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The Kings Bay periscope ( 01-17-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00284

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00284


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No injuries, little damage in accidentNo one was hurt when the periscope on USS Jacksonville (SSN 699), a Los Angeles-class submarine, struck a vessel while operating in the Arabian Gulf Jan. 10 at approximately 5 a.m. local time. Jacksonville surfaced from periscope depth to ascertain if there was any damage to the unidentied vessel. e ves sel continued on a consistent course and speed oering no indication of distress or ac knowledgement of a collision. Damage appears to be lim ited to one of Jacksonvilles two periscopes. e reactor remains in a safe condition, there was no dam age to the propulsion plant sys tems and there is no concern regarding watertight integrity. A U.S. P-3 Orion aircraft con ducted a search of the area and saw no debris in the water or vessels in distress. e airborne search of the area is complete. e incident is under inves tigation. Jacksonville is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Re sponsibil ity. Navy-wide award for Health, Safety, and Fitness Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay was recognized for com munity service excellence Dec. 14 as the Health, Safety, and Fit ness Flagship award winner for large shore command calendar year 2012. This award is par ticularly pleas ing as it demonstrates that the influ Up Periscope NFL playoffs: See who picked the winners Page 9 On patrol Out in the field in Afghanistan Page 4 The first USS George Washington blazed Boomer trail Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay cited for service USS Rhode Island (Blue) at work Soldier earns highest tributeSta Sgt. Clinton Romesha to receive Medal of HonorPresident Barack Obama an nounced Jan. 11 that former Army Sta Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha will receive the Medal of Honor Feb. 11 for his ac tions in Af ghanistan. Romesha will be the fourth living recipient to be awarded the Medal of Honor for ac tions in Iraq or Afghanistan. He and his family will join the president at the White House for the award. e sta sergeant helped re pel an enemy attack of some 300 ghters who outnumbered the defenders of Combat Outpost Keating in Nuristan Province, Afghanistan. e Soldiers awoke Oct. 3, 2009 to nd the enemy occupy ing the high ground surrounding their combat outpost. Romesha braved intense enemy re to mobilize a ve-man team, ac cording to sources who were there. He reportedly took out an enemy machine-gun team and while engaging a second, the generator he was using for cover was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, inicting him with shrapnel wounds. Yet he contin ued to ght. He directed air support that destroyed more than 30 Taliban ghters and personally took out several other enemy positions, according to reports. He provided covering re and helped three of his wounded comrades to reach the aid sta (Its) a testament to the tremendous effort of the personnel of Team Kings Bay ... Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. CO, NSB Kings Bay Sub periscope strikes vessel

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 e Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions will address the topic Planning a Family During Your Navy Career throughout the month of January. CSADD, whose motto is Ship mates Helping Shipmates, will pro vide information and training across the eet on resources available to Sailors considering parenthood, as well as information for Sailors who are already parents. We want you to continue your career in the Navy, and we want to make sure that child is cared for as well, said Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Fleet Mas ter Chief Scott Benning. Its a ho listic view of the whole situation, it is not about trying to tell someone not to have a family. Our leadership is focused on making sure that our Sailors and their families have the very best in resources. You can see that in housing, in medical facilities, and in the compensation that we have for our families. e CSADD topic is intended to facilitate an open discussion with Sailors about the many ways hav ing a child can aect an individual Sailors life. e responsibilities of parenthood require consideration and planning for both men and women in uniform, as all naval service members are expected to balance the de mands of a naval career with their family responsibilities. At the end of the day, if you want your child to be well taken care of, youve got to prepare, Benning said. You cant take childbirth lightly. Understand that your family does come rst, but that youll have com mitments to taking care of that child, while serving your country and the contract youve signed to serve the Navy. At the end of the day that child has got to be well taken care of. While a woman could become pregnant at any time, pregnancy can cause less disruption during shore duty. Unplanned pregnancy on sea duty can disqualify a female Sailor from her current duty position, and possibly create a manning loss for her operational command. Ensuring Sailors understand the seriousness of becoming a parent can potentially make a big dierence to overall Navy mission readiness. Many times we are taught to sep arate our personal life from our pro fessional life, but in reality the deci sions we make can aect both, said Chief Operations Specialist Jessica Myers, senior enlisted advisor to the Navys Oce of Womens Policy. It is important that male and female service members, to the best of their ability, plan a pregnancy in order to successfully balance the demands of family responsibilities with their military obligations. According to the Navys most re cent Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey, 74 percent of pregnancies in the Navy were unplanned. Of those unplanned pregnancies, only 31 percent were using birth control at the time they conceived. Furthermore, in 70 percent of enlisted pregnancies, the father was identied as being in the military. In the Navy, single parents make up 7.6 percent of the total number of service members with children. Ad ditionally, there are approximately 84,000 dual military couples in our Navy, of which 36,000 have children. While some Sailors may intend to be single parents and thrive in that role, Januarys CSADD topic pro motes discussion among men and women about the benets of plan ning a family. Unintended pregnancies can jeopardize operational mission readiness for both male and female service members, and can disrupt a naval career by causing unexpected nancial hardship, from the high cost of daycare to possible child sup THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA starts Jan. 22e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay begins Jan. 22. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Le gal Services Oce located in the back of the oce at the library. ShipShape weight loss starts Jan. 24January is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutri tion and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! Ship Shape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Regis tered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Na val Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retir ees and their spouses information on a vari ety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted liv ing, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Mili tary retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more informa tion, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Vols sought for Wreath cleanup e Wreathes Across America program will pick up the wreaths that were placed at the Jacksonville National Cemetery during the 2012 WAA Remembrance program, Saturday, Jan. 19. WAA Location Leader Ralph Drem Terreault asks that those with pickup trucks and trailers be at the cemetery by 9 a.m. All others should arrive no earlier than 9:15 a.m. is years forecast is for mostly cloudy with a high around 65 degrees. e morning low will be around 50, with a 30 percent chance of rain. As with the wreath laying, clean up is a rain-orshine event. Remember to bring cheap gloves to handle the wreaths, sap is still running. If you have a strong wooden pole bring it to will help remove a number of wreaths at one time. If you will be bringing a utility trailer, send an e-mail www.WreathsAcrossAmericaJacksonville.com to so its known how many will help. Now hear this! e Navy and Marine Corps Pub lic Health Center announced the unveiling of its upgraded publiclyfacing Web site Jan. 8. e upgraded Web site www.med. navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/Pages/ Home.aspx features an improved search capability and optimized navigation to provide user-friendly access to the centers vast library of public health tools and resources. NMCPHC is excited about the upgrades to our Web site, said Capt. Mike Macinski, NMCPHC com manding ocer. We have listened to our customers worldwide, and have developed a more user friendly page to navigate. e more peo ple that we can educate on Public Health, Navy Medicine, and ways to keep our forces t and healthy, the better our readiness is for the Navy. Visitors to the Web site will notice a fresh new look on the homepage specically designed to match NMCPHCs latest brand ing. NMCPHCs Web content has been revised and will continue to be updated, reecting the commands most recent strategic initiatives. We designed the web site to fa cilitate easy access to our programs which are aligned to support joint ness, value, and readiness, said Capt. Wes Farr, NMCPHC executive ocer and project champion. e Web site homepage also fea tures news and alerts for the latest information relating to Navy Medicine, public health and operational preventive medicine. According to Cmdr. Denise Ge chas, NMCPHC director for Popu lation Health, the public Web site is one of the most important outreach tools available to communicate with customers and leadership. We designed the site to make it an easy to use one-stop-shop for all our customers health promotion and wellness needs, Gechas said. Integration of social media will play a large part in content sharing as well as engaging customers and stakeholders. A mobile version of the website is also available, enabling users to ac cess content conveniently from their smart-phones. Customers will be able to provide feedback and ask questions through the Ask Us tab at the top of the homepage. Queries will be directed to the ap propriate subject matter expert for timely resolution. NMCPHC will also employ a Web analytics tool for tracking and ana lyzing Web trac. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible ben eciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission sup port aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld.Navy-Marines retool health Web site Health Family planning key to career success CSADD How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatali ties associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and conse quences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous condi tions unless personnel conscien tiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be re ported, no matter how small, to pre vent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the En terprise Safety Applications Man agement System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in report ing a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety of ce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety

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port garnishment. In some cases, parent hood also can cause an unexpected and undesired increase in personal responsibilities. Benning, who helped spearhead the initial cre ation of CSADD, believes the peer-to-peer education emphasis of CSADD will help ensure Sailors succeed in their family planning goals, whenever they de cide to take on the respon sibility of having a child. Family e United States Postal Service recently sent out a mandate that all let ter mail being shipped to overseas military installa tions be addressed with a nine-digit zip code, start ing January 2013. e policy change came with an upgrade to USPSs mail sorting system and the opening of an addi tional centralized gateway for receiving and shipping all government mail. e USPS is asking anyone sending letters to service members at overseas bases to label them with a nine-digit zip code, said Chief Logistic Specialist Jimmy Jimenez, leading chief petty ocer of the Naval Support Ac tivity Naples Capodichino post oce. is change accompanied the opening of a centralized gateway at OHare to take some of the stress o of John F. Kennedy International Airport, which used to be the sole routing hub for govern ment mail. e new mail sorting system will enable mail to be delivered and sorted quicker by giving the sort ing machines another way to divide up the mail. e new address format will include the box number as a four digit number at the end of the zip code. For ex ample: John Smith PSC 999 Box 82 FPO AE 09622-0082 e new system will make it so that everything is already sorted when it gets here, said Jimenez. is means we dont have to spend hours sort ing baskets full of mail, and we can put it directly into the boxes. Naval Station Mayport held a groundbreaking ceremony Jan. 9 to commence its base-wide ex pansion project. e project includes improvements on several avenues on base in order to improve base capacity as well as the safety of the specic intersections. Not only are these im provements going to pro vide safer vehicular and pedestrian trac, but it also shows the Navys commitment to Mayport remaining a vital Navy hub well into the future, said NAVSTA Mayports Public Aairs Ocer, Chief Mass Communication Specialist William H. Townsend. e current two-lane roads and four-way stop intersections are being transformed into boulevard-style roadways with two-lanes in each direc tion that are then going to be divided by a raised median. is project that were working on here with the Navy is our single most important project in the Department of Defense arena, said Pond and Company architect Mi chael Panczykowski. is is a major roadway im provement on a signicant corridor on NAVSTA Mayport. Its an honor to work alongside the United States Navy. e Navy has big plans for the future of Naval Station Mayport. e base is strategically located and plays a major role in the Navys sea pow er capabilities. e Department of De fense and the Department of the Navy are voting with their checkbook. What theyre voting on is the strategic importance and the vital nature of NAVSTA Mayport, said Capt. Doug las Cochrane, NAVSTA Mayport commanding ocer. is is the only military road project that is taking place in the Navy right now. By 2020 youre going to see nearly twenty thousand people on this installation as well as over 20 warships and a tremendously bright future for NAVSTA Mayport. Since its commissioning in December 1942, May port has grown to become the third largest naval sur face eet concentration area in the United States.Mayport project to expand roads New requirements for foreign base mail ence of our Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines and civilians spans far beyond our fence line, benet ting not only our own and our families but also our neighbors in St. Marys, Kingsland and beyond, said Capt. Harvey Guey Jr., commanding ocer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e award recognizes commands with the best overall community service programs that teach and encourage individuals, especially youth, to lead a healthy and active lives. Our receipt of this pres tigious award is a testa ment to the tremendous eorts of the personnel of Team Kings Bay on a daily basis, Guey said. Im always pleased when the men and women of SUB ASE, military and civilian, are recognized for their hard work and dedica tion. e Health, Safety and Fitness program features Navy volunteers who visit schools and neighbor hoods to share information that focuses on nu trition, hygiene, mental health, disease prevention, leisure skills development, personal safety, drug demand reduction, sports and recreation. e overall goal of the program is to foster and nurture community ties with the Navy. It helps promote volunteerism for service members while developing better Navy leaders through experience. e Navy Communi ty Service Program was launched in 1992 by then Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Frank B. Kelso and is sponsored by the Naval Education and Training Command and executed by the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center. Award THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 Patroling Afghanistan Photos by Sgt. 1st Class Abram Pinningtonn, USA and Sgt. Pete Thibodeau, USMC

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5 Plans changed from summer to springAfghan forces will take the lead for security throughout Afghanistan this spring rather than at mid-year, President Barack Obama announced at a White House news conference Jan. 11. Obama and Afghan President Hamid Karzai spoke following White House meetings. e Afghan president emphasized that the num ber of American forces that will remain in Af ghanistan after the NATO mission concludes at the end of 2014 is not crucial. Numbers are not go ing to make a dierence to the situation in Afghanistan, Karzai said. Its the broader relationship that will make a dierence to Afghanistan and beyond in the region. e specif ics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and Afghanistan will have no particular concern when we are talking of numbers and how they are deployed. Afghan forces will be in the lead sooner than planned, Obama said. U.S. and NATO forces have been training Afghan police and soldiers, who have progressed to the point where they are able to take the lead, Obama said. We are able to meet those goals and acceler ate them somewhat, he said. Whats going to happen this spring is that Afghans will be in the lead throughout the country. U.S. forces will still be in the ght, the president said. It does mean, though, that Afghans will have taken the lead and our presence, the nature of our work, will be dier ent, he said. We will be in a training, assisting, advis ing role. is will lead to a re sponsible end to the war in Afghanistan by the end of 2014, the president said. is progress is only pos sible because of the in credible sacrices of our troops and our diplomats, the forces of our many coalition partners, and the Afghan people, whove en dured extraordinary hard ship, he added. Obama noted that more than 2,000 Americans have been killed in Af ghanistan since the war began in 2001, and tens of thousands have been wounded. ese are patriots that we honor today, tomor row, and forever, the pres ident said. e president prom ised that the number of U.S. service members in Afghanistan will continue to drop over the next year. Some 66,000 Americans are deployed to the nation now. Ive pledged well con tinue to bring our forces home at a steady pace, he said. And in the com ing months, Ill announce the next phase of our drawdown, a responsible drawdown that protects the gains our troops have made. Karzai and Obama discussed the still to be worked out bilateral security agreement between the two nations. Part of this is a status of forces agreement, which will protect American ser vice members. Both said they think an agreement is possible this year. In the woods of central Virginia around Fort Pickett recently, the Legged Squad Support System four-legged robot has been showing o its capabilities during eld test ing. Working with the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory, researchers from DAR PAs LS3 program demon strated new advances in the robots control, stability and maneuverability, including Leader Follow decision making, enhanced roll recovery, exact foot placement over rough terrain, the ability to maneuver in an urban en vironment, and verbal command capability. e LS3 program seeks to demonstrate that a highly mobile, semi-autonomous legged robot can carry 400 pounds of a squads equipment, follow squad members through rugged terrain and interact with troops in a nat ural way similar to a trained animal with its handler. e robot could also be able to maneuver at night and serve as a mobile aux iliary power source to the squad, so troops can re charge batteries for radios and handheld devices while on patrol. is was the rst time DARPA and MCWL were able to get LS3 out on the testing grounds together to simulate military-relevant training conditions, Lt. Col. Joseph Hitt, DARPA program manager, said. e robots performance in the eld ex panded on our expectations, demonstrating, for example, how voice commands and follow the leader capabil ity would enhance the ro bots ability to interact with warghters. We were able to put the robot through di cult natural terrain and test its ability to right itself with minimal interaction from humans. Video from the testing shows the robot negotiat ing diverse terrain including ditches, streams, wooded slopes and simulated urban environments. e video also shows the map the LS3 perception sys tem creates to determine the path it takes. e December testing at Fort Pickett is the rst in a se ries of planned demonstrations that will test the robots capabilities across dierent environments as development continues through the rst half of 2014. e DARPA platform developer for the LS3 sys tem is Boston Dynamics of Waltham, Mass. More than 5,000 ser vice members from ac tive, Guard and Reserve components of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and other federal, state and lo cal agencies will take part in the nations 57th Presi dential Inauguration Jan 21. e Department of Defense, through U.S. Northern Command and its Joint Task Force-National Capital Region, is providing military ceremo nial support to inaugural events. JTF-NCR will co ordinate all U.S. military support during the 10-day inaugural period Jan. 15 to 24. e inaugural period is a large-scale cooperative eort among federal, state and local agencies its a great opportunity for our Airmen to work in a joint-interagency environment, said Air Force District of Washington Commander Maj. Gen. Sharon K.G. Dunbar who also serves as the 320th Air Expeditionary Wing commander. Air Combat Command activated the 320 AEW on April 9 as the Air Force Component Headquarters to JTF-NCR. e 320th AEW is providing an array of support including command and control, communications, inter-agency liaison, lo gistics, engineering, legal, and contingency re sponse. e U.S. military has participated in this important American tradi tion since April 30, 1789, when members of the U.S. Army, local militia units and Revolutionary War veterans escorted George Washington to his rst in auguration ceremony at Federal Hall in New York City. Military support for the inauguration is designed to honor the Commanderin-Chief, recognize civil ian control of the military and celebrate democracy. It has been a privilege to work with the great group of folks here at JTF-NCR Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, Coast Guardsmen who are all doing phenomenal work, said Air Force Re serve Brig. Gen. James P. Scanlon, JTF-NCR deputy commander for inaugural support. AFDW also provides personnel, legal, chaplain, nance, logistics, medical, and safety support for des ignated Air Force activities located within the NCR as well as for select Field Operating Agencies and Air Force elements worldwide on a daily basis. is responsibility en tails support for approximately 40,000 Air Force military and civilian per sonnel in more than 2,000 Air Force elements at 500 locations in some 108 countries. Military to play role in presidential inauguration Midshipmen to marchEighty-seven members of the Naval Academys 24th Company will proudly march in the 57th Presi dential Inaugural parade in Washington Jan. 21. e 24th Company was chosen to participate in the parade due to its status as the Brigades Color Company. e Academys Color Company competition is a tradition that began in 1867 and recognizes the su perior performing company based on exceptional academic, athletic, and military professional perfor mance. irty companies make up the Naval Academys student body, which is referred to as the Brigade of Midshipmen. Midshipmen representing 29 states will march in the parade with the 24th Company, which is led by Midshipman 1st Class (senior) Ryan Hagelin, 21, from Hamburg, N.Y. We are honored to be invited to participate in such an important event, said Hagelin, 24th Com pany commander Im personally very excited to march in the parade. As a company, we have prac ticed several times in order to prepare. is is one of many experiences that make the Naval Academy a truly special place to develop into a leader. Founded in 1845, the Naval Academy is a presti gious four-year service academy that prepares mid shipmen morally, mentally and physically to be professional ocers in the naval service. More than 4,400 men and women representing every state in the U.S. and several foreign countries make up the student body, known as the Brigade of Midshipmen. U.S. News and World Reports has recognized the Naval Academy as a top ve undergraduate en gineering school and a top 20 best liberal arts col lege. Upon graduation, midshipmen earn a federally funded Bachelor of Science degree in a choice of 23 dierent subject majors and go on to serve at least ve years of service as commissioned ocers in the Navy or Marine Corps. Robomule runs more trialsAfghan security forces accelerate taking control e mission objective to prevent al-Qaida from us ing Afghanistan to launch attacks against the United States is within reach, President Barack Obama said in his weekly address to the nation Jan. 12. is week, I welcomed [Afghanistan] President Hamid Karzai to the White House to discuss the way ahead in Afghanistan, Obama said in his ad dress. And today, I want to update you on how we will end this war, bring our troops home, and con tinue the work of rebuilding America. e president thanked U.S. service members, noting the United States has dealt devastating blows to al-Qaida and ejected the Taliban from their strongholds in the past four years. Obama said the 33,000 additional forces he or dered to Afghanistan served with honor, completed their mission, and returned home last fall as prom ised. is week, [President Karzai and I] agreed that this spring, Afghan forces will take the lead for se curity across the entire country and our troops will shift to a support role, Obama said. In the coming months, Ill announce the next phase of our draw down. By the end of next year, Americas war in Af ghanistan will be over. Obama gave credit for the progress made in Af ghanistan to the heroic sacrices of our troops and diplomats, alongside forces from many other na tions. More than a half-million Americans, military and civilian, have served in Afghanistan, the president said, noting thousands of have been wounded and more than 2,000 have given their lives. And, the drawdown in Afghanistan remains a challenge, he said. is remains a very dicult mission, Obama said. e work ahead will not be easy. Our forces are still in harms way. But make no mistake, our path is clear, and we are moving forward. Now, the United States must care for our troops and veterans who fought in our name, the presi dent said.Obama: Mission within reach

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Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Jan. 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? is workshop can help you de velop a realistic spending plan and family budget. It will be 9 to 11 a.m., Jan. 23. Call 573-4513 for more information.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 to 25. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of manag ing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 22. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29is two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include ne gotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing and high-pressure sales tactics. is training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops tion. He also braved re to recover several fallen com rades. Romeshas eorts enabled Bravo Troop, 3d Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, to regroup and ght o a force that greatly outnumbered them, ac cording to reports. At the time he was a section leader with Bravo Troop, which was part of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, in Afghanistan. Romesha separated from the Army April 4, 2011. He and his family currently live in Minot, N.D. He is married to Tamara Romesha and they have three children; Dessi, Gwen, and Colin. Romesha enlisted in the Army in September 1999 as an M1 armor crewman. After completion of training at Fort Knox, Ky., he was assigned as a tank gunner with B Compa ny, 1-63rd Armor, Camp Vilseck, Germany. His tour there included an operational deploy ment to Kosovo. After Germany, he was assigned as a gunner/as sistant tank commander with A Company, 2-72nd Armor, Camp Casey, Ko rea. Following Korea, which included a combat tour to Iraq, he was assigned as a section leader with 3-61st Cavalry, Fort Car son, Colo. ere he com pleted the Long Range Reconnaissance Course, Advanced Leader Course, and Air Assault Training. His military decorations include the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Iraq Cam paign Medal with three Campaign Stars, Bronze Star Medal, three Army Commendation Medals, Purple Heart, ve Army Achievement Medals, Val orous Unit Award, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Kosovo Campaign Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, Non Commis sioned Ocer Profes sional Development Ribbon with Numeral 2, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with Numeral 5, NATO Medal with Bronze Service Star and the Combat Action Badge. Medal Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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e Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip is Saturday, Jan. 26, and leave the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Un leashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault ri e w/all day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. eres a special $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends to gether for a full day of live ac tion. For more information con tact NAU at (912) 573-9869. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, start ing at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 9. All participants are wel come. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Winter Basketball League Registration is open now at the Fitness Complex. Plays begins Jan. 28. Team fee is $100 for active duty and $200 for DoD. Captains meeting is 5 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 23 in the Fitness Classroom. For more info call (912) 409-1611. Super Bowl 2013 Party at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more information call (912) 573-4548. 2nd Annual My Little Valentine Father & Daughter Dance Its 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a flower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel office. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be dertmined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur Jan. 18, Ice Age: Continental Drift Jan. 19 and 20, Where the Wild ings Are Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Airso shooting trip Jan. 26 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Wasnt that a thrill? The Divisional Round of the NFL playoffs had me on the end of my seat with outstanding Denver-Baltimore and Seattle-Atlanta matchups. I asked who would reach the Super Bowl and who would win last Thursday, prior to those games. I asked the same question Sept. 6 at the start of the season. Trident Training Facilitys MM3 Paul Ouma picked Ravens over the Falcons, so hes still in the running too. My pick? Pats over Packers. Im toast too. FT1 Martin Garza Trident Training Facility Temple, Texas Seattle and Denver. Seattle will win because Im a standup NFC fan and Marshawn Lynch is a beast. FT1 Barry Boyd Trident Training Facility Jacksonville, Fla. The Broncos and 49ers. The Broncos will win because Peyton Manning is the best quarterback of all time. MA3 Sean Lampley Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Tampa, Fla. If its not my Bucs, I dont care. Lance Cpl. David Waterfield Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Suffolk, Va. The Pats and 49ers. Hopefully my Pats will win. Pats Nation! Our defense hasnt played that well, but we have a remarkable offense with Tom Brady. MM3 ordell Erskine USS Rhode Island Blue Irvington, N.J. Denver and Seattle. Seattle will win because Denver cant stop Marshawn Lynch and Seattles defense is air tight. MTSA Austin Greig Trident Training Facility Villisca, Iowa Green Bay and Houston. Green Bay, because weve already beaten Houston, we have a lot of injured players back and have been building toward the playoffs. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho George Washington was the Navys rst SSBN and, with her inception, submarines became a vital linchpin in the nuclear triad. Ballistic missile submarines groundbreaking capabilities would forever transform the U.S.s land, air, and maritime forces. With George Washingtons entry into service in December 1959, the U.S. Navy instantly gained a powerful deterrence weapon a stealth platform with enormous nuclear repower. As the rst SSBN, George Washingtons innovative con cept and capabilities advanced Navy ballistic missile systems, paved the way for the rotating two-crew concept, foreshad owed the model of forward presence as a key part of U.S. maritime strategy, and laid the ground work for our present day SSBN to guided missile subma rine conversions. e third ship named after the rst U.S. president and com mander-in-chief of the Continental Army embodied the ide als put forth by her namesake. George Washington believed as early as the Revolutionary War that, In any operations, and under all circumstances a decisive Naval superiority is to be considered as a fundamental USS George Washington, the rst Boomer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Pirates Cove menus Brig. Gen. Margaret A. Brewer, the rst woman to be promoted to briga dier general in the Marine Corps, passed away Jan. 2. After successfully com pleting two six-week of cer candidate-training sessions, the University of Michigan graduate ac cepted an appointment as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in March 1952. Like thou sands of Marines today, she joined amidst a war the Korean War. Early in her career, the Durand, Mich., native made strides to integrate female Marines into the male-dominated Corps. Brewer was one of the rst women subsequent to World War II trained in communications. From 1956 to 1958, then Capt. Brewer served as commanding ocer of the woman Marine companies at Norfolk, Va., and Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. Brewer spent three years at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., where she oversaw the operation of the mess clubs and was promoted to major in 1961. In 1963, Brewer re turned to Quantico to serve as the executive of cer and later commanding ocer of the Woman Ocer School. In 1966, Brewer trans ferred to 6th Marine Corps District in Atlanta to be the public aairs ocer and was subsequently promoted to lieutenant colonel, the most senior rank women could hold at the time. President Lyndon B. Johnson repealed Public Law 90-130 Nov. 8, 1967, removing the limit on the number of women in ser vice and granted women promotion to colonel. Brewer returned to Quantico in 1971 to serve as assistant to the direc tor, and chief of the sup port department for the Marine Corps Education Center. In 1973, Brewer became the seventh and nal di rector of Women Marines, advising the commandant and his sta on matters pertaining to women in the Marine Corps. Separate women Ma rine companies were disbanded, and women became eligible for careertype formal and technical training and to obtain the rank of sergeant major. Brewer played a crucial role as the Corps began to develop regulations for pregnancy and parent hood. e most controversial of the recommendations pertained to the establishment of a pilot program to assign women to the Fleet Marine Forces.e pilot program, which consisted of sending 10 to 20 female Marines to the 1st Marine Division and 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing respectively, was deemed successful, and female Marines have served alongside their male counterparts ever since. In 1978, while serving as the deputy director of the Division of Information at Headquarters Marine Corps, then President Jimmy Carter nominated her for appointment to brigadier general. e Corps was the last of the services to appoint a female ag of cer. Brewer made history May 11, 1978, as she be came the rst female general ocer in the Corps. She passed away at the age of 82.First female Marine General dies at 82 e Center for Security Forces an nounced Jan. 13 that the fourth installment to its list of apprenticeship trades is now available to Sailors for open enrollment. e new Armory Technician Appren ticeship Trade is available to Sailors, E-4 and above, who serve in a broad range of ratings such as Gunners Mate, Master-AtArms, Special Warfare Operator, and more. is is an apprentice level trade appli cable to personnel who store, inventory, issue, receive and maintain records on assigned arms, ammunition and explo sives, said Jose Bautista, Master-At-Arms programs manager at CENSECFOR. Sailors can enroll in this new Depart ment of Labor-approved apprenticeship trade by visiting United Services Military Apprenticeship Program online and se lect the Enroll/Reinstate link to begin. Bautista went on to point out that this is probably the only apprenticeship trade that covers multiple ratings and provides sailors with improved skills and compe tencies. A Sailor must also possess NEC [Naval Enlisted Classication Code] 0812, 0814, 9525, or 9536, he said. Sailors who successfully complete the required 2000 hours of documented ex perience will earn the distinction of be ing an Armory Technician. e level of experience covers six select skill areas such as maintenance, inven tory control, security, and safety just to name a few. USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized appren ticeship programs that result in journey man-level certicates of completion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. During their apprentice ship, service members document their military duties while working in their rat ing or military occupational specialty. Bautista also alluded to the next wave of apprenticeship trades to be released as being the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship and the Military Working Dog Apprenticeship. e package for the Criminal Investi gator Apprenticeship is currently pend ing DOL approval with an anticipated release sometime this spring or summer. New apprenticeship opens 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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e Central Intellegence Agencys Historical Collections Division recently presented declassied information on hot-button Cold War events at the 44th Annual Association of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies con vention in New Orleans, La. Participating in academic conferences is one way CIA showcases its contributions to national security and shares insight into the workings of gov ernment. Session chair A. Ross Johnson, a research fellow at the Hoover Institu tion and a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, identied criteria for evaluating histori cal intelligence reports: What do they add to what we know? How prescient were these at the time? And, most importantly, how well did they inform the policymakers? ose questions formed the backbone of the dis cussions that followed, as each CIA case study was brought to life by an ana lyst who had contributed to the original reporting: Peter Nyren, a 25-year Soviet and Russian intelligence analyst, described the role intelligence played in forming Presi dent Ronald Reagans policy toward the USSR. Contrary to urban leg end, said Nyren, Reagan was an avid consumer of intelligence. He was also the rst president to re ceive CIA-produced video briengs, which included intelligence about the So viet space program and the Chernobyl disaster. John Bird, a 32-year vet eran analyst of Soviet mili tary issues at the CIA, ex plained the diculties the Agency faced in the late 1950s gauging the number of intercontinental ballistic missiles the Soviet Union had. We lived in an infor mation void, he said, cit ing the lack of internal Soviet sources and the unreliability of available analyses. e creation of satellite reconnaissance enabled the Agency to dispel concerns over the Soviet Unions reportedly superior missile capacity. Bird said the perception of a missile gap, as it was called, existed in part because Khrushchev had been blung! One of the best sources of intelligence reporting about the Soviet Union during the Cold War came from Polish military o cer Colonel Ryszard Kuk linski. He passed to the CIA approximately 40,000 documents over 9 years. He had access to al most all Soviet Pact intelli gence, said Terry Bender, a former CIA intelligence analyst who specialized in East European issues for 30 years. is was an unabashed success story. Bender also discussed the challenges in deter mining the likelihood of Poland implementing martial law, which was ultimately done on December 13, 1981. Panelist Mark Kramer, director of the Harvard University Cold War Stud ies Program and a Senior Fellow at Harvards Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, ad dressed the charge that the CIA failed to predict the collapse of the Soviet Union, a claim Nyren said is not borne out by the growing body of declassied reports revealing what the CIA was telling policy makers about the state of the Soviet Union. e CIA provided an excellent picture of what was going on in the Soviet Union. e Agency didnt have a Kuklinski in the So viet Union, but it did make great use of information from various sources, Kramer said. Intel examines Cold War issues e commander of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet, spent an afternoon addressing a contingent of Naval Post graduate School Information Dominance Corps students during an allhands call on the university campus, Jan. 8. Vice Adm. Mi chael S. Rogers spoke about the important role the IDC has in todays cyber-dependent world, and the important role education and training play in achieving the nations cyber defense goals. He said that FCC/C10F has made signicant prog ress in promoting cyber situational awareness and integrating cyberspace operations into traditional maritime operations. To preserve the Navys cyber warghting advantage, we must continue to develop an elite workforce that is recruited, trained and educated to better understand the maritime environment, employ the latest technology advanc es, and deliver cyber warf ighting capability anywhere around the world, Rogers said. Rogers recognized that there were still substan tial challenges to over come due to the inherent characteristics and rapid technological change of the eld. He noted that the cyber community was making signicant prog ress in eecting changes and improvements to the eld, but it was up to ev ery member in the IDC to take steps to continue with these goals. Rogers emphasized the importance of training and educating the next generation of cyber war riors to tackle the chal lenges of the future. I want us to be pre pared for the challenges of the future, Rogers said. But its up to you to be come the solution, to take charge of our future and face those challenges. He also said it is im perative to maintain a highly motivated and highly trained force that can tackle any challenge that may arise, and talked about the critical role NPS oers its students to suc ceed in these eorts. Monterey oers you a unique opportunity to learn and challenge yourselves, Rogers said. e Center for Excellence is an outstanding resource and knowl edge base for you to take benet from, I urge you to take advantage of your time here and maximize your learning experience. e Center for Excel lence Rogers referred to is NPS Information Domi nance Center for Excel lence, led by Executive Di rector Cmdr. Tim Unrein. NPS has been imple menting educational and research programs to help the Navy achieve the knowledge and skill base required for its IDC goals. Cyber boss addresses to Info class 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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principle upon which ev ery hope of success must ultimately depend. e words of General Washington remain true for todays maritime strat egy and were perhaps most realized in the capa bilities of his third namesake vessel. Electric Boat Co., in Groton, Conn., began con struction on George Wash ington originally an attack submarine named Scorpion in 1957. However, the name changed when the Navy inserted a 130-foot missile section aft of the bow and nished George Washington as the lead ship in the class of SSBNs. Mrs. Robert B. Anderson helped commission the boat on Dec. 30, 1959. In total, George Washington had a length of 381.6 feet, beam of 33.1 feet, draft of 28.9 feet and a displacement of approximately 6,700 tons submerged. It carried 16 vertical tubes for Polaris A-1 mis siles and six 21 inch tor pedo tubes. e crew of 12 ocers and 128 enlisted men would assert the U.S.s new strategic mis sion of nuclear deterrence from under the sea. Missile system advancement Nearly two decades before George Washingtons conception English author Herbert George H.G. Wells predicted the devel opment of long-range air torpedoes with directional apparatus that would for ever change the shape of conventional warfare. e rst successful tests of a submarine-based launch platform for guid ed missiles occurred in Germany on U-boats dur ing World War II with Ger man V1 rockets. is new era of guided missiles encouraged the U.S. Navy to develop the Regulus guided cruise mis sile program. e Regulus program was initially suc cessful. However, after its implementation, the Navy quickly discovered a ma jor drawback of the missile launch system. In order to launch a Regulus missile, the submarine needed to surface and remain sur faced during the launch. Unfortunately, submarines were very vulnerable to attacks during surface launches, and could not launch a fully or partially fueled missile on deck without serious hazards to the safety of the crew and the boat. erefore, in 1959 the U.S. Navy asked Lockheed, currently Lockheed Mar tin, to begin developing the Polaris two-stage sol id-fuel nuclear-armed, a submarine-launched ballistic missile that would replace the Regulus missile on Navy submarines. George Washington and her Polaris missiles provided a novel stealth capability. She was the rst submarine that could remain submerged and safely hidden from recon naissance satellites during launch. At the time, this nearly guaranteed her immunity from a rst or re taliatory strike. George Washington was equipped with the rst version of the Polaris A-1 missiles. Polaris A-1s were two-stage solid propellant missiles developed years ahead of schedule under the leadership of Rear Adm. W. F. Red Raborn, who would later become the seventh director of the Central Intelligence Agency. A-1s had a length of 28.5 feet, a body diameter of 54 in., and a launch weight of 28,800 lbs. A-1s had a range of 1,200 nautical miles, a Mk 1 re-entry ve hicle and carried a single W-47-Y1 600kT nuclear warhead with an iner tial guidance system that provided a circular error probability of 6000 ft. On July 20, 1960, George Washington conduct ed the rst submerged launch of the Polaris A-1 missile system at the At lantic Missile Test Range in Cape Canaveral, Fla., with Rear Adm. Raborn on board as an observer. Following the suc cessful launch, at 12:39 p.m., George Washingtons commanding ocer sent President Dwight D. Eisenhower notication of this historic achievement. Less than two hours later, another missile from the submerged submarine successfully launched on another impact area 1,100 miles down range. George Washington helped to forever tilt the scales of nuclear strike ca pability in Americas favor. Two-crew concept In addition to her innovative missile power, George Washington paved the way for the SSBN rotating twocrew concept. On July 1, 1958, Submarine Squadron Fourteen was established under the command of Capt. Norvell G. Ward to de velop operational doctrine before the commissioning of George Washington and future SSBNs. SUBRON-14 originally consisted of a submarine tender, a oating dry dock and one or two work space and berthing barges and was located at U.S. Naval Base, Holy Loch, Scotland. SUBRON-14 was re sponsible for the training, equipping and adminis tering of the rst SSBNs. One of the squadrons earliest and most notable achievements was its landmark development of the two-crew concept. is unique system provided two crews on a single SSBN, a Blue and a Gold crew, which would take alternate turns on pa trols. Each crew deployed for 180 days per year. While one crew was on patrol, the other would take its leave before deploying on its subsequent patrol. e deployment sched ule for both crews proved to be highly conducive for training during o time and allowed crewmembers to spend more time with fam ily before deployment. Following successful launch of the Polaris mis siles, George Washington and her Blue crew re turned to Cape Canaveral to pick up her Gold crew under the command of Cmdr. John L. From, Jr. Next, the crew dupli cated earlier successes by launching two more mis siles while submerged. On Aug. 30, 1960, shake down for the Gold crew ended and the Boomer went underway from Gro ton, Conn., on Oct. 28, 1960, for Charleston, S.C. to load her 16 Polaris missiles. In Charleston, George Washington and the Gold crew were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. After which, the Blue crew, under the command of Cmdr. James B. Osborn, took the boat on its rst deterrent patrol. On Jan. 21, 1961, George Washington completed the rst patrol at New Lon don, Conn., after 66 days of submerged running. e Gold crew then took over and she departed on the second patrol on Feb. 14, 1961. George Washington returned to Holy Loch on April 25, 1961 after its sec ond patrol. It remained forward deployed through 1964, alternating between Blue and Gold crews. In 1965 the boat re turned stateside for over haul and refueling by Electric Boat Co., in Gro ton, Conn., before resum ing deterrent patrols out of Holy Loch. Model of forward presence Although it was a suc cessful system, the Polaris A-1 missile had one limit: distance. With a range limit of 1,200 nautical miles, it was necessary to develop forward deployed submarine bases. Holy Loch served as a prime example of a for ward deployed base be cause its strategic geogra phy reduced transit times to and from SSBN submerged patrol areas. Holy Loch enabled SSBNs to achieve greater operational eciencies and resulted in SUB RON-14 rapidly expanding during the 1960s. SUBRON-14s success demonstrated proof of the concept of a forward de ployed strategic deterrent. George Washington proved that ballistic mis sile technology was mature and reliable. Com bined, they paved the way for the U.S. Navy to launch 40 additional SSBNs from 1960 to 1966. Dubbed the 41 for Free dom, these submarines in cluded the George Wash ington, USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608), USS Lafayette (SSBN-616), USS James Madison (SSBN-627), and USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640)classes. By actively promoting a policy of deterrence, these boats were instrumental in making sure that the relationship between the U.S. and the Soviet Union did not end in a nuclear catastrophe. e rst SSBN conversion e evolution of nuclear arms control forced the U.S. to make decisions about what to do with strategic platforms that were no longer needed in their primary mission, yet had not reached the end of their designed hull life. As the rst SSBN to un dergo a complete conver sion to an attack subma rine, George Washington was a pioneer to another class of submarines, the guided missile submarine (SSGN). After the inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon on Jan. 20, 1969, the Soviet Union oered to negotiate their nuclear arms control position. e U.S. accepted and together both nations implemented the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks from 1969 to 1972, which froze the number of intercontinental ballistic mis siles and replaced older missiles with newer ones. e reduction in mis siles was part of a larger post-Cold War nuclear disarmament that continued through 1982, when U.S. President Ronald Reagan abandoned SALT I and implemented the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. START put a further re duction on nuclear weapons by placing a cap on 1,600 strategic nuclear delivery vehicles and permitting only 6,000 ac countable warheads for each country. To stay within the limi tations imposed by START and to prevent unneces sary decommissionings, George Washington and two others in her class, USS Patrick Henry (SSBN599) and USS Robert E. Lee (SSBN-601), had their missiles removed and were reclassied as at tack submarines, allowing each to serve for several additional years. e redesign and reclas sication of these three submarines to extend their service life and con tribute to changing na val warghting missions pioneered the conversion years later of Ohio-class SSBNs to SSGNs. In 1994, under the ad ministration of President William J. Clinton, the Nu clear Posture Review rec ommended a two-ocean based Trident SSBN force 14 vessels in all to carry TRIDENT II (D-5) missiles. TRIDENT II (D5) missiles, rst deployed in 1990, were the sixth and latest version of bal listic missiles. ey were a modern improvement to the dated Polaris A-1 missiles carried by George Washington. e two-ocean based force met U.S. national security requirements un der Strategic Oensive Re ductions Treaty, which in 2004 was the latest of mu tual nuclear disarmament agreements between the U.S. and Russia. One of the provisions in SORT required the U.S. Navy to remove four Tri dent Ohio-class subma rines from strategic ser vice. Following George Washingtons example, four Ohio-class SSBNs underwent conversions to extend their service life and add special opera tions and strike capability. In 2002, Electric Boat received a contract to con vert the rst four Ohioclass submarines, USS Ohio (SSBN-726), USS Michigan (SSBN-727), USS Florida (SSBN-728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729), into conventional land attack and special forces (SOF) platforms, also known as guided mis sile submarines or SSGNs. e conversion process, ending successfully in 2008, allowed the Ohioclass submarines to suc ceed in their new form, and illustrated the Navys resourcefulness in maximizing submarine plat forms throughout available hull life. Just as George Wash ington dominated U.S. maritime strategy in 1960, todays Ohio-class SSGNs provide an unprecedented combination of Strike and SOF mission capability within a stealthy platform. e Navys adaptability and ingenuity in redesign ing SSBNs, starting with George Washington, continues to inuence and support Americas power ful presence at sea. Conclusion George Washington was a submarine of rsts. Its unique conception and innovative capabilities provided the Navy with a new missile system to promote nuclear deterrence, fostered the creation of the two-crew concept, promoted the model of for ward presence, and paved the way for recent SSBN to SSGN conversions. George Washingtons historic patrols were a principle element that helped deter nuclear war between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Its legacy continues; the U.S. Navys SSBN force is the survivable element of the U.S. nuclear triad. At present, there are 18 ballistic missile subma rines in the eet provid ing the U.S. with a decisive nuclear deterrent, an ac complishment that would have made their namesake proud. First THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13



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No injuries, little damage in accidentNo one was hurt when the periscope on USS Jacksonville (SSN 699), a Los Angeles-class submarine, struck a vessel while operating in the Arabian Gulf Jan. 10 at approximately 5 a.m. local time. Jacksonville surfaced from periscope depth to ascertain if there was any damage to the unidentied vessel. e vessel continued on a consistent course and speed oering no indication of distress or acknowledgement of a collision. Damage appears to be limited to one of Jacksonvilles two periscopes. e reactor remains in a safe condition, there was no damage to the propulsion plant systems and there is no concern regarding watertight integrity. A U.S. P-3 Orion aircraft conducted a search of the area and saw no debris in the water or vessels in distress. e airborne search of the area is complete. e incident is under investigation. Jacksonville is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibil ity. Navy-wide award for Health, Safety, and Fitness Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay was recognized for community service excellence Dec. 14 as the Health, Safety, and Fitness Flagship award winner for large shore command calendar year 2012. This award is particularly pleas ing as it demonstrates that the influ Up Periscope NFL playoffs: See who picked the winners Page 9 On patrol Out in the field in Afghanistan Page 4 The first USS George Washington blazed Boomer trail Page 9Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay cited for service USS Rhode Island (Blue) at work Soldier earns highest tributeSta Sgt. Clinton Romesha to receive Medal of HonorPresident Barack Obama announced Jan. 11 that former Army Sta Sgt. Clinton L. Romesha will receive the Medal of Honor Feb. 11 for his actions in Afghanistan. Romesha will be the fourth living recipient to be awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq or Afghanistan. He and his family will join the president at the White House for the award. e sta sergeant helped repel an enemy attack of some 300 ghters who outnumbered the defenders of Combat Outpost Keating in Nuristan Province, Afghanistan. e Soldiers awoke Oct. 3, 2009 to nd the enemy occupying the high ground surrounding their combat outpost. Romesha braved intense enemy re to mobilize a ve-man team, according to sources who were there. He reportedly took out an enemy machine-gun team and while engaging a second, the generator he was using for cover was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, inicting him with shrapnel wounds. Yet he continued to ght. He directed air support that destroyed more than 30 Taliban ghters and personally took out several other enemy positions, according to reports. He provided covering re and helped three of his wounded comrades to reach the aid sta (Its) a testament to the tremendous effort of the personnel of Team Kings Bay ... Capt. Harvey L. Guffey, Jr. CO, NSB Kings Bay Sub periscope strikes vessel

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 e Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions will address the topic Planning a Family During Your Navy Career throughout the month of January. CSADD, whose motto is Ship mates Helping Shipmates, will provide information and training across the eet on resources available to Sailors considering parenthood, as well as information for Sailors who are already parents. We want you to continue your career in the Navy, and we want to make sure that child is cared for as well, said Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Fleet Master Chief Scott Benning. Its a holistic view of the whole situation, it is not about trying to tell someone not to have a family. Our leadership is focused on making sure that our Sailors and their families have the very best in resources. You can see that in housing, in medical facilities, and in the compensation that we have for our families. e CSADD topic is intended to facilitate an open discussion with Sailors about the many ways having a child can aect an individual Sailors life. e responsibilities of parenthood require consideration and planning for both men and women in uniform, as all naval service members are expected to balance the demands of a naval career with their family responsibilities. At the end of the day, if you want your child to be well taken care of, youve got to prepare, Benning said. You cant take childbirth lightly. Understand that your family does come rst, but that youll have commitments to taking care of that child, while serving your country and the contract youve signed to serve the Navy. At the end of the day that child has got to be well taken care of. While a woman could become pregnant at any time, pregnancy can cause less disruption during shore duty. Unplanned pregnancy on sea duty can disqualify a female Sailor from her current duty position, and possibly create a manning loss for her operational command. Ensuring Sailors understand the seriousness of becoming a parent can potentially make a big dierence to overall Navy mission readiness. Many times we are taught to separate our personal life from our professional life, but in reality the decisions we make can aect both, said Chief Operations Specialist Jessica Myers, senior enlisted advisor to the Navys Oce of Womens Policy. It is important that male and female service members, to the best of their ability, plan a pregnancy in order to successfully balance the demands of family responsibilities with their military obligations. According to the Navys most recent Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey, 74 percent of pregnancies in the Navy were unplanned. Of those unplanned pregnancies, only 31 percent were using birth control at the time they conceived. Furthermore, in 70 percent of enlisted pregnancies, the father was identied as being in the military. In the Navy, single parents make up 7.6 percent of the total number of service members with children. Additionally, there are approximately 84,000 dual military couples in our Navy, of which 36,000 have children. While some Sailors may intend to be single parents and thrive in that role, Januarys CSADD topic promotes discussion among men and women about the benets of planning a family. Unintended pregnancies can jeopardize operational mission readiness for both male and female service members, and can disrupt a naval career by causing unexpected nancial hardship, from the high cost of daycare to possible child supTHEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Kings Bay VITA starts Jan. 22e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay begins Jan. 22. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce located in the back of the oce at the library. ShipShape weight loss starts Jan. 24January is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutrition and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Retired issues Feb. 2 at NAS JaxA retired military seminar will be at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Ocers Club 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 2 to provide military retirees and their spouses information on a variety of topics. e following will be discussed: healthcare, veterans benets, long term care, Survivor Benet Plan, pay matters, assisted living, Delta Dental and other retiree issues. Military retirees from all branches of service and their spouses and those planning to retire in 2013 are invited to attend. For more information, call (904) 542-5790 or e-mail JAXS_NAS_ RAO@navy.mil. Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Vols sought for Wreath cleanup e Wreathes Across America program will pick up the wreaths that were placed at the Jacksonville National Cemetery during the 2012 WAA Remembrance program, Saturday, Jan. 19. WAA Location Leader Ralph Drem Terreault asks that those with pickup trucks and trailers be at the cemetery by 9 a.m. All others should arrive no earlier than 9:15 a.m. is years forecast is for mostly cloudy with a high around 65 degrees. e morning low will be around 50, with a 30 percent chance of rain. As with the wreath laying, clean up is a rain-orshine event. Remember to bring cheap gloves to handle the wreaths, sap is still running. If you have a strong wooden pole bring it to will help remove a number of wreaths at one time. If you will be bringing a utility trailer, send an e-mail www.WreathsAcrossAmericaJacksonville.com to so its known how many will help. Now hear this! e Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center announced the unveiling of its upgraded publiclyfacing Web site Jan. 8. e upgraded Web site www.med. navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/Pages/ Home.aspx features an improved search capability and optimized navigation to provide user-friendly access to the centers vast library of public health tools and resources. NMCPHC is excited about the upgrades to our Web site, said Capt. Mike Macinski, NMCPHC commanding ocer. We have listened to our customers worldwide, and have developed a more user friendly page to navigate. e more people that we can educate on Public Health, Navy Medicine, and ways to keep our forces t and healthy, the better our readiness is for the Navy. Visitors to the Web site will notice a fresh new look on the homepage specically designed to match NMCPHCs latest branding. NMCPHCs Web content has been revised and will continue to be updated, reecting the commands most recent strategic initiatives. We designed the web site to facilitate easy access to our programs which are aligned to support jointness, value, and readiness, said Capt. Wes Farr, NMCPHC executive ocer and project champion. e Web site homepage also features news and alerts for the latest information relating to Navy Medicine, public health and operational preventive medicine. According to Cmdr. Denise Gechas, NMCPHC director for Population Health, the public Web site is one of the most important outreach tools available to communicate with customers and leadership. We designed the site to make it an easy to use one-stop-shop for all our customers health promotion and wellness needs, Gechas said. Integration of social media will play a large part in content sharing as well as engaging customers and stakeholders. A mobile version of the website is also available, enabling users to access content conveniently from their smart-phones. Customers will be able to provide feedback and ask questions through the Ask Us tab at the top of the homepage. Queries will be directed to the appropriate subject matter expert for timely resolution. NMCPHC will also employ a Web analytics tool for tracking and analyzing Web trac. NMCPHC is part of the Navy Medicine team, a global health care network of 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high-quality health care to more than one million eligible beneciaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battleeld.Navy-Marines retool health Web site Health Family planning key to career success CSADD How many time have you been enjoying your favorite recreation or o-duty activity and by luck you avoided injury or property damage? O-duty activities are the No. 1 cause of injury and the second cause of fatalities in the Navy. Already in 2012, there have been three fatalities associated with recreational and o-duty activities, which is three too many! ere are real risks and consequences in brushing o accidents that do not hurt, harm or damage. When these near mishaps happen, we should immediately inform our supervisors. A near mishap is an act or event which injury or damage was avoided merely by chance. e command cannot correct hazardous conditions unless personnel conscientiously report them. You are probably asking yourself, If no one was hurt and/or I was oduty why do I need to report it? Its simple. Per OPNAV Instruction 5100.23G, near mishaps must be reported, no matter how small, to prevent accidental injury or death. By reporting each and every near miss and o-duty mishap to your supervisor immediately, prompt investigation and follow up actions will be initiated that will help reduce the potential for future mishaps. Your supervisor must rely on you and your co-workers to report these near mishaps to them. All on-duty mishaps involving Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel are reported via the Enterprise Safety Applications Management System. O-duty mishaps involving service members are also reported using ESAMS. If you need assistance in reporting a mishap call the NSB Kings Bay Safety Oce at 573-2525 and the safety sta will be glad to assist you. Tenant commands are encouraged to contact their command safety ofce or call Kings Bay Safety Oce for referral assistance. One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future mishaps is by conducting a thorough root-cause analysis and implementing eective corrective actions, as well as sharing the lessons learned with others. Lessons learned from some of the mishaps that have occurred at NSB Kingsbay are available on the Kings Bay Internet Safety Web site, webkb. wh.nads.navy.mil:9011. All supervisors are encouraged to review these near misses and brief their employees. To view mishap statistics for the Navy and Marine Corps, visit www. public.navy.mil/navsafecen/Pages/ Home.aspx. e importance of reporting all near-miss and o-duty military only mishaps should be stressed to new employees military and civilian during indoctrination. Report all near miss and o duty mishaps to your supervisor and your command safety oce immediately. Near mishap reports are mandatory NSB Kings Bay Safety

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port garnishment. In some cases, parenthood also can cause an unexpected and undesired increase in personal responsibilities. Benning, who helped spearhead the initial cre ation of CSADD, believes the peer-to-peer education emphasis of CSADD will help ensure Sailors succeed in their family planning goals, whenever they de cide to take on the respon sibility of having a child. Family e United States Postal Service recently sent out a mandate that all letter mail being shipped to overseas military installations be addressed with a nine-digit zip code, starting January 2013. e policy change came with an upgrade to USPSs mail sorting system and the opening of an additional centralized gateway for receiving and shipping all government mail. e USPS is asking anyone sending letters to service members at overseas bases to label them with a nine-digit zip code, said Chief Logistic Specialist Jimmy Jimenez, leading chief petty ocer of the Naval Support Activity Naples Capodichino post oce. is change accompanied the opening of a centralized gateway at OHare to take some of the stress o of John F. Kennedy International Airport, which used to be the sole routing hub for government mail. e new mail sorting system will enable mail to be delivered and sorted quicker by giving the sort ing machines another way to divide up the mail. e new address format will include the box number as a four digit number at the end of the zip code. For ex ample: John Smith PSC 999 Box 82 FPO AE 09622-0082 e new system will make it so that everything is already sorted when it gets here, said Jimenez. is means we dont have to spend hours sorting baskets full of mail, and we can put it directly into the boxes. Naval Station Mayport held a groundbreaking ceremony Jan. 9 to commence its base-wide expansion project. e project includes improvements on several avenues on base in order to improve base capacity as well as the safety of the specic intersections. Not only are these improvements going to provide safer vehicular and pedestrian trac, but it also shows the Navys commitment to Mayport remaining a vital Navy hub well into the future, said NAVSTA Mayports Public Aairs Ocer, Chief Mass Communication Specialist William H. Townsend. e current two-lane roads and four-way stop intersections are being transformed into boulevard-style roadways with two-lanes in each direction that are then going to be divided by a raised median. is project that were working on here with the Navy is our single most important project in the Department of Defense arena, said Pond and Company architect Michael Panczykowski. is is a major roadway improvement on a signicant corridor on NAVSTA Mayport. Its an honor to work alongside the United States Navy. e Navy has big plans for the future of Naval Station Mayport. e base is strategically located and plays a major role in the Navys sea power capabilities. e Department of De fense and the Department of the Navy are voting with their checkbook. What theyre voting on is the strategic importance and the vital nature of NAVSTA Mayport, said Capt. Doug las Cochrane, NAVSTA Mayport commanding ocer. is is the only military road project that is taking place in the Navy right now. By 2020 youre going to see nearly twenty thousand people on this installation as well as over 20 warships and a tremendously bright future for NAVSTA Mayport. Since its commissioning in December 1942, Mayport has grown to become the third largest naval surface eet concentration area in the United States.Mayport project to expand roads New requirements for foreign base mail ence of our Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines and civilians spans far beyond our fence line, benetting not only our own and our families but also our neighbors in St. Marys, Kingsland and beyond, said Capt. Harvey Guey Jr., commanding ocer of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. e award recognizes commands with the best overall community service programs that teach and encourage individuals, especially youth, to lead a healthy and active lives. Our receipt of this prestigious award is a testament to the tremendous eorts of the personnel of Team Kings Bay on a daily basis, Guey said. Im always pleased when the men and women of SUBASE, military and civilian, are recognized for their hard work and dedication. e Health, Safety and Fitness program features Navy volunteers who visit schools and neighborhoods to share information that focuses on nutrition, hygiene, mental health, disease prevention, leisure skills development, personal safety, drug demand reduction, sports and recreation. e overall goal of the program is to foster and nurture community ties with the Navy. It helps promote volunteerism for service members while developing better Navy leaders through experience. e Navy Community Service Program was launched in 1992 by then Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Frank B. Kelso and is sponsored by the Naval Education and Training Command and executed by the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center. Award THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 Patroling Afghanistan Photos by Sgt. 1st Class Abram Pinningtonn, USA and Sgt. Pete Thibodeau, USMC

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 5 Plans changed from summer to springAfghan forces will take the lead for security throughout Afghanistan this spring rather than at mid-year, President Barack Obama announced at a White House news conference Jan. 11. Obama and Afghan President Hamid Karzai spoke following White House meetings. e Afghan president emphasized that the number of American forces that will remain in Afghanistan after the NATO mission concludes at the end of 2014 is not crucial. Numbers are not going to make a dierence to the situation in Afghanistan, Karzai said. Its the broader relationship that will make a dierence to Afghanistan and beyond in the region. e specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and Afghanistan will have no particular concern when we are talking of numbers and how they are deployed. Afghan forces will be in the lead sooner than planned, Obama said. U.S. and NATO forces have been training Afghan police and soldiers, who have progressed to the point where they are able to take the lead, Obama said. We are able to meet those goals and accelerate them somewhat, he said. Whats going to happen this spring is that Afghans will be in the lead throughout the country. U.S. forces will still be in the ght, the president said. It does mean, though, that Afghans will have taken the lead and our presence, the nature of our work, will be dierent, he said. We will be in a training, assisting, advising role. is will lead to a responsible end to the war in Afghanistan by the end of 2014, the president said. is progress is only possible because of the incredible sacrices of our troops and our diplomats, the forces of our many coalition partners, and the Afghan people, whove endured extraordinary hardship, he added. Obama noted that more than 2,000 Americans have been killed in Afghanistan since the war began in 2001, and tens of thousands have been wounded. ese are patriots that we honor today, tomorrow, and forever, the president said. e president promised that the number of U.S. service members in Afghanistan will continue to drop over the next year. Some 66,000 Americans are deployed to the nation now. Ive pledged well continue to bring our forces home at a steady pace, he said. And in the coming months, Ill announce the next phase of our drawdown, a responsible drawdown that protects the gains our troops have made. Karzai and Obama discussed the still to be worked out bilateral security agreement between the two nations. Part of this is a status of forces agreement, which will protect American service members. Both said they think an agreement is possible this year. In the woods of central Virginia around Fort Pickett recently, the Legged Squad Support System four-legged robot has been showing o its capabilities during eld test ing. Working with the Marine Corps Warghting Laboratory, researchers from DARPAs LS3 program demonstrated new advances in the robots control, stability and maneuverability, including Leader Follow decision making, enhanced roll recovery, exact foot placement over rough terrain, the ability to maneuver in an urban environment, and verbal command capability. e LS3 program seeks to demonstrate that a highly mobile, semi-autonomous legged robot can carry 400 pounds of a squads equipment, follow squad members through rugged terrain and interact with troops in a natural way similar to a trained animal with its handler. e robot could also be able to maneuver at night and serve as a mobile auxiliary power source to the squad, so troops can recharge batteries for radios and handheld devices while on patrol. is was the rst time DARPA and MCWL were able to get LS3 out on the testing grounds together to simulate military-relevant training conditions, Lt. Col. Joseph Hitt, DARPA program manager, said. e robots performance in the eld expanded on our expectations, demonstrating, for example, how voice commands and follow the leader capability would enhance the robots ability to interact with warghters. We were able to put the robot through dicult natural terrain and test its ability to right itself with minimal interaction from humans. Video from the testing shows the robot negotiating diverse terrain including ditches, streams, wooded slopes and simulated urban environments. e video also shows the map the LS3 perception system creates to determine the path it takes. e December testing at Fort Pickett is the rst in a series of planned demonstrations that will test the robots capabilities across dierent environments as development continues through the rst half of 2014. e DARPA platform developer for the LS3 system is Boston Dynamics of Waltham, Mass. More than 5,000 service members from active, Guard and Reserve components of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and other federal, state and local agencies will take part in the nations 57th Presidential Inauguration Jan 21. e Department of Defense, through U.S. Northern Command and its Joint Task Force-National Capital Region, is providing military ceremonial support to inaugural events. JTF-NCR will coordinate all U.S. military support during the 10-day inaugural period Jan. 15 to 24. e inaugural period is a large-scale cooperative eort among federal, state and local agencies its a great opportunity for our Airmen to work in a joint-interagency environment, said Air Force District of Washington Commander Maj. Gen. Sharon K.G. Dunbar who also serves as the 320th Air Expeditionary Wing commander. Air Combat Command activated the 320 AEW on April 9 as the Air Force Component Headquarters to JTF-NCR. e 320th AEW is providing an array of support including command and control, communications, inter-agency liaison, logistics, engineering, legal, and contingency response. e U.S. military has participated in this important American tradition since April 30, 1789, when members of the U.S. Army, local militia units and Revolutionary War veterans escorted George Washington to his rst inauguration ceremony at Federal Hall in New York City. Military support for the inauguration is designed to honor the Commanderin-Chief, recognize civilian control of the military and celebrate democracy. It has been a privilege to work with the great group of folks here at JTF-NCR Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, Coast Guardsmen who are all doing phenomenal work, said Air Force Reserve Brig. Gen. James P. Scanlon, JTF-NCR deputy commander for inaugural support. AFDW also provides personnel, legal, chaplain, nance, logistics, medical, and safety support for designated Air Force activities located within the NCR as well as for select Field Operating Agencies and Air Force elements worldwide on a daily basis. is responsibility entails support for approximately 40,000 Air Force military and civilian personnel in more than 2,000 Air Force elements at 500 locations in some 108 countries. Military to play role in presidential inauguration Midshipmen to marchEighty-seven members of the Naval Academys 24th Company will proudly march in the 57th Presidential Inaugural parade in Washington Jan. 21. e 24th Company was chosen to participate in the parade due to its status as the Brigades Color Company. e Academys Color Company competition is a tradition that began in 1867 and recognizes the superior performing company based on exceptional academic, athletic, and military professional performance. irty companies make up the Naval Academys student body, which is referred to as the Brigade of Midshipmen. Midshipmen representing 29 states will march in the parade with the 24th Company, which is led by Midshipman 1st Class (senior) Ryan Hagelin, 21, from Hamburg, N.Y. We are honored to be invited to participate in such an important event, said Hagelin, 24th Company commander Im personally very excited to march in the parade. As a company, we have practiced several times in order to prepare. is is one of many experiences that make the Naval Academy a truly special place to develop into a leader. Founded in 1845, the Naval Academy is a prestigious four-year service academy that prepares midshipmen morally, mentally and physically to be professional ocers in the naval service. More than 4,400 men and women representing every state in the U.S. and several foreign countries make up the student body, known as the Brigade of Midshipmen. U.S. News and World Reports has recognized the Naval Academy as a top ve undergraduate engineering school and a top 20 best liberal arts college. Upon graduation, midshipmen earn a federally funded Bachelor of Science degree in a choice of 23 dierent subject majors and go on to serve at least ve years of service as commissioned ocers in the Navy or Marine Corps. Robomule runs more trialsAfghan security forces accelerate taking control e mission objective to prevent al-Qaida from us ing Afghanistan to launch attacks against the United States is within reach, President Barack Obama said in his weekly address to the nation Jan. 12. is week, I welcomed [Afghanistan] President Hamid Karzai to the White House to discuss the way ahead in Afghanistan, Obama said in his address. And today, I want to update you on how we will end this war, bring our troops home, and continue the work of rebuilding America. e president thanked U.S. service members, noting the United States has dealt devastating blows to al-Qaida and ejected the Taliban from their strongholds in the past four years. Obama said the 33,000 additional forces he ordered to Afghanistan served with honor, completed their mission, and returned home last fall as promised. is week, [President Karzai and I] agreed that this spring, Afghan forces will take the lead for security across the entire country and our troops will shift to a support role, Obama said. In the coming months, Ill announce the next phase of our drawdown. By the end of next year, Americas war in Afghanistan will be over. Obama gave credit for the progress made in Afghanistan to the heroic sacrices of our troops and diplomats, alongside forces from many other nations. More than a half-million Americans, military and civilian, have served in Afghanistan, the president said, noting thousands of have been wounded and more than 2,000 have given their lives. And, the drawdown in Afghanistan remains a challenge, he said. is remains a very dicult mission, Obama said. e work ahead will not be easy. Our forces are still in harms way. But make no mistake, our path is clear, and we are moving forward. Now, the United States must care for our troops and veterans who fought in our name, the president said.Obama: Mission within reach

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Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Jan. 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? is workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and family budget. It will be 9 to 11 a.m., Jan. 23. Call 573-4513 for more information.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 to 25. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29is two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, nancing and high-pressure sales tactics. is training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 5739783.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops tion. He also braved re to recover several fallen comrades. Romeshas eorts enabled Bravo Troop, 3d Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, to regroup and ght o a force that greatly outnumbered them, according to reports. At the time he was a section leader with Bravo Troop, which was part of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, in Afghanistan. Romesha separated from the Army April 4, 2011. He and his family currently live in Minot, N.D. He is married to Tamara Romesha and they have three children; Dessi, Gwen, and Colin. Romesha enlisted in the Army in September 1999 as an M1 armor crewman. After completion of training at Fort Knox, Ky., he was assigned as a tank gunner with B Company, 1-63rd Armor, Camp Vilseck, Germany. His tour there included an operational deployment to Kosovo. After Germany, he was assigned as a gunner/assistant tank commander with A Company, 2-72nd Armor, Camp Casey, Korea. Following Korea, which included a combat tour to Iraq, he was assigned as a section leader with 3-61st Cavalry, Fort Carson, Colo. ere he completed the Long Range Reconnaissance Course, Advanced Leader Course, and Air Assault Training. His military decorations include the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with three Campaign Stars, Bronze Star Medal, three Army Commendation Medals, Purple Heart, ve Army Achievement Medals, Valorous Unit Award, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Kosovo Campaign Medal, Korean Defense Service Medal, Non Commissioned Ocer Professional Development Ribbon with Numeral 2, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon with Numeral 5, NATO Medal with Bronze Service Star and the Combat Action Badge. Medal Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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e Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip is Saturday, Jan. 26, and leave the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Unleashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault rie w/all day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. eres a special $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends together for a full day of live action. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. 4-versus-4 Flag Football Tournament Its at the Fitness Softball Complex, starting at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 9. All participants are wel come. Cost is $100 per team, for 4-versus-4 flag football, double elimination, 10 teams max. The champion will receive a team trophy and cash prize of $300. Registration closes on Feb. 8. For more information call (912) 409-1611. Winter Basketball League Registration is open now at the Fitness Complex. Plays begins Jan. 28. Team fee is $100 for active duty and $200 for DoD. Captains meeting is 5 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 23 in the Fitness Classroom. For more info call (912) 409-1611. Super Bowl 2013 Party at the Big EZ Sports Zone The excitement starts at 5:30 p.m. The free party will be complete with door prizes, food, football bingo and more. For more information call (912) 573-4548. 2nd Annual My Little Valentine Father & Daughter Dance Its 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 at Magnolias (formerly the Kings Bay Conference Center). Cost is $15 for adults and $10 for ages 12 and under, which includes a flower for each daughter, music, dancing, photo ops, heavy hors doeuvres, Shirley Temples and an ice cream Bar. Tickets will be available at the Information, Ticket and Travel office. For more information call (912) 573-4559. Bighearted 8K Relay Its at the Fitness Complex at 7 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 13 and is free to participate, for teams of three. Each member will run 1.66 miles for a team total of 8K. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Body Transformation Contest At the Fitness Complex, March 4 to April 15. $45 per person, 16 slots for four four-person teams. Cost includes a commissary grocery adventure with a registered dietician. Before-and-after body composition assessments in our new Bod Pod. Teams will meet with their trainers twice a week. Dates and times to be dertmined by each team. You must register your team by March 1. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p.m. with Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur Jan. 18, Ice Age: Continental Drift Jan. 19 and 20, Where the Wild ings Are Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. Youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Airso shooting trip Jan. 26 A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 7

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Wasnt that a thrill? The Divisional Round of the NFL playoffs had me on the end of my seat with outstanding Denver-Baltimore and Seattle-Atlanta matchups. I asked who would reach the Super Bowl and who would win last Thursday, prior to those games. I asked the same question Sept. 6 at the start of the season. Trident Training Facilitys MM3 Paul Ouma picked Ravens over the Falcons, so hes still in the running too. My pick? Pats over Packers. Im toast too. FT1 Martin Garza Trident Training Facility Temple, Texas Seattle and Denver. Seattle will win because Im a standup NFC fan and Marshawn Lynch is a beast. FT1 Barry Boyd Trident Training Facility Jacksonville, Fla. The Broncos and 49ers. The Broncos will win because Peyton Manning is the best quarterback of all time. MA3 Sean Lampley Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Tampa, Fla. If its not my Bucs, I dont care. Lance Cpl. David Waterfield Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Suffolk, Va. The Pats and 49ers. Hopefully my Pats will win. Pats Nation! Our defense hasnt played that well, but we have a remarkable offense with Tom Brady. MM3 ordell Erskine USS Rhode Island Blue Irvington, N.J. Denver and Seattle. Seattle will win because Denver cant stop Marshawn Lynch and Seattles defense is air tight. MTSA Austin Greig Trident Training Facility Villisca, Iowa Green Bay and Houston. Green Bay, because weve already beaten Houston, we have a lot of injured players back and have been building toward the playoffs. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho George Washington was the Navys rst SSBN and, with her inception, submarines became a vital linchpin in the nuclear triad. Ballistic missile submarines groundbreaking capabilities would forever transform the U.S.s land, air, and maritime forces. With George Washingtons entry into service in December 1959, the U.S. Navy instantly gained a powerful deterrence weapon a stealth platform with enormous nuclear repower. As the rst SSBN, George Washingtons innovative concept and capabilities advanced Navy ballistic missile systems, paved the way for the rotating two-crew concept, foreshadowed the model of forward presence as a key part of U.S. maritime strategy, and laid the ground work for our present day SSBN to guided missile submarine conversions. e third ship named after the rst U.S. president and commander-in-chief of the Continental Army embodied the ideals put forth by her namesake. George Washington believed as early as the Revolutionary War that, In any operations, and under all circumstances a decisive Naval superiority is to be considered as a fundamental USS George Washington, the rst Boomer THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 9

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Pirates Cove menus Brig. Gen. Margaret A. Brewer, the rst woman to be promoted to brigadier general in the Marine Corps, passed away Jan. 2. After successfully completing two six-week ofcer candidate-training sessions, the University of Michigan graduate accepted an appointment as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in March 1952. Like thou sands of Marines today, she joined amidst a war the Korean War. Early in her career, the Durand, Mich., native made strides to integrate female Marines into the male-dominated Corps. Brewer was one of the rst women subsequent to World War II trained in communications. From 1956 to 1958, then Capt. Brewer served as commanding ocer of the woman Marine companies at Norfolk, Va., and Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. Brewer spent three years at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., where she oversaw the operation of the mess clubs and was promoted to major in 1961. In 1963, Brewer returned to Quantico to serve as the executive ofcer and later commanding ocer of the Woman Ocer School. In 1966, Brewer transferred to 6th Marine Corps District in Atlanta to be the public aairs ocer and was subsequently promoted to lieutenant colonel, the most senior rank women could hold at the time. President Lyndon B. Johnson repealed Public Law 90-130 Nov. 8, 1967, removing the limit on the number of women in service and granted women promotion to colonel. Brewer returned to Quantico in 1971 to serve as assistant to the director, and chief of the support department for the Marine Corps Education Center. In 1973, Brewer became the seventh and nal director of Women Marines, advising the commandant and his sta on matters pertaining to women in the Marine Corps. Separate women Marine companies were disbanded, and women became eligible for careertype formal and technical training and to obtain the rank of sergeant major. Brewer played a crucial role as the Corps began to develop regulations for pregnancy and parenthood. e most controversial of the recommendations pertained to the establishment of a pilot program to assign women to the Fleet Marine Forces.e pilot program, which consisted of sending 10 to 20 female Marines to the 1st Marine Division and 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing respectively, was deemed successful, and female Marines have served alongside their male counterparts ever since. In 1978, while serving as the deputy director of the Division of Information at Headquarters Marine Corps, then President Jimmy Carter nominated her for appointment to brigadier general. e Corps was the last of the services to appoint a female ag ofcer. Brewer made history May 11, 1978, as she became the rst female general ocer in the Corps. She passed away at the age of 82.First female Marine General dies at 82 e Center for Security Forces an nounced Jan. 13 that the fourth installment to its list of apprenticeship trades is now available to Sailors for open enrollment. e new Armory Technician Appren ticeship Trade is available to Sailors, E-4 and above, who serve in a broad range of ratings such as Gunners Mate, Master-AtArms, Special Warfare Operator, and more. is is an apprentice level trade applicable to personnel who store, inventory, issue, receive and maintain records on assigned arms, ammunition and explosives, said Jose Bautista, Master-At-Arms programs manager at CENSECFOR. Sailors can enroll in this new Department of Labor-approved apprenticeship trade by visiting United Services Military Apprenticeship Program online and select the Enroll/Reinstate link to begin. Bautista went on to point out that this is probably the only apprenticeship trade that covers multiple ratings and provides sailors with improved skills and competencies. A Sailor must also possess NEC [Naval Enlisted Classication Code] 0812, 0814, 9525, or 9536, he said. Sailors who successfully complete the required 2000 hours of documented experience will earn the distinction of being an Armory Technician. e level of experience covers six select skill areas such as maintenance, inventory control, security, and safety just to name a few. USMAP works closely with the DOL to provide nationally recognized apprenticeship programs that result in journeyman-level certicates of completion for members of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. During their apprenticeship, service members document their military duties while working in their rating or military occupational specialty. Bautista also alluded to the next wave of apprenticeship trades to be released as being the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship and the Military Working Dog Apprenticeship. e package for the Criminal Investigator Apprenticeship is currently pending DOL approval with an anticipated release sometime this spring or summer. New apprenticeship opens 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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Navy College educational information THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 11

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e Central Intellegence Agencys Historical Collections Division recently presented declassied information on hot-button Cold War events at the 44th Annual Association of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies convention in New Orleans, La. Participating in academic conferences is one way CIA showcases its contributions to national security and shares insight into the workings of government. Session chair A. Ross Johnson, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, identied criteria for evaluating historical intelligence reports: What do they add to what we know? How prescient were these at the time? And, most importantly, how well did they inform the policymakers? ose questions formed the backbone of the discussions that followed, as each CIA case study was brought to life by an analyst who had contributed to the original reporting: Peter Nyren, a 25-year Soviet and Russian intelligence analyst, described the role intelligence played in forming President Ronald Reagans policy toward the USSR. Contrary to urban legend, said Nyren, Reagan was an avid consumer of intelligence. He was also the rst president to receive CIA-produced video briengs, which included intelligence about the Soviet space program and the Chernobyl disaster. John Bird, a 32-year veteran analyst of Soviet military issues at the CIA, explained the diculties the Agency faced in the late 1950s gauging the number of intercontinental ballistic missiles the Soviet Union had. We lived in an information void, he said, citing the lack of internal Soviet sources and the unreliability of available analyses. e creation of satellite reconnaissance enabled the Agency to dispel concerns over the Soviet Unions reportedly superior missile capacity. Bird said the perception of a missile gap, as it was called, existed in part because Khrushchev had been blung! One of the best sources of intelligence reporting about the Soviet Union during the Cold War came from Polish military ocer Colonel Ryszard Kuklinski. He passed to the CIA approximately 40,000 documents over 9 years. He had access to almost all Soviet Pact intelligence, said Terry Bender, a former CIA intelligence analyst who specialized in East European issues for 30 years. is was an unabashed success story. Bender also discussed the challenges in determining the likelihood of Poland implementing martial law, which was ultimately done on December 13, 1981. Panelist Mark Kramer, director of the Harvard University Cold War Studies Program and a Senior Fellow at Harvards Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, addressed the charge that the CIA failed to predict the collapse of the Soviet Union, a claim Nyren said is not borne out by the growing body of declassied reports revealing what the CIA was telling policymakers about the state of the Soviet Union. e CIA provided an excellent picture of what was going on in the Soviet Union. e Agency didnt have a Kuklinski in the Soviet Union, but it did make great use of information from various sources, Kramer said. Intel examines Cold War issues e commander of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet, spent an afternoon addressing a contingent of Naval Postgraduate School Information Dominance Corps students during an allhands call on the university campus, Jan. 8. Vice Adm. Mi chael S. Rogers spoke about the important role the IDC has in todays cyber-dependent world, and the important role education and training play in achieving the nations cyber defense goals. He said that FCC/C10F has made signicant progress in promoting cyber situational awareness and integrating cyberspace operations into traditional maritime operations. To preserve the Navys cyber warghting advantage, we must continue to develop an elite workforce that is recruited, trained and educated to better understand the maritime environment, employ the latest technology advances, and deliver cyber warfighting capability anywhere around the world, Rogers said. Rogers recognized that there were still substantial challenges to overcome due to the inherent characteristics and rapid technological change of the eld. He noted that the cyber community was making signicant progress in eecting changes and improvements to the eld, but it was up to every member in the IDC to take steps to continue with these goals. Rogers emphasized the importance of training and educating the next generation of cyber warriors to tackle the challenges of the future. I want us to be prepared for the challenges of the future, Rogers said. But its up to you to become the solution, to take charge of our future and face those challenges. He also said it is imperative to maintain a highly motivated and highly trained force that can tackle any challenge that may arise, and talked about the critical role NPS oers its students to succeed in these eorts. Monterey oers you a unique opportunity to learn and challenge yourselves, Rogers said. e Center for Excellence is an outstanding resource and knowl edge base for you to take benet from, I urge you to take advantage of your time here and maximize your learning experience. e Center for Excellence Rogers referred to is NPS Information Dominance Center for Excellence, led by Executive Director Cmdr. Tim Unrein. NPS has been implementing educational and research programs to help the Navy achieve the knowledge and skill base required for its IDC goals. Cyber boss addresses to Info class 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013

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principle upon which every hope of success must ultimately depend. e words of General Washington remain true for todays maritime strategy and were perhaps most realized in the capabilities of his third namesake vessel. Electric Boat Co., in Groton, Conn., began con struction on George Washington originally an attack submarine named Scorpion in 1957. However, the name changed when the Navy inserted a 130-foot missile section aft of the bow and nished George Washington as the lead ship in the class of SSBNs. Mrs. Robert B. Anderson helped commission the boat on Dec. 30, 1959. In total, George Washington had a length of 381.6 feet, beam of 33.1 feet, draft of 28.9 feet and a displacement of approximately 6,700 tons submerged. It carried 16 vertical tubes for Polaris A-1 missiles and six 21 inch torpedo tubes. e crew of 12 ocers and 128 enlisted men would assert the U.S.s new strategic mission of nuclear deterrence from under the sea. Missile system advancement Nearly two decades before George Washingtons conception English author Herbert George H.G. Wells predicted the development of long-range air torpedoes with directional apparatus that would forever change the shape of conventional warfare. e rst successful tests of a submarine-based launch platform for guided missiles occurred in Germany on U-boats during World War II with German V1 rockets. is new era of guided missiles encouraged the U.S. Navy to develop the Regulus guided cruise mis sile program. e Regulus program was initially suc cessful. However, after its implementation, the Navy quickly discovered a ma jor drawback of the missile launch system. In order to launch a Regulus missile, the submarine needed to surface and remain sur faced during the launch. Unfortunately, submarines were very vulnerable to attacks during surface launches, and could not launch a fully or partially fueled missile on deck without serious hazards to the safety of the crew and the boat. erefore, in 1959 the U.S. Navy asked Lockheed, currently Lockheed Mar tin, to begin developing the Polaris two-stage sol id-fuel nuclear-armed, a submarine-launched ballistic missile that would replace the Regulus missile on Navy submarines. George Washington and her Polaris missiles provided a novel stealth capability. She was the rst submarine that could remain submerged and safely hidden from reconnaissance satellites during launch. At the time, this nearly guaranteed her immunity from a rst or retaliatory strike. George Washington was equipped with the rst version of the Polaris A-1 missiles. Polaris A-1s were two-stage solid propellant missiles developed years ahead of schedule under the leadership of Rear Adm. W. F. Red Raborn, who would later become the seventh director of the Central Intelligence Agency. A-1s had a length of 28.5 feet, a body diameter of 54 in., and a launch weight of 28,800 lbs. A-1s had a range of 1,200 nautical miles, a Mk 1 re-entry vehicle and carried a single W-47-Y1 600kT nuclear warhead with an inertial guidance system that provided a circular error probability of 6000 ft. On July 20, 1960, George Washington conducted the rst submerged launch of the Polaris A-1 missile system at the Atlantic Missile Test Range in Cape Canaveral, Fla., with Rear Adm. Raborn on board as an observer. Following the successful launch, at 12:39 p.m., George Washingtons commanding ocer sent President Dwight D. Eisenhower notication of this historic achievement. Less than two hours later, another missile from the submerged submarine successfully launched on another impact area 1,100 miles down range. George Washington helped to forever tilt the scales of nuclear strike capability in Americas favor. Two-crew concept In addition to her innovative missile power, George Washington paved the way for the SSBN rotating twocrew concept. On July 1, 1958, Submarine Squadron Fourteen was established under the command of Capt. Norvell G. Ward to de velop operational doctrine before the commissioning of George Washington and future SSBNs. SUBRON-14 originally consisted of a submarine tender, a oating dry dock and one or two work space and berthing barges and was located at U.S. Naval Base, Holy Loch, Scotland. SUBRON-14 was responsible for the training, equipping and administering of the rst SSBNs. One of the squadrons earliest and most notable achievements was its landmark development of the two-crew concept. is unique system provided two crews on a single SSBN, a Blue and a Gold crew, which would take alternate turns on patrols. Each crew deployed for 180 days per year. While one crew was on patrol, the other would take its leave before deploying on its subsequent patrol. e deployment sched ule for both crews proved to be highly conducive for training during o time and allowed crewmembers to spend more time with fam ily before deployment. Following successful launch of the Polaris missiles, George Washington and her Blue crew returned to Cape Canaveral to pick up her Gold crew under the command of Cmdr. John L. From, Jr. Next, the crew duplicated earlier successes by launching two more missiles while submerged. On Aug. 30, 1960, shake down for the Gold crew ended and the Boomer went underway from Gro ton, Conn., on Oct. 28, 1960, for Charleston, S.C. to load her 16 Polaris missiles. In Charleston, George Washington and the Gold crew were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. After which, the Blue crew, under the command of Cmdr. James B. Osborn, took the boat on its rst deterrent patrol. On Jan. 21, 1961, George Washington completed the rst patrol at New London, Conn., after 66 days of submerged running. e Gold crew then took over and she departed on the second patrol on Feb. 14, 1961. George Washington returned to Holy Loch on April 25, 1961 after its second patrol. It remained forward deployed through 1964, alternating between Blue and Gold crews. In 1965 the boat returned stateside for overhaul and refueling by Electric Boat Co., in Groton, Conn., before resuming deterrent patrols out of Holy Loch. Model of forward presence Although it was a successful system, the Polaris A-1 missile had one limit: distance. With a range limit of 1,200 nautical miles, it was necessary to develop forward deployed submarine bases. Holy Loch served as a prime example of a forward deployed base because its strategic geography reduced transit times to and from SSBN submerged patrol areas. Holy Loch enabled SSBNs to achieve greater operational eciencies and resulted in SUBRON-14 rapidly expanding during the 1960s. SUBRON-14s success demonstrated proof of the concept of a forward deployed strategic deterrent. George Washington proved that ballistic missile technology was mature and reliable. Combined, they paved the way for the U.S. Navy to launch 40 additional SSBNs from 1960 to 1966. Dubbed the 41 for Freedom, these submarines included the George Washington, USS Ethan Allen (SSBN-608), USS Lafayette (SSBN-616), USS James Madison (SSBN-627), and USS Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640)classes. By actively promoting a policy of deterrence, these boats were instrumental in making sure that the relationship between the U.S. and the Soviet Union did not end in a nuclear catastrophe. e rst SSBN conversion e evolution of nuclear arms control forced the U .S. to make decisions about what to do with strategic platforms that were no longer needed in their primary mission, yet had not reached the end of their designed hull life. As the rst SSBN to undergo a complete conversion to an attack submarine, George Washington was a pioneer to another class of submarines, the guided missile submarine (SSGN). After the inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon on Jan. 20, 1969, the Soviet Union oered to negotiate their nuclear arms control position. e U.S. accepted and together both nations implemented the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks from 1969 to 1972, which froze the number of intercontinental ballistic missiles and replaced older missiles with newer ones. e reduction in missiles was part of a larger post-Cold War nuclear disarmament that continued through 1982, when U.S. President Ronald Reagan abandoned SALT I and implemented the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. START put a further reduction on nuclear weapons by placing a cap on 1,600 strategic nuclear delivery vehicles and permitting only 6,000 accountable warheads for each country. To stay within the limitations imposed by START and to prevent unnecessary decommissionings, George Washington and two others in her class, USS Patrick Henry (SSBN599) and USS Robert E. Lee (SSBN-601), had their missiles removed and were reclassied as attack submarines, allowing each to serve for several additional years. e redesign and reclassication of these three submarines to extend their service life and contribute to changing naval warghting missions pioneered the conversion years later of Ohio-class SSBNs to SSGNs. In 1994, under the administration of President William J. Clinton, the Nuclear Posture Review recommended a two-ocean based Trident SSBN force 14 vessels in all to carry TRIDENT II (D-5) missiles. TRIDENT II (D5) missiles, rst deployed in 1990, were the sixth and latest version of ballistic missiles. ey were a modern improvement to the dated Polaris A-1 missiles carried by George Washington. e two-ocean based force met U.S. national security requirements under Strategic Oensive Reductions Treaty, which in 2004 was the latest of mutual nuclear disarmament agreements between the U.S. and Russia. One of the provisions in SORT required the U.S. Navy to remove four Trident Ohio-class submarines from strategic service. Following George Washingtons example, four Ohio-class SSBNs underwent conversions to extend their service life and add special operations and strike capability. In 2002, Electric Boat received a contract to convert the rst four Ohioclass submarines, USS Ohio (SSBN-726), USS Michigan (SSBN-727), USS Florida (SSBN-728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729), into conventional land attack and special forces (SOF) platforms, also known as guided missile submarines or SSGNs. e conversion process, ending successfully in 2008, allowed the Ohioclass submarines to succeed in their new form, and illustrated the Navys resourcefulness in maximizing submarine platforms throughout available hull life. Just as George Washington dominated U.S. maritime strategy in 1960, todays Ohio-class SSGNs provide an unprecedented combination of Strike and SOF mission capability within a stealthy platform. e Navys adaptability and ingenuity in redesigning SSBNs, starting with George Washington, continues to inuence and support Americas powerful presence at sea. Conclusion George Washington was a submarine of rsts. Its unique conception and innovative capabilities provided the Navy with a new missile system to promote nuclear deterrence, fostered the creation of the two-crew concept, promoted the model of forward presence, and paved the way for recent SSBN to SSGN conversions. George Washingtons historic patrols were a principle element that helped deter nuclear war between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. Its legacy continues; the U.S. Navys SSBN force is the survivable element of the U.S. nuclear triad. At present, there are 18 ballistic missile submarines in the eet providing the U.S. with a decisive nuclear deterrent, an accomplishment that would have made their namesake proud. First THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 17, 2013 13