrand itself and diversify into Africa, because theyre able to nd, in those ungoverned spaces, the sanctuary they need to become strate gic, he said. Northern Africa has the four elements al-Qa ida needs to do just that, Sheehan said: ungoverned space, terrorist groups, weapons and funding. Countering al-Qaida requires both direct action and security force assis tance, Sheehan said. In the long term, we recognize that we cant solely rely on precision strikes to defeat enemy networks and foster the kind of stability we need in these regions, he said. Such stability can best be established by aiding friends, partners and allies, he added. Special operations forc es play a major role in se curity force assistance as well as in direct action, Sheehan noted. Security force assistance takes two approaches, he explained: training local forces to control border areas and deny space and sanctuary to terrorists, and training specialized counterterror forces. U.S. special operations forces have, throughout their history, focused largely on training hostnation militaries, Sheehan said. In Somalia, he noted, the African Union and a multinational force led by the Ugandans did a darn good job, and we helped them. eir job was to control space and push al-Shabaab o. Meanwhile, he added, other units focused on high-value targets and other leaders of the orga nization. Coupled together, we had a strategy that worked, Sheehan said. Sheehan acknowledged that a partnered strategy holds risks. Other coun tries may embarrass the United States, or U.S. forces could get pulled into other conicts, he said. But the risk of inac tion is greater, he added, as it holds the danger of al-Qaida or other groups developing a strategic at tack capability. Special operations troops understand those risks and have the experi ence and maturity to man age them, Sheehan said. He noted security force assistance is a classic role for special operations forces. ey can deploy to farung places in small num bers to protect U.S. nation al interests and to work with partners to continue to crush al-Qaida, he said. Small-footprint ops eective, ocial says 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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Up Periscope Who are you sending valentines to? Page 9 College tour Kings Bay area students visit four campuses Page 4 Home Port Connect to branch clinic via e-mail Page 3 Navy salutes Black History Lessons in scal responsibility set for Feb. 25 to March 2 e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nancial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the com munity to participate in Mili tary Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www. militarysaves. org/take-thepledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commitment to begin the journey toward financial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in personal nan cial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great oppor tunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, family members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specic goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient Military Saves Week sets sea and anchor detail A noted author highlighted for Pentagon employees Feb. 4 an often-overlooked fact: the loyalty that emancipated slaves displayed toward the country that enslaved them in the days leading up to the end of the Civil War. Dr. Edward L. Ayers, president of the University of Richmond, spoke at the Pentagon as part of the Defense Departments commemoration of African-American History Month. Ayers, a historian specializing in the Antebellum South and the author and editor of 12 books on the history of the southern United States, was invited to speak on the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincolns signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, which ended slavery in states that had seceded from the Union during the Civil War and allowed blacks to serve in the Union Army and Navy. With the Emancipation African American Sailors have long, proud record As announced by NAVADMIN 009/13 released Jan. 16, the Navy joins the nation in celebrating the vibrant history and culture of African American and Black Sailors during African American/Black History Month throughout the month of February. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include the entire month of February. is year Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate and reect on the theme, At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: e EmancipaRear Adm. Tofalo conducts tour of NSB Kings BayChilean submarine Simpson (SS-21) departed Naval Station Mayport to return to homeport in Talcahuano, Chile, Feb. 7, after taking part in the Diesel Electric Submarine Initiative, and CHILEMAR IV with the U.S. Navy. During the Mayport visit, crew members from Simpson toured Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay with Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander of Submarine Group 10. DESI is a partnership that allows the United States and other partner navies to work together to train and test underwater warfare capabilities through engagement tactics, weapon system tests and close encounter operations. is particular training evolution helps the American and Peruvian navies train their crews and test capabilities while helping foster bilateral cooperation and further improve joint interoperability. CHILEMAR is an annual bilateral exer-Chilean Sailors visit Obama unhappy with cutsDeep, across-the-board spending cuts slated to take eect March 1 in the absence of con gressional action could severely aect military readiness and should not happen, President Barack Obama said Feb. 8 during a farewell tribute to retiring Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta. And since we are now just weeks away from deep automatic cuts to federal spending, including defense, let me say this: ere is no reason, no reason, for that to happen, Obama said. Putting our scal house in order calls for a balanced approach, not massive, indiscriminate cuts that could have a severe impact on our military preparedness. He called on both political parties to work together to avoid the automatic: solving problems, not trying to score points; doing right for the country, not for any particular political agenda; sustaining our economic recovery; balancing budgets; but also maintaining the nest military in history. Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Dolphin Auction set for March 2e 2013 Silver and Gold Dolphin Auction Wild Wild West will begin at 6 p.m., Saturday, March 2 at the NSB Kings Bay gym. Tickets are $20 for E-& and above. e event raises funds for the Dolphin Scholarship fund. Reservations can be made through command contacts. For more information, contact Brigid Mills at (215) 990-8883 or brigidredmond@gmail.com.YC teens hold kids book drive e youth and teens of the Kings Bay Youth Center are having a childrens book drive as part of their Days of Service program honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teens are calling on members of the community to bring new and slightly used childrens books to the Youth Cen ter from now until Feb. 28. ey will be cleaned, sorted, packaged and distributed to various community and service organizations throughout Camden County. Teens interested in learn ing more about this and other events should contact Sharon Grant, Youth Center director at (912) 573-2380 or visit the MWR Facebook page at www.facebook.com/kingsbaymwr.MOAA installs officers Feb. 19e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Association will have its new chap ter ocer instillation ceremony beginning with social hour at 5 :30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 19 at Os prey Coves Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. Cost of dinner is $30. Dress is mess dress, tuxedo or coat and tie. Guest speaker is Capt. Kelly Mc Dowell, deputy commander/chief of sta, Sub marine Group Ten. RSVP by Feb. 15 with Capt. Orren Crouch (Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net.Washington memorial Feb. 17Sunday Feb. 17 St. Marys Masonic Lodge No. 109 will host a re-enactment of e George Washington Memorial Service. Citizens are encouraged to join us for this event at noon at the St. Marys Masonic Lodge, 205 Wheeler St., St. Marys, on the corner of Weed and Wheeler. Food will be served. e procession will start at 2:30 p.m., Fellowship at the hall will follow. For more information, call (912) 882-5226.NEX book signing this weekendAuthor J.D. Langford will have a book signing for his work Walk With Me Feb. 15, 16 and 17 at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exhange.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure percentage of body fat, thats accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Minimal form-tting clothing is required; ide ally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compres sion shorts and/or a lightweight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an ap pointment, call Health Promotion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Motorcycle run aids Wall causeABATE of Floridas Black Creek Chapter will have a Run for the Wall Feb. 23 to help fund bring ing the Moving Wall Vietnam veterans memorial to Green Cove Springs, Fla. e run begins with 9 a.m. registration at Middleburg VFW Post 8255, 2296 Aster Ave., Middleburg, Fla.. Kickstands up 10:30 a.m. Entry fee is $10 per rider and $5 per passenger. For more information, call Herb Hil derbrand at (904) 704-5501.County school buses add camerasCamden County Schools, in partnership with local law enforcement and municipalities, is combating motorists not obeying trac laws when children are loading and unloading school buses, by implementing the Cross Safe bus cam era system. Its designed to deter motorists from passing stopped school buses when ashing red lights, stop sign and child crossing gate are de ployed.Battle of Olustee Feb. 15 to 17e Civil War Battle of Olustee marks its 149th anniversary with 1,800 re-enactors 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Feb. 15 to 17 with battle re-enactments Saturday and Sunday. e site is on U.S. 90, 50 miles west of Jacksonville. For more information, call (877) 635-3655 or visit battleofolustee.org or www.oridastateparks/olustee Now hear this! Changes to how the Navy processes awards makes it easier for Sailors to conrm their personal decorations and medals are reected in their Ocial Military Personnel File, ocials said recently. NAVADMIN 016/13 outlines the steps Sailors should take to verify their awards are accurately reected in the Navy Department Awards Web Service and their OMPF. All personal awards, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and higher, should be showing in a service members record. In the past, award citations or certicates received directly from the member for the OMPF were not accepted, since they were required to be mailed from the command authorized to enter the award into NDAWS, said Jim Giger, head of Records Management Policy Branch, Navy Personnel Command. Sailors will now be able to send in copies of their own award citations or certicates for their OMPF if the award is accurately reected in NDAWS. Before a Sailor requests a missing award citation or certicate be added to their OMPF, they should verify the award is recorded in NDAWS by visiting the U.S. Navy Awards website at https://awards.navy.mil and launching the Personal Awards Query. If a Sailors award is recorded in NDAWS, but missing in their OMPF, they should mail a legible, clean copy of the signed award citation, or certicate in the case of Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals, with the service members full social security number printed in the upper right hand corner, to PERS-313 at: Navy Personnel Command PERS313 5720 Integrity Drive Millington, TN 38055-3130. Giger said if a Sailors award is not reected in the NDAWS database, the citation will not be accepted by NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. To resolve this conict, a Sailor must contact their commands NDAWS coordinator, since only NDAWS coordinators can enter approved awards into the NDAWS database. e NDAWS coordinator will need an original copy of the award citation/certicate and, if available, a copy of the orders from the service or joint approval authorities. Once and award is entered and reected in the database, the NDAWS coordinator will then submit the award citation or certicate to NPC for entry into the service members OMPF. Awarding authorities must submit a completed OPNAV Form 1650/3 and award citations or certicates to their NDAWS coordinator for entry into NDAWS. A list of NDAWS coordinators is available on the U.S. Navy Awards Web site. It is important that only authorized personal awards are reected in both NDAWS and in a service members OMPF, Giger said. And ensuring only those award citations or certicates that are accurately reecting in NDAWS are included in the OMPF will increase the integrity of both NDAWS and the OMPF. Per NAVADMIN 016/13, Sailors submitting a selection board package with an award citation or certicate not already in their OMPF, but recorded in NDAWS, will automatically have the award added to their OMPF. ose Sailors can expect to see the award citation added to their OMPF four to six weeks after the selection board has adjourned, said Giger. Sailors can access their OMPF anytime online for the most up-todate service record information by visiting BUPERS Online at https:// www.bol.navy.mil. For more information, read NAVADMIN 016/13, visit the NDAWS Web Page on the NPC Web site at http://www.public.navy.mil/bu pers-npc/career/recordsmanage ment/pages/awddecormedal.aspx or call the NPC Customer Service Center at (866) 827-5672.Check your awards in your records Personnel Command e Navy relaunched its agship magazine, All Hands magazine, for Sailors and their families as an online publication Feb. 11 at www. ah.mil. e new online version features stories, photos and videos about topics that are relevant to Sailors and their families. e magazine highlights Navy culture and heritage, and aims to be an informative and entertaining resource Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. All Hands magazine is a Web publication for Sailors by Sailors, said Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Navy chief of information. For almost 90 years, the print ver sion of All Hands magazine greeted Sailors everywhere. It started as a typewritten news bulletin, but over its lifespan it grew in style and stature. e Navy stopped printing a monthly version of the magazine in Dec. 2011. My intent is to bring that same sense of purpose and tradition forward with this online magazine, Kirby said. e rst issue features stories about how sequestration and the continuing resolution will aect the Navy if they occur; recruit division commander duty; changes to the Navys enlisted detailing process and more. Additionally, the Web site allows readers to comment and share content across various popular social media channels. According to its mission statement, the goal of All Hands maga zine is to include articles, information, imagery and videos that are relevant to Sailors and their families. It will explore issues that are of concern to Sailors and provide information that Sailors and their families can use to make decisions regarding their Navy careers. We are excited to see you contribute your story in whatever format that may be, Kirby said. e Navy production division of the Defense Media Activity is producing the magazine, but its editors are counting on contributions from across the eet. Readers can visit www.ah.mil for details on how to contribute.All Hands magazine goes online Defense Media e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase begian Feb. 7, and remain open until 5 a.m. Feb. 19 for Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the Web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders nine to seven months from their projected rotation date. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy.mil. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with a November 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a September 2013 PRD. ese Sailors, with Fleet Ride/ Perform to Serve approval if applicable, may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is typically about 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before making applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers also must follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. February PCS applications open Personnel Command

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Each of the 57,000 patients with a primary care manager at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and its remaining branch health clinics in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport, belongs to a primary care team as part of Medical Home Port. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide medical home model of care. Medical Home Port places our patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers, from doctors to nurses to case managers, led by their primary care manager, said NH Jacksonville Director for Medical Services Cmdr. Troy Borema. Our patients and their Medical Home Port teams work together for a coordinated, whole-person approach to health. is comprehensive approach is designed to meet the full range of patients health and wellness needs. Medical Home Port in creases continuity of care and the use of preventive services, which can lead to better outcomes for people with chronic conditions. It also reduces emergency room visits and hospital izations because the care teams provide urgent care, something that boosts both patient and sta sat isfaction. My Medical Home Port team keeps me current on my appointments, immunizations and blood checks that I need regularly, said Patricia Wampler, a family medicine red team patient. Medical Home Port also oers a new way for patients and their care teams to connect, via Medical Home Port Online secure e-mail. Patients can e-mail their care team directly for non-urgent issues, like requesting an appointment, lab results or medication rells. And, patients can still call Central Appointments and After Hours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 5294677. To register and log onto Medical Home Port Online, patients can visit the commands Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax. NH Jacksonvilles Medical Home Port is seeking health care industry recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the gold standard in the patient-centered medical home model. e application process includes a site visit to evaluate continuous adherence to multiple standards. Patientand familycentered care has always been at the core of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles delivery of health care, whether at our hospital or one of our branch health clinics, said Borema. Medical Home Port enhances this, oering increased coordination and access to the highest quality care for our patients. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. To nd out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax, like the Facebook page at www. facebook/navalhospital jacksonville, follow on Twitter at www.twitter. com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www. youtube.com/user/naval hospitaljax. Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@ med.navy.mil Branch clinic adds Med Home PortSome factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Sailors can learn more about CMS/ID from their CCC or access CMS/ID by selecting the CMS/ID link on the Navy Personnel Command Web site at www.npc.navy.mil.PCS THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 5 U.S. and NATO leaders congratulated Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen for a job well done as commander of the alliances International Security Assistance Force and praised Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. as the strategic leader needed for the next phase of the command, Feb. 10. At a ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, Allen passed Dunford the ags of the NATO command and of U.S. Forces Afghanistan. ere are 66,000 American service members in the country. e chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey was on hand and praised Allen as a coalition builder. Dunford is perfect to follow Allen as the new commander, Dempsey said. With 50 nations represented in the coalition to help the country, Allen said he is condent in victory. He remem bered the more than 560 ISAF person nel who were killed and the more than 5,500 who were wounded during his 19 months in command. e new commander kept his remarks short, but promised to keep up the momentum. Dunford will have his work cut out for him as he continues training Afghan forces and the movement of supplies and personnel out of the country ahead of the drawdown. And all this must be done in a way that allows a yet to be determined post NATO force to be ready to begin operations Jan. 1, 2015. Today is not about change, its about continuity, Dunford said. INSURV steadies big shipInspectors from the Board of Inspection and Survey were welcomed by the sta of Battleship Wisconsin (BB 64) prior to conducting a survey as part of a volunteer community relations project Jan. 25 in Norfolk, Va. After a storied history beginning in World War II, the battleship received its last ocial INSURV inspection in 1992, before becoming a oating museum on the James River. John Elliker, Battleship Wisconsin project manager, said the city of Norfolk initially contacted INSURV to ask them about surveying the ship. What we want is for your grandkids grandkids to enjoy this ship in a meaningful way, and we cant do that if were constantly battling rust and deterioration, Elliker said. is is the beginning of a unique partnership between the active duty Navy and the city of Norfolk for the preservation of the battleship. Capt. Mark Metzger, INSURV director of craft and auxiliary force inspections, said the 15-man team was happy to volunteer to help the museum. e team spent the day getting a feel for the ship and looking for obvious safety discrepancies. Elliker said the report on the ndings will help them put together a detailed plan for opening up more spaces on the ship. At the end of the day Elliker said the preliminary results look promising. Metzger said this wont be INSURVs last visit to the ship. Elliker said there are a number of volunteer opportunities on the ship, either for individuals or groups. ey even have an adopt-a-spot program for groups who would like to take ownership of a particular space on the ship and bring it back to Navy standards. Trident Refit Facility 2012 honorees tion Proclamation and the March on Washington. African American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service in every major armed conict since the Revolutionary War. African Americans continue to serve with distinction, now comprising more than 17 percent of the active duty Navy total force end-strength. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African American Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the rst African American graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He died May 22, 2012 after a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian workforce. Edna Young, the rst African American woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the rst African American woman to achieve the rank of chief petty ocer, also died in 2012. In 2012, Vice Adm. Michelle Janine Howard became the rst AfricanAmerican woman to receive a third star in ag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Howard is currently serving as deputy commander for U.S. Fleet Forces Command. In 1999, she became the rst African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47). Immediately following this years celebration of African American/Black History Month, Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys rst female African American Fleet Master Chief. Beldo will become the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Fleet Master Chief in March 2013. emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and create an emergency savings, a future emergen cy wont become a nan cial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the Department of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.SaveHistory cise between the U.S. and Chile, which is designed to demonstrate interoperability between U.S. submarine rescue systems and Chilean submarines. e exercise promotes greater understanding and cooperation between the U.S. and Chile. During its three-month deployment, Simpson conducted training with both surface ships and air units. Shortly after Simpson arrived in Mayport, the submarine participated in independent deployed certication exercises with various units from the USS KEARSARGE Amphibious Readiness Group. In January, the crew took part in CHILEMAR IV, which focused on the notication and localization phases of a bottomed, disabled submarine. Several U.S. Atlantic Fleet air and surface units also participated in the exercise, employing side-scan sonar, an undersea unmanned vehicle, and several P-3 Orion and SH-60 aircraft. Simpson then participated in an anti-submarine warfare exercise with Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School, and excelled in its role in the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Tofalo, was at the closing ceremony for DESI, held aboard Mayport, and talked about the importance of such exercises. I was actually in the audience when former U.S. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead rolled out the cooperative strategy for 21st Century Sea Power, and Ill never forget his words where he stated, you cant surge trust, he said. Rather, it takes long term relationships, built upon interactions like CHILEMAR and DESI, to foster the important bond between our great nations,. Also attending the closing ceremony was Vice Almirante Jose Romero, commander naval operations of Chile, and talked about the importance of the U.S. Navy and Chilean navy continuing to work together. Exercises such as this will only continue to improve the interoperability of our navies, which is important for our nations, Romero said. Commander Eduardo Torres, commanding ofcer of Simpson, thanked his crew and Naval Station Mayport. To the crew of Simpson, thank you for your hard work, I would like to thank Naval Station Mayport for giving us the support we needed when we were in port, he said. It will take the submarine a month traveling through the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Pacic Ocean to return to its homeport on the southern tip of South America. Chilean Marine takes NATO Afghan command

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Presidents Dollar Days bowling is at Rack-N-Roll Lanes 1 to 5 p.m., Friday, Feb. 15 and Monday, Feb. 18, with $1 games and $1 shoe rental on these two days. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. MWR Golf Tournament starts with an 8:30 a.m. shot gun start Wednesday, Feb. 20 at Trident Lakes Golf Course. Its $26 per patron, which includes lunch and door prizes. Closest to pin and longest drive. Best ball format. All are welcome. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Dominos Like Kings Bay Dominos on Facebook to receive special code phrases, daily specials, upcoming events and corporate promotions for some super deals. (912) 510-5400. www.facebook. com/kingsbaydominos Fireside Jam Session Its outside the Gaming Zone at 6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 21. Bring your instrument and hang. Smores will be provided. Call (912) 573-4548 for more details.. The Harlem Ambassadors Theyre coming to Kings Bay, Wednesday, Feb. 27 at the Fitness Complex Basketball Courts. All tickets are $2, children 2 and under are free. Tickets available at ITT. Doors open at 5:20 p.m. with game time at 6 p.m. There will be food available for purchase. Get an autograph at 7:30 p.m. No video taping will be allowed during the performance. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free twoweek introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your Feb. 24 Daytona 500 race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 5739492. Game on Rack-NRoll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holidays, plus a Saturday sign-up 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, players must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and cannot turn 16 prior to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reservists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 5738202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Spring Break Registration at the Youth Center Camp runs April 1 to 5 for ages kindergarten to 12 years old. Register at the Youth Center starting March 11 for current school age care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors and individual augmentees, March 18 for active duty working or student spouse and DoD employees and March 25 for DoD contractors. Hours to sign up 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, not including holidays. Cost is based on total family income. Most recent leave and earnings state ment or pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. Birth certifi cate must be available for confirmation of age. Single/ dual military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. IAs must provide orders. Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information call (912) 573-2380. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Presidents Dollar Days soon MWR Sports 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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e Navy Marksmanship Team is looking for new members to participate in Navy and interservice rie and pistol matches. All active-duty and reserve Sailors are welcomed and encouraged to participate. Sailors receive lim ited small arms training as they process through Navy Individual Augmentee Training at various U.S. Army training centers, said Cmdr. Mick Glancey, USNMT ocer in charge. All Sailors serving IA/GSA tours are issued a service rie (M-16) or a service pistol (M9), some receive both prior to deployment. Small arms marksmanship is a basic fundamental skill set all our Sailors are re quired to possess. e USNMT is the leading proponent of small arms marksmanship and safety training for U.S. Navy personnel. Each year, the team conducts the U.S. Fleet (Atlantic and Pacic) Rie and Pistol Matches, where hun dreds of Sailors are trained in service rie and service pistol marksmanship. Sailors participating in eet matches represent their commands in individual and team events, earn marksmanship medals and badges, and qualify to stand armed watches aboard ships and at other commands. USNMT also conducts the annual All Navy (East and West) Rie and Pistol Championships, in which the top 100 Sailors who have red qualifying scores in eet matches compete. As members of the rie and pistol teams, the top 20 Sailors from each coast represent the Navy in the annual Inter Service Rie and Pistol Matches where the best of the best come to compete from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. I/S Pistol Championships are held at Ft Benning, Ga., while the I/S Rie Championships are held at MCB Quantico, Va. e Civilian Marksmanship Programs National Rie and Pistol Matches and the National Rie Associations National Rie and Pistol Championships are held at Camp Perry, Ohio. Both eet matches begin with classroom and range training to familiarize shooters of all skill levels with safety and proper practices on the range as well as the fundamentals of marksmanship. en the shooting starts. ere are warm-up matches before the 1000-point rie matches red at distances of 200, 300 and 500 yards and the 1000 point pistol matches red one-handed from 25 and 50 yards. Competitors also shoot in both pistol and rie excellence-in-competi tion matches. EIC competitions are qualication matches in which competitors earn leg points toward the Distinguished Marksman and the Distinguished Pistol Shot badges. We want to get the word out to everybody, Glancey said. We want more new shooters to come out and participate in the matches. Lt. Rich Ray, 2012 East Coast Match Director, reports is years theme is Train the new shooter! Sailors do not have to be experienced shooters to benet from competitive shooting-nor do they even need to own rearms. roughout the match season, Naval Sea Systems Command Crane Division provides an armorers van with match grade ries, pistols, ammunition, and a workshop where a group of veteran gunsmiths build and maintain these precision rearms for Navy shooters. ey even have all the small gear for matches like spotting scopes, shooting coats, mats, and folding stools used to carry gear up and down the 600-yard rie range. One common area of confusion for Sailors wanting to shoot is how to join the team. It couldnt be easier. e Navy Marksmanship Team is not a commissioned unit of the Navy. It has no unit identication code and there are no billets. Team leadership is a collateral duty and team membership is entirely voluntary. e annual match announcement message and team details may be found at the team Web site www. usnst.org. Proclamation, Jan. 1, 1863, African-American men can ght for the United States, Ayers said. eyve been held at bay for two years, but with incredible loyalty to the nation that had betrayed them so badly, they come to the defense of the United States. But short of a military victory by the Union, that document would have been only words on paper, it was the eort put forth by African-Americans themselves to ensure emancipation by supporting the military that became just as pivotal as the proclamation itself, Ayers said. e controversy among historians is, was it selfemancipation?, the historian asked. Did the slaves free themselves? ey risked everything that they could to free themselves, but without the presence of the United States Army, there was nothing to free themselves with. During four years, from the rst shots at Fort Sumter to the time the Civil War ended in 1865, some 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought on the side of the Union and for freedom. But the black struggle did not end there, Ayers said. e South was left in ruins by the war, and as history has shown, the legacy of slavery continued to haunt the nation for decades. is is the beginning of the story. is is the beginning of America slowly becoming itself and fullling what it had promised, Ayers said, noting that this process would continue for the next 100 years as black Americans fought to fully gain their civil rights. Despite the struggle, Ayers pointed out, black Americans, especially those in the military, then as well as now, continued to show loyalty to the country that had long denied them. Beginning with the 180,000 black soldiers and 20,000 black sailors, African-Americans have stepped forward to defend this country from the very rst hour that they were committed to, to today, Ayers said. e Emancipation Proclamation is on display in the National Archives in the nations capital.Revisit Marksmen to compete THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 7

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Budget for Baby oered Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Kings Bay was pleased to assist SueBell Lewis and EM1 Gregory Lewis of the USS Rhode Island (Gold) in welcoming the newest member of their family, one-month old Rowan Caleb Lewis. SueBell attended a oneon-one Budget for Baby session with a volunteer caseworker at NMCRS. She received a spending plan review, to help understand the sometimes hidden costs associated with growing a family, and also a layette for the new baby. In 2011 more than 6,400 families attended a Budget for Baby Workshop, receiving a spending plan review and Layette which includes terry sleepers, handmade blankets, sheets, towels, and much more. SueBell and Rowan are pictured here in the Layette Room at the Kings Bay NMCRS oce. For more information regarding NMCRS B4B Workshops please call (912) 573-3928. Pirates Cove menus 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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With women already provid ing direct support in special operations, ocials are studying how to open more positions that currently are open only to men, the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command said in Washington, D.C., Jan. 29. Special operations forces include a number of women with specialized language, cultural and special skills training, but Navy Adm. William H. McRaven acknowledged that Army Rangers, Navy SEALs and other door-kicking special operations units have never included women. Socom leaders have an opportunity over the next few years to assess how to open the commands ranks to women, McRaven said. I guarantee you, there will be females out there that will come to [basic underwater demolition/SEAL] training or be Rangers and will do a phenomenal job, he said.Ive sent a valentine to my granddaughter. I used to send my daughter valentines, but I figure now thats her husbands job, right? These are unconditionallove valentines. Im trying not to be too cynical now, but let me share this old valentine Ive held onto for some reason: Please come and let me love you. I dont ever want to be apart again. We are going to have such a wonderful life together. There has never been anything or anyone I wanted more than you. I love you forever and even after that. Sound good? This was from someone I once called my wife but now is merely a bad memory I call x-2. Forever and even after that lasted seven years.Lt. Gregory Price USS Tennessee Gold Lamar, S.C. My wife. She takes care of me and the family all the time and is a special lady. Beth Walker Contractor Eatontown, N.J. My husband and children, because I love them and theyre special. John Martin Retired Navy Cascade, West Va. My wife and granddaughters. I always get my wife flowers and stuff. Ellie Brown Navy Exchange employee Lemoore, Calif. My husband. Hes my sweetheart. MTSN Marcus Craig Trident Training Facility Owings Mills, Md. My mom. Shes always been supportive, especially because she was in the Navy as well. MA3 DeAngelo DuPree Security Force Battalion Atlanta Im sending a package to my mother and sisters. Theyve really been the backbone of this year for me and are most deserving. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Huff Women target spec ops duties THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information Thrift Savings Plan workshop Feb. 27The Thrift Savings Plan is an interactive workshop suit able for all service mem bers. It is designed to provide detailed information on the Thrift Savings Program and to help learners understand how TSP can contribute to finan cial security during retirement. This workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Feb. 27. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move is designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transportation, trav el pay, allowances, important forms and documents, hous ing referral office and reloca tion services. Service members and spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer. Plus, while attending the workshop, children ages 7 to 12 learn about relocation, how it affects them and what to look forward to. The workshop is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five-day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market including skills, experience, edu cation and values plus simple, effective and easy-to-use formats that get interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions, this workshop is for you. It assists job seekers in writing a resume that will get them in the door. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recommended, class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512. program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan, which assists service members and spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to better understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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e size and impact of Hurricane Sandy will be remembered for years to come and the signicance of the storm will not be lost to the Coast Guard civilian volunteers who were part of the Department of Homeland Securitys Surge Capacity Force. Following Hurricane Katrina, a need was recognized for the federal government to be more responsive in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. us, the surge capacity force was created. e surge capacity force, made up of federal employees, would augment a response when the scope of the incident exceeded the response capacity of the Federal Emergency Management Agencys existing disaster workforce. Beginning in 2011, Coast Guard civilian employees began to apply for selection to serve as volunteers. Living near the coast like we do in North Caroli na and experiencing all the hurricanes and storms that we do, I have witnessed the volunteers and FEMA em ployees respond to coastal North Carolina and felt the need to return the help and assistance that we were so grateful to receive, said Donald Plymel, a volunteer out of the Aviation Lo gistics Center in Elizabeth City, N.C. Until Sandy, FEMA had not activated the Surge Capacity Force. Sandys damage was unprecedented, however, and soon volunteers were being called to action. Deploying for up to 45 days, federal employees from across the nation set out on a mission to help those impacted by the storm. e message from FEMA came in Friday afternoon, just as I was leaving for the day, said Annette Ambrosio, an organizational performance consultant for the 8th Coast Guard District. I immediately made the plans to y in on Sunday and start the SCF adventure. I was part of the rst wave of 400 and we were all trained as community relations specialists. Working for the Coast Guard, civilians dont often get a chance to work responses; it usually goes to active duty or reserve Coast Guard employees. I was honored to be a DHS volunteer. Other volunteers, such as Tim Sheer, retired master chief petty ocer of the Coast Guard and member of the National Maritime Center in Martinsburg, W. Va., were prior military members. We were met by FEMA personnel and a whole lot of other people at the airport in Washington, D.C. said, Sheer. e group of us were loaded on a bus and driven to a training site. Ours was in Emmetsburg, Md., where the Emergency Management Institute is located. After three days of training, our group was sent to Fort Dix, N.J., where we were issued a laptop computer, a remote access token, and mobile phone. We were then broken into teams of up to 10 people, assigned vans, and o we drove to New York. Working conditions were challenging, both mentally and physically. Along with civilian volunteers from other DHS components, Coast Guard employees reached out as community relations volunteers to provide food, water and shelter to Sandy survivors. Volunteers removed debris from homes and roads, provided assistance to storm victims and helped restore the impacted communities. Volunteers were housed on either the United States Training Ship Kennedy or the United States Training Ship Empire State, troop ships of the Navy and training vessels of the U.S. Maritime Service. Workers slept in narrow bunks stacked three high that embedded into the walls like cubbies. e bunks were in one of several berthing areas that could sleep dozens of people. Below were steel oors, and above were labyrinths of ducts and wiring. ey ate breakfast and dinner in a mess hall, served cafeteria-style on metal trays. e response continued over the holidays and despite volunteers missing anksgiving with their own families, they said the stories of Sandy victims humbled them and made them grateful for their own families. I found my experience helping the people in Queens and in particular in the Rockaway Beach area to be extremely rewarding. I learned a lot about what is required to assist those in need after a major disaster such as Hurricane Sandy, said omas Farr, a volunteer from the Pay and Pernnel Center. I was extremely impressed by how the people of New York pulled together to come back from Sandy. I was fortunate to work with a great team who had a single goal in mind do whatever we could to help no matter what the personal sacrice meant. I wish the folks back there the best and may God watch over them. Surge Capacity Force lends aid e service Library Press Display is now available through the Navy General Library Program and oers free access to more than 2,200 newspapers from 97 countries in 54 languages. By logging onto the Navy Knowledge Online, either through user name and password or their Common Access Card, all Department of the Navy employees, Sailors, to include reservists, plus retirees and their dependants can now have access to many of the worlds newspapers in just a few clicks. Whether youre into world politics and foreign aairs, fashion or just want to catch up on whats happening in your hometown, this service is another great resource to help you ll your information needs, said Nilya Carrato, program assistant for Navy General Library Program, And you dont have to pay any subscription fees. Once onto the Library Press Service site, which is found on the Navy eLibrary News section of NKO, users are then able to navigate through various subject headings or geographical locations. From there they nd the newspaper or periodical theyre interested in reading and read it as though theyre reading a traditional hardcopy newspaper. e newspapers even have hyperlinks embedded that allow the user to jump through them with ease, Carrato said. e service can be used on all forms of digital devices, to include personal computers, tablets and smartphones, all thats needed is an internet connection and authorized access. Navy Library patrons may register for this and many of NGLPs services by logging into NKO at www.nko.navy.mil, clicking on the Reference heading in the upper right part of the screen. en click on e-Library news. Once on this NKO page Sailors and their families can explore the vast array of newspapers. Interested patrons are also encouraged to visit the YouTube tutorials for more information on how to nd and use the service on NKO. e Navy General Library Program has existed for nearly a century and is a service of Commander, Navy Installations Command. Navy links to online newspapers THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013 11

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Counterterrorism operations in Somalia and Yemen demonstrate the value of small-footprint approaches and building partner capacity, the Pentagons special operations chief said Jan. 30. Michael A. Sheehan, assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conict, spoke here about the threat of terror in those and other countries during remarks at the National Defense Industrial Associations 24th Annual Special Operations and Low-intensity Conict Symposium, which ended Jan. 30. Sheehan pointed out the defense strategy released in January 2012 called for innovative, low-cost approaches in widely distributed counterterrorism eorts. In the year since that guidance was issued, such approaches have brought good results, he added. A year ago in Yemen, alQaida had taken over vast swaths of territory and was really threatening the state in Yemen, and also threatening to re-establish some capabilities that were very problematic, he said. Over the past year, weve made great progress in Yemen. With the support of U.S. special operations forces, he said, counterterror efforts there have turned the corner. Somalia also shows progress over the past year, he said, with alShabaab, a terrorist group that controlled large parts of the country, pushed out of the major cities. ey havent gone away, he added. eyre a persistent group. [But] you can see in our strategies, our policies and programs in Yemen and Somalia, some of the components of how our strategy might look in the months and years ahead. Sheehan said while terror groups are known to spread and metastasize, the three traditional areas where al-Qaida is an entrenched threat are the moun tainous area between Pakistan and Afghani stan, in Yemen, and in East Africa. ose three traditional areas have been and will continue to be areas of al-Qaida persistence, he said. Fortunately for us, weve been able to batter them in all of those three areas over the last 10 or 11 years with a great deal of success. e measure of success against terror groups is their inability to mount strategic attacks, Sheehan said. He credits constant pressure on al-Qaida with diminishing that organizations ability to train and equip terrorists. Some people say weve been a little bit lucky, with the underwear bomber and other incidents that havent quite gone right for al-Qaida, but Id say its more than luck, he said. Because we put more pressure on them around the world, because its more dicult for them to train and deploy operatives, they make more mistakes. Sheehan said the failed May 1 bombing in New Yorks Times Square demonstrated his point. Faizal Shazad, an American citizen later sentenced to life in prison for the bombing attempt, failed, Sheehan said, because he was trained by the Pakistan Taliban. He couldnt get to al-Qaida. e bomb Shazad created didnt work, and he had no network to support him, Sheehan said. He also wasnt a suicide bomber, the special operations chief noted. Why? Because he wasnt in those camps long enough to be indoctrinated. e factors that caused the attack to fail werent just luck, Sheehan said, but the result of enormous pressure put on the organization, that prevents them from planning, training and launching skilled operatives. Maintaining that pressure against al-Qaida and similar groups is a task U.S. special operations forces and partner militaries are focused on around the world, he said. If such groups nd sanctuary and a place where they can act with impunity, he warned, they can rebuild their strategic capability. New and evolving terrorist threats are emerging in Syria and North Africa, Sheehan noted. In Syria, where Bashar Assads government forces and the people have battled for two years, Sheehan said, the al-Nusra Front is very closely associated with al-Qaida and we believe they are trying to hijack [the] struggles of the Syrian people and perhaps put their own agenda on a post-Assad Syria. In Africa, the Maghreb region along the Mediterranean Sea and the Saharan area of the Sahel are of major concern to us, he said. Libya, he added, is awash with weapons, while Mali was the scene of a Tuareg tribal rebellion that was hijacked by alQaida and other aliates, who gained control of an area about the size of Texas in the countrys north. e French have had great initial success in pushing back al-Qaida advances in Mali, Sheehan noted, but the whole northern part of the continent is seeing increased terrorist presence and involvement. All these groups share a similar al-Qaida narrative. In many ways, al-Qaida is seeking to rebrand itself and diversify into Africa, because theyre able to nd, in those ungoverned spaces, the sanctuary they need to become strategic, he said. Northern Africa has the four elements al-Qaida needs to do just that, Sheehan said: ungoverned space, terrorist groups, weapons and funding. Countering al-Qaida requires both direct action and security force assistance, Sheehan said. In the long term, we recognize that we cant solely rely on precision strikes to defeat enemy networks and foster the kind of stability we need in these regions, he said. Such stability can best be established by aiding friends, partners and allies, he added. Special operations forces play a major role in security force assistance as well as in direct action, Sheehan noted. Security force assistance takes two approaches, he explained: training local forces to control border areas and deny space and sanctuary to terrorists, and training specialized counterterror forces. U.S. special operations forces have, throughout their history, focused largely on training hostnation militaries, Sheehan said. In Somalia, he noted, the African Union and a multinational force led by the Ugandans did a darn good job, and we helped them. eir job was to control space and push al-Shabaab o. Meanwhile, he added, other units focused on high-value targets and other leaders of the organization. Coupled together, we had a strategy that worked, Sheehan said. Sheehan acknowledged that a partnered strategy holds risks. Other countries may embarrass the United States, or U.S. forces could get pulled into other conicts, he said. But the risk of inaction is greater, he added, as it holds the danger of al-Qaida or other groups developing a strategic attack capability. Special operations troops understand those risks and have the experience and maturity to manage them, Sheehan said. He noted security force assistance is a classic role for special operations forces. ey can deploy to farung places in small numbers to protect U.S. national interests and to work with partners to continue to crush al-Qaida, he said. Small-footprint ops eective, ocial says 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 14, 2013

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