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The Kings Bay periscope ( 02-07-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00287

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00287


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Volunteers, sta enjoy birthday lunch at Kings Bay When you hear the name Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, the rst thoughts that come to mind are compassion, as sistance, and dedication. is is exactly what this organization has represented for the past 109 years, and the NMCRS team has been a shining memento to the cause. is Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society volunteers and sta are an essential part of the Command at Kings Bay, Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Ex ecutive Ocer Cmdr. Je Paord said at the 109th NMCRS birthday luncheon, Jan. 22 at the on Jan uary 22nd at the Kings Bay Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society oce. ey help countless Sailors and Ma rines in their times of need. Members of the NMCRS team were delighted at the turn out for their celebra tory luncheon, which was a way to celebrate the re markable achievements the society has made over the past years and to say thank you to the volun teers and their eorts. Volunteers and sta were excited at just how much support they have from the members and leaders of Kings Bay. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huck aba helped with the cake cutting ceremony that fol lowed the speeches of the afternoon. Black History Who do you think of during February salute Page 9 Wildcats visit Kings Bay welcomes Camden NJROTC Page 4 Honored MFPU member earns monthly service award Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Four earn Battle Es Students tour four college campuses Navy-Marine Relief celebrates 109 years of service Quick loans availableSailors and Marines on active duty can apply for a Quick Assist Loan for up to $500 at all 51 Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Full Service Oces on Navy and Marine Corps installations worldwide. Most QALs can be processed on a walk-in basis in Making decisions about what to do af ter high school can be overwhelming for many students and their parents. To assist students and parents through this decision-making process, Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson, planned and hosted the rst Southeast Georgia College Tours Jan. 18 and 19. Camden County High School students in grades 9 through 12 were taken to Sa vannah, Statesboro and Brunswick to visit four colleges and universities Savan nah State University, Georgia Southern University, Savannah College of Art and Design and the College of Coastal Geor gia. e two one-day tours exposed stu dents to life on a college campus and provided an opportunity to ask questions about admissions, dorm life, nancial aid, college majors and more. Sixteen students participated in the tours and enjoyed opportunities to see in side dormitories, eat in college cafeterias, sit in university classrooms and visit cam pus libraries. For many students, these tours provided some much-needed insight about the importance of high school studies and helped clarify choices for stu dents nearing graduation this May. Students in grades 9 to 11 were encour aged to begin talking with their parents about college, vocational training, mili tary service and employment. e choices are many. e most important aspect of the tours was that they built a foundation for students and parents to begin having conver sations about how they can work together Security exercise comingNavy-wide annual to be held at Kings Bay this month Exercise SOLID CURTAINCITADEL SHIELD 2013 will be conducted on Naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States from Feb. 25 to March 1. is annual exercise is de signed to enhance the training and readiness of Navy Security Forces to respond to threats to installations and units. Exercise SOLID CURTAINCITADEL SHIELD 2013 is not in response to any specic threat, but is a regularly-scheduled ex ercise. Measures have been taken to minimize disruptions to normal base and station operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased trac around bases or delays in base access. Area residents also may see increased security activity asso ciated with the exercise. For more information about Exercise SOLID CURTAIN-CIT ADEL SHIELD 2013, contact Scott Bassett, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Aairs Ocer at (912) 573-4718. USS Georgia, USS Alaska Blue and Gold crews receive coveted awardFour Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay submarine crews received the coveted Battle Eciency, or Battle E, award from their respective squadrons; the last of the awards being present to USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Blue) Feb. 4 at Kings Bay. e Georgia blue crew received their Battle E award from Commodore, Sub marine Squadron 16, Capt. Stephen Gil lespie, Jan. 18. is award is a reection of the hard work, dedication and teamwork through out the entire year from [the Georgia] crews, Gillespie said. e sacrices you and your families made are what earned you this recognition and you should be very proud of your accomplishments. ere is always more work to be done; al ways things we can improve; but I want to acknowledge Georgias superior perfor mance throughout 2012 on several very successful deployments. e second boat presented the coveted award was the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) who received the Submarine Squadron 20 Battle E Jan. 31. e Alaska crews also won the squadrons 2011 award. is award echoes the crews continu ous work, family support and teamwork

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 In August of 2011, President Barack Obama called for all Military Service Members to be career ready when they leave active duty. One important piece of the plan to reach this goal was the rst over haul of the Transition Assistance Program in 20 years. Transition Goal Plan Success, re ferred to as Transition GPS, is the result. e revised Program has ve component areas: Pre-separation assessment and individual counseling, revised ve day transition work shop, two-day optional career track workshops, a mandatory Capstone event, and development of a Military Life Cycle Transition Model. e pre-separation assessment and individual counseling allows commands to determine what spe cic services each individual service member needs or would benet from prior to separation. is also allows the service mem ber a time to begin an Individual Transition Plan that will meet his or her post-military goals. e revised ve-day Transition GPS workshop includes a nancial planning workshop, tools to assist translating military skills and oc cupations into civilian terminology, the value of a mentor, a completely re-designed Department of Labor Employment Workshop, a work shop by the Department of Veterans Aairs covering available VA bene ts and how to sign up, and a review of each Service Members Individual Transition Plan. Currently there are three planned, two-day, career track workshops: Education Track for those planning to pursue a college degree, a Voca tional Career Track for those wish ing to seek job-ready skills and in dustry recognized certications in short term training programs, and an Entrepreneurship Track for those planning to start their own business. Every transitioning service mem ber, regardless of post-military plans, will be required to attend a Capstone event where they show their Transition Plan to industry ex perts and demonstrate they are career ready. One important aspect of the Military Life Cycle Transition Model is the development of Career Readiness Standards. Currently there is a set of Career Readiness Standards common to all transitioning service members and then additional standards based on each individuals chosen career path. ese standards have been in corporated into the Individual Tran sition Plans are must be met prior to attending the Capstone event. If there are any questions, or if fur ther information is needed, call the Transition Oce at (912) 573-4511. e Defense Department Web site for military children has added new features to help parents and educa tors explain dicult topics of the military lifestyle to children. Since its launch in January 2012, MilitaryKidsConnect.org has served more than 125,000 visitors and won ve industry excellence awards. To mark the one-year anniversary, the Web site added new content designed for children, parents and educators, ocials said. e new features include: Military culture videos and lesson plans for teachers, school counselors, and educators to better understand the differ ences between military and civilian youth; Graphic novels and mini-documentaries by military kids sharing their experiences; New modules for children and parents on handling grief, loss and physical injury. e Web site, created by the Defense Departments National Cen ter for Telehealth and Technology, known as T2, uses innovative ways to help military youth cope with the unique strains of military life. In addition to disruptions from parents deploying to assignments away from home, military children are aected by moving frequently, changing schools and making new friends. ey also have to live with readjustment issues when a parent returns from deployments. ese issues may include posttraumatic stress and physical dis abilities. After watching the interaction with kids on MilitaryKidsConnect this past year, we saw many conver sations about trying to understand the issues they live with, said Dr. Kelly Blasko, T2 psychologist. We developed the added features to help parents and teachers answer the questions the kids were sharing with each other. Blasko said the Web site is con tinuing to add features and infor mation to military children with the special challenges of living in a military family. Separations, mov ing and changing friends frequently may be unusual for civilian children, but its a normal lifestyle for military children. e Web site helps them live in that world and, hopefully, makes it more fun for them, Blasko added. e National Center for Telehealth and Technology serves as the pri mary Defense Department oce for cutting-edge approaches in applying technology to psychological health. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Black history program Feb. 13Black History Month will be celebrated at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at 10 a.m., Feb. 13 at the chapel with a presentation of At the Crossroads of Freedom Street and Equality Lane, the Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963 Lunch, at $4.65, will follow immediately at Pirates Cove Galley.YC teens hold kids book drive e youth and teens of the Kings Bay Youth Center are having a childrens book drive as part of their Days of Service program honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teens are calling on members of the community to bring new and slightly used childrens books to the Youth Cen ter from now until Feb. 28. ey will be cleaned, sorted, packaged and distributed to various community and service organizations throughout Camden County. Teens interested in learn ing more about this and other events should contact Sharon Grant, Youth Center director at (912) 573-2380 or visit the MWR Facebook page at www.facebook.com/kingsbaymwr.Washington memorial Feb. 17Sunday Feb. 17 St. Marys Masonic Lodge No. 109 will host a re-enactment of e George Washington Memorial Service. Citizens are encouraged to join us for this event at noon at the St. Marys Masonic Lodge, 205 Wheeler St., St. Marys, on the corner of Weed and Wheeler. Food will be served. e procession will start at 2:30 p.m., Fellowship at the hall will follow. For more information, call (912) 882-5226.St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 9St. Marys 19th Annual Mardi Gras Festival and Parade is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. e parade begins at 10 am. ere will be arts, crafts and food vendors, plus childrens activi ties and entertainment on the main stage. e Mardi Gras Ball begins at 7 pm at Southern Junction Events Center. Tickets are available at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center. e 2013 Great Camden County Chili Cook-O in downtown St. Marys is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.camden-chili.com.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Youth program needs mentorsKids First of Floridas YESS Mentoring Pro gram for youth ages 12 to 17, who are in li censed care and in need of a supportive adult who can provide consistency and guidance as they transition into the real world. For ad ditional information or to sign up for mentor training, contact Crystal Bennett at (904) 2785644 ext. 2016. For more information, visit kidsrstoorida.org/Motorcycle run aids Wall causeABATE of Floridas Black Creek Chapter will have a Run for the Wall Feb. 23 to help with costs of bringing the Moving Wall Vietnam vet erans memorial to Green Cove Springs, Fla. e run begins with 9 a.m. registration at Mid dleburg VFW Post 8255, 2296 Aster Ave., Mid dleburg, Fla., with kickstands up at 10:30 a.m. Entry fee is $10 per rider and $5 per passenger. For more information, call Herb Hilderbrand at (904) 704-5501.Dinner-auction funds Sea CadetsA dinner and a dessert auction, to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, will be hosted by the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League starting at 6 p.m., Feb. 14 at the Kings Bay Con ference Center, followed by a dessert auction. Dinner is $25 per person, with a reservation deadline of Monday, Feb. 11. For more infor mation, call Cheryl Aston at (912) 882-2967. Now hear this! Trans GPS helps prepare for world FFSC Web site focus on military children Defense Department While theres a lot of talk about influenza, or flu, in the national news lately, were staying pretty healthy locally. Across Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles patient populations, in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, were seeing u-like illness activity thats similar to last year at this time. is might be due in part to the success of the vaccination campaign at each of the ve bases where NH Jacksonville has a facility. At our hospital and branch health clinics this u season, we were early in meeting our goal to vaccinate 100 percent of active duty. We also vaccinated nearly twothirds of our pregnant patients, e national average is about 10 percent. Inuenza is a serious illness, leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths each year, and its important to protect against it. What can people do? e U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends u vac cine for everyone age six months and up. Its still worthwhile to get vaccinated if you havent already, and the hospital and branch health clinics have vaccine on-hand. More recommendations from the CDC include: Avoid close contact with sick people. If youre sick, stay home. Sneeze or cough into your elbow or a tissue. Dont sneeze or cough into your hands. Wash or sanitize your hands often. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Practice good health. Keep your home and workplace clean, get plenty of sleep, be active, manage stress, drink uids and eat nutri tious food. For information, check out www. cdc.gov or call Immunizations at 573-8250, which is open for walk-ins 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. And, as always, to reach your Medical Home Port team, call Central Appointments and AfterHours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 529-4677. At Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, call 546-7094 or 546-7095 dur ing clinic hours. Find out more about services at the hospital and branch health clinics on NH Jacksonvilles Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax and keep up with current news on Facebook at www. facebook.com/NavalHospitalJack sonville. Ask Dr. Joe By Capt. Joe McQuade, MD, NH JacksonvilleWere doing well in ght against uto achieve academic goals and personal dreams. For more information about life after high school, students and parents are advised to con tact the guidance counselor at their local public school. To learn more about the services of the school liaison ocer, contact Clainetta Jeerson at (912) 573-8986 or e-mail kingsbaylo@navy.mil.Tours

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help service members and their fami lies reach their nancial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commit ment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in per sonal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, fam ily members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the De partment of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.Military Saves Week starts Feb. 25 about 15 minutes. Active duty Marines and Sailors must ap ply in person. QALs are short-term, inter est-free loans available to ser vice members facing a family emergency or other urgent nancial situation. QALs are available to Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Have no outstanding loans with NMCRS Need help with basic liv ing expenses or family emer gencies is program is our best defense against questionable pay day lenders who create a cycle of debt with tripledigit interest and short-term repayments that adversely impact our service mem bers and their families said Maj. Gen Carl Jensen, USMC (Ret.), executive vice president, Navy-Marine Corps Re lief Society. Last year, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society provided more than 43,000 QALs to ac tive duty Sailors and Marines. For more information visit www.nmcrs.org/QAL or contact the Kings Bay NMCRS oce. Founded in 1904, the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society is a private non-prot chari table organization. It is spon sored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 250 oces ashore and aoat at Navy and Marine Corps bases throughout the world. More than 3,600 trained Volunteers, both ashore and aboard ships, accomplish the major portion of the Societys mission.Loans THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 5 Before one of the worlds largest gatherings of foreign and defense ministers, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter took time to detail the grim consequences a second round of severe and potentially imminent budget cuts could have on the Defense Department. Carter spoke as part of an expert panel that took the stage in Munich, Ger many, late in the after noon on Feb. 2, day two of the Munich Security Conference, also called the Wehrkunde Conference on Security Policy. eir topic was the fu ture of European defense, and Carter was joined on the panel by Netherlands Defense Min ister JeanineAntoi nette HennisPlass chaert, Russian Fed eration Deputy Defense Minister Anatoly Antonov, European Union Com missioner for Internal Market and Services Michel Barnier, NATO Su preme Allied Commander for Transformation Gen. Jean-Paul Palomros and others. As the deputy secretary neared the end of his talk, he remarked on what has become nearly a routine occurrence at Munich security conferences a U.S. defense secretary urging allies to meet their agreedon NATO benchmarks for defense spending. At this point at Wehrkunde, Carter said, its traditional for the DOD leader of the U.S. delegation to emphasize, as [for mer Defense Secretary] Bob Gates did memorably a few years ago, the need for allies to provide the necessary resources for defense. In the nal analysis, the deputy secretary quoted Gates as saying, theres no substitute for nations providing re sources necessary to have the capability they need when faced with security challenges. is time at Wehrkunde, Carter told the audience, I have to add my own country to this exhortation because were facing the very real prospect of a huge and reckless additional cut in our defense budget. e department absorbed a budget cut of $487 billion over 10 years beginning in scal year 2012, crafting as a result, and with input from every part of DOD and the ser vices, a defense strategy for the 21st century that President Barack Obama and the Defense Depart ment leadership launched in January 2012. between the blue and gold crews, said Cmdr. Robert Wirth, commanding of cer, USS Alaska (SSBN 732). e day-to-day lev el of eort demonstrated by both crews helped us repeat as the Battle E re cipients. Every year, one sub marine from each squad ron is recognized and the Battle E is presented to the submarine crews that demonstrated the highest level of battle readiness during the evaluation year. e Battle E competition is conducted to strengthen individual command performance, overall force readiness and to recognize outstanding performance. e criterion for the an nual award is the overall readiness of the command to carry out its assigned wartime tasks as a unit of the Submarine Force At lantic, and is based on a year-long evaluation procedure. I am blessed and hum bled to have the opportunity to serve alongside the extraordinary men and women of USS Georgia, said Capt. Rhett Jaehn, commanding ocer, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Gold). e crews ex ceptional initiative, dedi cation and perseverance was enabled by genuine deckplate leadership and served as the foundation for mission success on Georgia. I am very proud of the coordination and collaboration between both Georgia crews. It is truly a one boat, one ght and a boat rst mentality. Jaehn also recognized how critical Georgia families support throughout the year was in the suc cessful mission accomplishment. e award is also rec ognition of the exceptional support we receive here in Kings Bay and Diego Gar cia, he said. e profes sionalism and determined eorts by Trident Ret Facility, Trident Training Facility, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Fleet and Family Service Center as well as the host of other organizations in Kings Bay are key enablers to our accomplishments. Georgia is a total team ef fort. is is the nest crew I have served with in 25 years, and I could not be prouder of their eorts to support our nations de fense and protect our fam ilies back home. On Jan. 1, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic announced the winners of the Battle E competition. Being safe Battle ECarter: Sequestration looming as reckless reality

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e 2nd Annual My Little Val entine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a ower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shir ley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. All participants are wel come. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Big-hearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. The Harlem Ambassadors Theyre coming to Kings Bay, Wednesday, Feb. 27 at the Fitness Complex Basketball Courts. All tickets are $2, chil dren 2 and under are free. Tickets available at ITT. Doors open at 5:20 p.m. with game time at 6 p.m. There will be food available for purchase. Get an autograph at 7:30 p.m. No video taping will be allowed during the performance. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holi days, plus a Saturday signup 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, play ers must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and can not turn 16 prior to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reservists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 573-8202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Frankenweenie Feb. 9 10 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 MWR Sports e looming March 1 threat of another half-tril lion dollars slashed from military spending over 10 years will happen un less Congress manages to avoid the huge and reck less cuts, he said, that sequestration would gener ate. One action will be to freeze the hiring of civil ians, he said, adding, And Ill just remind you that the Department of Defense hires between 1,000 and 2,000 people a week, 44 percent of them veterans.Cuts 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Special Olympics e Navy Exchange Service Command announced Jan. 29 that it is piloting a program with RedBox, its DVD rental business partner, to sell local tickets to sporting events, music, arts, theater, fam ily and various other live events through its vending kiosks. is new initiative is being oered as a cooperative eort between NEXCOM and Commander Naval Installations Command/ITT Ticket Program Oce, said Gerard Fantano, NEXCOM vend ing branch manager. RedBox kiosks are placed in various locations throughout the base, making it an ideal way for mili tary members to purchase local event tickets. We see this as a win-win for our Sailors as well as all personnel on base. Once at the RedBox kiosk, customers can choose the event, pick a seat and pur chase a ticket. During the ticket selection and pur chase process, customers can choose to either pick up the ticket at the will call window before the event or have the ticket voucher sent to them via e-mail to print at home. Redbox charges a $1 fee per ticket for its service. is service will supplement the al ready great entertainment and ticket op tions available to authorized patrons by allowing us to make a wider variety of tickets available than we are able to at our 84 local ticket oces, said Dawn Smith, CNIC ITT program manager. NEXCOM is testing this program at RedBox locations aboard Naval Con struction Battalion Center Port Huen eme, Naval Base Ventura County (Point Mugu) and Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Calif., beginning Feb. 1. NEXCOM currently has 100 RedBox kiosks on Navy bases around throughout installations within continental United States and Hawaii. Since ticket sales are the responsibility of Morale, Welfare and Recreation, prof its generated through this program will be given back to MWR to support Navy quality of life programs. Currently, 70 percent of NEX prots go to MWR. Since 1946, NEXCOM has con tributed more than $2.3 billion in NEX prots to MWR programs.NEXs Redbox to sell tickets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 7

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On April 8, 1974, my shipmates and I watched the Atlanta Braves Hank Aaron break Babe Ruths home run record on a black-and-white TV. Aaron had anonymous death threats made against him should he break the record. When he did it, two young white men suddenly appeared, running along side him as he rounded second base. They patted him on the back, congratulated him and ran back to the stands, and eventually an overnight cell, as Aaron rounded third. It was a suspense-filled moment, but the way it turned out left even Aaron feeling good. I wish baseball had seen fit to make Hank Aaron its commissioner. Patricia Tarry Family member Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King. I grew up with the movement. I was just about 13 when it started. CS2 Kenneth James Pirates Cove Galley New Orleans Martin Luther King and his marches for civil rights. Then, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas and a bunch of others. Alexis Jenkins Contractor Daytona, Fla. Vivien Thomas. He was one of the first black heart surgeons and created a new procedure. EN2 Preston Turner Phone Operations Chicago Martin Luther King and his entire career. MK3 Roy Larsen Marine Force Protection Unit Rising, Md. Rosa Parks, an elderly lady who stood up for her rights. SKCS Corey Sidlo Maritime Force Protection Unit Astoria, Ore. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his inspirational activism. America needs more of that. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 9

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Khalid Sheikh Moham med, the self-proclaimed mastermind behind the 9/11 terrorist attacks, along with four co-defen dants charged with plan ning and carrying out the attacks, acknowledged to the judge Jan. 28 that they understand and have no questions about their rights. Army Col. James Pohl, the judge, opened four days of pretrial hearings at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arming that the defendants under stand they have the right to attend the proceedings and may voluntarily skip most proceedings. In outlining the rights, Pohl also made clear that opting out of court could hurt the defense, while recognizing that the ac cused could be compelled to come to court when spe cic issues are discussed. Pohl asked each defendant Mohammed, Walid Muhammad Salih Mubarak Bin Attash, Ramzi Binalshibh, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, and Mustafa Ahmed Adam al Hawsawi to arm that they un derstand these rights. Bin Attash, the only defendant to oer more than a simple Yes, told Pohl he and his fellow defen dants have no motivating factors to come to court. He complained that the prosecution does not want the defendants to hear or understand what is going on or to speak during the proceedings. Bin Attash also ex pressed frustration that af ter a year and a half of as sociation, the defendants have not established trust in the attorneys involved. e attorneys are bound, but we are bound also, he told the court. Much of the opening days discussions involved whether the prosecution and defense teams need to go into a closed session to discuss what issues they can address in open court. at included one of the most controversial aspects of the hearing: informa tion about the defendants detention at so-called black sites operated by the CIA before they were transferred to the Guanta namo Bay facility. Portions of the proceedings were blocked out by loud static to keep the statements out of the public record. is also prevented the audio from being heard by families of 9/11 victims at Guantana mo Bay, Cuba, and watch ing via closed-circuit television at Fort Meade, Md., and at Joint Base Mc Guire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.; Fort Hamilton, N.Y.; and Fort Devens, Mass. Reporters covering the proceedings at Guantanamo Bay and from a media center at Fort Meade also heard the static. is led Pohl to ques tion during the hearing who has a right to turn on a light that generates the static sound and also institutes a 40-second delay in the audio feed. After closing the open ing session, he brought together the prosecution and defense teams to work through these issues. All ve defendants at todays hearing were captured in Pakistan in 2002 and 2003 and have been conned at Guantanamo Bay since 2006. ey were charged dur ing their arraignment in May 2012 with terrorism, conspiracy, attacking civilians, attacking civil ian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily injury, murder in viola tion of the law of war, de struction of property in violation of the law of war, hijacking or hazarding a vessel or aircraft. is round of commis sion hearings ran through Jan. 31, with the next slat ed for Feb. 11 to 14. Opening day hearings began three days after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia overturned the convic tion of Ali Hamza Ahmad Suliman al Bahlul of Ye men. e court ruled that the charges of conspiracy, providing material support for terrorism and soliciting murder did not qualify as war crimes when Bahlul committed them. A military commission found him guilty of con spiracy with Osama bin Laden and others to com mit murder of protected persons, attacking civil ians and other crimes in November 2008. He was also found guilty of solicitation to commit murder of protected per sons, to attack civilian ob jects, and to commit acts of terrorism. In addition, the commission found him guilty of providing material sup port for terrorism by sup porting al-Qaida through meeting with the highestranking members of the organization and creating al-Qaida propaganda, in cluding a widely distribut ed propaganda video, e Destruction of the Ameri can Destroyer U.S.S. Cole. All oenses were in vio lation of the Military Com missions Act of 2006. He was sentenced to life in prison. Pre-trial hearings held Arm transplants heal As a wounded warrior who lost all four limbs in Iraq shared news of his successful double-arm transplant Jan. 29, o cials at the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, which funded the research making it possible, say the invest ment will continue to bear fruit in giving new hope to wounded warriors. Army Spc. Brendan Marrocco appeared Jan. 29 with his medical team, led by Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee, chair of Johns Hopkins Hospitals plastic and reconstructive surgery department, to announce the successful Dec. 18 double transplant at the Baltimore hospital. I really dont know what to say, because it is such a big thing for my life, 26-year-old Marrocco told reporters as he dem onstrated his ability to move his new left arm. His right arm has lim ited movement, but Mar rocco said hes hoping to get more soon. Marrocco, who enlisted in the Army in January 2008, deployed to Iraq nine months later with the 25th Infantry Divisions 3rd Brigade, Alpha Com pany, 2nd Battalion, 27th Regiment. He and his fellow sol diers had completed a night mission and were returning to Forward Oper ating Base Summerall on April 12, 2009, when their armored vehicle has hit by an explosively formed projectile a roadside bomb designed speci cally to pierce armor. e explosion, which severed Marroccos carotid artery and all of his limbs, killed one soldier and wounded another. Medevaced through Iraq to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germa ny and on to Walter Reed, Marrocco became one of the rst quadruple amputees of the conict to sur vive his wounds. He had been wearing prosthetic limbs before the 13-hour surgery, the rst of its kind at Johns Hopkins and only the sev enth in the United States. His rehabilitation will continue for years, his sur gical team explained, as his nerves slowly regener ate one inch per month and he gains the abil ity to use and control the arms and hands. I feel like I got a second chance to start over after I got hurt, Marrocco told reporters. If feels amaz ing. Its something I was waiting for for a long time. Excitement about the successful transplant, and its implications for other wounded warriors, rippled through the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick, Md., home of the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. e Defense Depart ment launched AFIRM in 2008 to advance research to treat wounded war riors suering traumatic injuries, explained Army Col. (Dr.) John Scherer, director of the clinical and rehabilitative medicine research program. One of the goals was to promote transplant procedures that were being conducted overseas, but typically not in the United States, he said. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Navy College educational information Thrift Savings Plan workshop Feb. 27The Thrift Savings Plan is an interactive workshop suit able for all service mem bers. It is designed to provide detailed information on the Thrift Savings Program and to help learners understand how TSP can contribute to finan cial security during retirement. This workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Feb. 27. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families receive training on second Wednesday every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and other benefits and services available to expect ant parents. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expect ant moms. Class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move is designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transportation, trav el pay, allowances, important forms and documents, hous ing referral office and reloca tion services. Service members and spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer. Plus, while attending the workshop, children ages 7 to 12 learn about relocation, how it affects them and what to look forward to. The workshop is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five-day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11 to 15. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market including skills, experience, edu cation and values plus simple, effective and easy-to-use formats that get interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions, this workshop is for you. It assists job seekers in writing a resume that will get them in the door. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recommended, class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 8A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 8. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and rec ommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and fam ily members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 to 9 p.m., Feb. 8 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Savings and investing examined Feb. 12This six-session class series was developed as a resource for beginning investors with small amounts to invest at any one time. It assumes that participants are investing for the first time and/ or selecting investment products that they have not purchased pre viously. Its every Monday until completed. This training is 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible. Attendees are provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the elec tronic Federal resume. This class is 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to manage the cycle of deploy ment. It prepares family members for reunion so problems will be minimized and the posi tive aspects of reunion maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Feb. 13The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. To register, call 573-4513.Home buying and selling workshop upcomingBuying or selling a home can be the one of the largest finan cial decision someone can ever make. This interactive work shop is designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level for anyone entering the housing market. The Camden County Board of Realtors will provide an experienced member who will provide tools to educate both buyers and sellers, from 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan pro vides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan, which assists ser vice members and spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retire ment plan. This workshop is 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 13

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Volunteers, sta enjoy birthday lunch at Kings Bay When you hear the name Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, the rst thoughts that come to mind are compassion, assistance, and dedication. is is exactly what this organization has represented for the past 109 years, and the NMCRS team has been a shining memento to the cause. is Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society volunteers and sta are an essential part of the Command at Kings Bay, Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Ex ecutive Ocer Cmdr. Je Paord said at the 109th NMCRS birthday luncheon, Jan. 22 at the on Jan uary 22nd at the Kings Bay Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society oce. ey help countless Sailors and Ma rines in their times of need. Members of the NMCRS team were delighted at the turn out for their celebratory luncheon, which was a way to celebrate the remarkable achievements the society has made over the past years and to say thank you to the volunteers and their eorts. Volunteers and sta were excited at just how much support they have from the members and leaders of Kings Bay. Kings Bay Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba helped with the cake cutting ceremony that followed the speeches of the afternoon. Black History Who do you think of during February salute Page 9 Wildcats visit Kings Bay welcomes Camden NJROTC Page 4 Honored MFPU member earns monthly service award Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Four earn Battle Es Students tour four college campuses Navy-Marine Relief celebrates 109 years of service Quick loans availableSailors and Marines on active duty can apply for a Quick Assist Loan for up to $500 at all 51 Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Full Service Oces on Navy and Marine Corps installations worldwide. Most QALs can be processed on a walk-in basis in Making decisions about what to do after high school can be overwhelming for many students and their parents. To assist students and parents through this decision-making process, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay School Liaison Ocer Clainetta Jeerson, planned and hosted the rst Southeast Georgia College Tours Jan. 18 and 19. Camden County High School students in grades 9 through 12 were taken to Savannah, Statesboro and Brunswick to visit four colleges and universities Savannah State University, Georgia Southern University, Savannah College of Art and Design and the College of Coastal Georgia. e two one-day tours exposed students to life on a college campus and provided an opportunity to ask questions about admissions, dorm life, nancial aid, college majors and more. Sixteen students participated in the tours and enjoyed opportunities to see inside dormitories, eat in college cafeterias, sit in university classrooms and visit campus libraries. For many students, these tours provided some much-needed insight about the importance of high school studies and helped clarify choices for students nearing graduation this May. Students in grades 9 to 11 were encouraged to begin talking with their parents about college, vocational training, military service and employment. e choices are many. e most important aspect of the tours was that they built a foundation for students and parents to begin having conversations about how they can work together Security exercise comingNavy-wide annual to be held at Kings Bay this month Exercise SOLID CURTAINCITADEL SHIELD 2013 will be conducted on Naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States from Feb. 25 to March 1. is annual exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of Navy Security Forces to respond to threats to installations and units. Exercise SOLID CURTAINCITADEL SHIELD 2013 is not in response to any specic threat, but is a regularly-scheduled exercise. Measures have been taken to minimize disruptions to normal base and station operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased trac around bases or delays in base access. Area residents also may see increased security activity associated with the exercise. For more information about Exercise SOLID CURTAIN-CITADEL SHIELD 2013, contact Scott Bassett, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Aairs Ocer at (912) 573-4718. USS Georgia, USS Alaska Blue and Gold crews receive coveted awardFour Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay submarine crews received the coveted Battle Eciency, or Battle E, award from their respective squadrons; the last of the awards being present to USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Blue) Feb. 4 at Kings Bay. e Georgia blue crew received their Battle E award from Commodore, Submarine Squadron 16, Capt. Stephen Gillespie, Jan. 18. is award is a reection of the hard work, dedication and teamwork throughout the entire year from [the Georgia] crews, Gillespie said. e sacrices you and your families made are what earned you this recognition and you should be very proud of your accomplishments. ere is always more work to be done; always things we can improve; but I want to acknowledge Georgias superior performance throughout 2012 on several very successful deployments. e second boat presented the coveted award was the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Alaska (SSBN 732) who received the Submarine Squadron 20 Battle E Jan. 31. e Alaska crews also won the squadrons 2011 award. is award echoes the crews continuous work, family support and teamwork

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 In August of 2011, President Barack Obama called for all Military Service Members to be career ready when they leave active duty. One important piece of the plan to reach this goal was the rst overhaul of the Transition Assistance Program in 20 years. Transition Goal Plan Success, referred to as Transition GPS, is the result. e revised Program has ve component areas: Pre-separation assessment and individual counseling, revised ve day transition workshop, two-day optional career track workshops, a mandatory Capstone event, and development of a Military Life Cycle Transition Model. e pre-separation assessment and individual counseling allows commands to determine what specic services each individual service member needs or would benet from prior to separation. is also allows the service member a time to begin an Individual Transition Plan that will meet his or her post-military goals. e revised ve-day Transition GPS workshop includes a nancial planning workshop, tools to assist translating military skills and occupations into civilian terminology, the value of a mentor, a completely re-designed Department of Labor Employment Workshop, a workshop by the Department of Veterans Aairs covering available VA benets and how to sign up, and a review of each Service Members Individual Transition Plan. Currently there are three planned, two-day, career track workshops: Education Track for those planning to pursue a college degree, a Vocational Career Track for those wishing to seek job-ready skills and industry recognized certications in short term training programs, and an Entrepreneurship Track for those planning to start their own business. Every transitioning service member, regardless of post-military plans, will be required to attend a Capstone event where they show their Transition Plan to industry experts and demonstrate they are career ready. One important aspect of the Military Life Cycle Transition Model is the development of Career Readiness Standards. Currently there is a set of Career Readiness Standards common to all transitioning service members and then additional standards based on each individuals chosen career path. ese standards have been incorporated into the Individual Transition Plans are must be met prior to attending the Capstone event. If there are any questions, or if further information is needed, call the Transition Oce at (912) 573-4511. e Defense Department Web site for military children has added new features to help parents and educators explain dicult topics of the military lifestyle to children. Since its launch in January 2012, MilitaryKidsConnect.org has served more than 125,000 visitors and won ve industry excellence awards. To mark the one-year anniversary, the Web site added new content designed for children, parents and educators, ocials said. e new features include: Military culture videos and lesson plans for teachers, school counselors, and educators to better understand the differences between military and civilian youth; Graphic novels and mini-documentaries by military kids sharing their experiences; New modules for children and parents on handling grief, loss and physical injury. e Web site, created by the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology, known as T2, uses innovative ways to help military youth cope with the unique strains of military life. In addition to disruptions from parents deploying to assignments away from home, military children are aected by moving frequently, changing schools and making new friends. ey also have to live with readjustment issues when a parent returns from deployments. ese issues may include posttraumatic stress and physical disabilities. After watching the interaction with kids on MilitaryKidsConnect this past year, we saw many conversations about trying to understand the issues they live with, said Dr. Kelly Blasko, T2 psychologist. We developed the added features to help parents and teachers answer the questions the kids were sharing with each other. Blasko said the Web site is continuing to add features and information to military children with the special challenges of living in a military family. Separations, moving and changing friends frequently may be unusual for civilian children, but its a normal lifestyle for military children. e Web site helps them live in that world and, hopefully, makes it more fun for them, Blasko added. e National Center for Telehealth and Technology serves as the pri mary Defense Department oce for cutting-edge approaches in applying technology to psychological health. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Black history program Feb. 13Black History Month will be celebrated at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at 10 a.m., Feb. 13 at the chapel with a presentation of At the Crossroads of Freedom Street and Equality Lane, the Emancipation Proclamation 1863 and the March on Washington 1963 Lunch, at $4.65, will follow immediately at Pirates Cove Galley.YC teens hold kids book drive e youth and teens of the Kings Bay Youth Center are having a childrens book drive as part of their Days of Service program honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Teens are calling on members of the community to bring new and slightly used childrens books to the Youth Cen ter from now until Feb. 28. ey will be cleaned, sorted, packaged and distributed to various community and service organizations throughout Camden County. Teens interested in learn ing more about this and other events should contact Sharon Grant, Youth Center director at (912) 573-2380 or visit the MWR Facebook page at www.facebook.com/kingsbaymwr.Washington memorial Feb. 17Sunday Feb. 17 St. Marys Masonic Lodge No. 109 will host a re-enactment of e George Washington Memorial Service. Citizens are encouraged to join us for this event at noon at the St. Marys Masonic Lodge, 205 Wheeler St., St. Marys, on the corner of Weed and Wheeler. Food will be served. e procession will start at 2:30 p.m., Fellowship at the hall will follow. For more information, call (912) 882-5226.St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 9St. Marys 19th Annual Mardi Gras Festival and Parade is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. e parade begins at 10 am. ere will be arts, crafts and food vendors, plus childrens activities and entertainment on the main stage. e Mardi Gras Ball begins at 7 pm at Southern Junction Events Center. Tickets are available at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center. e 2013 Great Camden County Chili Cook-O in downtown St. Marys is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.camden-chili.com.Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Youth program needs mentorsKids First of Floridas YESS Mentoring Program for youth ages 12 to 17, who are in licensed care and in need of a supportive adult who can provide consistency and guidance as they transition into the real world. For additional information or to sign up for mentor training, contact Crystal Bennett at (904) 2785644 ext. 2016. For more information, visit kidsrstoorida.org/Motorcycle run aids Wall causeABATE of Floridas Black Creek Chapter will have a Run for the Wall Feb. 23 to help with costs of bringing the Moving Wall Vietnam veterans memorial to Green Cove Springs, Fla. e run begins with 9 a.m. registration at Middleburg VFW Post 8255, 2296 Aster Ave., Middleburg, Fla., with kickstands up at 10:30 a.m. Entry fee is $10 per rider and $5 per passenger. For more information, call Herb Hilderbrand at (904) 704-5501.Dinner-auction funds Sea CadetsA dinner and a dessert auction, to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, will be hosted by the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League starting at 6 p.m., Feb. 14 at the Kings Bay Conference Center, followed by a dessert auction. Dinner is $25 per person, with a reservation deadline of Monday, Feb. 11. For more information, call Cheryl Aston at (912) 882-2967. Now hear this! Trans GPS helps prepare for world FFSC Web site focus on military children Defense Department While theres a lot of talk about influenza, or flu, in the national news lately, were staying pretty healthy locally. Across Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles patient populations, in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, were seeing u-like illness activity thats similar to last year at this time. is might be due in part to the success of the vaccination campaign at each of the ve bases where NH Jacksonville has a facility. At our hospital and branch health clinics this u season, we were early in meeting our goal to vaccinate 100 percent of active duty. We also vaccinated nearly twothirds of our pregnant patients, e national average is about 10 percent. Inuenza is a serious illness, leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths each year, and its important to protect against it. What can people do? e U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends u vaccine for everyone age six months and up. Its still worthwhile to get vaccinated if you havent already, and the hospital and branch health clinics have vaccine on-hand. More recommendations from the CDC include: Avoid close contact with sick people. If youre sick, stay home. Sneeze or cough into your elbow or a tissue. Dont sneeze or cough into your hands. Wash or sanitize your hands often. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Practice good health. Keep your home and workplace clean, get plenty of sleep, be active, manage stress, drink uids and eat nutritious food. For information, check out www. cdc.gov or call Immunizations at 573-8250, which is open for walk-ins 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. And, as always, to reach your Medical Home Port team, call Central Appointments and AfterHours Nurse Advice Line at (800) 529-4677. At Branch Health Clinic Kings Bay, call 546-7094 or 546-7095 during clinic hours. Find out more about services at the hospital and branch health clinics on NH Jacksonvilles Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax and keep up with current news on Facebook at www. facebook.com/NavalHospitalJacksonville. Ask Dr. Joe By Capt. Joe McQuade, MD, NH JacksonvilleWere doing well in ght against uto achieve academic goals and personal dreams. For more information about life after high school, students and parents are advised to contact the guidance counselor at their local public school. To learn more about the services of the school liaison ocer, contact Clainetta Jeerson at (912) 573-8986 or e-mail kingsbaylo@navy.mil.Tours

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nancial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commit ment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in per sonal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, family members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the Department of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.Military Saves Week starts Feb. 25 about 15 minutes. Active duty Marines and Sailors must apply in person. QALs are short-term, interest-free loans available to service members facing a family emergency or other urgent nancial situation. QALs are available to Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Have no outstanding loans with NMCRS Need help with basic living expenses or family emergencies is program is our best defense against questionable pay day lenders who create a cycle of debt with tripledigit interest and short-term repayments that adversely impact our service members and their families said Maj. Gen Carl Jensen, USMC (Ret.), executive vice president, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Last year, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society provided more than 43,000 QALs to active duty Sailors and Marines. For more information visit www.nmcrs.org/QAL or contact the Kings Bay NMCRS oce. Founded in 1904, the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society is a private non-prot charitable organization. It is sponsored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 250 oces ashore and aoat at Navy and Marine Corps bases throughout the world. More than 3,600 trained Volunteers, both ashore and aboard ships, accomplish the major portion of the Societys mission.Loans THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 3

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 5 Before one of the worlds largest gatherings of foreign and defense ministers, Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter took time to detail the grim consequences a second round of severe and potentially imminent budget cuts could have on the Defense Department. Carter spoke as part of an expert panel that took the stage in Munich, Germany, late in the afternoon on Feb. 2, day two of the Munich Security Conference, also called the Wehrkunde Conference on Security Policy. eir topic was the future of European defense, and Carter was joined on the panel by Netherlands Defense Min ister JeanineAntoi nette HennisPlass chaert, Russian Fed eration Deputy Defense Minister Anatoly Antonov, European Union Commissioner for Internal Market and Services Michel Barnier, NATO Supreme Allied Commander for Transformation Gen. Jean-Paul Palomros and others. As the deputy secretary neared the end of his talk, he remarked on what has become nearly a routine occurrence at Munich security conferences a U.S. defense secretary urging allies to meet their agreedon NATO benchmarks for defense spending. At this point at Wehrkunde, Carter said, its traditional for the DOD leader of the U.S. delegation to emphasize, as [former Defense Secretary] Bob Gates did memorably a few years ago, the need for allies to provide the necessary resources for defense. In the nal analysis, the deputy secretary quoted Gates as saying, theres no substitute for nations providing resources necessary to have the capability they need when faced with security challenges. is time at Wehrkunde, Carter told the audience, I have to add my own country to this exhortation because were facing the very real prospect of a huge and reckless additional cut in our defense budget. e department absorbed a budget cut of $487 billion over 10 years beginning in scal year 2012, crafting as a result, and with input from every part of DOD and the services, a defense strategy for the 21st century that President Barack Obama and the Defense Department leadership launched in January 2012. between the blue and gold crews, said Cmdr. Robert Wirth, commanding ofcer, USS Alaska (SSBN 732). e day-to-day level of eort demonstrated by both crews helped us repeat as the Battle E recipients. Every year, one submarine from each squadron is recognized and the Battle E is presented to the submarine crews that demonstrated the highest level of battle readiness during the evaluation year. e Battle E competition is conducted to strengthen individual command performance, overall force readiness and to recognize outstanding performance. e criterion for the annual award is the overall readiness of the command to carry out its assigned wartime tasks as a unit of the Submarine Force Atlantic, and is based on a year-long evaluation procedure. I am blessed and humbled to have the opportunity to serve alongside the extraordinary men and women of USS Georgia, said Capt. Rhett Jaehn, commanding ocer, USS Georgia (SSGN 729) (Gold). e crews exceptional initiative, dedication and perseverance was enabled by genuine deckplate leadership and served as the foundation for mission success on Georgia. I am very proud of the coordination and collaboration between both Georgia crews. It is truly a one boat, one ght and a boat rst mentality. Jaehn also recognized how critical Georgia families support throughout the year was in the successful mission accomplishment. e award is also recognition of the exceptional support we receive here in Kings Bay and Diego Garcia, he said. e professionalism and determined eorts by Trident Ret Facility, Trident Training Facility, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Fleet and Family Service Center as well as the host of other organizations in Kings Bay are key enablers to our accomplishments. Georgia is a total team effort. is is the nest crew I have served with in 25 years, and I could not be prouder of their eorts to support our nations defense and protect our families back home. On Jan. 1, Commander, Submarine Force Atlantic announced the winners of the Battle E competition. Being safe Battle ECarter: Sequestration looming as reckless reality

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e 2nd Annual My Little Valentine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a ower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. All participants are welcome. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Big-hearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. The Harlem Ambassadors Theyre coming to Kings Bay, Wednesday, Feb. 27 at the Fitness Complex Basketball Courts. All tickets are $2, children 2 and under are free. Tickets available at ITT. Doors open at 5:20 p.m. with game time at 6 p.m. There will be food available for purchase. Get an autograph at 7:30 p.m. No video taping will be allowed during the performance. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holi days, plus a Saturday signup 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, play ers must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and can not turn 16 prior to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reservists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 573-8202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Frankenweenie Feb. 9 10 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 MWR Sports e looming March 1 threat of another half-trillion dollars slashed from military spending over 10 years will happen unless Congress manages to avoid the huge and reckless cuts, he said, that sequestration would generate. One action will be to freeze the hiring of civil ians, he said, adding, And Ill just remind you that the Department of Defense hires between 1,000 and 2,000 people a week, 44 percent of them veterans.Cuts 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Special Olympics e Navy Exchange Service Command announced Jan. 29 that it is piloting a program with RedBox, its DVD rental business partner, to sell local tickets to sporting events, music, arts, theater, family and various other live events through its vending kiosks. is new initiative is being oered as a cooperative eort between NEXCOM and Commander Naval Installations Command/ITT Ticket Program Oce, said Gerard Fantano, NEXCOM vending branch manager. RedBox kiosks are placed in various locations throughout the base, making it an ideal way for military members to purchase local event tickets. We see this as a win-win for our Sailors as well as all personnel on base. Once at the RedBox kiosk, customers can choose the event, pick a seat and purchase a ticket. During the ticket selection and purchase process, customers can choose to either pick up the ticket at the will call window before the event or have the ticket voucher sent to them via e-mail to print at home. Redbox charges a $1 fee per ticket for its service. is service will supplement the already great entertainment and ticket options available to authorized patrons by allowing us to make a wider variety of tickets available than we are able to at our 84 local ticket oces, said Dawn Smith, CNIC ITT program manager. NEXCOM is testing this program at RedBox locations aboard Naval Construction Battalion Center Port Hueneme, Naval Base Ventura County (Point Mugu) and Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Calif., beginning Feb. 1. NEXCOM currently has 100 RedBox kiosks on Navy bases around throughout installations within continental United States and Hawaii. Since ticket sales are the responsibility of Morale, Welfare and Recreation, profits generated through this program will be given back to MWR to support Navy quality of life programs. Currently, 70 percent of NEX prots go to MWR. Since 1946, NEXCOM has contributed more than $2.3 billion in NEX prots to MWR programs.NEXs Redbox to sell tickets THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 7

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On April 8, 1974, my shipmates and I watched the Atlanta Braves Hank Aaron break Babe Ruths home run record on a black-and-white TV. Aaron had anonymous death threats made against him should he break the record. When he did it, two young white men suddenly appeared, running along side him as he rounded second base. They patted him on the back, congratulated him and ran back to the stands, and eventually an overnight cell, as Aaron rounded third. It was a suspense-filled moment, but the way it turned out left even Aaron feeling good. I wish baseball had seen fit to make Hank Aaron its commissioner. Patricia Tarry Family member Washington, D.C. Martin Luther King. I grew up with the movement. I was just about 13 when it started. CS2 Kenneth James Pirates Cove Galley New Orleans Martin Luther King and his marches for civil rights. Then, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas and a bunch of others. Alexis Jenkins Contractor Daytona, Fla. Vivien Thomas. He was one of the first black heart surgeons and created a new procedure. EN2 Preston Turner Phone Operations Chicago Martin Luther King and his entire career. MK3 Roy Larsen Marine Force Protection Unit Rising, Md. Rosa Parks, an elderly lady who stood up for her rights. SKCS Corey Sidlo Maritime Force Protection Unit Astoria, Ore. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his inspirational activism. America needs more of that. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 9

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Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind behind the 9/11 terrorist attacks, along with four co-defendants charged with planning and carrying out the attacks, acknowledged to the judge Jan. 28 that they understand and have no questions about their rights. Army Col. James Pohl, the judge, opened four days of pretrial hearings at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arming that the defendants under stand they have the right to attend the proceedings and may voluntarily skip most proceedings. In outlining the rights, Pohl also made clear that opting out of court could hurt the defense, while recognizing that the ac cused could be compelled to come to court when spe cic issues are discussed. Pohl asked each defendant Mohammed, Walid Muhammad Salih Mubarak Bin Attash, Ramzi Binalshibh, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, and Mustafa Ahmed Adam al Hawsawi to arm that they understand these rights. Bin Attash, the only defendant to oer more than a simple Yes, told Pohl he and his fellow defendants have no motivating factors to come to court. He complained that the prosecution does not want the defendants to hear or understand what is going on or to speak during the proceedings. Bin Attash also expressed frustration that after a year and a half of association, the defendants have not established trust in the attorneys involved. e attorneys are bound, but we are bound also, he told the court. Much of the opening days discussions involved whether the prosecution and defense teams need to go into a closed session to discuss what issues they can address in open court. at included one of the most controversial aspects of the hearing: information about the defendants detention at so-called black sites operated by the CIA before they were transferred to the Guantanamo Bay facility. Portions of the proceedings were blocked out by loud static to keep the statements out of the public record. is also prevented the audio from being heard by families of 9/11 victims at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and watching via closed-circuit television at Fort Meade, Md., and at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.; Fort Hamilton, N.Y.; and Fort Devens, Mass. Reporters covering the proceedings at Guantanamo Bay and from a media center at Fort Meade also heard the static. is led Pohl to question during the hearing who has a right to turn on a light that generates the static sound and also institutes a 40-second delay in the audio feed. After closing the opening session, he brought together the prosecution and defense teams to work through these issues. All ve defendants at todays hearing were captured in Pakistan in 2002 and 2003 and have been conned at Guantanamo Bay since 2006. ey were charged during their arraignment in May 2012 with terrorism, conspiracy, attacking civilians, attacking civilian objects, intentionally causing serious bodily injury, murder in violation of the law of war, destruction of property in violation of the law of war, hijacking or hazarding a vessel or aircraft. is round of commission hearings ran through Jan. 31, with the next slated for Feb. 11 to 14. Opening day hearings began three days after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia overturned the convic tion of Ali Hamza Ahmad Suliman al Bahlul of Ye men. e court ruled that the charges of conspiracy, providing material support for terrorism and soliciting murder did not qualify as war crimes when Bahlul committed them. A military commission found him guilty of conspiracy with Osama bin Laden and others to commit murder of protected persons, attacking civilians and other crimes in November 2008. He was also found guilty of solicitation to commit murder of protected persons, to attack civilian objects, and to commit acts of terrorism. In addition, the commission found him guilty of providing material support for terrorism by supporting al-Qaida through meeting with the highestranking members of the organization and creating al-Qaida propaganda, including a widely distributed propaganda video, e Destruction of the American Destroyer U.S.S. Cole. All oenses were in violation of the Military Commissions Act of 2006. He was sentenced to life in prison. Pre-trial hearings held Arm transplants heal As a wounded warrior who lost all four limbs in Iraq shared news of his successful double-arm transplant Jan. 29, ocials at the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, which funded the research making it possible, say the investment will continue to bear fruit in giving new hope to wounded warriors. Army Spc. Brendan Marrocco appeared Jan. 29 with his medical team, led by Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee, chair of Johns Hopkins Hospitals plastic and reconstructive surgery department, to announce the successful Dec. 18 double transplant at the Baltimore hospital. I really dont know what to say, because it is such a big thing for my life, 26-year-old Marrocco told reporters as he demonstrated his ability to move his new left arm. His right arm has limited movement, but Marrocco said hes hoping to get more soon. Marrocco, who enlisted in the Army in January 2008, deployed to Iraq nine months later with the 25th Infantry Divisions 3rd Brigade, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Regiment. He and his fellow soldiers had completed a night mission and were returning to Forward Operating Base Summerall on April 12, 2009, when their armored vehicle has hit by an explosively formed projectile a roadside bomb designed specically to pierce armor. e explosion, which severed Marroccos carotid artery and all of his limbs, killed one soldier and wounded another. Medevaced through Iraq to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and on to Walter Reed, Marrocco became one of the rst quadruple amputees of the conict to survive his wounds. He had been wearing prosthetic limbs before the 13-hour surgery, the rst of its kind at Johns Hopkins and only the seventh in the United States. His rehabilitation will continue for years, his surgical team explained, as his nerves slowly regenerate one inch per month and he gains the ability to use and control the arms and hands. I feel like I got a second chance to start over after I got hurt, Marrocco told reporters. If feels amazing. Its something I was waiting for for a long time. Excitement about the successful transplant, and its implications for other wounded warriors, rippled through the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick, Md., home of the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. e Defense Department launched AFIRM in 2008 to advance research to treat wounded warriors suering traumatic injuries, explained Army Col. (Dr.) John Scherer, director of the clinical and rehabilitative medicine research program. One of the goals was to promote transplant procedures that were being conducted overseas, but typically not in the United States, he said. 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Navy College educational information Thrift Savings Plan workshop Feb. 27The Thrift Savings Plan is an interactive workshop suit able for all service mem bers. It is designed to provide detailed information on the Thrift Savings Program and to help learners understand how TSP can contribute to finan cial security during retirement. This workshop will be 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Feb. 27. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 1 to 3 p.m., Feb. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families receive training on second Wednesday every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and other benefits and services available to expect ant parents. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expect ant moms. Class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move is designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transportation, trav el pay, allowances, important forms and documents, hous ing referral office and reloca tion services. Service members and spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer. Plus, while attending the workshop, children ages 7 to 12 learn about relocation, how it affects them and what to look forward to. The workshop is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more infor mation, contact at 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the mili tary. The five-day seminar pro vides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, inter viewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11 to 15. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market including skills, experience, edu cation and values plus simple, effective and easy-to-use formats that get interviews. Part-time, full-time or permanent positions, this workshop is for you. It assists job seekers in writing a resume that will get them in the door. The workshop is at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recommended, class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 8A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 8. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and rec ommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and fam ily members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for pro spective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 to 9 p.m., Feb. 8 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Savings and investing examined Feb. 12This six-session class series was developed as a resource for beginning investors with small amounts to invest at any one time. It assumes that participants are investing for the first time and/ or selecting investment products that they have not purchased pre viously. Its every Monday until completed. This training is 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. Registration is recommended. For more infor mation call 573-9783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible. Attendees are provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the elec tronic Federal resume. This class is 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to manage the cycle of deploy ment. It prepares family members for reunion so problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Feb. 13The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. To register, call 573-4513.Home buying and selling workshop upcomingBuying or selling a home can be the one of the largest financial decision someone can ever make. This interactive work shop is designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level for anyone entering the housing market. The Camden County Board of Realtors will provide an experienced member who will provide tools to educate both buyers and sellers, from 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan, which assists service members and spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, February 7, 2013 13

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