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The Kings Bay periscope ( 01-31-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00286

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00286


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Full Text

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Local Navy League event set for base conference center A dinner and a dessert auc tion, to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, will be hosted by the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States, as its rst event of 2013. e event will be Feb. 14, Val entines Day, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, beginning at 6 p.m., with dinner followed by an auction of some mouth-watering des serts, baked and donated by council members. Sea Cadets and their families are invited, as well as the general public. Everyone is encouraged to donate a dessert for the auction. In addition to the dessert auc tion, there will be a rae for prizes, including a special Lovers Get-Awa y at e Spencer House Inn in St. Marys, plus other door prize baskets such as Popcorn and a Movie and others. You do not have to be present to win. All proceeds go to help defray the cost of training, travel, drills and other expenses of local Sea Cadets. Members and interested per sons who cannot attend the meeting can still help the coun cil meet its goal of nancially supporting the Sea Cadets by sending a tax-deductible contribution to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League and write Sea Cadets on the memo line. If you wish to purchase rae tickets, contact Aston at (912) 882-2967. Attendees must register and pay in advance for the dinner and dessert auction. e cost of the dinner is $25 per person, with a reservation deadline of Monday, Feb. 11. Mail the names of all attendees in your group, along with your check in the proper amount, made payable to Camden-Kings Bay Navy League to Aston. If you will be bringing a des sert for the auction, e-mail your name, what you call your des sert, a brief description and the number of servings to teach er1@tds.net. Any questions about the des sert auction can be included in the e-mail. Additional information is available on the council Web site at http://kingsbaynavyleague. org/. e Naval Sea Cadet Corps provides American youth with a drug-and-alcohol-free environment to foster leadership abilities, broaden horizons through hands-on training and guid ance to becoming mature young adults. Support of youth programs is one of the four cornerstones of the Navy League, and the Camden-Kings Bay Council has committed to at least one major annual fund-raiser for the local Sea Cadet unit. Up Periscope Its almost unanimous, our Super Bowl MVP pick Page 10 Bio defense Global terrorism spurs Defense concerns Page 6 In combat Defense department opens roles for women Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Feb. 14 dinner-auction benets Kings Bay Sea Cadets Distinguished Men of Brass trombonist hits big time Hitting the stage and the eld, and bust ing out a bass beat for all to follow. Look out world, here comes the Distinguished Men of Brass! is group of musicians come from all walks of life. But one in particular is spe cial to us locally. Rico Clark, trombonist and persona extraordinaire. He is a life force! Rico and I go back a ways, to the early 1990s onboard the USS Pennsylvania, (SSBN 735) (Gold). I was a Sonar Tech nician Submarines, Second Class Petty Of cer and Rico, a Missile Technician ird Class. Our watch standing duties as mis sile compartment roving patrol kept us in close contact with one another. Being a submarine Sailor made me the man I am, said Clark, who turns 40 today. I dont regret one minute of it. Both of us shared the Navy and a love of music as kindred passions. In those early days at Kings Bay, Rico would Jack of all trades and master of them all Being a sub marine Sailor made me the man I am. Rico Clark Distinguished Men of Brass Two-phase program includes year-round training, instruction For 119 years, the ranks of Chief Petty Ocer have exem plied experience and success, throughout many changes. Now, Master Chief Petty O cer of the Navy Michael Stevens and the rest of the Navy Chiefs Mess greet another change. ey will say goodbye to the words Chiefs induction and ini tiation and embrace the new, modern concept of CPO 365. Our charge as Chief Petty Of cers is to develop our Sailors every day, Fleet Master Chief Charles Clarke, Fleet Master Chief, Fleet Forces Command, said. Change is sometimes nec essary to move forward. CPO 365 allows more time to embed our values, history and leader ship tenets. At Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CPO 365 not only af fects those selected to become the Navys newest Chief Petty Ocers, but those First Class Petty Ocers who are working their way to the next stage of their Navy careers. CPO 365 will better represent our year-round commitment to prepare our First Class Petty Of cers to become eective Chief Petty Ocers, whether they are selected this year or in the fu ture, said Command Master Chiefs steer to CPO 365 Dempsey discusses securityCyberattack other issues covered in NBC interview e worrisome nature of cy berattacks, the threat of global terrorism and the militarys need to emphasize character as well as competence were among topics the chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta discussed in an interview with correspondent Ted Koppel broadcast Jan. 24 on NBCs Rock Center with Brian Williams. Governments, individuals and organizations are engaged in trying to take advantage of vulnerabilities in the cyber domain, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said, citing disruptive denial-of-service attacks as an example. Such attacks over whelm Web sites, rendering them inaccessible to users. What I worry about is that [a cyberattack] could be used to implant a destructive device that could cause signicant harm to the industrial base, whether its critical infrastruc ture or the nancial network,

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 e Navy and Marine Corps Pub lic Health Center announced today the introduction of a new version of the electronic Deployment Health Assessment. is latest version, made avail able to the Fleet Jan. 1, is an upgrade to the previous version originally launched in 2008 that initially re quired seven separate assessments. e most signicant change to the series of assessments was the inte gration of the Congressionally-man dated mental health assessment into the Pre-Deployment Health Assessment and Post-Deployment Health Reassessment. Now, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen will be able to complete two assessments instead of the four that were required to complete the original eDHA. e new format focuses on the sig nature conditions of OIF/OEF al cohol abuse, depression, traumatic brain injuries, and post-traumatic stress disorder and oers the oppor tunity for the member to discuss his or her health concerns with a medi cal professional during the face-toface review. is was a technological chal lenge, said Mr. Azad Al-Koshnaw, NMCPHC Lead Developer of the eDHA application. Providing a seamless tool that comfortably col lects sensitive health information and facilitates the member-provider meeting was the goal of this version. According to Tina Luse, NMCPHC Lead Epidemiologist for Deployment Health, the new format is a value-added resource to military leadership for helping assess Fleet and Force readiness. Deployment health assessments are a valuable tool for all concerned. By spacing the assessments out over the entire deployment cycle, the members have several oppor tunities to discuss their health with their medical providers, Luse said. Some of these conditions have a delayed mental or physical response and could be missed if the assess ments were done just once or too early. Currently, eDHA is fully imple mented and is available for Depart ment of Defense active and reserve components. Because the tool is web-based, many units complete the assess ment while still in theater. e Air Force has completed implementation while the Army is scheduled to be implemented by March 2013. With all services using the same assessments, our service members can get their deployment health assessments done in any military treatment facility around the world, including in theater, said Capt. Michael Macinski, NMCPHC Com manding Ocer. e addition of the enhanced mental health ques tions will provide a good measure of the eects of the conict on resil ience and readiness. Medical and Line leaders across the Department of Defense have oered high-praise for the health status reports that are derived from these deployment health assess ments. Our monthly Force Health re ports provide senior Marine Corps leadership a snapshot of the health and concerns of the Force, enabling us to focus on risk reduction and prevention strategies that improve the health and well-being of our Ma rines. said Capt. William Padgett, Director of Preventive Medicine, Health Services, Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible ben eciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld. Active duty service members and their families will be unaected when long-delayed reductions to areas where the TRICARE Prime option is oered take place Oct. 1, TRI CARE ocials said recently. But as TRICARE seeks to synchronize service area shifts once staggered by contract delays, some military retirees and their dependents will be moved to TRICARE Standard coverage, S. Dian Lawhon, beneciary education and support division director, said during a con ference call with reporters. ose aected reside more than 40 miles from a military treatment facility or base closure site, she said. e new contracts limit Prime networks to regions within a 40-mile radius of military treatment facili ties and in areas aected by the 2005 base closure and realignment pro cess, she explained. But provisions will allow Prime beneciaries who see providers outside the 40-mile service area to remain in Prime if they reside within 100 miles of an available primary care manager and sign an access waiver, she added. If TRICARE retirees and young adults live less than 100 miles away from a remaining Prime service area, they can re-enroll in Prime by waiving their drive standards and there will be room made for them, Lawhon said, adding that the net works are required to connect pro viders to those who elect to waive their drive standards. Contractors such as United HealthCare Military & Veterans, Health Net Federal Services and Humana Military will continue to assist beneciaries in obtaining pro viders in their regions, she added. Health care is best if its local, Lawhon said. Weve established the drive standards [to enable] people to access their primary and special ty care within a reasonable period of time. Austin Camacho, TRICAREs benet information and outreach branch chief, said the out-of-pock et, fee-for-service cost of TRICARE Standard would cost a bit more, de pending on the frequency of health care use and visits. No cost applies for preventive care such as mammo grams, vaccines, cancer screening, prostate examinations and routine check-ups, he added. Ocials estimate the changes will lower overall TRICARE costs by $45 million to $56 million a year, depending on the number of ben eciaries who choose to remain in Prime, Camacho said. Lawhon and Camacho said beneciaries should speak to their health care providers and families to assess the best course of action. Were hoping people will take a careful look at their health care needs, Lawhon said. We have seen that people using the Standard benet are very pleased with it, and their customer satisfaction is the highest of all. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Na val Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retir ees and their spouses information on a vari ety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted liv ing, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Mili tary retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more informa tion, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 9St. Marys 19th Annual Mardi Gras Festival and Parade is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. e parade begins at 10 am. there will be arts, crafts and food vendors, plus childrens activi ties and entertainment on the main stage. e Mardi Gras Ball begins at 7 pm at Southern Junction Events Center. Tickets are available at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center. e 2013 Great Camden County Chili Cook-O in downtown St. Marys is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.camden-chili.com.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Union at Fort Clinch Feb. 2, 3Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Gar rison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2, and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Feb. 3. is program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. e grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in ring demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Fort Clinch State Park is at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Youth program needs mentorsKids First of Floridas YESS Mentoring Pro gram for youth ages 12 to 17, who are in li censed care and in need of a supportive adult who can provide consistency and guidance as they transition into the real world. For ad ditional information or to sign up for mentor training, contact Crystal Bennett at (904) 2785644 ext. 2016. For more information, visit kidsrstoorida.org/ Now hear this! e Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center Career Support and Retention Oce is hosting a Techni cal and Engineering Field Job Fair for transitioning and retired military members with experience within the electronic, mechanical, electrical, engineering and information technology elds. e fair will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, Building 1039. We anticipate that at least 20 companies will have representatives on hand, said Beth Hubbart, Fam ily Employment Readiness program manager at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Kings Bay. All are actively hiring and many have a well established history of recruiting vet erans due to the skills and workplace values he or she gained while serv ing in the military. Many of the registered companies have employment opportunities in multiple locations throughout the U.S., including those with vacancies within the commut ing area of Camden County. Ed Neleski, Transition Assistance program manager, said job seekers should bring an updated resume. We recommend that anyone at tending the job fair bring multiple copies of a current resume, he said. Career Support and Retention sta members are available to assist you in writing or reviewing your resume for this event. ose interested in resume preparation assistance can call 573-4513 to schedule an appointment. Specic positions being recruited include eld service technicians, instrumentation technicians, facility maintenance supervisors, nuclear reactor operator candidates and other personnel with nuclear craft training, engineers of all disciplines, training instructors, construction project managers, mechanics, technical supervisors, logistic specialists and operators. Companies will be registering for the job fair through the rst week of February. For the listing of employers at tending, visit or call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-4513.Technical, engineering job fair Feb. 6 FFSC TRICARE prime service area changes TRICARE New health assessment now available Health Center

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help service members and their fami lies reach their nancial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commit ment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in per sonal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, fam ily members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the De partment of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.Military Saves Week gets underway Feb. 25 Absentee voting goes really wellWASHINGTON, Jan. 25, 2013 e Federal Voting As sistance Program exceeded congressional expectations in the 2012 election cycle by getting guidance to service members so they could vote by absentee ballot, a senior FVAP ocial said here yesterday. David Beirne, acting deputy director of technology programs for FVAP, participated in a MOVE and the Military panel discussion at George Washington Uni versity during the seventh annual summit of the Over seas Vote Foundation and U.S. Vote Foundation. MOVE refers to the Military and Overseas Voter Em powerment Act, designed to help military people serv ing overseas and citizens who live abroad to vote in U.S. elections. e FVAPs role [as outlined by Congress] in the MOVE Act is very specic in terms of communicating di rectly to [service members] in the eld, Beirne said. He added that FVAP sent 90-day, 60-day and 30-day email voting notices to troops throughout the election cycle to instruct them on how to request, obtain and track their ballots. If theres any one group of voters thats familiar with the FVAP, its active-duty military, Beirne said. Anyone with a dot mil email address got one of our emails. at gives us some level of [success in] our outreach and en gagement. We not only met, but exceeded, our congres sional requirement. To get the word out on absentee voting, FVAP deliv ered some 18 million emails, he said, adding that the FVAP website also lays out the how-to-vote instructions, with links to state voting guidance. Because 2012 was the rst general election for FVAPs compliance with the MOVE Act, Beirne said, the out come is similar to taking an exam. Were just waiting for the results to come in, he said. at is whats going to determine the success weve had. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 Special report: Women in Combat Silver Star for valor in IraqIn 2005, for the rst time since World War II, a woman soldier was awarded the Silver Star Medal in Iraq. Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester of the 617th Military Po lice Company, a National Guard unit out of Rich mond, Ky., received the Silver Star, along with two other members of her unit, Sta Sgt. Timothy Nein and Spc. Jason Mike, for their actions during an enemy ambush on their convoy. Hesters squad was shadowing a supply con voy March 20 when anti-Iraqi ghters ambushed the convoy. e squad moved to the side of the road, anking the insurgents and cutting o their escape route. Hester led her team through the kill zone and into a anking position, where she assaulted a trench line with grenades and M203 grenadelauncher rounds. She and Nein, her squad leader, then cleared two trenches, at which time she killed three insur gents with her rie. When the ght was over, 27 insurgents were dead, six were wounded, and one was captured. Hester, 23 at the time, was born in Bowling Green, Ky., and later moved to Nashville, Tenn. She was surprised when she heard she was being considered for the Silver Star. Im honored to even be considered, much less awarded, the medal, she said. Being the rst woman soldier since World War II to receive the medal is signicant to Hester. But, she said, she doesnt dwell on the fact. It really doesnt have anything to do with be ing a female, she said. Its about the duties I per formed that day as a soldier. Hester said she didnt have time to be scared when the ght started, and she didnt realize the impact of what had happened until much later. Your training kicks in and the soldier kicks in, she said. Its your life or theirs. ... Youve got a job to do protecting yourself and your fellow com rades. ree soldiers of the 617th were wounded in the ambush. Hester said she and the other squad members were thinking about them, and she is very thankful to have made it through unscathed. e reght, along with the entire deployment, has had a lasting eect on her, Hester said. I think about it every day, and probably will for the rest of my life, she said. e rst female pilot in the Department of De fense to y in combat re ected on some of her career experiences. An A-10 underbolt II pilot, Lt. Col. Martha McSally was also the rst female in the Air Force to serve as the commander of any combat aviation squadron, to include ghters and bombers. In July 2004, McSally took command of the 354th Fighter Squadron at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. becoming the rst woman to com mand a ghter squadron. One of her most memo rable missions was also the rst time she deployed weapons in combat. Her squadron was called in to take out insurgents in very rugged terrain in Afghanistan, but the bad guys were surrounded by good guys. We got eyes on the area, and needed to then ensure we had the right target area, given the friendlies were so close and in multiple directions in a wind ing steep canyon, McSally said. Friendlies were now climbing up the canyon to get away from the enemy and get outside the safe distance of our gun. I shot some rockets to conrm the enemy location, and we honed the target. en, things got complicated. On my last rocket pass, my heads up display failed with all of our computer ized weapons sights. I had to rely on the very archaic backup called standby pipper, which was a hard sight. I needed to quickly get ready to shoot the gun manually, where I had to be at an exact dive angle, airspeed, and altitude when opening re in or der to be accurate. We de stroyed the enemy on sev eral passes. . During the squadrons time in Afghanistan, it ew just short of 2,000 sorties, accumulated more than 7,000 combat ight hours, and expended more than 23,000 rounds of 30 mm ammunition. A covert force August 30, 1862, proved to be yet another bloody day. Henry Clark was in the thick of things, fending o Federal troops in the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky, when the Confederate private caught an enemy shell in the thigh. Clark was swarmed by bluecoats and taken prisoner. It was presumably when a Union medic treated Clarks wound that the soldiers tightly held secret was unmasked. Henrys real name was Mary Ann. Indeed, she was a divorced mother of two. When Federal troops realized that they had a woman on their hands, they moved quickly to release heras long as she swore to return to the life of a proper lady. ey even gave her a dress to wear. She agreed and was freed, then quickly cast o the frock and made her way back to the rebel army, where she was promptly promoted. Clark was by no means unique. She was one of an estimated 400 women who took up arms in the war; they were not nurses, or laundresses or cooks, but actual female soldiers disguised as men, who marched, mastered their weapons, entered into battle and even gave their lives. What would compel a woman to march into that terrible combat and how could she conceal her identity in what must have been un comfortably close quarters? In the case of Clark, for example, a bad marriage and the death of a brother-in-law at the hands of a pro-Union mob took such an emotional toll that she sought ref uge in the military, according to a letter from her mother. Loreta Velazquez, a.k.a. Lt. Harry T. Bu ford, was one of several women who fought sim ply for the unadulterated thrill of it: I plunged into adventure for the love of the thing, she said after writing a postwar memoir called e Woman in Battle. Following a unanimous recommendation by the Joint Chiefs of Sta, De fense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Jan. 24 the end of the direct ground combat exclusion rule for female service members. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the Joint Chiefs chairman, joined Panetta at a Pentagon news con ference in announcing the policy change. e secretary also an nounced that the service branches will continue to move forward with a plan to eliminate all unneces sary gender-based barriers to service. e change is intended to ensure that the best qualied and most ca pable service members, regardless of gender, are available to carry out the mission, Panetta said. If members of our military can meet the quali cations for a job, then they should have the right to serve, regardless of creed, color, gender or sexual ori entation, he said. In a statement following the announcement, President Barack Obama praised the decision. is milestone reects the courageous and pa triotic service of women through more than two centuries of American his tory and the indispensable role of women in todays military, the president said. e decision opens up about 237,000 posi tions to women 184,000 in combat arms profes sions and 53,000 assignments that were closed based on unit type. Women are an integral part of DODs ability to fulll its mission, Panetta said. Over more than a decade of war, they have demonstrated courage, skill and patriotism, and 152 women in uniform have died serving this na tion in Iraq and Afghani stan, he said. e new policy is the culmina tion of a process that began last year, a senior defense official told reporters. More than 14,000 assign ments in ground combat units or collocated with ground combat units were opened to women in February. at extension of womens roles had a posi tive impact, Panetta said at the news conference. Every time Ive visited the war zone, met with troops, reviewed military operations, talked to wounded warriors, I have been impressed with the fact that everyone is com mitted to doing the job, he said. ey are ghting and dying together. e time has come for our policies to recognize that reality. e change ensured suf cient female mid-grade and senior enlisted and ocers were in place to guar antee suc cessful inte gration of junior personnel. e secretary has direct ed the military services to undertake an evalua tion of all occupational performance standards to ensure they are up to date and gender-neutral. Specialty schools will be included in the evalu ation. e results of this evaluation are to be sub mitted to the defense sec retary by May 15, while the entire process is to be completed by Jan. 1, 2016. We are all committed to implementing this change without compromising readiness or morale or our warghting capabilities, Panetta said. Occupations and as signments will open in crementally, but as ex peditiously as possible. We would fully expect that we will open positions throughout the year as we go forward, a senior de fense ocial said.. Once the policy is fully implemented, military oc cupations will be closed to women only by exception, and only if approved by the defense secretary. I fundamentally believe that our military is more eective when success is based solely on ability, qualications and on per formance, Panetta said. In life, as we all know, there are no guarantees of success, he added. Not everyone is going to be able to be a combat sol dier. But everyone is entitled to a chance. DOD expands womens role in combat Mabus backs call for Navy, Marines Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the fol lowing statement Jan. 24 on the Women in Service Review. I fully support Secretary Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Denition and Assignment Rule, which removes barriers pre venting women Sailors and Marines from reaching their potential in certain elds. I am pleased the Navy has completed an initia tive I announced several months ago to open up one of the few areas not currently available to wom en, that of service on Virginia Class submarines (SSNs). ree years ago we announced a policy change allowing women to serve in guided-missile attack (SSGNs) and ballistic mis sile submarines (SSBNs) and this is a planned continuation of that eort. Newly commissioned female ocers have been selected for assignment to Virginia Class submarines upon successful com pletion of the Naval Nuclear Pow ered training pipeline. We expect these ocers, along with female Supply Corps Ocers, to report to their submarines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in this process. e Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we have achieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary. Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the Direct Ground Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to ex pand opportunities for women in our riverine forc es and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospital corpsman and chaplains. e Marine Corps has already opened ocer and sta noncommissioned ocer billets in unre stricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Ocer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan. e Marines are dedicated to maintaining the Women in Combat:For the U.S., its nothing really new Pilot recounts aerial combat We are all committed to implementing this change ... Leon Panetta Secretary of Defense

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 5 Chief Shaun Garvin, Submarine Group Ten Command Master Chief. e concept of a year-long de velopment and training process for FCPOs was rst introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It consists of a two-phase process the rst begins in Sep tember and ends upon selection of new Chief Petty Ocers. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guid ance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are boardeligible or not. As a junior rst class petty ocer, I have gotten a lot out of the training, Religious Programs Specialist 1st Class Mi chael Brewer said. Getting the opportunity to network and work alongside my fellow 1st classes, which have been doing this longer, will make it easier for me when my opportunity comes to take the next step in my career as a Chief Petty Ocer. Once CPO selection results are announced, the second phase begins with the same principled, professional leader ship training that has been con ducted all year. While selectees complete the Chief Petty Ocer Selectee Leadership Course, non-select ees will have the opportunity to continue yearlong training. One of the keys to this pro cess is establishing the culture of tness and providing the sound physical readiness that our fu ture Chief Petty Ocers need to carry us into the 21st century, said Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Mas ter Chief. eres always been Physical Training involved with Chiefs inductions. But with CPO 365, the process will be lengthened from six weeks to a year. Chief Culinary Specialist Warren Wauson said its a great way to in troduce a new, fast er-paced workout program that is good for the entire body. is will strengthen the Navys PT program, that will increase physi cal readiness year around, while strengthening the relationship between Chiefs and future Chiefs of the Navy, Wauson said. e Kings Bay Chiefs Mess will take on the charge of CPO 365 and will be an example of what success can come from change. What has been refreshing to hear, when I travel around the base, are the positive attitudes from the Sailors willing to step forward and volunteer to be part of the process, Huckaba said. Our dening point will always be the day we accept the new Chiefs in uniform. But our best work will be done throughout the year. volunteer to help band students in the Camden County schools. He mentored countless young men and women in the years he was stationed here. Years passed. Rico left the service but never lost his love of Camden County, music or the submarine force. Life carried him to Tampa, Fla., where he continued his dream of performing and met with a brass and percussion en semble named e Mystic Sheiks of Morocco. ey had a vision to put smiles on peoples faces. He joined the band, playing at Busch Gardens Tampa, roving the park while performing their own arrangements of popular music and classics. eir popularity grew thanks to the advent of YouTube and smart phones. Guests in the park would make videos of the groups performances and post them as a highlight of their visit. Just as all good dreams must come to an end, this one did too. Due to budget issues at the park, the band was released. It did not end the dream of the group. e Distinguished Men of Brass was born anew and took their act on the road. Festivals, parks, street corners, clubs, any where they could land a gig they would bring their high-energy brand of performance art to an audience. Again, YouTube helped build the fame of this electric group. Adding high-stepping march ing moves that many historically black college and universities strive to emulate, they rened their act and brand of musical art. Time warp to the spring of 2012. Rico is again working in the Kings Bay community for General Dynamics as a network engineer and commuting for gigs with DMO Brass as they have been nicknamed by their fans. He also is working as an ad junct professor with ITT Tech nical Institute in Jacksonville, imparting his knowledge of in formation technology to more young men and women wishing to enter the high-tech eld. Plus he still nds time to ride his be loved motorcycle, a Ducati 1098. e man is nothing short of amazing. He can multi-task with the best. But the dream of performing for large crowds kept digging at him and DMO Brass. So they took a leap of faith and audi tioned for the TV show Americas Got Talent. Not knowing if they would be accepted by the crowd or the judges, they worked tire lessly, crafting their 90-second audition. It had to have energy, dazzling footwork and charm. But most of all, their music had to touch the soul of the listener. ey nailed it! April 3, at the end of their au dition, the crowd went nuts. e normally rude Howard Stern, the lovely Sharon Osborne and Howie Mandell all raved enough to pass them on to the next round in Las Vegas. e epic journey had begun. With all of the contract agree ments that had to be signed, the next few months of Ricos life with DMO Brass became almost secretive, a lifestyle not lost on him due to his days as a qualied, Silver Dolphin wear ing submariner. Band members were not allowed to discuss the show with anyone or the results of their perfor mances due to the contracts that were signed with the network. Sound familiar? Sorry honey, I cant tell you or Id have to kill ya. As fate would have it, the group wowed again May 5 in Las Vegas. ey were voted on to the live shows in New York July 2. At the time, Rico would only say to his friends, Hey, you need to watch AGT this week. We all got the message and spread the word that one of our friends may be on the show that week. We tuned in attentively until here came DMO Brass. My sons would say, Wheres Rico? He was right smack dab in the middle, performing his duet on his trombone. e 90 seconds ew by. DMO Brass gathered with host Nick Cannon at center stage for their critique from the judges. ere was Rico, with that cra zy, big smile that just lights up a room, right over Nicks shoulder. e judges decided that they didnt think the band could go any fur ther, but it would be up to America to decide. e next night, we tuned in for the results show, and DMOs run was over. Out of 75,000 auditions, DMO nished in the top 48, with a play list that included I Like It Like at, I Got You (I Feel Good) and Crazy In Love. e chance to perform on na tional television was the chance of a lifetime, Clark said. But that would only be the be ginning of the next chapter for Rico and his brothers. ey were invited to play for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Tampa Bay Lightning. ey will play for the Orlando Magic at halftime, Feb. 6. ey were invited back to Las Vegas and played several shows along the strip. ey have made appearances at numerous marching band Battle of the Bands competitions. We do have a busy schedule, but were always looking to book more performances, here or anywhere, Clark said. Rico has crossed the country with these magnicent troubadours, and they have carved out a cult-like following. And all the while, he still found time to go back to his musical roots and paid it forward. Hes giving countless hours of what little free time he has to again work with the Camden County High School Marching Wildcat Band. He works with percussion, brass players and on choreography. And thats not to mention his involvement with youth sports and American Le gion Post 511. e man is a machine. rough it all, he never lost fo cus on who he is. He is still the same joker and hard worker that he was more than 20 years ago on board the 735(G). Rico hasnt let it go to his head or interfere with his work ethic. So what is the moral to the story? you ask, after all of this. Good people still exist. Good things still happen when you work hard and set a goal. Rico Clark and DMO Brass are living proof of that. I am proud to be able to call him friend and shipmate after all of these years. To quote my friend Rico, with his usual sign o salutation on line: Hollah at ya boy! 735G! Author Mark Rector is pub lic aairs specialist for Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Kings Bay, and a retired Navy chief.DMO The chance to perform on national television was the chance of a lifetime. Rico Clark Distinguished Men of BrassChief In a Jan. 25 statement expressing his support of a Defense Department pol icy change that rescinds a ban on mili tary women serving in certain groundcombat positions, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said that the Navy and Marine Corps already had taken steps to open up elds previously available only to men. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, announced the policy change and signed a joint memo. Rescinding the direct ground-combat exclusion allows the Navy to ex pand opportunities for women in its riverine forces and in billets that di rectly support Marine infantry opera tions, such as hospital corpsmen and chaplains, Mabus noted. He also pointed out that the Marine Corps which is part of the Navy De partment already has opened o cer and sta noncommissioned ocer billets in unrestricted mission occupa tional specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women, such as artillery, armor, lowaltitude air defense and combat engi neer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry O cer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehen sive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan, the Navy secretary said. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, he added, the focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore, Ma bus said. Drawing from their talent in additional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. Navy to expand womens roles in Riverine Forces Marine Corps onboard e entire Marine Corps is dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warghting ca pabilities and the contributions of every Marine; its simply the right thing to do. Our ongoing deliberate, measured and respon sible approach to validate occupational per formance standards for all Marines is con sistent with SECDEFs decision to rescind the direct combat exclusion rule for women. As our Corps moves forward with this pro cess, our focus will remain on combat readi ness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. e talent pool from which we select our nest warghters will consist of all qualied individuals, regardless of gender. What has been refreshing to hear, when I travel around the base, are the positive attitudes from the Sailors willing to step forward and volunteer to be part of the process. CMC Randy Huckaba Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CMC

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Global terrorism drives biosurveillance e global nature of terrorism and the grow ing potential of nations and individuals to acquire weapons of mass destruc tion drive the Defense Departments eort to counter these threats, the assistant secretary of de fense for nuclear, chemical and biological defense programs said. Andrew C. Weber said DOD programs target nuclear deterrence, seek early warning for infec tious diseases and bolster the ability of U.S. partners worldwide to prevent, pre pare for and respond to events involving WMD. Our national security strategy makes prevent ing and preparing for the possibility that terror ist groups would acquire weapons of mass destruc tion, whether it be biological weapons or nuclear weapons, our rst prior ity, Weber said during an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. e 2001 terrorist at tacks on New York, Penn sylvania and the Pentagon drove home the global nature of terrorism, the as sistant secretary said. Later that year, he said, a series of anthrax attacks caused defense ocials to focus more attention on the possibility that terrorist groups would acquire biological or nuclear weapons and use them against cities here or around the world. Since 9/11, he added, the Defense Department has broadly improved its response to terrorist nuclear, chemical and es pecially biological threats, which can be accessible to small groups, terror cells and even individuals. is is why its so di cult to disrupt and to learn about these types of at tacks while theyre being planned, Weber said, so we need to be very pre pared. American forces are vac cinated against anthrax and smallpox, and the de partment has stockpiled antibiotics against poten tial biological attacks. In a sense, we have taken parts of the biological threat o the table, Weber said, by improving our capability for medi cal countermeasures and early warning and surveillance. To keep terrorists from getting access to materials needed to construct bio logical weapons, he said, DOD has helped strengthen biosecurity at laboratories in the United States. We also have launched a program working with partners around the world to make sure public health and veterinary laboratories that have danger ous pathogen strains that cause diseas es like anthrax and ebola are bet ter secured, the as sistant secretary said. Some kinds of biologi cal attacks by terrorists, he said, could look at rst just like natural disease out breaks. We might not know about it until people or even animals show up sick or start dying, he said, so the best thing you can do [is] to have a global early warning system for biological attacks, whether they are deliberate or nat ural. e Defense Depart ment has several programs that involve global biosur veillance, Weber said, including the Global Emerg ing Infections Surveillance and Response System, or GEIS, a division of the Armed Forces Health Sur veillance Center. For 50 years, he said, DOD has had a network of biomedical laboratories in countries around the world that are part of this system. e laborato ries allow DOD scientists to develop drugs for rare diseases that are not en demic in the United States but that may be in coun tries where U.S. forces are deployed, Weber said. ey also give us a good platform, he added, for enhancing regional partner capacity to detect and monitor and respond to infectious disease out breaks. Humans today inhabit an interconnected world, Weber said, so a disease outbreak anywhere is a potential global threat. ats why we need to work with our partners to have a global system for early warning, he said. Early warning systems for diseases, based on good laboratory diag nostics and information systems for tracking sick people, he added, are es sential because the mostimportant aspect of preventing mass casualties in a biological attack is time. e Defense Depart ment has a robust pro gram to develop medical countermeasures and rapid diagnostics for a range of specic biological threats that terrorist groups and countries like North Korea are pursuing, Weber said. DOD works closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and with the World Health Organization, which has global re sponsibilities under the United Nations for improv ing the worlds capability to respond to infectious dis ease outbreaks and work ing with health authorities worldwide in the event of an outbreak or attack. e Department of Defense has a liaison of cer assigned to WHO Headquarters, he said, and recently the U.S. gov ernment signed an agreement with WHO [to fund] some eorts to enhance capabilities around the world to monitor infec tious diseases. In countering future biological threat poten tial, the assistant secretary said, research and devel opment plays an impor tant role. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Online game starts Feb. 4 To generate ideas from a broad eld of participants, the Navy Warfare Devel opment Command, the Oce of Naval Research and the Naval Postgradu ate School are partnering to conduct a crowd-sourc ing online war game on electromagnetic maneuver starting Feb. 4. Electromagnetic Maneuver Massive Multiplayer Online War Game Le veraging the Internet or em2 MMOWGLI will be played in three one-week phases: Know the EM Environment: Understanding EM Energy, from Feb. 4 to Feb. 10 Be Agile: C2 in the EM Environment, from Feb. 18 to Feb. 24 Change Our Paradigm: Tactical Employment of EM Weapons, from March 4 to March 10 To facilitate global par ticipation, the game will be open 24-hours a day during the game phases. Interested players can request to register at mmowgli.nps.edu/em2/ signup. After registration, the game can be played on any Web browser. e electromagnetic spectrum and cyberspace are key dierentiators for winning future Navy bat tles, said Rear Adm. Ter ry B. Kraft, commander, NWDC. em2 MMOWGLI is designed to bring to gether a massive, distributed audience focused on helping the Navy operate in the EM environment. Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder, chief of naval research, said communications, electronics, and sensor systems aboard na val ships and submarines must operate eectively in order to support the execution of military mis sions and operations. Were looking to the experts in electromag netic warfare from across military, government, academia, industry and think tanks to actively par ticipate and make meaningful contributions in the game which could ulti mately improve warghter eectiveness, he said. Each phase of the game will start by the partners posting root cards which pose questions on the topic for that phase. Players then post idea cards that other players can respond to by either building on, countering, redirecting, or calling for further expertise. Points are earned based on each idea cards inu ence and perceived value. Individuals contributing to particularly intriguing concepts are invited to collaborate on an Action Plan to move that idea forward. Published action plans are awarded further points by all players providing ratings and additional comments. Signicant achievements will be recognized. In addition to the unclassied em2 MMOWGLI game, a blog on NWDCs Navy Center for Innovation classied Web site at fims.nwdc.navy.smil.mil/ nci/bloglist.aspx will allow players with SIPRNet access to continue game discussions in a secure environment. Results from the game will inform Navy innovation concept development and experimentation ef forts. DIs still push new boots With eyes squinted in exertion and camouage utilities salted in sand, recruits of Company C, 1st Recruit Training Battal ion, worked through vari ous combat conditioning exercises aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 9. Recruits of Co. C, 1st RTBn. pushed through a circuit of multiple exercis es that included reman carries, low crawling and Marine Corps Martial Arts Program techniques in or der to improve their physi cal tness and prepare for the demands of a combat environment. Every exercise from the reman carry to MCMAP is combat related to build a combat mindset, should there be an encounter with the enemy, explained Sgt. Cesar D. Martinez, drill instructor, Platoon 1053, Co. C, 1st RTBn. Fatigue crept up on re cruits like the calm before a storm, but when it came, drill instructors were there to get them out of the rain. During a buddy drag exercise, one recruit fell behind and didnt appear to have any energy left. Suddenly, a drill instruc tor swooped in on his lo cation, yelled a few orders, and the recruit nished quicker than he started. eir minds think they cant do anymore, but we know they can, said Mar tinez, a black belt MC MAP instructor. You al ways have one more mile in you. When you think youre tired you just have to tell yourself, one more mile, one more mile . Recruits appreciated the extra motivation and said their encouragement isnt limited to physical tness exercises. (Motivation) helps a lot. Instead of bringing us down, they motivate us by reminding us why we came here to be Ma rines, said Recruit Man uel Gomez-Gonzales, Plt. 1054, Co C., 1st RTBn. Although drill instruc tors play a large role in motivating recruits, some recruits also have other sources of motivation. Its not in my blood to quit. I keep my family in my mind to motivate me to be a better person and not a quitter, said GomezGonzales, a Colorado Springs, Colo., native. For others it could be an inspiring quote. Its about putting 100 percent, not about doing the bare minimum. Its like someone said, To do anything less than your best is to sacrice the gift, said Recruit Rodolfo Lopez, Plt. 1050, Co. C., 1st RTBn. For drill instructors like Martinez, the idea that these recruits will be the next generation of Ma rines is their motivation to keep pushing and mo tivating recruits to do the best they can do. If I put out, it will be worth it in the end when they get to the eet, Mar tinez said. From the strained faces and grunts it appeared all inspiration was benecial in helping the recruits n ish that extra mile. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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highest levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warghting capabilities and the contributions of every Ma rine. Its simply the right thing to do. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, our focus will re main on combat readiness and generating combatready units while simultaneously ensuring maxi mum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honor ably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent in additional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue to deploy the nest naval force in the world. With the revolution in biotechnology the range of threats is po tentially innite, Weber said, so we need a rapid response capability after exposure, once we iden tify what is causing the disease, to develop a drug quickly, within weeks or days, rather than the years it takes now. e Defense Depart ment has its own biological research laboratories, he said, that work on developing medical products and also with industrial and academic partners around the world. Agencies like DARPA [Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency] and the Defense reat Reduction Agency have been very active in fund ing biodefense research, Weber said. e focus, he said, is on nding rapid ways to respond to a biological attack from an unknown agent, quickly character ize it and develop a countermeasure. Rather than having a drug or a vaccine for every potential [threat], Weber said, we need a capability to respond quickly, to be able to characterize what is causing illness, and then to develop as quickly as possible a medical coun termeasure to save lives. e 2nd Annual My Little Val entine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which in cludes a ower for each daugh ter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Super Friday Golf Tournament is Friday, Feb. 1 at Trident Lakes Golf Club with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $26 per person, which includes tail gate party in Legends Grille from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Non-golfers can enjoy the buffet for only $6. Pick your team. Individual play with low gross and low net in each flight. Flights are deter mined by your current handicap (if no handicap established, golf pro will determine.) Your net score is determined by deduct ing the total score of your picked team and subtracting from your gross score. Additional prizes for closest to the pin. Winners will be contacted on Monday, Feb. 4. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. All partic ipants are welcome. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration clos es on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Championship Game Football Party 2013 at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m., Feb. 3. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holi days, plus a Saturday signup 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, play ers must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and can not turn 16 prior to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reservists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 573-8202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Finding Nemo 3-D Feb. 2, 3 Frankenweenie Feb. 9 10 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 Bio A Defense Department inspector general investi gation into allegations of professional misconduct has cleared Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, com mander of the Interna tional Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Jan. 22. In a statement, Little said Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta was pleased to learn the investigation did not substantiate the allega tions and that the inspec tor general has closed the investigation. On Oct. 10, President Barack Obama nominated Allen to serve as NATOs supreme allied com mander for Europe and commander of U.S. Euro pean Com mand. In No vem ber, the FBI referred a matter involv ing Allen to the Defense Department. Panetta directed that the matter be referred to the DOD IG for investigation. e secretary also asked the ranking members of the Senate Armed Ser vices Committee to delay a conrmation hearing scheduled for Nov. 15 on Allens pending NATO nomination until the mat ter was resolved. On Dec. 3, the Senate conrmed Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., assistant Marine Corps commandant, as the next commander of ISAF and U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Panetta, Little said, has complete condence in the continued leadership of General Allen, who is serving with distinction in Afghanistan. Marine Corps Maj. David Nevers, an ISAF spokes man, said Allen placed his faith in and fully supported the investigation. Hes obviously pleased by the outcome, Nev ers said. But more critically, he is grateful for the support he received throughout this process from his chain of com mand, friends, family and colleagues. He remains focused, as he has always been, on leading the brave men and women of the ISAF team.Investigation clears Allen Mabus Dempsey said. ere are reports that destructive cyber tools have been used against Iran, the chairman said. Im neither conrming nor denying any part in that, but what it should tell you is that capability ex ists, he added. And if it ex ists, whoevers using those [capabilities] cant assume that theyre the only smart people in the world. When Koppel asked Dempsey which part of the world he worries about most, the general noted that the threat of global terrorism compli cates matters. eres kind of a nearterm, long-term aspect to that, he explained. I think near-term continues to be the threat of global terrorism. We track a glob al terrorist network that is not uniquely al-Qaida, but is aliated at some level with al-Qaida. is re quires a network to defeat a network, Dempsey said. What it means is youre not going to see these broad, sweeping movements across the desert of eastern Iraq Hail Mary, right-hand cross, [or] what ever it was called in 1991, he explained. Youre going to see smaller groups of military formations confronting these distributed enemies across a much wider scope. Although U.S. combat forces will be out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, Dempsey said, it would be a mistake to give the Ameri can people the sense that al-Qaida is defeated. I think that its fair to say there will be a part of the al-Qaida threat ema nating from northwestern Pakistan, and potentially, Afghanistan, for the foreseeable future, he added.Dempsey THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 9

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My football fever is reaching its peak. Two weeks ago, I asked for Super Bowl picks. None of the six people I asked picked the Ravens and 49ers. Last week, we talked about Tim Tebow. This week, Im asking, Who will be the most valuable player in the Super Bowl? Colin Kaepernick is the Las Vegas favorite at 7-to-4. Joe Flacco (it usually goes to quarterbacks) is next at 5-to-2, followed by Ray Lewis, 6-to-1, Frank Gore, 17-to-2, Ray Rice, 6-to-1, Michael Crabree, 16-to1 and Anquan Boldin, 18-to-1. Alex Smith is the listed longshot at 100-to-1. Almost everybody at Pirates Cove last week was taking Lewis, the sentimental favorite.MA1 Nicholas Green Security Force Battalion Huntsville, Ohio (Colin) Kaepernick. If Kaepernick performs, hes going to win it. MA3 Justin Adams Security Force Battalion Beaumont, Texas It has to be Ray Lewis. Its his final game, and hes one of the best defensive players of all time. LS2 Juvins Thelusma Trident Refit Facility Miami Ray Lewis. Hes a beast. CS3 Michael Copeland Pirates Cove Galley Fayetteville, N.C. Ray Lewis because hes getting ready to retire, and theyre trying to send him out with a bang. Pfc. Jason Theriot Security Force Battalion Berwick, La. Ray Lewis. Hes my favorite player. Its his last year, so me might as well go out with MVP and as a champion. YN3 Wilbert Camacho USS Alabama Gold Redding, Pa. It think it will be Ray Lewis. Throughout the season, I just kept hearing his name. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho TRF honorees THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 11

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 27Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 27. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 4, 11 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered Feb. 6The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved com munication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and trans fers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transpor tation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All ser vice members and their spouses are encouraged to attend with in six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This pro gram will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and informa tion on any licenses or certifica tions held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Feb. 5, 12 and 19. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 8A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 8. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 5, 12, 19 and 26. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 to 9 p.m., Feb. 8 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 4 to 8. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11 to 15. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Savings and investing examined Feb. 12This six-session class series was developed as a resource for beginning investors with small dollar amounts to invest at any one time. It assumes that partic ipants are investing for the first time and/or selecting invest ment products that they have not purchased previously. This workshop will be every Monday until completed. This training is scheduled 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. Registration is recommended. For more information call 5739783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Feb. 13The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. To register, call 573-4513.Home buying and selling workshop upcomingBuying or selling a home can be the one of the largest finan cial decision someone can ever make. This interactive work shop is designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level for anyone entering the housing market. The Camden County Board of Realtors will provide an experienced member who will provide tools to educate both buyers and sellers, from 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Devel opment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to in crease a couples ability to bet ter understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and com munication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfac tion, closeness, and genuine ness in their marriage. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in mak ing informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more infor mation call 573-4513.Command Return and Reunion training scheduledThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21. Registration recommended, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of dis charge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC Following a nine-month investigation into sexual misconduct at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in San Antonio, the Air Force has implemented a com prehensive program aimed at eliminating sexual as sault, senior Air Force leaders told Congress Jan. 23. Air Force Chief Of Sta Gen. Mark A. Welsh III and Air Force Gen. Edward A. Rice Jr., the commander of the services Air Education and Training Command, spoke before the House Armed Services Commit tee about the Air Forces recently completed inter nal investigation. Describing the crimes as stunning, Welsh said there could be no excuses. eres no justiable ex planation, and there is no way we can allow this to happen again, he said. e Air Force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. e goal is zero, Welsh added. Its the only acceptable objective. e impact on every victim, their fam ily, their friends [and] the other people in their unit is heart-wrenching, and attacking this cancer is a full-time job, and we are giving it our full attention. e eort includes an Air Force-wide health and welfare inspection, held in December, the results of which are publicly available, Welsh said. Also last month, Welsh used his monthly Letter to Airmen to reinforce that obscene, vulgar or disre spectful images, songs or so-called traditions are not part of our heritage and will not be accepted as part of our culture. In addition, a Recruit ing Education and Training Oversight Council will be established, Rice said, to review and advise any current or future actions undertaken to eliminate sexual assault. e council also will provide advice on strate gic issues aecting airman safety and the maintenance of good order and discipline in basic military training, he added. More than 7,700 inter views were conducted as part of the investigation, Rice said. When contact information was avail able, anyone who gradu ated from basic military training within the past 10 years was interviewed, he added. Although we have conducted a 10-year look back, the vast majority of the allegations are of alleged misconduct that oc curred over the past three years, Rice said. Allegations ranged from sexual assault to inappro priate contact with former students, Rice said. Each victim or alleged victim was oered the full range of available victim support services, he added. Of the 855 personnel assigned as military training instructors during this three-year period, 32, less than 4 percent, have been disciplined or are now under investigation, Rice said. I believe it is important to underscore that the vast majority of our instructors served with distinction in a very demanding duty assignment, Rice said. at said, it is completely unacceptable to us that so many of our instructors have committed crimes or violated our policies, and we clearly failed in our responsibility to maintain good order and discipline among too many of our in structors in basic military training. Maintaining good order and discipline is one of the most important and fun damental responsibilities of command, Rice said, one that cannot be del egated. With that in mind, Air Force ocials are focus ing their eorts on helping commanders meet this fundamental responsibility, he said. e Air Force has re committed itself to en suring that every airman is treated with respect, Welsh said. Its not a onetime x. It has to be a way of life. With no room for mis understanding, Welsh said, every Air Force su pervisor and commander must be actively engaged in this eort. If they dont get actively engaged, I consider them part of the problem, he added. While it is still early, Rice said, it appears that the Air Forces eorts are making an impact. ere have been no reports of sexual mis conduct in basic military training in the past seven months, he noted. We know this is not the beginning of the end, but the end of the beginning of a journey that can never end, he said. e American people trust us with their greatest treasure: their sons and daughters, Welsh said. ey expect us to lead them with honor, to value each of them, and to treat them as if they were our own. We do not have a greater responsibility than that. I will never stop attack ing this problem. e United States Air Force leadership team will never quit working to eliminate this horrible crime from the ranks of our Air Force, he said.Air Force sights on eliminating sexual assault Veterans Moving For ward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the pup pies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog. Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As I grow up I am begin ning to learn more about what it takes to be a service dog. A good service dog has to be healthy, happy, condent and steady. Oh, and did I say smart? All of these traits are also traits many Coast Guardsmen have. Just as in their train ing, I am provided all sorts of experiences so I can be prepared. Id like to think I am always ready just like they are! While some activities are chal lenging, I know my human is with me and will not allow anything bad to happen and she actually makes it fun. And so it was that I began ying. Now, I actually can y o the dock into the water to reach a tennis ball. Or, I was once caught y ing over the couch play ing chase with my sister Lori. I know, not my most professional move, but it sure was fun at the time! Anyway, Im talking about getting into what you hu mans call a plane and go ing way above the ground. I have to tell you from a canine point of view this is not an easy concept. We rst went to the air port so I could get famil Life of a Service Dog Part 6 Nathan visits Coast Guard Air Station Washington THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 13

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Going from seaman to skipper Success is dened dierently for everybody. But for one Coast Guardsman who started his en listment as a young, untested seaman recruit and is now the commanding ocer of a small-boat station suc cess was constructed by a goal he set for himself when he was only two years into his career. More than 16 years ago, 22-year-old Seaman Com mander K. Moore stood shoulder-to-shoulder with his shipmates on the lawn of Station Atlantic City, N.J., watching his new commanding ocer take an oath of leadership. Moore could not help but stare at the crisp, bright white dress uniforms worn by the ocers in the cere mony. Although he graduated from basic training nearly two years earlier, it was his rst time seeing a formal military change of command. Up until this point, Moore, who grew up in Harlem, N.Y., could not have guessed what his future would hold. Before he joined the Coast Guard, the freedom of his rst car left him missing too many classes and eventu ally out of college living back at home with his mother. He found work at a clothing store in New York City but wanted a career he could be proud of. He joined the Coast Guard and after graduating from basic training began his career in Atlantic City as a nonrate, the Coast Guards lowest enlisted job position. Reporting to a unit after basic training as the newest crewmember can be dicult. Despite this challenge, his work ethic set the foundation needed to build a success ful Coast Guard career. As Moore stood in formation at Atlantic City, an idea engulfed his mind. Moore was determined to earn the white uniform; he gave himself eight years to become an ocer. For an enlisted member of the Coast Guard, becoming a commissioned ocer can be dicult. e process requires a member to complete numer ous forms, fulll prerequisites and put together a pack age of credentials that can take months to complete. ough dicult, it is not impossible. In 2003, as a 2nd class food service specialist, with just under eight years as an enlisted service member behind him, Moore went to Ocer Candidate School where he earned his commissioning. Even after accomplishing his goal and serving a few tours as an ocer, Moore could not have predicted how meaningful the accomplishment was to become. It wasnt long before Moore received orders to be the commanding ocer of Station Atlantic City. During the stations change of command ceremony, with his new crew watching from formation, Moore, standing in his crisp, white dress uniform, became emotional as he read his orders out loud. I got choked up when they said introducing the commanding ocer of Coast Guard Station Atlantic City, Moore recalls. His career had come full circle. He said he would have never, ever ex pected to be back at the station where his career began, especially as the commanding ocer. Although he is now in charge, Moore takes pride in always being the same person re gardless of his rank. Nobody knows this better than Chief Petty Ocer Ryan McKenna, executive petty ocer of Station Atlan tic City, who met Moore in Atlantic City in January 1996. We worked together for about four months but got to know each other fairly well. From what I remember he was always a hard worker with a strong determination to succeed, McKenna said. We had only known each other for a small period of time as young Coasties but those bonds last through the years, and have really cre ated the foundation for a strong command cadre at Sta tion Atlantic City. e strong command cadre is valuable for the sta tions junior members who rely on McKenna and Moore for leadership and career guidance. Seaman Terrah Faillo, a crewmember at Station Atlantic City who wants to apply for Ocer Candidate School, said she feels very fortunate to have Moore as a com manding ocer. Lt. Moore is easy to relate to and is someone I strive to be like, Faillo said. To know he started at the bottom, where I am, and worked his way to the top is amazing. I hope to learn a lot from him. He expects a lot from us, but he is our biggest advocate. Aside from being a great role model for junior crew members, Moore has a lot of knowledge to share. From being a station non-rate; a cook on the nowdecommissioned cutter Hornbeam; an admirals aide; the on-scene commander during the Coast Guards re sponse to Flight 1549 crash landing in the Hudson River; and recently responding in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Moore proves having a strong work ethic pays o. I was where they are now, Moore said. I stood duty, cleaned bilges, painted hulls, sandblasted and I have stumbled. Now I am sitting before them as their com manding ocer. I want my people to know you can make a mistake and still climb your way back up to the top. It is never impossible. Moores new oce is a reminder of this, as it is care fully decorated with remnants of his incredible career. Some are out on display and others led neatly in bind ers, all serving as reminders of where he came from, which is coincidently, right outside his oce door. iar with the new sights, sounds and smells. Pretty easy. e next time we went I actually got on a plane. At the airport we had to stand in long lines. Walk a few feet and sit down. Walk a few feet and sit down. e short walks and sitting was punctuated by me occasionally laying down. I am nding a great deal of service dog training is pretty boring. en we moved on to stairs, eleva tors and moving oors Ive got to tell you those are simply un-natu ral, but I got a few treats and lots of praise, so I could do it. After a train and nally a long hallway I was on the plane. Getting in the plane was no big deal. People smiled at me. I peeked into the front where all the buttons and lights are. en we moved to our seats, in the front row they said there was more room for me there, I hope I dont get any big ger or it is going to be one tight t. I listened attentively as the nice ight attendant talked about safety. I felt the plane rumble, we moved and I began sliding. at was a little scary. But I got a few treats and lots of reassurance. I also got to hold my favorite stued animal toy so I felt better. I dont need my toy anymore just want to make that clear. Im a big dog now, a pro at ying and have done it many times on dier ent planes to dierent places. If the person who I am to help needs to y I know how to do that with them. All this ying talk reminds me of how I came to be named after Nate Bruckenthal. You see Nates detach ment was co-located at Air Station Miami where my human handlers nephew and godson, Lt. Cmdr. Troy Glendye, was stationed. Even be fore I was born Troy and Cyndi be gan talking about me what kind of service dog I might become and how we might pay tribute to some ones service and ultimate sacrice. Troy, a pilot in the Coast Guard, sug gested I be named after Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nate Bruckenthal, who was killed when suicide bombers as saulted his security mission in Iraq. So Troy wrote to Coast Guard o cials and asked permission from the family to do so. Nates father happily approved the request. I was about six-weeks-old when I rst heard humans speak my name Nathan. I liked it right away. It is a strong, solid name. When Lt. Cmdr. Glendye heard I really liked ying, he invited me to visit Air Station Washington for a tour.Troy greeted us at the door and walked us in to this huge room he called it a hangar. In the hangar was a plane and I got to smell the tires, dogs like to do that. We met some nice Coast Guards men who were checking the outside of the plane. en Troy invited us to see the inside of the plane. Well, he did not need to ask me twice, I had walked up plane stairs many times so this was easy. e plane seemed about the size of some other planes I had been in so I knew how to move about carefully backing up when there was no space to turn around, not bumping into anything. My hu man handler calls that body aware ness, she says I have good body awareness. It was very exciting to be at the Coast Guard Air Station Washington and meet some of the great people who are part of the Coast Guard. I am proud and honored to carry Nate Bruckenthals name and be embraced by the Coast Guard fam ily. Stay tuned for my next blog as I grow into an awesome service dog. Nathan 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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e rise and fall of Mis sissippi River water levels is a constant, impacted by ooding and drought. Its something those who work on or around the river contend with on a regular basis. is year, rivers through out the Midwest region are experiencing record low water levels and natural relief through the winter may be minimal. As water levels drop, the channels in which ships and barges travel shrink in width and depth, creating diculties for shipping commerce. e Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers and shipping industries are working together to adapt to the pressure of keeping the Mississippi open for commerce and the public. After experiencing an historic ood in 2011, the American heartland is now facing low water lev els not seen since 1988. is greatly impacts the industries that rely on the rivers to ship products across the country. To keep the channels as wide and deep as possible, the Army Corps of Engineers monitors river levels and dredges in targeted areas. It is then up to Coast Guard river tenders to mark the navigable wa terways so industry and the public can travel safely and eectively. ere are at least ve Coast Guard cutters work ing in the major rivers marking and maintaining navigation. ese cutters place about 3,000 buoys and service more than 500 navigation beacons along 10,300 miles of inland navigable waterways. To perform this task, the Coast Guard and Army Corps of Engineers must work closely with industry partners to ensure where they dredge and mark channels is beneting commerce in the best pos sible way. e Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers and river towing industry have worked together to ensure the safe navigation of commercial trac on the Inland River Sys tem in order to mitigate the low water eects of this drought on our nations inland waterways and economy, said Rear Adm. Roy A. Nash, com mander of the 8th Coast Guard District. e Coast Guard keeps mariners in formed of changes and restrictions in the river via broadcast and local notice to mariners. Industry is, of course, the key reporting source for many of these changes and has been ex ceptionally vigilant during this challenging period. With the use of the Wa terways Action Plan, cre ated between the Coast Guard, Army Corps of En gineers and industry, op tions such as draft and tow size controls have kept the commerce owing until water conditions can improve. However, with a lack of rain and low snowfall this winter closures have oc curred on the Mississippi. ese closures are designed to have the small est impact on commerce. Safety is our primary focus, said Capt. Byron Black, commander of Sector Upper Mississippi River. We have prudent controls in place with goals of trying to prevent an incident with negative impacts. Nash pointed out the importance of the collec tive work to keep commerce owing on the rivers and protecting the nations economic pros perity. We commit to work ing closely with the Army Corps of Engineers and our industry partners to do all we can to ensure the safety of those on the riv ers, while facilitating commerce to the maximum extent we safely can, Nash said. Mississippi levels dropping Pirates Cove menus 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Local Navy League event set for base conference center A dinner and a dessert auction, to benet the Kings Bay Division of the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, will be hosted by the Camden-Kings Bay Council of the Navy League of the United States, as its rst event of 2013. e event will be Feb. 14, Valentines Day, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, beginning at 6 p.m., with dinner followed by an auction of some mouth-watering desserts, baked and donated by council members. Sea Cadets and their families are invited, as well as the general public. Everyone is encouraged to donate a dessert for the auction. In addition to the dessert auction, there will be a rae for prizes, including a special Lovers Get-Awa y at e Spencer House Inn in St. Marys, plus other door prize baskets such as Popcorn and a Movie and others. You do not have to be present to win. All proceeds go to help defray the cost of training, travel, drills and other expenses of local Sea Cadets. Members and interested persons who cannot attend the meeting can still help the council meet its goal of nancially supporting the Sea Cadets by sending a tax-deductible contribution to Cheryl Aston, 103 Hallowes Drive S., St. Marys, GA 31558. Make checks payable to Camden Kings Bay Navy League and write Sea Cadets on the memo line. If you wish to purchase rae tickets, contact Aston at (912) 882-2967. Attendees must register and pay in advance for the dinner and dessert auction. e cost of the dinner is $25 per person, with a reservation deadline of Monday, Feb. 11. Mail the names of all attendees in your group, along with your check in the proper amount, made payable to Camden-Kings Bay Navy League to Aston. If you will be bringing a dessert for the auction, e-mail your name, what you call your dessert, a brief description and the number of servings to teacher1@tds.net. Any questions about the dessert auction can be included in the e-mail. Additional information is available on the council Web site at http://kingsbaynavyleague. org/. e Naval Sea Cadet Corps provides American youth with a drug-and-alcohol-free environment to foster leadership abilities, broaden horizons through hands-on training and guidance to becoming mature young adults. Support of youth programs is one of the four cornerstones of the Navy League, and the Camden-Kings Bay Council has committed to at least one major annual fund-raiser for the local Sea Cadet unit. Up Periscope Its almost unanimous, our Super Bowl MVP pick Page 10 Bio defense Global terrorism spurs Defense concerns Page 6 In combat Defense department opens roles for women Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Feb. 14 dinner-auction benets Kings Bay Sea Cadets Distinguished Men of Brass trombonist hits big time Hitting the stage and the eld, and busting out a bass beat for all to follow. Look out world, here comes the Distinguished Men of Brass! is group of musicians come from all walks of life. But one in particular is special to us locally. Rico Clark, trombonist and persona extraordinaire. He is a life force! Rico and I go back a ways, to the early 1990s onboard the USS Pennsylvania, (SSBN 735) (Gold). I was a Sonar Technician Submarines, Second Class Petty Ofcer and Rico, a Missile Technician ird Class. Our watch standing duties as missile compartment roving patrol kept us in close contact with one another. Being a submarine Sailor made me the man I am, said Clark, who turns 40 today. I dont regret one minute of it. Both of us shared the Navy and a love of music as kindred passions. In those early days at Kings Bay, Rico would Jack of all trades and master of them all Being a sub marine Sailor made me the man I am. Rico Clark Distinguished Men of Brass Two-phase program includes year-round training, instruction For 119 years, the ranks of Chief Petty Ocer have exemplied experience and success, throughout many changes. Now, Master Chief Petty Ocer of the Navy Michael Stevens and the rest of the Navy Chiefs Mess greet another change. ey will say goodbye to the words Chiefs induction and initiation and embrace the new, modern concept of CPO 365. Our charge as Chief Petty Ofcers is to develop our Sailors every day, Fleet Master Chief Charles Clarke, Fleet Master Chief, Fleet Forces Command, said. Change is sometimes necessary to move forward. CPO 365 allows more time to embed our values, history and leadership tenets. At Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CPO 365 not only affects those selected to become the Navys newest Chief Petty Ocers, but those First Class Petty Ocers who are working their way to the next stage of their Navy careers. CPO 365 will better represent our year-round commitment to prepare our First Class Petty Ofcers to become eective Chief Petty Ocers, whether they are selected this year or in the future, said Command Master Chiefs steer to CPO 365 Dempsey discusses securityCyberattack other issues covered in NBC interview e worrisome nature of cyberattacks, the threat of global terrorism and the militarys need to emphasize character as well as competence were among topics the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta discussed in an interview with correspondent Ted Koppel broadcast Jan. 24 on NBCs Rock Center with Brian Williams. Governments, individuals and organizations are engaged in trying to take advantage of vulnerabilities in the cyber domain, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said, citing disruptive denial-of-service attacks as an example. Such attacks overwhelm Web sites, rendering them inaccessible to users. What I worry about is that [a cyberattack] could be used to implant a destructive device that could cause signicant harm to the industrial base, whether its critical infrastructure or the nancial network,

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center announced today the introduction of a new version of the electronic Deployment Health Assessment. is latest version, made available to the Fleet Jan. 1, is an upgrade to the previous version originally launched in 2008 that initially required seven separate assessments. e most signicant change to the series of assessments was the integration of the Congressionally-mandated mental health assessment into the Pre-Deployment Health Assessment and Post-Deployment Health Reassessment. Now, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen will be able to complete two assessments instead of the four that were required to complete the original eDHA. e new format focuses on the signature conditions of OIF/OEF alcohol abuse, depression, traumatic brain injuries, and post-traumatic stress disorder and oers the opportunity for the member to discuss his or her health concerns with a medical professional during the face-toface review. is was a technological challenge, said Mr. Azad Al-Koshnaw, NMCPHC Lead Developer of the eDHA application. Providing a seamless tool that comfortably collects sensitive health information and facilitates the member-provider meeting was the goal of this version. According to Tina Luse, NMCPHC Lead Epidemiologist for Deployment Health, the new format is a value-added resource to military leadership for helping assess Fleet and Force readiness. Deployment health assessments are a valuable tool for all concerned. By spacing the assessments out over the entire deployment cycle, the members have several opportunities to discuss their health with their medical providers, Luse said. Some of these conditions have a delayed mental or physical response and could be missed if the assessments were done just once or too early. Currently, eDHA is fully implemented and is available for Department of Defense active and reserve components. Because the tool is web-based, many units complete the assessment while still in theater. e Air Force has completed implementation while the Army is scheduled to be implemented by March 2013. With all services using the same assessments, our service members can get their deployment health assessments done in any military treatment facility around the world, including in theater, said Capt. Michael Macinski, NMCPHC Commanding Ocer. e addition of the enhanced mental health questions will provide a good measure of the eects of the conict on resilience and readiness. Medical and Line leaders across the Department of Defense have oered high-praise for the health status reports that are derived from these deployment health assessments. Our monthly Force Health reports provide senior Marine Corps leadership a snapshot of the health and concerns of the Force, enabling us to focus on risk reduction and prevention strategies that improve the health and well-being of our Marines. said Capt. William Padgett, Director of Preventive Medicine, Health Services, Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld. Active duty service members and their families will be unaected when long-delayed reductions to areas where the TRICARE Prime option is oered take place Oct. 1, TRICARE ocials said recently. But as TRICARE seeks to synchronize service area shifts once staggered by contract delays, some military retirees and their dependents will be moved to TRICARE Standard coverage, S. Dian Lawhon, beneciary education and support division director, said during a conference call with reporters. ose aected reside more than 40 miles from a military treatment facility or base closure site, she said. e new contracts limit Prime networks to regions within a 40-mile radius of military treatment facilities and in areas aected by the 2005 base closure and realignment process, she explained. But provisions will allow Prime beneciaries who see providers outside the 40-mile service area to remain in Prime if they reside within 100 miles of an available primary care manager and sign an access waiver, she added. If TRICARE retirees and young adults live less than 100 miles away from a remaining Prime service area, they can re-enroll in Prime by waiving their drive standards and there will be room made for them, Lawhon said, adding that the networks are required to connect providers to those who elect to waive their drive standards. Contractors such as United HealthCare Military & Veterans, Health Net Federal Services and Humana Military will continue to assist beneciaries in obtaining providers in their regions, she added. Health care is best if its local, Lawhon said. Weve established the drive standards [to enable] people to access their primary and specialty care within a reasonable period of time. Austin Camacho, TRICAREs benet information and outreach branch chief, said the out-of-pocket, fee-for-service cost of TRICARE Standard would cost a bit more, depending on the frequency of health care use and visits. No cost applies for preventive care such as mammograms, vaccines, cancer screening, prostate examinations and routine check-ups, he added. Ocials estimate the changes will lower overall TRICARE costs by $45 million to $56 million a year, depending on the number of beneciaries who choose to remain in Prime, Camacho said. Lawhon and Camacho said beneciaries should speak to their health care providers and families to assess the best course of action. Were hoping people will take a careful look at their health care needs, Lawhon said. We have seen that people using the Standard benet are very pleased with it, and their customer satisfaction is the highest of all. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA help ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce, locat ed in the back of the oce at the library. Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retirees and their spouses information on a variety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted living, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Military retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more information, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. St. Marys Mardi Gras Feb. 9St. Marys 19th Annual Mardi Gras Festival and Parade is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. e parade begins at 10 am. there will be arts, crafts and food vendors, plus childrens activities and entertainment on the main stage. e Mardi Gras Ball begins at 7 pm at Southern Junction Events Center. Tickets are available at Once Upon a Bookseller and the St. Marys Welcome Center. e 2013 Great Camden County Chili Cook-O in downtown St. Marys is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, visit www.camden-chili.com.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Union at Fort Clinch Feb. 2, 3Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Gar rison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2, and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Feb. 3. is program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. e grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in ring demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Fort Clinch State Park is at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org.Youth program needs mentorsKids First of Floridas YESS Mentoring Program for youth ages 12 to 17, who are in licensed care and in need of a supportive adult who can provide consistency and guidance as they transition into the real world. For additional information or to sign up for mentor training, contact Crystal Bennett at (904) 2785644 ext. 2016. For more information, visit kidsrstoorida.org/ Now hear this! e Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center Career Support and Retention Oce is hosting a Technical and Engineering Field Job Fair for transitioning and retired military members with experience within the electronic, mechanical, electrical, engineering and information technology elds. e fair will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, Building 1039. We anticipate that at least 20 companies will have representatives on hand, said Beth Hubbart, Fam ily Employment Readiness program manager at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Kings Bay. All are actively hiring and many have a well established history of recruiting vet erans due to the skills and workplace values he or she gained while serv ing in the military. Many of the registered companies have employment opportunities in multiple locations throughout the U.S., including those with vacancies within the commut ing area of Camden County. Ed Neleski, Transition Assistance program manager, said job seekers should bring an updated resume. We recommend that anyone attending the job fair bring multiple copies of a current resume, he said. Career Support and Retention sta members are available to assist you in writing or reviewing your resume for this event. ose interested in resume preparation assistance can call 573-4513 to schedule an appointment. Specic positions being recruited include eld service technicians, instrumentation technicians, facility maintenance supervisors, nuclear reactor operator candidates and other personnel with nuclear craft training, engineers of all disciplines, training instructors, construction project managers, mechanics, technical supervisors, logistic specialists and operators. Companies will be registering for the job fair through the rst week of February. For the listing of employers attending, visit or call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-4513.Technical, engineering job fair Feb. 6 FFSC TRICARE prime service area changes TRICARE New health assessment now available Health Center

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e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nancial goals. As part of Military Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commit ment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in per sonal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, family members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the Department of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513.Military Saves Week gets underway Feb. 25 Absentee voting goes really wellWASHINGTON, Jan. 25, 2013 e Federal Voting Assistance Program exceeded congressional expectations in the 2012 election cycle by getting guidance to service members so they could vote by absentee ballot, a senior FVAP ocial said here yesterday. David Beirne, acting deputy director of technology programs for FVAP, participated in a MOVE and the Military panel discussion at George Washington University during the seventh annual summit of the Overseas Vote Foundation and U.S. Vote Foundation. MOVE refers to the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act, designed to help military people serving overseas and citizens who live abroad to vote in U.S. elections. e FVAPs role [as outlined by Congress] in the MOVE Act is very specic in terms of communicating directly to [service members] in the eld, Beirne said. He added that FVAP sent 90-day, 60-day and 30-day email voting notices to troops throughout the election cycle to instruct them on how to request, obtain and track their ballots. If theres any one group of voters thats familiar with the FVAP, its active-duty military, Beirne said. Anyone with a dot mil email address got one of our emails. at gives us some level of [success in] our outreach and engagement. We not only met, but exceeded, our congressional requirement. To get the word out on absentee voting, FVAP delivered some 18 million emails, he said, adding that the FVAP website also lays out the how-to-vote instructions, with links to state voting guidance. Because 2012 was the rst general election for FVAPs compliance with the MOVE Act, Beirne said, the outcome is similar to taking an exam. Were just waiting for the results to come in, he said. at is whats going to determine the success weve had. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 Special report: Women in Combat Silver Star for valor in IraqIn 2005, for the rst time since World War II, a woman soldier was awarded the Silver Star Medal in Iraq. Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester of the 617th Military Police Company, a National Guard unit out of Richmond, Ky., received the Silver Star, along with two other members of her unit, Sta Sgt. Timothy Nein and Spc. Jason Mike, for their actions during an enemy ambush on their convoy. Hesters squad was shadowing a supply convoy March 20 when anti-Iraqi ghters ambushed the convoy. e squad moved to the side of the road, anking the insurgents and cutting o their escape route. Hester led her team through the kill zone and into a anking position, where she assaulted a trench line with grenades and M203 grenadelauncher rounds. She and Nein, her squad leader, then cleared two trenches, at which time she killed three insurgents with her rie. When the ght was over, 27 insurgents were dead, six were wounded, and one was captured. Hester, 23 at the time, was born in Bowling Green, Ky., and later moved to Nashville, Tenn. She was surprised when she heard she was being considered for the Silver Star. Im honored to even be considered, much less awarded, the medal, she said. Being the rst woman soldier since World War II to receive the medal is signicant to Hester. But, she said, she doesnt dwell on the fact. It really doesnt have anything to do with being a female, she said. Its about the duties I performed that day as a soldier. Hester said she didnt have time to be scared when the ght started, and she didnt realize the impact of what had happened until much later. Your training kicks in and the soldier kicks in, she said. Its your life or theirs. ... Youve got a job to do protecting yourself and your fellow comrades. ree soldiers of the 617th were wounded in the ambush. Hester said she and the other squad members were thinking about them, and she is very thankful to have made it through unscathed. e reght, along with the entire deployment, has had a lasting eect on her, Hester said. I think about it every day, and probably will for the rest of my life, she said. e rst female pilot in the Department of Defense to y in combat reected on some of her career experiences. An A-10 underbolt II pilot, Lt. Col. Martha McSally was also the rst female in the Air Force to serve as the commander of any combat aviation squadron, to include ghters and bombers. In July 2004, McSally took command of the 354th Fighter Squadron at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. becoming the rst woman to command a ghter squadron. One of her most memo rable missions was also the rst time she deployed weapons in combat. Her squadron was called in to take out insurgents in very rugged terrain in Afghanistan, but the bad guys were surrounded by good guys. We got eyes on the area, and needed to then ensure we had the right target area, given the friendlies were so close and in multiple directions in a winding steep canyon, McSally said. Friendlies were now climbing up the canyon to get away from the enemy and get outside the safe distance of our gun. I shot some rockets to conrm the enemy location, and we honed the target. en, things got complicated. On my last rocket pass, my heads up display failed with all of our computerized weapons sights. I had to rely on the very archaic backup called standby pipper, which was a hard sight. I needed to quickly get ready to shoot the gun manually, where I had to be at an exact dive angle, airspeed, and altitude when opening re in order to be accurate. We destroyed the enemy on several passes. . During the squadrons time in Afghanistan, it ew just short of 2,000 sorties, accumulated more than 7,000 combat ight hours, and expended more than 23,000 rounds of 30 mm ammunition. A covert force August 30, 1862, proved to be yet another bloody day. Henry Clark was in the thick of things, fending o Federal troops in the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky, when the Confederate private caught an enemy shell in the thigh. Clark was swarmed by bluecoats and taken prisoner. It was presumably when a Union medic treated Clarks wound that the soldiers tightly held secret was unmasked. Henrys real name was Mary Ann. Indeed, she was a divorced mother of two. When Federal troops realized that they had a woman on their hands, they moved quickly to release heras long as she swore to return to the life of a proper lady. ey even gave her a dress to wear. She agreed and was freed, then quickly cast o the frock and made her way back to the rebel army, where she was promptly promoted. Clark was by no means unique. She was one of an estimated 400 women who took up arms in the war; they were not nurses, or laundresses or cooks, but actual female soldiers disguised as men, who marched, mastered their weapons, entered into battle and even gave their lives. What would compel a woman to march into that terrible combat and how could she conceal her identity in what must have been uncomfortably close quarters? In the case of Clark, for example, a bad marriage and the death of a brother-in-law at the hands of a pro-Union mob took such an emotional toll that she sought refuge in the military, according to a letter from her mother. Loreta Velazquez, a.k.a. Lt. Harry T. Buford, was one of several women who fought simply for the unadulterated thrill of it: I plunged into adventure for the love of the thing, she said after writing a postwar memoir called e Woman in Battle. Following a unanimous recommendation by the Joint Chiefs of Sta, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Jan. 24 the end of the direct ground combat exclusion rule for female service members. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the Joint Chiefs chairman, joined Panetta at a Pentagon news conference in announcing the policy change. e secretary also announced that the service branches will continue to move forward with a plan to eliminate all unnecessary gender-based barriers to service. e change is intended to ensure that the best qualied and most capable service members, regardless of gender, are available to carry out the mission, Panetta said. If members of our military can meet the qualications for a job, then they should have the right to serve, regardless of creed, color, gender or sexual orientation, he said. In a statement following the announcement, President Barack Obama praised the decision. is milestone reects the courageous and patriotic service of women through more than two centuries of American history and the indispensable role of women in todays military, the president said. e decision opens up about 237,000 positions to women 184,000 in combat arms professions and 53,000 assignments that were closed based on unit type. Women are an integral part of DODs ability to fulll its mission, Panetta said. Over more than a decade of war, they have demonstrated courage, skill and patriotism, and 152 women in uniform have died serving this nation in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said. e new policy is the culmina tion of a process that began last year, a senior defense official told reporters. More than 14,000 assignments in ground combat units or collocated with ground combat units were opened to women in February. at extension of womens roles had a positive impact, Panetta said at the news conference. Every time Ive visited the war zone, met with troops, reviewed military operations, talked to wounded warriors, I have been impressed with the fact that everyone is com mitted to doing the job, he said. ey are ghting and dying together. e time has come for our policies to recognize that reality. e change ensured sufcient female mid-grade and senior enlisted and ocers were in place to guar antee suc cessful inte gration of junior personnel. e secretary has directed the military services to undertake an evaluation of all occupational performance standards to ensure they are up to date and gender-neutral. Specialty schools will be included in the evaluation. e results of this evaluation are to be submitted to the defense secretary by May 15, while the entire process is to be completed by Jan. 1, 2016. We are all committed to implementing this change without compromising readiness or morale or our warghting capabilities, Panetta said. Occupations and assignments will open incrementally, but as expeditiously as possible. We would fully expect that we will open positions throughout the year as we go forward, a senior defense ocial said.. Once the policy is fully implemented, military oc cupations will be closed to women only by exception, and only if approved by the defense secretary. I fundamentally believe that our military is more eective when success is based solely on ability, qualications and on per formance, Panetta said. In life, as we all know, there are no guarantees of success, he added. Not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. But everyone is entitled to a chance. DOD expands womens role in combat Mabus backs call for Navy, Marines Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus released the following statement Jan. 24 on the Women in Service Review. I fully support Secretary Panettas decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Denition and Assignment Rule, which removes barriers preventing women Sailors and Marines from reaching their potential in certain elds. I am pleased the Navy has completed an initiative I announced several months ago to open up one of the few areas not currently available to women, that of service on Virginia Class submarines (SSNs). ree years ago we announced a policy change allowing women to serve in guided-missile attack (SSGNs) and ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) and this is a planned continuation of that eort. Newly commissioned female ocers have been selected for assignment to Virginia Class submarines upon successful completion of the Naval Nuclear Powered training pipeline. We expect these ocers, along with female Supply Corps Ocers, to report to their submarines in FY15. We also plan to include female enlisted Sailors in this process. e Navy has a long history of inclusion and integration and I am proud we have achieved another important milestone during my tenure as Secretary. Along with the changes already being made in the submarine force, rescinding the Direct Ground Combat and Assignment Rule allows Navy to expand opportunities for women in our riverine forces and in Navy billets that directly support Marine infantry operations like hospital corpsman and chaplains. e Marine Corps has already opened ocer and sta noncommissioned ocer billets in unrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women such as artillery, armor, low altitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Ocer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan. e Marines are dedicated to maintaining the Women in Combat:For the U.S., its nothing really new Pilot recounts aerial combat We are all committed to implementing this change ... Leon Panetta Secretary of Defense

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 5 Chief Shaun Garvin, Submarine Group Ten Command Master Chief. e concept of a year-long de velopment and training process for FCPOs was rst introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It consists of a two-phase process the rst begins in Sep tember and ends upon selection of new Chief Petty Ocers. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all FCPOs will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are boardeligible or not. As a junior rst class petty ocer, I have gotten a lot out of the training, Religious Programs Specialist 1st Class Michael Brewer said. Getting the opportunity to network and work alongside my fellow 1st classes, which have been doing this longer, will make it easier for me when my opportunity comes to take the next step in my career as a Chief Petty Ocer. Once CPO selection results are announced, the second phase begins with the same principled, professional leadership training that has been conducted all year. While selectees complete the Chief Petty Ocer Selectee Leadership Course, non-selectees will have the opportunity to continue yearlong training. One of the keys to this process is establishing the culture of tness and providing the sound physical readiness that our future Chief Petty Ocers need to carry us into the 21st century, said Command Master Chief Randy Huckaba, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Command Master Chief. eres always been Physical Training involved with Chiefs inductions. But with CPO 365, the process will be lengthened from six weeks to a year. Chief Culinary Specialist Warren Wauson said its a great way to introduce a new, faster-paced workout program that is good for the entire body. is will strengthen the Navys PT program, that will increase physi cal readiness year around, while strengthening the relationship between Chiefs and future Chiefs of the Navy, Wauson said. e Kings Bay Chiefs Mess will take on the charge of CPO 365 and will be an example of what success can come from change. What has been refreshing to hear, when I travel around the base, are the positive attitudes from the Sailors willing to step forward and volunteer to be part of the process, Huckaba said. Our dening point will always be the day we accept the new Chiefs in uniform. But our best work will be done throughout the year. volunteer to help band students in the Camden County schools. He mentored countless young men and women in the years he was stationed here. Years passed. Rico left the service but never lost his love of Camden County, music or the submarine force. Life carried him to Tampa, Fla., where he continued his dream of performing and met with a brass and percussion ensemble named e Mystic Sheiks of Morocco. ey had a vision to put smiles on peoples faces. He joined the band, playing at Busch Gardens Tampa, roving the park while performing their own arrangements of popular music and classics. eir popularity grew thanks to the advent of YouTube and smart phones. Guests in the park would make videos of the groups performances and post them as a highlight of their visit. Just as all good dreams must come to an end, this one did too. Due to budget issues at the park, the band was released. It did not end the dream of the group. e Distinguished Men of Brass was born anew and took their act on the road. Festivals, parks, street corners, clubs, anywhere they could land a gig they would bring their high-energy brand of performance art to an audience. Again, YouTube helped build the fame of this electric group. Adding high-stepping marching moves that many historically black college and universities strive to emulate, they rened their act and brand of musical art. Time warp to the spring of 2012. Rico is again working in the Kings Bay community for General Dynamics as a network engineer and commuting for gigs with DMO Brass as they have been nicknamed by their fans. He also is working as an adjunct professor with ITT Technical Institute in Jacksonville, imparting his knowledge of information technology to more young men and women wishing to enter the high-tech eld. Plus he still nds time to ride his beloved motorcycle, a Ducati 1098. e man is nothing short of amazing. He can multi-task with the best. But the dream of performing for large crowds kept digging at him and DMO Brass. So they took a leap of faith and auditioned for the TV show Americas Got Talent. Not knowing if they would be accepted by the crowd or the judges, they worked tirelessly, crafting their 90-second audition. It had to have energy, dazzling footwork and charm. But most of all, their music had to touch the soul of the listener. ey nailed it! April 3, at the end of their audition, the crowd went nuts. e normally rude Howard Stern, the lovely Sharon Osborne and Howie Mandell all raved enough to pass them on to the next round in Las Vegas. e epic journey had begun. With all of the contract agreements that had to be signed, the next few months of Ricos life with DMO Brass became almost secretive, a lifestyle not lost on him due to his days as a qualied, Silver Dolphin wearing submariner. Band members were not allowed to discuss the show with anyone or the results of their perfor mances due to the contracts that were signed with the network. Sound familiar? Sorry honey, I cant tell you or Id have to kill ya. As fate would have it, the group wowed again May 5 in Las Vegas. ey were voted on to the live shows in New York July 2. At the time, Rico would only say to his friends, Hey, you need to watch AGT this week. We all got the message and spread the word that one of our friends may be on the show that week. We tuned in attentively until here came DMO Brass. My sons would say, Wheres Rico? He was right smack dab in the middle, performing his duet on his trombone. e 90 seconds ew by. DMO Brass gathered with host Nick Cannon at center stage for their critique from the judges. ere was Rico, with that crazy, big smile that just lights up a room, right over Nicks shoulder. e judges decided that they didnt think the band could go any further, but it would be up to America to decide. e next night, we tuned in for the results show, and DMOs run was over. Out of 75,000 auditions, DMO nished in the top 48, with a play list that included I Like It Like at, I Got You (I Feel Good) and Crazy In Love. e chance to perform on national television was the chance of a lifetime, Clark said. But that would only be the beginning of the next chapter for Rico and his brothers. ey were invited to play for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Tampa Bay Lightning. ey will play for the Orlando Magic at halftime, Feb. 6. ey were invited back to Las Vegas and played several shows along the strip. ey have made appearances at numerous marching band Battle of the Bands competitions. We do have a busy schedule, but were always looking to book more performances, here or anywhere, Clark said. Rico has crossed the country with these magnicent troubadours, and they have carved out a cult-like following. And all the while, he still found time to go back to his musical roots and paid it forward. Hes giving countless hours of what little free time he has to again work with the Camden County High School Marching Wildcat Band. He works with percussion, brass players and on choreography. And thats not to mention his involvement with youth sports and American Legion Post 511. e man is a machine. rough it all, he never lost focus on who he is. He is still the same joker and hard worker that he was more than 20 years ago on board the 735(G). Rico hasnt let it go to his head or interfere with his work ethic. So what is the moral to the story? you ask, after all of this. Good people still exist. Good things still happen when you work hard and set a goal. Rico Clark and DMO Brass are living proof of that. I am proud to be able to call him friend and shipmate after all of these years. To quote my friend Rico, with his usual sign o salutation online: Hollah at ya boy! 735G! Author Mark Rector is public aairs specialist for Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, Kings Bay, and a retired Navy chief.DMO The chance to perform on national television was the chance of a lifetime. Rico Clark Distinguished Men of BrassChief In a Jan. 25 statement expressing his support of a Defense Department policy change that rescinds a ban on military women serving in certain groundcombat positions, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said that the Navy and Marine Corps already had taken steps to open up elds previously available only to men. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta, announced the policy change and signed a joint memo. Rescinding the direct ground-combat exclusion allows the Navy to expand opportunities for women in its riverine forces and in billets that directly support Marine infantry operations, such as hospital corpsmen and chaplains, Mabus noted. He also pointed out that the Marine Corps which is part of the Navy Department already has opened ocer and sta noncommissioned ocer billets in unrestricted mission occupational specialties in ground combat units that were previously closed to women, such as artillery, armor, lowaltitude air defense and combat engineer battalions. We will continue to seek female volunteers to train at the Infantry Ocer Course to prepare women to serve in the infantry as part of a comprehensive research plan that will inform the Marine Corps implementation plan, the Navy secretary said. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, he added, the focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore, Mabus said. Drawing from their talent in additional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. Navy to expand womens roles in Riverine Forces Marine Corps onboard e entire Marine Corps is dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warghting capabilities and the contributions of every Marine; its simply the right thing to do. Our ongoing deliberate, measured and responsible approach to validate occupational performance standards for all Marines is consistent with SECDEFs decision to rescind the direct combat exclusion rule for women. As our Corps moves forward with this process, our focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combat-ready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. e talent pool from which we select our nest warghters will consist of all qualied individuals, regardless of gender. What has been refreshing to hear, when I travel around the base, are the positive attitudes from the Sailors willing to step forward and volunteer to be part of the process. CMC Randy Huckaba Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay CMC

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Global terrorism drives biosurveillance e global nature of terrorism and the growing potential of nations and individuals to acquire weapons of mass destruction drive the Defense Departments eort to counter these threats, the assistant secretary of defense for nuclear, chemical and biological defense programs said. Andrew C. Weber said DOD programs target nuclear deterrence, seek early warning for infectious diseases and bolster the ability of U.S. partners worldwide to prevent, prepare for and respond to events involving WMD. Our national security strategy makes preventing and preparing for the possibility that terrorist groups would acquire weapons of mass destruction, whether it be biological weapons or nuclear weapons, our rst priority, Weber said during an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. e 2001 terrorist attacks on New York, Pennsylvania and the Pentagon drove home the global nature of terrorism, the assistant secretary said. Later that year, he said, a series of anthrax attacks caused defense ocials to focus more attention on the possibility that terrorist groups would acquire biological or nuclear weapons and use them against cities here or around the world. Since 9/11, he added, the Defense Department has broadly improved its response to terrorist nuclear, chemical and especially biological threats, which can be accessible to small groups, terror cells and even individuals. is is why its so dicult to disrupt and to learn about these types of attacks while theyre being planned, Weber said, so we need to be very prepared. American forces are vac cinated against anthrax and smallpox, and the de partment has stockpiled antibiotics against poten tial biological attacks. In a sense, we have taken parts of the biological threat o the table, Weber said, by improving our capability for medical countermeasures and early warning and surveillance. To keep terrorists from getting access to materials needed to construct biological weapons, he said, DOD has helped strengthen biosecurity at laboratories in the United States. We also have launched a program working with partners around the world to make sure public health and veterinary laboratories that have dangerous pathogen strains that cause diseas es like anthrax and ebola are better secured, the assistant secretary said. Some kinds of biological attacks by terrorists, he said, could look at rst just like natural disease outbreaks. We might not know about it until people or even animals show up sick or start dying, he said, so the best thing you can do [is] to have a global early warning system for biological attacks, whether they are deliberate or natural. e Defense Depart ment has several programs that involve global biosur veillance, Weber said, including the Global Emerg ing Infections Surveillance and Response System, or GEIS, a division of the Armed Forces Health Sur veillance Center. For 50 years, he said, DOD has had a network of biomedical laboratories in countries around the world that are part of this system. e laboratories allow DOD scientists to develop drugs for rare diseases that are not endemic in the United States but that may be in countries where U.S. forces are deployed, Weber said. ey also give us a good platform, he added, for enhancing regional partner capacity to detect and monitor and respond to infectious disease outbreaks. Humans today inhabit an interconnected world, Weber said, so a disease outbreak anywhere is a potential global threat. ats why we need to work with our partners to have a global system for early warning, he said. Early warning systems for diseases, based on good laboratory diagnostics and information systems for tracking sick people, he added, are essential because the mostimportant aspect of preventing mass casualties in a biological attack is time. e Defense Department has a robust program to develop medical countermeasures and rapid diagnostics for a range of specic biological threats that terrorist groups and countries like North Korea are pursuing, Weber said. DOD works closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and with the World Health Organization, which has global re sponsibilities under the United Nations for improv ing the worlds capability to respond to infectious dis ease outbreaks and work ing with health authorities worldwide in the event of an outbreak or attack. e Department of Defense has a liaison ofcer assigned to WHO Headquarters, he said, and recently the U.S. government signed an agreement with WHO [to fund] some eorts to enhance capabilities around the world to monitor infectious diseases. In countering future biological threat potential, the assistant secretary said, research and development plays an important role. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Online game starts Feb. 4 To generate ideas from a broad eld of participants, the Navy Warfare Development Command, the Oce of Naval Research and the Naval Postgraduate School are partnering to conduct a crowd-sourcing online war game on electromagnetic maneuver starting Feb. 4. Electromagnetic Maneuver Massive Multiplayer Online War Game Leveraging the Internet or em2 MMOWGLI will be played in three one-week phases: Know the EM Environment: Understanding EM Energy, from Feb. 4 to Feb. 10 Be Agile: C2 in the EM Environment, from Feb. 18 to Feb. 24 Change Our Paradigm: Tactical Employment of EM Weapons, from March 4 to March 10 To facilitate global participation, the game will be open 24-hours a day during the game phases. Interested players can request to register at mmowgli.nps.edu/em2/ signup. After registration, the game can be played on any Web browser. e electromagnetic spectrum and cyberspace are key dierentiators for winning future Navy battles, said Rear Adm. Terry B. Kraft, commander, NWDC. em2 MMOWGLI is designed to bring together a massive, distributed audience focused on helping the Navy operate in the EM environment. Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder, chief of naval research, said communications, electronics, and sensor systems aboard naval ships and submarines must operate eectively in order to support the execution of military missions and operations. Were looking to the experts in electromagnetic warfare from across military, government, academia, industry and think tanks to actively participate and make meaningful contributions in the game which could ultimately improve warghter eectiveness, he said. Each phase of the game will start by the partners posting root cards which pose questions on the topic for that phase. Players then post idea cards that other players can respond to by either building on, countering, redirecting, or calling for further expertise. Points are earned based on each idea cards inuence and perceived value. Individuals contributing to particularly intriguing concepts are invited to collaborate on an Action Plan to move that idea forward. Published action plans are awarded further points by all players providing ratings and additional comments. Signicant achievements will be recognized. In addition to the unclassied em2 MMOWGLI game, a blog on NWDCs Navy Center for Innovation classied Web site at fims.nwdc.navy.smil.mil/ nci/bloglist.aspx will allow players with SIPRNet access to continue game discussions in a secure environment. Results from the game will inform Navy innovation concept development and experimentation efforts. DIs still push new boots With eyes squinted in exertion and camouage utilities salted in sand, recruits of Company C, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, worked through various combat conditioning exercises aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Jan. 9. Recruits of Co. C, 1st RTBn. pushed through a circuit of multiple exercises that included reman carries, low crawling and Marine Corps Martial Arts Program techniques in order to improve their physical tness and prepare for the demands of a combat environment. Every exercise from the reman carry to MCMAP is combat related to build a combat mindset, should there be an encounter with the enemy, explained Sgt. Cesar D. Martinez, drill instructor, Platoon 1053, Co. C, 1st RTBn. Fatigue crept up on recruits like the calm before a storm, but when it came, drill instructors were there to get them out of the rain. During a buddy drag exercise, one recruit fell behind and didnt appear to have any energy left. Suddenly, a drill instructor swooped in on his location, yelled a few orders, and the recruit nished quicker than he started. eir minds think they cant do anymore, but we know they can, said Martinez, a black belt MCMAP instructor. You always have one more mile in you. When you think youre tired you just have to tell yourself, one more mile, one more mile . Recruits appreciated the extra motivation and said their encouragement isnt limited to physical tness exercises. (Motivation) helps a lot. Instead of bringing us down, they motivate us by reminding us why we came here to be Marines, said Recruit Manuel Gomez-Gonzales, Plt. 1054, Co C., 1st RTBn. Although drill instructors play a large role in motivating recruits, some recruits also have other sources of motivation. Its not in my blood to quit. I keep my family in my mind to motivate me to be a better person and not a quitter, said GomezGonzales, a Colorado Springs, Colo., native. For others it could be an inspiring quote. Its about putting 100 percent, not about doing the bare minimum. Its like someone said, To do anything less than your best is to sacrice the gift, said Recruit Rodolfo Lopez, Plt. 1050, Co. C., 1st RTBn. For drill instructors like Martinez, the idea that these recruits will be the next generation of Marines is their motivation to keep pushing and motivating recruits to do the best they can do. If I put out, it will be worth it in the end when they get to the eet, Martinez said. From the strained faces and grunts it appeared all inspiration was benecial in helping the recruits nish that extra mile. 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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highest levels of combat readiness and capitalizing upon every opportunity to enhance our warghting capabilities and the contributions of every Marine. Its simply the right thing to do. As the Marine Corps moves forward with this process, our focus will remain on combat readiness and generating combatready units while simultaneously ensuring maximum success for every Marine. Women continue to serve bravely and honorably at sea and ashore. Drawing from their talent in additional assignments increases our ability to maintain readiness. We will meet the goals and timeline laid out by Secretary Panetta and we will continue to deploy the nest naval force in the world. With the revolution in biotechnology the range of threats is potentially innite, Weber said, so we need a rapid response capability after exposure, once we identify what is causing the disease, to develop a drug quickly, within weeks or days, rather than the years it takes now. e Defense Department has its own biological research laboratories, he said, that work on developing medical products and also with industrial and academic partners around the world. Agencies like DARPA [Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency] and the Defense reat Reduction Agency have been very active in funding biodefense research, Weber said. e focus, he said, is on nding rapid ways to respond to a biological attack from an unknown agent, quickly characterize it and develop a countermeasure. Rather than having a drug or a vaccine for every potential [threat], Weber said, we need a capability to respond quickly, to be able to characterize what is causing illness, and then to develop as quickly as possible a medical countermeasure to save lives. e 2nd Annual My Little Valentine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a ower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Super Friday Golf Tournament is Friday, Feb. 1 at Trident Lakes Golf Club with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $26 per person, which includes tailgate party in Legends Grille from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Non-golfers can enjoy the buffet for only $6. Pick your team. Individual play with low gross and low net in each flight. Flights are determined by your current handicap (if no handicap established, golf pro will determine.) Your net score is determined by deducting the total score of your picked team and subtracting from your gross score. Additional prizes for closest to the pin. Winners will be contacted on Monday, Feb. 4. For more information call (912) 573-8475. Valentines 9-Hole Tournament Wine and Dine Its Friday, Feb. 15 with a 3 p.m. Shotgun start at the Trident Lakes Gold Club. Two better ball of four w/handicap (each couple must include one female and one male). $30 per cou ple. Cost includes green fees, cart, heavy hors doeuvres and drinks. For more information call (912) 573-8475. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 9. All participants are welcome. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Championship Game Football Party 2013 at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m., Feb. 3. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Registration for soccer and t-ball is through Feb. 20 at the Kings Bay Youth Center, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, except holi days, plus a Saturday signup 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Feb. 23. T-ball is for ages 4 to 6, play ers must turn 4 prior to April 1 and cannot turn 7 prior to May 1, 2013. Soccer is for ages 3 to 5, players must turn 3 prior to August and can not turn 16 prior to April 1, 2013. Cost $60 for active duty and reservists, $65 for DoD, retirees, civilians and NSB contractor family members. Cost includes uniforms. For more information call (912) 573-8202. Navy Child and Youth Programs welcome children of all abilities. Februarys free mov ies for kids On Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Finding Nemo 3-D Feb. 2, 3 Frankenweenie Feb. 9 10 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Feb. 14, Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodericks Revenge Feb. 15 Diary of a Wimpy Kid Dog Days Feb. 16, 17, Fantastic 4 Silver Surfer, Feb. 18, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs Feb. 19 and Madagascar3 Europes Most Wanted Feb. 23 and 24. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Soccer, t-ball signups Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 Bio A Defense Department inspector general investigation into allegations of professional misconduct has cleared Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Jan. 22. In a statement, Little said Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta was pleased to learn the investigation did not substantiate the allega tions and that the inspec tor general has closed the investigation. On Oct. 10, President Barack Obama nominated Allen to serve as NATOs supreme allied commander for Europe and commander of U.S. European Com mand. In No vem ber, the FBI referred a matter involv ing Allen to the Defense Department. Panetta directed that the matter be referred to the DOD IG for investigation. e secretary also asked the ranking members of the Senate Armed Services Committee to delay a conrmation hearing scheduled for Nov. 15 on Allens pending NATO nomination until the matter was resolved. On Dec. 3, the Senate conrmed Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., assistant Marine Corps commandant, as the next commander of ISAF and U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Panetta, Little said, has complete condence in the continued leadership of General Allen, who is serving with distinction in Afghanistan. Marine Corps Maj. David Nevers, an ISAF spokes man, said Allen placed his faith in and fully supported the investigation. Hes obviously pleased by the outcome, Nevers said. But more critically, he is grateful for the support he received throughout this process from his chain of command, friends, family and colleagues. He remains focused, as he has always been, on leading the brave men and women of the ISAF team.Investigation clears Allen Mabus Dempsey said. ere are reports that destructive cyber tools have been used against Iran, the chairman said. Im neither conrming nor denying any part in that, but what it should tell you is that capability ex ists, he added. And if it ex ists, whoevers using those [capabilities] cant assume that theyre the only smart people in the world. When Koppel asked Dempsey which part of the world he worries about most, the general noted that the threat of global terrorism complicates matters. eres kind of a nearterm, long-term aspect to that, he explained. I think near-term continues to be the threat of global terrorism. We track a global terrorist network that is not uniquely al-Qaida, but is aliated at some level with al-Qaida. is requires a network to defeat a network, Dempsey said. What it means is youre not going to see these broad, sweeping movements across the desert of eastern Iraq Hail Mary, right-hand cross, [or] whatever it was called in 1991, he explained. Youre going to see smaller groups of military formations confronting these distributed enemies across a much wider scope. Although U.S. combat forces will be out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, Dempsey said, it would be a mistake to give the Ameri can people the sense that al-Qaida is defeated. I think that its fair to say there will be a part of the al-Qaida threat emanating from northwestern Pakistan, and potentially, Afghanistan, for the foreseeable future, he added.Dempsey THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 9

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My football fever is reaching its peak. Two weeks ago, I asked for Super Bowl picks. None of the six people I asked picked the Ravens and 49ers. Last week, we talked about Tim Tebow. This week, Im asking, Who will be the most valuable player in the Super Bowl? Colin Kaepernick is the Las Vegas favorite at 7-to-4. Joe Flacco (it usually goes to quarterbacks) is next at 5-to-2, followed by Ray Lewis, 6-to-1, Frank Gore, 17-to-2, Ray Rice, 6-to-1, Michael Crabree, 16-to1 and Anquan Boldin, 18-to-1. Alex Smith is the listed longshot at 100-to-1. Almost everybody at Pirates Cove last week was taking Lewis, the sentimental favorite.MA1 Nicholas Green Security Force Battalion Huntsville, Ohio (Colin) Kaepernick. If Kaepernick performs, hes going to win it. MA3 Justin Adams Security Force Battalion Beaumont, Texas It has to be Ray Lewis. Its his final game, and hes one of the best defensive players of all time. LS2 Juvins Thelusma Trident Refit Facility Miami Ray Lewis. Hes a beast. CS3 Michael Copeland Pirates Cove Galley Fayetteville, N.C. Ray Lewis because hes getting ready to retire, and theyre trying to send him out with a bang. Pfc. Jason Theriot Security Force Battalion Berwick, La. Ray Lewis. Hes my favorite player. Its his last year, so me might as well go out with MVP and as a champion. YN3 Wilbert Camacho USS Alabama Gold Redding, Pa. It think it will be Ray Lewis. Throughout the season, I just kept hearing his name. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho TRF honorees THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 11

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 21. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Feb. 27Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Feb. 27. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Feb. 4, 11 and 25. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered Feb. 6The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Feb. 6. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Feb. 14. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Smooth Move Plus Kids Workshop comingSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help personnel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include the new DPS Web site, transpor tation, travel pay, allowances, important forms and docu ments, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend within six months of their transfer date. Plus, while attending the workshop, children of attendees ages 7 to 12 will learn about the relocation process, how it affects them and what to look forward to, as to ease the transition. The workshop will be 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 20, For details and registration, call 573-4513.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume for mats that get job interviews. Part-time, full-time or perma nent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The workshop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 20. Registration is highly recom mended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Military Resumes 3-part series will helpThis three-part series of one-hour sessions walks par ticipants through the practical and creative aspects of applying military experience to build a successful document for a postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 2 to 3 p.m., Feb. 5, 12 and 19. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Feb. 8A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 8. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 5, 12, 19 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Ombudsman Basic Training comingThere will be an Ombudsman Basic Training course for prospective Ombudsman, new Ombudsman and Command Support Spouses at Fleet and Family Support Center Bldg. 1051. This class will be 5 to 9 p.m., Feb. 8 and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 9 and 10. For more information and to register, call 573-4513.Command Financial Specialist class offeredA five-day training course will be offered for prospective Command Financial Specialists. All CFS must be nominated by their Command. Registration is open to personnel E-6 and above who are financially stable, with at least one year left before PRD from their commands. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 4 to 8. Registration is required. For more information, call 5739783.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Feb. 25The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Feb. 25. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 11 to 15. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Savings and investing examined Feb. 12This six-session class series was developed as a resource for beginning investors with small dollar amounts to invest at any one time. It assumes that participants are investing for the first time and/or selecting invest ment products that they have not purchased previously. This workshop will be every Monday until completed. This training is scheduled 9 to 11 a.m., Feb. 12. Registration is recommended. For more information call 5739783.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electron ic Federal resume. This class is from 5 to 8 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513.Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Spouse Indoctrination class meets Feb. 13The goal of Spouse Indoctrination is to educate the participant on the numerous resources that are available to them while stationed at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. This class hosts 20-plus speakers who provide information and answer any questions. This class will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. To register, call 573-4513.Home buying and selling workshop upcomingBuying or selling a home can be the one of the largest financial decision someone can ever make. This interactive work shop is designed to increase the knowledge and comfort level for anyone entering the housing market. The Camden County Board of Realtors will provide an experienced member who will provide tools to educate both buyers and sellers, from 1 to 4 p.m., Feb. 13. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to better understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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program Feb. 20The survivor Benefit Plan is a program that provides basic information on the key provisions of the Survivor Benefit Plan. This information will assist ser vice members and their spouses in making informed decisions about SBPs role in their retirement plan. This workshop is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Feb. 10. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Command Return and Reunion training scheduledThe target audience for this class is Command Training Coordinators and provides a tool kit for trainers to use while on deployment to address the issues associated with return and reunion after deployment. This class will be 10 a.m. to noon, Feb. 21. Registration recommended, call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.FFSC Following a nine-month investigation into sexual misconduct at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in San Antonio, the Air Force has implemented a com prehensive program aimed at eliminating sexual as sault, senior Air Force leaders told Congress Jan. 23. Air Force Chief Of Sta Gen. Mark A. Welsh III and Air Force Gen. Edward A. Rice Jr., the commander of the services Air Education and Training Command, spoke before the House Armed Services Committee about the Air Forces recently completed internal investigation. Describing the crimes as stunning, Welsh said there could be no excuses. eres no justiable explanation, and there is no way we can allow this to happen again, he said. e Air Force goal for sexual assault is not simply to lower the number. e goal is zero, Welsh added. Its the only acceptable objective. e impact on every victim, their family, their friends [and] the other people in their unit is heart-wrenching, and attacking this cancer is a full-time job, and we are giving it our full attention. e eort includes an Air Force-wide health and welfare inspection, held in December, the results of which are publicly available, Welsh said. Also last month, Welsh used his monthly Letter to Airmen to reinforce that obscene, vulgar or disrespectful images, songs or so-called traditions are not part of our heritage and will not be accepted as part of our culture. In addition, a Recruiting Education and Training Oversight Council will be established, Rice said, to review and advise any current or future actions undertaken to eliminate sexual assault. e council also will provide advice on strategic issues aecting airman safety and the maintenance of good order and discipline in basic military training, he added. More than 7,700 interviews were conducted as part of the investigation, Rice said. When contact information was available, anyone who graduated from basic military training within the past 10 years was interviewed, he added. Although we have conducted a 10-year look back, the vast majority of the allegations are of alleged misconduct that occurred over the past three years, Rice said. Allegations ranged from sexual assault to inappropriate contact with former students, Rice said. Each victim or alleged victim was oered the full range of available victim support services, he added. Of the 855 personnel assigned as military training instructors during this three-year period, 32, less than 4 percent, have been disciplined or are now under investigation, Rice said. I believe it is important to underscore that the vast majority of our instructors served with distinction in a very demanding duty assignment, Rice said. at said, it is completely unacceptable to us that so many of our instructors have committed crimes or violated our policies, and we clearly failed in our responsibility to maintain good order and discipline among too many of our instructors in basic military training. Maintaining good order and discipline is one of the most important and fundamental responsibilities of command, Rice said, one that cannot be delegated. With that in mind, Air Force ocials are focusing their eorts on helping commanders meet this fundamental responsibility, he said. e Air Force has recommitted itself to ensuring that every airman is treated with respect, Welsh said. Its not a onetime x. It has to be a way of life. With no room for misunderstanding, Welsh said, every Air Force supervisor and commander must be actively engaged in this eort. If they dont get actively engaged, I consider them part of the problem, he added. While it is still early, Rice said, it appears that the Air Forces eorts are making an impact. ere have been no reports of sexual misconduct in basic military training in the past seven months, he noted. We know this is not the beginning of the end, but the end of the beginning of a journey that can never end, he said. e American people trust us with their greatest treasure: their sons and daughters, Welsh said. ey expect us to lead them with honor, to value each of them, and to treat them as if they were our own. We do not have a greater responsibility than that. I will never stop attacking this problem. e United States Air Force leadership team will never quit working to eliminate this horrible crime from the ranks of our Air Force, he said.Air Force sights on eliminating sexual assault Veterans Moving Forward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog. Enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. As I grow up I am beginning to learn more about what it takes to be a service dog. A good service dog has to be healthy, happy, condent and steady. Oh, and did I say smart? All of these traits are also traits many Coast Guardsmen have. Just as in their training, I am provided all sorts of experiences so I can be prepared. Id like to think I am always ready just like they are! While some activities are challenging, I know my human is with me and will not allow anything bad to happen and she actually makes it fun. And so it was that I began ying. Now, I actually can y o the dock into the water to reach a tennis ball. Or, I was once caught ying over the couch playing chase with my sister Lori. I know, not my most professional move, but it sure was fun at the time! Anyway, Im talking about getting into what you humans call a plane and going way above the ground. I have to tell you from a canine point of view this is not an easy concept. We rst went to the airport so I could get familLife of a Service Dog Part 6 Nathan visits Coast Guard Air Station Washington THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013 13

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Going from seaman to skipper Success is dened dierently for everybody. But for one Coast Guardsman who started his enlistment as a young, untested seaman recruit and is now the commanding ocer of a small-boat station success was constructed by a goal he set for himself when he was only two years into his career. More than 16 years ago, 22-year-old Seaman Commander K. Moore stood shoulder-to-shoulder with his shipmates on the lawn of Station Atlantic City, N.J., watching his new commanding ocer take an oath of leadership. Moore could not help but stare at the crisp, bright white dress uniforms worn by the ocers in the ceremony. Although he graduated from basic training nearly two years earlier, it was his rst time seeing a formal military change of command. Up until this point, Moore, who grew up in Harlem, N.Y., could not have guessed what his future would hold. Before he joined the Coast Guard, the freedom of his rst car left him missing too many classes and eventually out of college living back at home with his mother. He found work at a clothing store in New York City but wanted a career he could be proud of. He joined the Coast Guard and after graduating from basic training began his career in Atlantic City as a nonrate, the Coast Guards lowest enlisted job position. Reporting to a unit after basic training as the newest crewmember can be dicult. Despite this challenge, his work ethic set the foundation needed to build a successful Coast Guard career. As Moore stood in formation at Atlantic City, an idea engulfed his mind. Moore was determined to earn the white uniform; he gave himself eight years to become an ocer. For an enlisted member of the Coast Guard, becoming a commissioned ocer can be dicult. e process requires a member to complete numerous forms, fulll prerequisites and put together a package of credentials that can take months to complete. ough dicult, it is not impossible. In 2003, as a 2nd class food service specialist, with just under eight years as an enlisted service member behind him, Moore went to Ocer Candidate School where he earned his commissioning. Even after accomplishing his goal and serving a few tours as an ocer, Moore could not have predicted how meaningful the accomplishment was to become. It wasnt long before Moore received orders to be the commanding ocer of Station Atlantic City. During the stations change of command ceremony, with his new crew watching from formation, Moore, standing in his crisp, white dress uniform, became emotional as he read his orders out loud. I got choked up when they said introducing the commanding ocer of Coast Guard Station Atlantic City, Moore recalls. His career had come full circle. He said he would have never, ever expected to be back at the station where his career began, especially as the commanding ocer. Although he is now in charge, Moore takes pride in always being the same person regardless of his rank. Nobody knows this better than Chief Petty Ocer Ryan McKenna, executive petty ocer of Station Atlantic City, who met Moore in Atlantic City in January 1996. We worked together for about four months but got to know each other fairly well. From what I remember he was always a hard worker with a strong determination to succeed, McKenna said. We had only known each other for a small period of time as young Coasties but those bonds last through the years, and have really created the foundation for a strong command cadre at Station Atlantic City. e strong command cadre is valuable for the stations junior members who rely on McKenna and Moore for leadership and career guidance. Seaman Terrah Faillo, a crewmember at Station Atlantic City who wants to apply for Ocer Candidate School, said she feels very fortunate to have Moore as a commanding ocer. Lt. Moore is easy to relate to and is someone I strive to be like, Faillo said. To know he started at the bottom, where I am, and worked his way to the top is amazing. I hope to learn a lot from him. He expects a lot from us, but he is our biggest advocate. Aside from being a great role model for junior crewmembers, Moore has a lot of knowledge to share. From being a station non-rate; a cook on the nowdecommissioned cutter Hornbeam; an admirals aide; the on-scene commander during the Coast Guards response to Flight 1549 crash landing in the Hudson River; and recently responding in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Moore proves having a strong work ethic pays o. I was where they are now, Moore said. I stood duty, cleaned bilges, painted hulls, sandblasted and I have stumbled. Now I am sitting before them as their commanding ocer. I want my people to know you can make a mistake and still climb your way back up to the top. It is never impossible. Moores new oce is a reminder of this, as it is carefully decorated with remnants of his incredible career. Some are out on display and others led neatly in binders, all serving as reminders of where he came from, which is coincidently, right outside his oce door. iar with the new sights, sounds and smells. Pretty easy. e next time we went I actually got on a plane. At the airport we had to stand in long lines. Walk a few feet and sit down. Walk a few feet and sit down. e short walks and sitting was punctuated by me occasionally laying down. I am nding a great deal of service dog training is pretty boring. en we moved on to stairs, elevators and moving oors Ive got to tell you those are simply un-natural, but I got a few treats and lots of praise, so I could do it. After a train and nally a long hallway I was on the plane. Getting in the plane was no big deal. People smiled at me. I peeked into the front where all the buttons and lights are. en we moved to our seats, in the front row they said there was more room for me there, I hope I dont get any bigger or it is going to be one tight t. I listened attentively as the nice ight attendant talked about safety. I felt the plane rumble, we moved and I began sliding. at was a little scary. But I got a few treats and lots of reassurance. I also got to hold my favorite stued animal toy so I felt better. I dont need my toy anymore just want to make that clear. Im a big dog now, a pro at ying and have done it many times on dierent planes to dierent places. If the person who I am to help needs to y I know how to do that with them. All this ying talk reminds me of how I came to be named after Nate Bruckenthal. You see Nates detachment was co-located at Air Station Miami where my human handlers nephew and godson, Lt. Cmdr. Troy Glendye, was stationed. Even before I was born Troy and Cyndi began talking about me what kind of service dog I might become and how we might pay tribute to someones service and ultimate sacrice. Troy, a pilot in the Coast Guard, suggested I be named after Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nate Bruckenthal, who was killed when suicide bombers assaulted his security mission in Iraq. So Troy wrote to Coast Guard ocials and asked permission from the family to do so. Nates father happily approved the request. I was about six-weeks-old when I rst heard humans speak my name Nathan. I liked it right away. It is a strong, solid name. When Lt. Cmdr. Glendye heard I really liked ying, he invited me to visit Air Station Washington for a tour.Troy greeted us at the door and walked us in to this huge room he called it a hangar. In the hangar was a plane and I got to smell the tires, dogs like to do that. We met some nice Coast Guardsmen who were checking the outside of the plane. en Troy invited us to see the inside of the plane. Well, he did not need to ask me twice, I had walked up plane stairs many times so this was easy. e plane seemed about the size of some other planes I had been in so I knew how to move about carefully backing up when there was no space to turn around, not bumping into anything. My human handler calls that body awareness, she says I have good body awareness. It was very exciting to be at the Coast Guard Air Station Washington and meet some of the great people who are part of the Coast Guard. I am proud and honored to carry Nate Bruckenthals name and be embraced by the Coast Guard family. Stay tuned for my next blog as I grow into an awesome service dog. Nathan 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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e rise and fall of Mississippi River water levels is a constant, impacted by ooding and drought. Its something those who work on or around the river contend with on a regular basis. is year, rivers throughout the Midwest region are experiencing record low water levels and natural relief through the winter may be minimal. As water levels drop, the channels in which ships and barges travel shrink in width and depth, creating diculties for shipping commerce. e Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers and shipping industries are working together to adapt to the pressure of keeping the Mississippi open for commerce and the public. After experiencing an historic ood in 2011, the American heartland is now facing low water levels not seen since 1988. is greatly impacts the industries that rely on the rivers to ship products across the country. To keep the channels as wide and deep as possible, the Army Corps of Engineers monitors river levels and dredges in targeted areas. It is then up to Coast Guard river tenders to mark the navigable waterways so industry and the public can travel safely and eectively. ere are at least ve Coast Guard cutters working in the major rivers marking and maintaining navigation. ese cutters place about 3,000 buoys and service more than 500 navigation beacons along 10,300 miles of inland navigable waterways. To perform this task, the Coast Guard and Army Corps of Engineers must work closely with industry partners to ensure where they dredge and mark channels is beneting commerce in the best possible way. e Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers and river towing industry have worked together to ensure the safe navigation of commercial trac on the Inland River System in order to mitigate the low water eects of this drought on our nations inland waterways and economy, said Rear Adm. Roy A. Nash, commander of the 8th Coast Guard District. e Coast Guard keeps mariners informed of changes and restrictions in the river via broadcast and local notice to mariners. Industry is, of course, the key reporting source for many of these changes and has been exceptionally vigilant during this challenging period. With the use of the Waterways Action Plan, created between the Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers and industry, options such as draft and tow size controls have kept the commerce owing until water conditions can improve. However, with a lack of rain and low snowfall this winter closures have occurred on the Mississippi. ese closures are designed to have the smallest impact on commerce. Safety is our primary focus, said Capt. Byron Black, commander of Sector Upper Mississippi River. We have prudent controls in place with goals of trying to prevent an incident with negative impacts. Nash pointed out the importance of the collective work to keep commerce owing on the rivers and protecting the nations economic prosperity. We commit to working closely with the Army Corps of Engineers and our industry partners to do all we can to ensure the safety of those on the rivers, while facilitating commerce to the maximum extent we safely can, Nash said. Mississippi levels dropping Pirates Cove menus 16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 31, 2013

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