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The Kings Bay periscope ( 01-24-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00285

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00285


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Annual Fleet & Family event scheduled for conference center e Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center Career Support and Retention Of ce is hosting a Technical and Engineering Field Job Fair for transitioning and retired military members with experience within the electronic, mechani cal, electrical, engineering and information technology elds. e fair will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, Building 1039. We anticipate that at least 20 companies will have repre sentatives on hand, said Beth Hubbart, Family Employment Readiness program manager at the Fleet and Family Sup port Center, Kings Bay. All are actively hiring and many have a well established history of recruiting veterans due to the skills and workplace values he or she gained while serving in the military. Many of the regis tered companies have employment opportunities in multiple locations throughout the U.S., including those with vacancies within the commuting area of Camden County. Ed Neleski, Transition Assis tance program manager, said job seekers should bring an up dated resume. We recommend that anyone attending the job fair bring mul tiple copies of a current resume, he said. Career Support and Re tention sta members are avail able to assist you in writing or reviewing your resume for this event. ose interested in resume preparation assistance can call 573-4513 to schedule an ap pointment. Specic positions being re cruited include eld service technicians, instrumentation technicians, facility maintenance supervisors, nuclear re actor operator candidates and other personnel with nuclear craft training, engineers of all disciplines, training instructors, construction project managers, mechanics, technical supervisors, logistic specialists and op erators. Companies will be registering for the job fair through the rst week of February. For the most current listing of employers attending, visit or call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-4513. Up Periscope Whats in store for Tim Tebow? Page 9 Inauguration Barack Obama begins second term as president Page 3 Future Navy Strange new world may be closer than you think Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Obama condemns terror attack in Algeria Tech, engineering job fair Feb. 6 at NSB Kings Bay FFSC, MWR events run Feb. 25 to March 2 aboard NSB Kings Baye Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Depart ment for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nancial goals. As part of Mili tary Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings mes sage and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commit ment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in personal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more peo ple to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial mo tivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, family members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of Kings Bay reaches overseas RV park gets face li at hidden gem lake in Northwest GeorgiaMorale, Welfare and Recreation Kings Bay re cently renovated the Recreational Vehicle Park at Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Located about 30 miles north of Atlanta, the Navy Lake Site is a 52-acre campground nestled in the Georgia pines on Lake Allatoona. e RV Park was upgraded to 50-amp hook-ups and new water lines. Gone are the days of shared power among sev eral RVs. Each site now has a utility tower on a concrete pad, oering easy hook-ups for guests. Additional work was done in the grounds and landscaping and the sta is excited to unveil the work to patrons. e campground opens again for business on Feb. 1. e Navy Lake Site also has beautiful cabins ranging from one to four bedrooms, for those looking for more comfort in their vacation. Allatoona renovates siteMilitary Saves Week coming Blame for deadly tragedy rests with al-Qaeda terroristse nations thoughts and prayers are with the families of those killed and injured in the terrorist attack in Algeria, and the blame for the tragedy rests with the terrorists who carried it out, President Barack Obama said Jan. 19. In a statement, the president said the United States con demns the terrorists actions in the strongest possible terms. We have been in constant contact with Algerian ocials and stand ready to provide whatever assistance they need in the aftermath of this attack, Obama said. We also will con tinue to work closely with all of our partners to combat the scourge of terrorism in the region, which has claimed too many innocent lives. e attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-Qaeda and other violent ex tremist groups in North Africa, the president said. In the coming days, we will remain in close touch with the government of Algeria to gain a fuller understanding of what took place so that we can work together to prevent tragedies like this in the future, he added. During a news conference in London today, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond said both of their governments remain in close contact with Al gerian ocials, and are working to establish rm details of the as sault, kidnappings and murders that took place at a remote natural gas facility in Algeria. Panetta conrmed Americans were among those held hostage, but he said the possible number of U.S. deaths remains unclear.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. According to Prevent Blindness America, glaucoma aects more than 3 million Americans. Many people dont even know that they have it. Glaucoma begins by attacking peripheral vision, typically causing objects to appear blurry. At rst, its possible to compensate by squinting or turning the head to focus better. Although it typically happens at a gradual pace, glaucoma can also ac celerate quickly, causing eyesight to rapidly and irreversibly deteriorate. Some factors can increase the risk of developing glaucoma, such as age, race or genetics. Glau coma usually aects one out of 200 people by age 50 and as many as one out of 10 people by age 80. While everyone is at risk for glaucoma, its the leading cause of blindness in the African-American and Hispanic populations. Glaucoma cant be prevented, but if diagnosed and treated early, it can be controlled. is reinforces what the National Optometric Association and the American Optomet ric Association recommend: adults need regular, comprehensive eye exams. A proper diet and exercise can improve overall health. Start o the new year right by setting up an appointment with your eye doctor. And maybe hit the gym and grab a salad on the way home. Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre is an optometrist at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic. e chairman of theJoint Chiefs of Stais preparing to nish a study on ethics training in the military, a task he received from Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta to examine follow ing some misjudgments, revelations and crimes by a few senior military leaders. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempseyand the rest of the Joint Chiefs of Sta are nishing up work on recommenda tions, but he said he hopes this is a work in progress. I dont want this to be a one-o, take 60 days, slap our hands togeth er and declare victory, he said. I think we have to continue to learn about the profession. Dempsey said he would like to put some of these recommendations in place and review them again about six months later. e chairman noted that the ser vice chiefs themselves are working this issue. Were not out-sourcing this, Dempsey said. e Joint Chiefs of Sta will write a memo to the secretary about their conclusions, present an internal tasking on aspects the chiefs can change and present a request to the secretary for changes he can autho rize. ere will be changes to military education and to the way the mili tary evaluates, assesses, selects and promotes, Dempsey said. e idea is to review the conclu sions, decide what is working and what isnt, educate the force, [and] encourage the force and its leaders to have a conversation, he said. I want the process to be a dynamic and interactive continuum of stud ies, so we can be the best leaders that we can be. Dempsey has been interested in what makes the military a profes sion since he joined. As a major at the Armys Com mand and General Sta College on Fort Leavenworth, Kan., he did a January is National Blood Donor Month and Defense Department employees are encouraged to roll up their sleeves and give the gift of life, said Air Force Col. Richard Mc Bride, Armed Services Blood Pro gram director. e military blood program also celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, with Years of Donors We ank You, as its theme, McBride said. e program coordinates support between the military services and the combatant commands to en sure sucient blood products and services exist wherever troops serve, McBride explained. e blood program is a tri-service eort involving the Army, Navy and Air Force, he said. e militarys blood program began during the late 1940s, when or ganizations such as the Red Cross supplied blood to wounded warriors during World War II, McBride said. In the past 60 years, blood donors have helped save wounded warriors in the Korean and Vietnam conicts, and Operations Desert Storm, Des ert Shield, Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. Both civilian and military pro grams comply with the same fed eral regulations, test for infectious diseases and process, manufacture, store and distribute blood wherever its needed. DOD has the added mission of supporting wounded warriors and DOD beneciaries worldwide. e need for blood at military hospitals around the world always exists. Potential donors must be at least 17 years old and free of medical con ditions or diseases that would pre vent them from donating, McBride said, adding that donors can con tribute blood every 56 days. Blood is perishable and only con sidered safe to use at a maximum of 42 days by law, he added. e Sea Warrior Program, within the Navys Program Executive Oce for Enterprise Information Systems, is supporting the Navy Recruit ing Command through a contract award for up to $65 million to mod ernize key information technology systems. e new Recruiting and Acces sions Information Technology ser vices contract helps lay the IT foun dation for Recruiting Force 2020, a strategy that relies on agile, paper less technology to recruit quality ap plicants for Americas navy. e RAIT contract award is an important next step toward realizing the Navy Recruiting Force 2020 strategic plan of anytime, anywhere recruiting, said Kevin Sullivan, NRC chief information ocer. One of the rst orders of business will be an IT solution to replace todays manu al process for recruiting and access ing enlisted and ocer active and reserve candidates. Currently, the NRC Ocer Pro grams are managed using a paperbased process for both active duty and Reserve across 14 ocer program categories, each with a unique set of candidate qualication forms. As a result, NRCs 38 ocer program managers maintain stand-alone spreadsheets on their specic pro grams. In addition, roughly 147 dierent candidate forms are managed sepa rately by the Navys 26 recruiting dis tricts. e PRIDE Mod [Personalized Recruiting for Immediate and De layed Enlistment Modernization] Increment II will change the manual application process into a data-driv en process supported by electronic forms, Sullivan said. As a result, we anticipate the error rate for of cer applicant processing, which is now around 35 percent, to decrease dramatically because of better data quality. Also, the time to enlist an applicant or commission an ocer will be shorter, reducing the chance well lose good candidates due to a lengthy process. Under the RAIT contract, selected applications and systems will be mi grated over time to a more exible, interoperable solution for todays mobile and agile Navy recruiting force. e RAIT team has initially identied nine legacy systems for mod ernization and integration into sev eral Web-based applications built on a Services-Oriented Architecture. Examples of these capabilities are recruit marketing research and analysis, applicant medical waiver review, and investigative data for applicant security clearances. e SOA-driven approach lets us leverage current applications as services, thereby safeguarding our existing IT infrastructure invest ment, said Laura Knight, program manager, Sea Warrior Program. e SOA has already proven eective for recruiters in the eld who now have a Web-based capability that enables a faster, more automated process to seek and admit future Sailors into the Navy. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA starts ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Of ce, located in the back of the oce at the li brary. ShipShape weight loss starts todayJanuary is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutri tion and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! Ship Shape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Regis tered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Na val Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retir ees and their spouses information on a vari ety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted liv ing, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Mili tary retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more informa tion, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Union at Fort Clinch Feb. 2, 3Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Gar rison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2, and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Feb. 3. is program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. e grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in ring demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Fort Clinch State Park is at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. Now hear this! Tech paves way for agile recruiting Navy Recruiting January National Blood Donor Month Armed Forces Blood Joint Chiefs ethics study near complete Joint Chiefs of Sta Ask the Doc By Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre NSB Branch Health Clinic Eye exams can help spot glaucoma

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President Barack Obama took the ceremonial oath of oce Jan. 21 for his second term as the 44th U.S. president and commander in chief on the steps of the U.S. Capi tol, honoring the men and women in uniform who have preserved Americas freedoms throughout its history. More than 5,000 military members some par ticipating in the Inaugural Parade, others playing musical accompaniment, ring artillery rounds into the sky or providing be hind-the-scenes support were among more than a half million people who gathered on the National Mall to watch Obama and Vice President Joe Biden enter their second term. Recognizing the draw down of forces in Afghani stan and the ramping down of more than a de cade of conict, Obama oered high praise dur ing his inaugural address for U.S. service members, their contributions and sacrices. Our brave men and women in uniform, tem pered by the ames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage, he said. Our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. e knowledge of their sacrice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. Obama expressed hope for a more peaceful future, noting that Americans understand that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. Americans are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, the president said. And we must carry those les If youre looking to get back to nature, MWR Kings Bay encourages pa trons to check out Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Dont have an RV? Rent one for the weekend from the Outdoor Adventure Center and mention it to the Navy Lake Site sta for a 25 percent savings $12 RV rental per night during the months of February march March. Call (770) 974-6309 to make your reservation.Obama takes oath, salutes military paper based on Robert E. Lees quote that duty is the sublimest word in our language. So he isnt a Johnnycome-lately to this party. I want these values to be less abstract and more real to people, he said. It makes sense to study ethics in the military pro fession, but Dempsey hur ries to say that the profes sion is in good shape. He does not anticipate a sea change on ethics, rath er a small course correc tion to make the military better. We have to require leaders to understand and think about their profes sion, he said. If you dont, then you migrate pretty quickly into the military being just another job. e discussion of that goes to the distinction that must be made between competence and charac ter. is is what sets a pro fession apart. A profession cares about both compe tence and character, and it wants to keep them in bal ance, Dempsey said. In times of conict, it may be that we tend to overvalue competence and undervalue charac ter, and we need to watch that, he said.Ethics Lake THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 the Future of the Navy

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 5

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the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the De partment of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513. e 2nd Annual My Little Val entine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which in cludes a ower for each daugh ter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. The Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip Its Saturday, Jan. 26, and leaves the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Unleashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault rifle with all-day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. Theres a special $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends together for a full day of live action. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 9. All partic ipants are welcome. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Winter Basketball League Registration is open now at the Fitness Complex. Plays begins Jan. 28. Team fee is $100 for active duty and $200 for DoD. Captains meeting is 5 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 23 in the Fitness Classroom. For more info call (912) 409-1611. Super Bowl 2013 Party at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more infor mation call (912) 573-4548. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Where the Wild ings Are, Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. He pledged continued close consultation with Algerian authorities, and emphasized the attackers bear full and sole responsibility for all loss of life. Just as we cannot ac cept terrorist attacks against our cities, we can not accept attacks against our citizens and our in terests abroad, he said. Neither can we accept an al-Qaida safe haven any where in the world.SaveTerror 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 7 Two years ago Coast Guard Compass rst brought you the story of two Coast Guard aviators who died in Greenland attempting to rescue a Downed B-17 crew during World War II. eir bodies were never recovered but an exhaus tive search has ensued in the decades since. Recently, the Defense Departments Joint POW/ MIA Accounting Command announced that an expedition team, comprised of Coast Guard ser vicemembers, scientists and other explorers, has produced sucient evi dence that the crash site of the Grumman Duck has been found beneath the ice near Koge Bay, Green land. By using historical infor mation, ground penetrat ing radar, a magnetometer and metal detection equipment, the expedi tion team isolated the lo cation where the aircrew crashed on Nov. 29, 1942. e team then melted ve six-inch-wide holes deep into the ice and low ered a specially designed camera scope. At approximately 38 feet below the ice surface in the second hole, the team observed black cables consistent with wiring used in WWII-era J2F-4 amphibious Grumman aircraft. Further analysis of vid eo from the camera scope and photographs captured by a member of the expedition team revealed additional aircraft components similar to those found in the engine area of the J2F-4 Grumman Duck. For nearly three years, crews have been working together on this project researching historical documentation about the last ight of U.S. Coast Guard Lt. John Pritchard, Petty Ocer 1st Class Benjamin Bottoms and Army Air Force Cpl. Loren Howarth aboard the Duck. e three men aboard this aircraft were heroes who made the ultimate sacrice for their coun try, said Cmdr. Jim Blow, from the U.S. Coast Guard oce of Aviation Forces. e story of the Grum man Duck reects the his tory and the mission of the Coast Guard, and by nd ing the aircraft we have begun to repay our coun trys debt to them. Information was obtained, analyzed and cross-referenced to for mulate the primary points of interest to search dur ing the course of the Coast Guard-sponsored expedition. Once at the remote lo cation on Greenlands southeast coast, the joint teams, consisting of safe ty personnel and scien tic analysts, searched 10 points of interest, nine with negative results. It wasnt until the end of the seven-day expedition when the team, utilizing the ground penetrating radar, swept an additional historical position and made the strongest radar contact. is ultimately led to the location of the Duck. e Coast Guard is co ordinating eorts with the Joint POW/MIA Personnel Accounting Command on future actions.Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experi ences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. For more information or to register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29is two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include ne gotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing and high-pressure sales tactics. is training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its reg ular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social is sues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Devel opment Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to in crease a couples ability to bet ter understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and com munication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfac tion, closeness, and genuine ness in their marriage. World War II plane found under ice sons into this time as well. e president armed the nations resolve to de fend its people and uphold its values through both the strength of arms and rule of law and with an arm extended to its friends as well as adversaries to help lay conditions for longterm peace. We will show the cour age to try and resolve our dierences with other nations peacefully not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear, he said. Meanwhile, America will remain the anchor of strong alliances in ev ery corner of the globe, he said. We will renew those institutions that ex tend our capacity to man age crisis abroad, for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. e United States will support democracy around the world, because our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom, Obama said. And we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes: tolerance and opportunity; human dignity and justice. First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, vowed to continue leading the Joining Forces initiative during the next four years with a goal of creating a national culture of appreciation and sup port. Joining Forces has mo bilized every sector of so ciety by encouraging em ployers to hire veterans and military family mem bers, promoting eorts to cut through red tape to transfer professional licenses as military spouses move between states with their loved ones, and giv ing teachers the tools to help military children, the rst lady noted. Oath

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The Brooklyn Dodgers once had an outfielder named Dixie Walker. He was known as The Peoples Choice. Although Timothy Richard Tebow is one of the most polarizing figures to hit sports since Walker, he is The Peoples Choice, at least around Jacksonville. Owner Shad Kahn teased like he wanted him. But the first significant words out of Kahns new GM, David Caldwells mouth were, I cant imagine a scenario where he (Tebow) would be a Jacksonville Jaguar. I dont care how many self-styled quarterback gurus say Tebow cant play quarterback. Ive seen him do it. Anybody remember Terry Bradshaw as a player? The guy was lucky if one-of-five of his passes spiraled. Look sometime at The Immaculate Reception. Bradshaws got four rings. Tebow is a no-brainer for the nowhere-bound Jags. Plus, hell be president by 2042. CWO Michael Snyder MFPU Minneapolis I dont think hes going to get on an NFL team next year. Francis Marrs Retired Navy Salina, Okla. I heard hes going to the Cardinals because theyve had so many losing quar terbacks. It was on Yahoo last night. Andre Alexander Retired Navy Baltimore He wont be in Jacksonville. The new GM already made that clear. If he came here though, he would sell seats. Barbara Pyne Civil Service Oneida, N.Y. I think they should have brought him to Jacksonville a long time ago. Hes from here and has a huge fan base. Firefighter Trevor Olinto Kings Bay Fire Department Hilliard, Fla. I pray God the Jaguars and maybe coach for Florida after that. Lt. Joseph Grayer SWFLANT Gulfport, Miss. I think hell be a quarterback somewhere, but I dont know where. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e U.S. 7th Fleet Com mander on Saturday ex pressed regret over the grounding of USS Guardian (MCM 5) on Tubbataha Reef in the Sulu Sea. As a protector of the sea and a Sailor myself, I greatly regret any damage this inci dent has caused to the Tub bataha Reef, said Vice Adm. Scott Swift. We know the sig nicance of the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park and its importance as a World Heritage Site. Its protection is vital, and we take seriously our obligations to protect and preserve the maritime envi ronment. Swift also announced that Rear Adm. omas Carney, Commander of Logistics Group Western Pacic, will take over on Jan. 21 as the onscene commander to oversee the Guardian recovery op erations. Carney will embark the destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89), which along with several other U.S. Navy support ves sels, is focused on preventing any further environmental damage to the reef and sur rounding marine environment. As of Jan. 20 the condi tion of the Guardian has not changed; the ship was still grounded with no one on board and there are no traces of an oil slick in the area. No one was injured during the Jan. 17 grounding, and due to a concern for person nel safety caused by hazard ous weather conditions and poor sea states, essential Navy crewmembers have not yet returned to survey Guardian. Once the survey is com plete, recovery eorts will commence. When the Guardian is safely recovered by the U.S. Navy, the U.S. government will continue to work with the Republic of Philippines government to assess the ex tent of the damage to the reef and the surrounding marine environment caused by the grounding. e Republic of the Phil ippines government was promptly informed of the incident and is being updated regularly by U.S. ocials. Prior to leaving a port visit in Subic Bay, Guardian can celed a scheduled fuel stop to Puerto Princesa. Guardian departed Olongapo City en route to Indo nesia and was transiting the Sulu Sea when the grounding occurred at approximately 2:25 a.m. ursday. Based in Sasebo, Japan, the Avenger-class mine counter measures ship remains stuck on Tubbataha Reefs south atoll, about 400 nautical miles southwest of Manila, Philippines. e Navy is undertaking an investigation to deter mine the exact cause of the grounding. Commander regrets ship grounding THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information U.S. and allied ocials are worked around the clock to resolve the hos tage situation in Algeria, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in London, Jan. 18. Earlier last week, Panet ta conrmed that Ameri cans were among those taken hostage in eastern Algeria Jan. 16 when ter rorists attacked and occu pied a natural gas plant. During a speech at Kings College, the sec retary departed from his prepared remarks to comment on the situation. I just received a brief ing from my sta, and we are continuing to work very closely with the Brit ish government and with other nations ... to assess precisely what is happening on the ground, he said. Even as we continue to try and gather better information about what has hap pened, let me make a few points. First, Panetta said, Re gardless of the motiva tion of the hostage-takers, there is no justication no justication for the kidnapping and murder of innocent people ... going about their daily lives. Second, he said, We are working around the clock to ensure the safe return of our citizens, and we will continue to be in close consultation with the Algerian government. ird, he continued, Terrorists should be on notice that they will nd no sanctuary, no refuge not in Algeria, not in North Africa, not any where. ose who would wantonly attack our coun try and our people will have no place to hide. Shortly after his speech, the secretary attended an unscheduled meeting with British Prime Minis ter David Cameron. As the two entered the meeting, Cameron was heard to say, Lets start with Algeria. Senior defense ocials traveling with Panetta said the Algeria and Mali dis cussion took up approxi mately half of the meeting. It focused on policy rather than tactics, ocials said. e two leaders had an in-depth discussion of the unfolding situation in Al geria, exchanged assess ments. Cameron and Panetta also discussed budget is sues, Syria, Iran, the bilat eral relationship between the two countries and how they can work with other countries to address coun terterrorism, ocials said. Panetta was in London on the nal leg of a week long European tour. eres no place to hide THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 11

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Defense leaders from NATO countries and part ner nations discussed what capabilities will be needed by an enduring force in Afghanistan after 2014, and what the param eters of that force will be, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said in an interview Jan. 17. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey met with chiefs of defense of allied nations at the NATO headquarters in Brussels. He said they used the annual meeting to renew old military-to-military ties and build new ones. On Afghanistan, the military chiefs discussed the transition to an Afghan lead this year and to total Afghan control of opera tions by the end of 2014. While numbers of troops after 2014 were discussed, there were no decisions made. In fact, some NATO ocials went so far as to say the numbers werent important this far out from the actual date. At some point, num bers count, Dempsey said. ere is a cost to force pro tection, and there is a cost to sustain the force. On top of those two cornerstones, we have to address the mission sets weve been given to address. e missions include putting pressure on alQaida and continuing the development of Afghan security forces. We are looking at dif ferent options, and we will decide at what level we will train, advise and assist, and that will illu minate the requirement for forces, he said. When folks say were not focused on the numbers so much, its because we want to get the mission prole cor rect, and the level at which we need to be engaged, in order to deliver it. e U.S. military is not as interested in the over all numbers as is NATO and partners countries, Dempsey noted. Because were bigger and better resourced, we tend to be more agile, he said. We can change the level of commitment up or down with a little more agility than potentially some of our partners can. eyre really eager to un derstand what we need to accomplish beyond 2014. e Afghans are also eager to hear the results, he said. ey are not pressing us for a specic number, but they do want to know how many bases (we need), for example, Dempsey said. ey are eager to under stand at what level we will be assisting them. Dempsey noted that such information can also help the U.S. prepare for the transition. ere is physics involved for retrograding out of Afghanistan, so we need to know the rough order of magnitude so we can begin planning, the general said. During the meeting, Dempsey spoke with his new Russian counterpart, Army Col.Gen. Valery V. Gerasimov, chief of the General Sta. e Russian leader was very candid about the is sues and things he con siders irritants, Dempsey said, noting that he was equally candid on our views of these irritants. Dempsey said he is pleased with the progress made in the military-tomilitary engagement between Russia and the U.S. We have a work plan that includes engagements and exercises and contacts, he said. It works very well at the lower and medium level and its beginning to work a little better at the upper echelons. e two nations have many issues and concerns in common counter narcotics, counter piracy, the supply chain to Af ghanistan through Central Asia and more, he said. Dempsey said he also spoke to Gerasimov about the Russians two years in Afghanistan in the 1980s. e (overall) Russian experience in the country was that they were moving in the right direction, and if the Soviet Union hadnt collapsed, Afghanistan would have been ne, Dempsey said. e chairman maintains there is some commonal ity in the U.S. and Russian approach to Afghansitan, but I think we learned from their mistakes, he said. Pirates Cove menus Dempsey ponders future 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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Mabus sets priorities Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus rolled out his new Four Ps during a speech at the 25th Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium in Arlington, Va. Jan. 17. Mabus said the Four Ps of People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships are a way to bin key areas that are interrelated pri orities for the Navy. A top priority of mine and of our Navy is people... taking care of our people, said Mabus. Unlike most organizations, we push responsibility down ... down in rank, down in age, and day-in, day-out we get the type of positive results we need and expect. Mabus added that al though the majority of Sailors are responsible and successful, leadership realized that there needed to be more attention paid to programs to ensure their mental, emotional and physical well-being. In response, the Navy introduced the 21st Cen tury Sailor and Marine initiative to maintain or improve the resilience of the force. Recognizing abuse of alcohol was a common factor in sexual abuse, do mestic violence, suicide and other issues, breatha lyzers were brought into commands to help prevent alcohol-related incidents. is is not intended to be punitive. But, if you pop positive when report ing for duty, were going to get you into a program to help you, he said. We dont want a career or lifethreatening alcohol-relat ed incident, and because of that we have to focus on health physical, mental and emotional. Mabus also noted that part of maintaining the health of the eet means taking steps to help Sailors as they transi tion out of the Navy by ensuring they have access to education, training and employment opportunities. is is especially true for wounded warriors. Last year, we set a goal to hire one wounded warrior a day in the Navy, he said. We tripled it ... we hired over 1,000 wounded vet erans. e Navy is also help ing those want to join the military, by re-establishing the Naval Reserve Ocer Training Corps in universities such as Harvard, Yale and Columbia, and implementing it for the rst time at other colleges like Ari zona State University. No one should be de nied the honor of serving this country, Mabus said. e second P, platforms, refers to the ships, aircraft, submarines, unmanned vehicles and hardware the Navy buys and builds. For the Surface Navy As sociation audience, Mabus focused on shipbuild ing programs as a strategic priority for the Navy today and in the future. I think that we have made great strides in ship building, Mabus said. Were getting the ships we need, the mix we need and the numbers we need while being good stewards of the taxpayers money. Im proud of where we are. We owe the shipbuilding industry transparency ... I feel were giving them that. In turn, they owe us that every ship built with out major design changes, should cost us less than the one before it. is is happening, and we cur rently have 288 ships. Additionally, Mabus said that the Navy has 42 ships currently under contract and is making steady progress toward building a eet of 300 ships by the end of the decade. e third P, power, focuses on Mabus ve en ergy goals which include pursuing energy eciencies and alternative sourc es of energy. e U.S. military is the largest single consumer of fossil fuels in the world, he said. Every time a bar rel of oil goes up one dol lar, it costs the Navy 30 million dollars. Mabus illustrated that additional cost in terms of steaming days, saying it was roughly the equiva lent of 142 steaming days for LHDs or 293 days of combat operations for an Arleigh Burke class destroyer. Last year the Navy demonstrated the Great Green Fleet in Hawaii, as part of RIMPAC. e Great Green Fleet included a nuclear-powered aircraft car rier, aircraft and ships operating on 50/50 blends of traditional and advanced biofuels, and several rsts such as underway and airto-air refueling using biofuels. Something truly re markable happened when we demonstrated the Great Green Fleet, Mabus said. Nothing. Not a single engine or process had to be changed. ey simply did not know the dierence. I dont want to y less, steam less or deploy less. And I dont think we have to, but we have to make this move. Partnerships may be the last P, but theyre a top pri ority according to Mabus who links it back to our new Defense Strategy and its focus on innovative, small footprint engagements around the world. Participants from the Naval Sea Cadet Corps toured the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Jeerson City (SSN 759) aboard Naval Base Point Loma Jan. 12 to see what life is like aboard a Navy submarine. Submariner tour guides taught the students how the submarine moves through the water and how it stays balanced, heated and defensive, along with how the crew lives. I enjoy telling people what we do, said Logis tics Specialist 2nd Class Jared Sainz, one of Jef ferson Citys appointed tour guides. Most people dont understand what happens in a submarine or how a submarine works on a basic level. Twenty-three children, ranging in age from 11 to 17, toured the vessel along with their chaperones in an eort to better under stand what a career as a submariner would be like. Its a good eye-opener for these guys to pinpoint what they want to do when they graduate from high school, said Ginny Fessler, a chaperone and parent volunteer. Some of them said, Yeah, I could do this, and others were like, No, I think Im too tall! e tour allowed the visitors to see virtually all of the unclassied spaces on the nuclear-powered submarine including the control center, sleeping quarters, galley, torpedo space and wardroom. Hannah Lockmann, a 14-year-old student at Hill Creek Elementary School, said she enjoyed the rst hand experience. Today was a lot of fun and I learned a lot, Lock mann said. She added that her ca reer ambition is to be come a Navy Corpsman, but not on a sub. Its just too small, she said. Sainz said there was real value for the touring children in familiarizing themselves with actual Navy equipment and culture. I wish these oppor tunities existed when I was younger, Sainz said. ey get to see whats going on in the Navy and theyll understand a little bit better what theyre get ting into if they do decide to join. Since 1958, the Naval Sea Cadet Corps has been committed to providing American youth with a drug and alcohol-free environment to foster their leadership abilities, broaden their horizons through hands-on train ing, and guide them to becoming mature young adults.Sea Cadets visit submarine THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 13

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Annual Fleet & Family event scheduled for conference center e Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center Career Support and Retention Ofce is hosting a Technical and Engineering Field Job Fair for transitioning and retired military members with experience within the electronic, mechanical, electrical, engineering and information technology elds. e fair will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 6, at the Kings Bay Conference Center, Building 1039. We anticipate that at least 20 companies will have representatives on hand, said Beth Hubbart, Family Employment Readiness program manager at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Kings Bay. All are actively hiring and many have a well established history of recruiting veterans due to the skills and workplace values he or she gained while serving in the military. Many of the registered companies have employment opportunities in multiple locations throughout the U.S., including those with vacancies within the commuting area of Camden County. Ed Neleski, Transition Assistance program manager, said job seekers should bring an updated resume. We recommend that anyone attending the job fair bring multiple copies of a current resume, he said. Career Support and Retention sta members are available to assist you in writing or reviewing your resume for this event. ose interested in resume preparation assistance can call 573-4513 to schedule an appointment. Specic positions being recruited include eld service technicians, instrumentation technicians, facility maintenance supervisors, nuclear reactor operator candidates and other personnel with nuclear craft training, engineers of all disciplines, training instructors, construction project managers, mechanics, technical supervisors, logistic specialists and operators. Companies will be registering for the job fair through the rst week of February. For the most current listing of employers attending, visit or call the Fleet and Family Support Center at 573-4513. Up Periscope Whats in store for Tim Tebow? Page 9 Inauguration Barack Obama begins second term as president Page 3 Future Navy Strange new world may be closer than you think Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Obama condemns terror attack in Algeria Tech, engineering job fair Feb. 6 at NSB Kings Bay FFSC, MWR events run Feb. 25 to March 2 aboard NSB Kings Baye Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center partners with the Morale Welfare and Recreation Department for Military Saves Week. Promoting automatic savings to help servicemembers and their families reach their nancial goals. As part of Mili tary Saves Week 2013, Feb. 25 to March 2, Kings Bay, is spreading the savings message and urging the community to participate in Military Saves Week and take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org/ take-the-pledge e goal is to encourage service members and their families to take the Military Saves Pledge at www.militarysaves.org, a commitment to begin the journey toward nancial freedom. FFSC ad MWR promote positive changes in personal nancial behavior, through the notion that everyone can Start Small, ink Big. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help service members and their families in the community to Set a Goal, Make a Plan, and Save Automatically. To help people save more successfully and encourage more people to save, FFSC and MWR are partnering with youth nancial motivational speaker Peter Bielagus to oer military, family members and retirees educational events about savings and budgets. ree free events will be oered Feb. 26 at MWRs Sports Zone, as part of Kings Bay reaches overseas RV park gets face li at hidden gem lake in Northwest GeorgiaMorale, Welfare and Recreation Kings Bay recently renovated the Recreational Vehicle Park at Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Located about 30 miles north of Atlanta, the Navy Lake Site is a 52-acre campground nestled in the Georgia pines on Lake Allatoona. e RV Park was upgraded to 50-amp hook-ups and new water lines. Gone are the days of shared power among several RVs. Each site now has a utility tower on a concrete pad, oering easy hook-ups for guests. Additional work was done in the grounds and landscaping and the sta is excited to unveil the work to patrons. e campground opens again for business on Feb. 1. e Navy Lake Site also has beautiful cabins ranging from one to four bedrooms, for those looking for more comfort in their vacation. Allatoona renovates siteMilitary Saves Week coming Blame for deadly tragedy rests with al-Qaeda terroristse nations thoughts and prayers are with the families of those killed and injured in the terrorist attack in Algeria, and the blame for the tragedy rests with the terrorists who carried it out, President Barack Obama said Jan. 19. In a statement, the president said the United States condemns the terrorists actions in the strongest possible terms. We have been in constant contact with Algerian ocials and stand ready to provide whatever assistance they need in the aftermath of this attack, Obama said. We also will continue to work closely with all of our partners to combat the scourge of terrorism in the region, which has claimed too many innocent lives. e attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-Qaeda and other violent extremist groups in North Africa, the president said. In the coming days, we will remain in close touch with the government of Algeria to gain a fuller understanding of what took place so that we can work together to prevent tragedies like this in the future, he added. During a news conference in London today, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and British Defense Secretary Philip Hammond said both of their governments remain in close contact with Al gerian ocials, and are working to establish rm details of the as sault, kidnappings and murders that took place at a remote natural gas facility in Algeria. Panetta conrmed Americans were among those held hostage, but he said the possible number of U.S. deaths remains unclear.

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. According to Prevent Blindness America, glaucoma aects more than 3 million Americans. Many people dont even know that they have it. Glaucoma begins by attacking peripheral vision, typically causing objects to appear blurry. At rst, its possible to compensate by squinting or turning the head to focus better. Although it typically happens at a gradual pace, glaucoma can also accelerate quickly, causing eyesight to rapidly and irreversibly deteriorate. Some factors can increase the risk of developing glaucoma, such as age, race or genetics. Glau coma usually aects one out of 200 people by age 50 and as many as one out of 10 people by age 80. While everyone is at risk for glaucoma, its the leading cause of blindness in the African-American and Hispanic populations. Glaucoma cant be prevented, but if diagnosed and treated early, it can be controlled. is reinforces what the National Optometric Association and the American Optometric Association recommend: adults need regular, comprehensive eye exams. A proper diet and exercise can improve overall health. Start o the new year right by setting up an appointment with your eye doctor. And maybe hit the gym and grab a salad on the way home. Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre is an optometrist at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Branch Health Clinic. e chairman of theJoint Chiefs of Stais preparing to nish a study on ethics training in the military, a task he received from Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta to examine following some misjudgments, revelations and crimes by a few senior military leaders. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempseyand the rest of the Joint Chiefs of Sta are nishing up work on recommendations, but he said he hopes this is a work in progress. I dont want this to be a one-o, take 60 days, slap our hands together and declare victory, he said. I think we have to continue to learn about the profession. Dempsey said he would like to put some of these recommendations in place and review them again about six months later. e chairman noted that the service chiefs themselves are working this issue. Were not out-sourcing this, Dempsey said. e Joint Chiefs of Sta will write a memo to the secretary about their conclusions, present an internal tasking on aspects the chiefs can change and present a request to the secretary for changes he can authorize. ere will be changes to military education and to the way the military evaluates, assesses, selects and promotes, Dempsey said. e idea is to review the conclusions, decide what is working and what isnt, educate the force, [and] encourage the force and its leaders to have a conversation, he said. I want the process to be a dynamic and interactive continuum of studies, so we can be the best leaders that we can be. Dempsey has been interested in what makes the military a profession since he joined. As a major at the Armys Command and General Sta College on Fort Leavenworth, Kan., he did a January is National Blood Donor Month and Defense Department employees are encouraged to roll up their sleeves and give the gift of life, said Air Force Col. Richard McBride, Armed Services Blood Program director. e military blood program also celebrates its 60th anniversary this year, with Years of Donors We ank You, as its theme, McBride said. e program coordinates support between the military services and the combatant commands to ensure sucient blood products and services exist wherever troops serve, McBride explained. e blood program is a tri-service eort involving the Army, Navy and Air Force, he said. e militarys blood program began during the late 1940s, when organizations such as the Red Cross supplied blood to wounded warriors during World War II, McBride said. In the past 60 years, blood donors have helped save wounded warriors in the Korean and Vietnam conicts, and Operations Desert Storm, Desert Shield, Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. Both civilian and military programs comply with the same federal regulations, test for infectious diseases and process, manufacture, store and distribute blood wherever its needed. DOD has the added mission of supporting wounded warriors and DOD beneciaries worldwide. e need for blood at military hospitals around the world always exists. Potential donors must be at least 17 years old and free of medical conditions or diseases that would prevent them from donating, McBride said, adding that donors can contribute blood every 56 days. Blood is perishable and only considered safe to use at a maximum of 42 days by law, he added. e Sea Warrior Program, within the Navys Program Executive Oce for Enterprise Information Systems, is supporting the Navy Recruiting Command through a contract award for up to $65 million to modernize key information technology systems. e new Recruiting and Accessions Information Technology services contract helps lay the IT foundation for Recruiting Force 2020, a strategy that relies on agile, paperless technology to recruit quality applicants for Americas navy. e RAIT contract award is an important next step toward realizing the Navy Recruiting Force 2020 strategic plan of anytime, anywhere recruiting, said Kevin Sullivan, NRC chief information ocer. One of the rst orders of business will be an IT solution to replace todays manual process for recruiting and accessing enlisted and ocer active and reserve candidates. Currently, the NRC Ocer Programs are managed using a paperbased process for both active duty and Reserve across 14 ocer program categories, each with a unique set of candidate qualication forms. As a result, NRCs 38 ocer program managers maintain stand-alone spreadsheets on their specic programs. In addition, roughly 147 dierent candidate forms are managed separately by the Navys 26 recruiting districts. e PRIDE Mod [Personalized Recruiting for Immediate and Delayed Enlistment Modernization] Increment II will change the manual application process into a data-driven process supported by electronic forms, Sullivan said. As a result, we anticipate the error rate for ofcer applicant processing, which is now around 35 percent, to decrease dramatically because of better data quality. Also, the time to enlist an applicant or commission an ocer will be shorter, reducing the chance well lose good candidates due to a lengthy process. Under the RAIT contract, selected applications and systems will be migrated over time to a more exible, interoperable solution for todays mobile and agile Navy recruiting force. e RAIT team has initially identied nine legacy systems for modernization and integration into several Web-based applications built on a Services-Oriented Architecture. Examples of these capabilities are recruit marketing research and analysis, applicant medical waiver review, and investigative data for applicant security clearances. e SOA-driven approach lets us leverage current applications as services, thereby safeguarding our existing IT infrastructure investment, said Laura Knight, program manager, Sea Warrior Program. e SOA has already proven eective for recruiters in the eld who now have a Web-based capability that enables a faster, more automated process to seek and admit future Sailors into the Navy. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA starts ongoinge IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Ofce, located in the back of the oce at the library. ShipShape weight loss starts todayJanuary is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutrition and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retirees and their spouses information on a variety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted living, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Military retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more information, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Union at Fort Clinch Feb. 2, 3Fort Clinch State Park will host a Union Gar rison event 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2, and 9 a.m. to noon, Sunday, Feb. 3. is program will allow visitors to interact with living historians to experience life in the fort as it was in 1864. e grounds will be bustling with soldiers in period costumes involved in ring demonstrations, marching drills, cooking and daily activities. Ladies in their dresses, sutlers displaying their wares and drummer boys bring every part of the civil war era to life. Fort Clinch State Park is at 2601 Atlantic Ave., Fernandina Beach, Fla. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. Now hear this! Tech paves way for agile recruiting Navy Recruiting January National Blood Donor Month Armed Forces Blood Joint Chiefs ethics study near complete Joint Chiefs of Sta Ask the Doc By Cmdr. Jacqueline Pierre NSB Branch Health Clinic Eye exams can help spot glaucoma

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President Barack Obama took the ceremonial oath of oce Jan. 21 for his second term as the 44th U.S. president and commander in chief on the steps of the U.S. Capitol, honoring the men and women in uniform who have preserved Americas freedoms throughout its history. More than 5,000 military members some participating in the Inaugural Parade, others playing musical accompaniment, ring artillery rounds into the sky or providing behind-the-scenes support were among more than a half million people who gathered on the National Mall to watch Obama and Vice President Joe Biden enter their second term. Recognizing the drawdown of forces in Afghanistan and the ramping down of more than a decade of conict, Obama oered high praise during his inaugural address for U.S. service members, their contributions and sacrices. Our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the ames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage, he said. Our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. e knowledge of their sacrice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. Obama expressed hope for a more peaceful future, noting that Americans understand that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. Americans are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, the president said. And we must carry those lesIf youre looking to get back to nature, MWR Kings Bay encourages patrons to check out Navy Lake Site Allatoona. Dont have an RV? Rent one for the weekend from the Outdoor Adventure Center and mention it to the Navy Lake Site sta for a 25 percent savings $12 RV rental per night during the months of February march March. Call (770) 974-6309 to make your reservation.Obama takes oath, salutes military paper based on Robert E. Lees quote that duty is the sublimest word in our language. So he isnt a Johnnycome-lately to this party. I want these values to be less abstract and more real to people, he said. It makes sense to study ethics in the military profession, but Dempsey hurries to say that the profession is in good shape. He does not anticipate a sea change on ethics, rather a small course correction to make the military better. We have to require leaders to understand and think about their profes sion, he said. If you dont, then you migrate pretty quickly into the military being just another job. e discussion of that goes to the distinction that must be made between competence and character. is is what sets a profession apart. A profession cares about both competence and character, and it wants to keep them in balance, Dempsey said. In times of conict, it may be that we tend to overvalue competence and undervalue character, and we need to watch that, he said.Ethics Lake THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 3

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the week to help people build wealth, not debt. Did you know? Fewer than 50 percent of Americans have a savings plan with specific goals. 54 percent of military families have not set aside sucient emergency funds to cover at least three months worth of monthly expenses. 68 percent of military families express that they feel stress from their families current nancial condition. Budgeting will help get your nances under control. When you budget and cre ate an emergency savings, a future emergency wont be come a nancial crisis. Military Saves Week is coordinated by America Saves and the Consumer Federation of America in partnership with the Department of Defense. e week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good sav ings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. Learn more by visiting the Fleet and Family Sup port Center Kings Bay or by calling the FFSC nancial educator at (912) 573-4513. e 2nd Annual My Little Valentine Father & Daughter Dance is 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a ower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel oce. For more information call (912) 573-4559. The Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip Its Saturday, Jan. 26, and leaves the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Unleashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault rifle with all-day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. Theres a special $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends together for a full day of live action. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 9. All participants are welcome. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Winter Basketball League Registration is open now at the Fitness Complex. Plays begins Jan. 28. Team fee is $100 for active duty and $200 for DoD. Captains meeting is 5 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 23 in the Fitness Classroom. For more info call (912) 409-1611. Super Bowl 2013 Party at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be deter mined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Where the Wild ings Are, Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. Youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 5734548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Father-daughter dance Feb. 9 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. He pledged continued close consultation with Algerian authorities, and emphasized the attackers bear full and sole responsibility for all loss of life. Just as we cannot accept terrorist attacks against our cities, we cannot accept attacks against our citizens and our interests abroad, he said. Neither can we accept an al-Qaida safe haven anywhere in the world.SaveTerror 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 7 Two years ago Coast Guard Compass rst brought you the story of two Coast Guard aviators who died in Greenland attempting to rescue a Downed B-17 crew during World War II. eir bodies were never recovered but an exhaustive search has ensued in the decades since. Recently, the Defense Departments Joint POW/ MIA Accounting Command announced that an expedition team, comprised of Coast Guard servicemembers, scientists and other explorers, has produced sucient evidence that the crash site of the Grumman Duck has been found beneath the ice near Koge Bay, Greenland. By using historical information, ground penetrating radar, a magnetometer and metal detection equipment, the expedition team isolated the location where the aircrew crashed on Nov. 29, 1942. e team then melted ve six-inch-wide holes deep into the ice and lowered a specially designed camera scope. At approximately 38 feet below the ice surface in the second hole, the team observed black cables consistent with wiring used in WWII-era J2F-4 amphibious Grumman aircraft. Further analysis of video from the camera scope and photographs captured by a member of the expedition team revealed additional aircraft components similar to those found in the engine area of the J2F-4 Grumman Duck. For nearly three years, crews have been working together on this project researching historical documentation about the last ight of U.S. Coast Guard Lt. John Pritchard, Petty Ocer 1st Class Benjamin Bottoms and Army Air Force Cpl. Loren Howarth aboard the Duck. e three men aboard this aircraft were heroes who made the ultimate sacrice for their country, said Cmdr. Jim Blow, from the U.S. Coast Guard oce of Aviation Forces. e story of the Grumman Duck reects the history and the mission of the Coast Guard, and by nding the aircraft we have begun to repay our countrys debt to them. Information was obtained, analyzed and cross-referenced to formulate the primary points of interest to search during the course of the Coast Guard-sponsored expedition. Once at the remote location on Greenlands southeast coast, the joint teams, consisting of safety personnel and scientic analysts, searched 10 points of interest, nine with negative results. It wasnt until the end of the seven-day expedition when the team, utilizing the ground penetrating radar, swept an additional historical position and made the strongest radar contact. is ultimately led to the location of the Duck. e Coast Guard is coordinating eorts with the Joint POW/MIA Personnel Accounting Command on future actions.Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experi ences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. For more information or to register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29is two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing and high-pressure sales tactics. is training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops One-day marriage program coming e Fleet and Family Support Center Kings Bay, in coordination with Chaplains Religious Enrichment Development Operations, is hosting Reconnect: One-Day Marriage Enrichment Workshop. is workshop is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, Feb. 22. It is designed to enhance and support the ability of a couple to get away from the distractions of everyday life in order to improve their marital relationship. Activities are designed to increase a couples ability to better understand one another and communicate on a more intimate level. Couples discover ways to: Better handle inevitable conflicts Understand how they interact with their spouse Build intimacy and communication Become closer by strengthening the emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of their marriage Take time to have fun with one another Who should attend? Couples seeking greater satisfaction, closeness, and genuineness in their marriage. World War II plane found under ice sons into this time as well. e president armed the nations resolve to defend its people and uphold its values through both the strength of arms and rule of law and with an arm extended to its friends as well as adversaries to help lay conditions for longterm peace. We will show the courage to try and resolve our dierences with other nations peacefully not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear, he said. Meanwhile, America will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe, he said. We will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad, for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. e United States will support democracy around the world, because our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom, Obama said. And we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes: tolerance and opportunity; human dignity and justice. First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, vowed to continue leading the Joining Forces initiative during the next four years with a goal of creating a national culture of appreciation and support. Joining Forces has mobilized every sector of society by encouraging employers to hire veterans and military family members, promoting eorts to cut through red tape to transfer professional licenses as military spouses move between states with their loved ones, and giving teachers the tools to help military children, the rst lady noted. Oath

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The Brooklyn Dodgers once had an outfielder named Dixie Walker. He was known as The Peoples Choice. Although Timothy Richard Tebow is one of the most polarizing figures to hit sports since Walker, he is The Peoples Choice, at least around Jacksonville. Owner Shad Kahn teased like he wanted him. But the first significant words out of Kahns new GM, David Caldwells mouth were, I cant imagine a scenario where he (Tebow) would be a Jacksonville Jaguar. I dont care how many self-styled quarterback gurus say Tebow cant play quarterback. Ive seen him do it. Anybody remember Terry Bradshaw as a player? The guy was lucky if one-of-five of his passes spiraled. Look sometime at The Immaculate Reception. Bradshaws got four rings. Tebow is a no-brainer for the nowhere-bound Jags. Plus, hell be president by 2042. CWO Michael Snyder MFPU Minneapolis I dont think hes going to get on an NFL team next year. Francis Marrs Retired Navy Salina, Okla. I heard hes going to the Cardinals because theyve had so many losing quarterbacks. It was on Yahoo last night. Andre Alexander Retired Navy Baltimore He wont be in Jacksonville. The new GM already made that clear. If he came here though, he would sell seats. Barbara Pyne Civil Service Oneida, N.Y. I think they should have brought him to Jacksonville a long time ago. Hes from here and has a huge fan base. Firefighter Trevor Olinto Kings Bay Fire Department Hilliard, Fla. I pray God the Jaguars and maybe coach for Florida after that. Lt. Joseph Grayer SWFLANT Gulfport, Miss. I think hell be a quarterback somewhere, but I dont know where. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho e U.S. 7th Fleet Commander on Saturday expressed regret over the grounding of USS Guardian (MCM 5) on Tubbataha Reef in the Sulu Sea. As a protector of the sea and a Sailor myself, I greatly regret any damage this incident has caused to the Tubbataha Reef, said Vice Adm. Scott Swift. We know the signicance of the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park and its importance as a World Heritage Site. Its protection is vital, and we take seriously our obligations to protect and preserve the maritime environment. Swift also announced that Rear Adm. omas Carney, Commander of Logistics Group Western Pacic, will take over on Jan. 21 as the onscene commander to oversee the Guardian recovery operations. Carney will embark the destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89), which along with several other U.S. Navy support vessels, is focused on preventing any further environmental damage to the reef and surrounding marine environment. As of Jan. 20 the condition of the Guardian has not changed; the ship was still grounded with no one onboard and there are no traces of an oil slick in the area. No one was injured during the Jan. 17 grounding, and due to a concern for person nel safety caused by hazard ous weather conditions and poor sea states, essential Navy crewmembers have not yet returned to survey Guardian. Once the survey is complete, recovery eorts will commence. When the Guardian is safely recovered by the U.S. Navy, the U.S. government will continue to work with the Republic of Philippines government to assess the extent of the damage to the reef and the surrounding marine environment caused by the grounding. e Republic of the Philippines government was promptly informed of the incident and is being updated regularly by U.S. ocials. Prior to leaving a port visit in Subic Bay, Guardian canceled a scheduled fuel stop to Puerto Princesa. Guardian departed Olongapo City en route to Indonesia and was transiting the Sulu Sea when the grounding occurred at approximately 2:25 a.m. ursday. Based in Sasebo, Japan, the Avenger-class mine countermeasures ship remains stuck on Tubbataha Reefs south atoll, about 400 nautical miles southwest of Manila, Philippines. e Navy is undertaking an investigation to determine the exact cause of the grounding. Commander regrets ship grounding THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 9

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Navy College educational information U.S. and allied ocials are worked around the clock to resolve the hostage situation in Algeria, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in London, Jan. 18. Earlier last week, Panetta conrmed that Americans were among those taken hostage in eastern Algeria Jan. 16 when terrorists attacked and occupied a natural gas plant. During a speech at Kings College, the secretary departed from his prepared remarks to comment on the situation. I just received a briefing from my sta, and we are continuing to work very closely with the British government and with other nations ... to assess precisely what is happening on the ground, he said. Even as we continue to try and gather better information about what has hap pened, let me make a few points. First, Panetta said, Re gardless of the motivation of the hostage-takers, there is no justication no justication for the kidnapping and murder of innocent people ... going about their daily lives. Second, he said, We are working around the clock to ensure the safe return of our citizens, and we will continue to be in close consultation with the Algerian government. ird, he continued, Terrorists should be on notice that they will nd no sanctuary, no refuge not in Algeria, not in North Africa, not anywhere. ose who would wantonly attack our country and our people will have no place to hide. Shortly after his speech, the secretary attended an unscheduled meeting with British Prime Minister David Cameron. As the two entered the meeting, Cameron was heard to say, Lets start with Algeria. Senior defense ocials traveling with Panetta said the Algeria and Mali discussion took up approximately half of the meeting. It focused on policy rather than tactics, ocials said. e two leaders had an in-depth discussion of the unfolding situation in Algeria, exchanged assessments. Cameron and Panetta also discussed budget issues, Syria, Iran, the bilateral relationship between the two countries and how they can work with other countries to address counterterrorism, ocials said. Panetta was in London on the nal leg of a weeklong European tour. eres no place to hide THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 11

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Defense leaders from NATO countries and partner nations discussed what capabilities will be needed by an enduring force in Afghanistan after 2014, and what the parameters of that force will be, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta said in an interview Jan. 17. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey met with chiefs of defense of allied nations at the NATO headquarters in Brussels. He said they used the annual meeting to renew old military-to-military ties and build new ones. On Afghanistan, the military chiefs discussed the transition to an Afghan lead this year and to total Afghan control of operations by the end of 2014. While numbers of troops after 2014 were discussed, there were no decisions made. In fact, some NATO ocials went so far as to say the numbers werent important this far out from the actual date. At some point, num bers count, Dempsey said. ere is a cost to force pro tection, and there is a cost to sustain the force. On top of those two cornerstones, we have to address the mission sets weve been given to address. e missions include putting pressure on alQaida and continuing the development of Afghan security forces. We are looking at different options, and we will decide at what level we will train, advise and assist, and that will illuminate the requirement for forces, he said. When folks say were not focused on the numbers so much, its because we want to get the mission prole correct, and the level at which we need to be engaged, in order to deliver it. e U.S. military is not as interested in the overall numbers as is NATO and partners countries, Dempsey noted. Because were bigger and better resourced, we tend to be more agile, he said. We can change the level of commitment up or down with a little more agility than potentially some of our partners can. eyre really eager to understand what we need to accomplish beyond 2014. e Afghans are also eager to hear the results, he said. ey are not pressing us for a specic number, but they do want to know how many bases (we need), for example, Dempsey said. ey are eager to understand at what level we will be assisting them. Dempsey noted that such information can also help the U.S. prepare for the transition. ere is physics involved for retrograding out of Afghanistan, so we need to know the rough order of magnitude so we can begin planning, the general said. During the meeting, Dempsey spoke with his new Russian counterpart, Army Col.Gen. Valery V. Gerasimov, chief of the General Sta. e Russian leader was very candid about the issues and things he considers irritants, Dempsey said, noting that he was equally candid on our views of these irritants. Dempsey said he is pleased with the progress made in the military-tomilitary engagement between Russia and the U.S. We have a work plan that includes engagements and exercises and contacts, he said. It works very well at the lower and medium level and its beginning to work a little better at the upper echelons. e two nations have many issues and concerns in common counter narcotics, counter piracy, the supply chain to Afghanistan through Central Asia and more, he said. Dempsey said he also spoke to Gerasimov about the Russians two years in Afghanistan in the 1980s. e (overall) Russian experience in the country was that they were moving in the right direction, and if the Soviet Union hadnt collapsed, Afghanistan would have been ne, Dempsey said. e chairman maintains there is some commonality in the U.S. and Russian approach to Afghansitan, but I think we learned from their mistakes, he said. Pirates Cove menus Dempsey ponders future 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013

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Mabus sets priorities Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus rolled out his new Four Ps during a speech at the 25th Annual Surface Navy Association Symposium in Arlington, Va. Jan. 17. Mabus said the Four Ps of People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships are a way to bin key areas that are interrelated priorities for the Navy. A top priority of mine and of our Navy is people... taking care of our people, said Mabus. Unlike most organizations, we push responsibility down ... down in rank, down in age, and day-in, day-out we get the type of positive results we need and expect. Mabus added that although the majority of Sailors are responsible and successful, leadership realized that there needed to be more attention paid to programs to ensure their mental, emotional and physical well-being. In response, the Navy introduced the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative to maintain or improve the resilience of the force. Recognizing abuse of alcohol was a common factor in sexual abuse, do mestic violence, suicide and other issues, breatha lyzers were brought into commands to help prevent alcohol-related incidents. is is not intended to be punitive. But, if you pop positive when reporting for duty, were going to get you into a program to help you, he said. We dont want a career or lifethreatening alcohol-related incident, and because of that we have to focus on health physical, mental and emotional. Mabus also noted that part of maintaining the health of the eet means taking steps to help Sailors as they transi tion out of the Navy by ensuring they have access to education, training and employment opportunities. is is especially true for wounded warriors. Last year, we set a goal to hire one wounded warrior a day in the Navy, he said. We tripled it ... we hired over 1,000 wounded veterans. e Navy is also help ing those want to join the military, by re-establishing the Naval Reserve Ocer Training Corps in universities such as Harvard, Yale and Columbia, and implementing it for the rst time at other colleges like Ari zona State University. No one should be denied the honor of serving this country, Mabus said. e second P, platforms, refers to the ships, aircraft, submarines, unmanned vehicles and hardware the Navy buys and builds. For the Surface Navy Association audience, Mabus focused on shipbuilding programs as a strategic priority for the Navy today and in the future. I think that we have made great strides in ship building, Mabus said. Were getting the ships we need, the mix we need and the numbers we need while being good stewards of the taxpayers money. Im proud of where we are. We owe the shipbuilding industry transparency ... I feel were giving them that. In turn, they owe us that every ship built without major design changes, should cost us less than the one before it. is is happening, and we currently have 288 ships. Additionally, Mabus said that the Navy has 42 ships currently under contract and is making steady progress toward building a eet of 300 ships by the end of the decade. e third P, power, focuses on Mabus ve energy goals which include pursuing energy eciencies and alternative sources of energy. e U.S. military is the largest single consumer of fossil fuels in the world, he said. Every time a barrel of oil goes up one dollar, it costs the Navy 30 million dollars. Mabus illustrated that additional cost in terms of steaming days, saying it was roughly the equivalent of 142 steaming days for LHDs or 293 days of combat operations for an Arleigh Burke class destroyer. Last year the Navy demonstrated the Great Green Fleet in Hawaii, as part of RIMPAC. e Great Green Fleet included a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, aircraft and ships operating on 50/50 blends of traditional and advanced biofuels, and several rsts such as underway and airto-air refueling using biofuels. Something truly remarkable happened when we demonstrated the Great Green Fleet, Mabus said. Nothing. Not a single engine or process had to be changed. ey simply did not know the dierence. I dont want to y less, steam less or deploy less. And I dont think we have to, but we have to make this move. Partnerships may be the last P, but theyre a top priority according to Mabus who links it back to our new Defense Strategy and its focus on innovative, small footprint engagements around the world. Participants from the Naval Sea Cadet Corps toured the Los Angelesclass attack submarine USS Jeerson City (SSN 759) aboard Naval Base Point Loma Jan. 12 to see what life is like aboard a Navy submarine. Submariner tour guides taught the students how the submarine moves through the water and how it stays balanced, heated and defensive, along with how the crew lives. I enjoy telling people what we do, said Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Jared Sainz, one of Jefferson Citys appointed tour guides. Most people dont understand what happens in a submarine or how a submarine works on a basic level. Twenty-three children, ranging in age from 11 to 17, toured the vessel along with their chaperones in an eort to better understand what a career as a submariner would be like. Its a good eye-opener for these guys to pinpoint what they want to do when they graduate from high school, said Ginny Fessler, a chaperone and parent volunteer. Some of them said, Yeah, I could do this, and others were like, No, I think Im too tall! e tour allowed the visitors to see virtually all of the unclassied spaces on the nuclear-powered submarine including the control center, sleeping quarters, galley, torpedo space and wardroom. Hannah Lockmann, a 14-year-old student at Hill Creek Elementary School, said she enjoyed the rsthand experience. Today was a lot of fun and I learned a lot, Lockmann said. She added that her career ambition is to become a Navy Corpsman, but not on a sub. Its just too small, she said. Sainz said there was real value for the touring children in familiarizing themselves with actual Navy equipment and culture. I wish these opportunities existed when I was younger, Sainz said. ey get to see whats going on in the Navy and theyll understand a little bit better what theyre getting into if they do decide to join. Since 1958, the Naval Sea Cadet Corps has been committed to providing American youth with a drug and alcohol-free environment to foster their leadership abilities, broaden their horizons through hands-on training, and guide them to becoming mature young adults.Sea Cadets visit submarine THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 24, 2013 13

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