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The Kings Bay periscope ( 01-10-2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00283

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00283


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3-year, $617 million deal for up-to-date soware technologye Defense Department has leveraged the buying power of more than two million information technology users to award a three-year, $617 million joint enter prise license agreement for Mi crosoft products, defense o cials announced Dec. 28. e deal, led by the Army Contracting Command in col laboration with the Defense Information Systems Agency, the Army and the Air Force, demon strates the best pricing DOD has received to date for Microsoft desktop and server software li censes, ocials said. eres a move afoot throughout the department to bring about eciencies in the [in formation technology] world, David L. DeVries, DOD deputy chief information ocer, told American Forces Press Service. We took a long, hard look at it realizing that the Department of Defense re lies upon the network and upon information technology to do its business. Under the agreement, the Army, Air Force and DISA can begin using the newest versions of Microsoft products, including Microsoft Oce 2013, Share Point 2013 and Windows 8, of cials said, adding that Oce 2013 provides enhanced secu rity and content management tools. e package has been cus tomized to meet the specic security needs of the Defense Department. How do we bring about better eectiveness for the warghter, better improved security on the networks ... while reducing the cost of ownership? DeVries asked. We are the largest cor poration out there, comprised of four military services. No one comes close to our scale, so when we talk about something that produces a standardized way of buying, installing and maintaining [enterprise soft ware], thats a huge deal. Department ocials estimate savings could run into tens of millions over the course of sev eral years through lower license and software assurance costs, ocials said. is eort is a signicant pathnder on how to do major contract awards for the Department of Defense, said Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael J. Basla, Up Periscope Fearless predictions for 2013 Page 9 Holiday hits The joy of the season celebrated by military Page 4 Best of 2012 Military photographers show their stuff Page 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay chief, family welcome 2013s rst baby Vera and Heath Gilbert of Kingsland welcomed the newest addition to their family, Maximus Heath Gilbert, on New Years Day. Baby Maximus arrived at 9:57 a.m. at the Southeast Georgia Health System Camden Campus Maternity Care Cen ter in St. Marys as Camden Countys rst baby of 2013. Maximus weighed in at 6 lbs., 2 oz., and measured 21 inches long. Mom was quite surprised to celebrate the delivery of little Maximus on New Years Day, since he was not due for an other three weeks. Another cause for celebration was the arrival of her grand father, Nikolay Atrashkevich, 74, from Russia. He wanted to meet his rst greatgrandson, she said, smiling. Maximus early birth also ensured his father, Heath, a Navy chief petty ocer at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, would have time to get to know him before be ing deployed next month. To welcome Maximus, the Health Sys tem presented the happy parents with a large gift basket full of gifts and baby care necessities from the Southeast Georgia Health System Camden Campus Gift Shop. e family also received a newborn gift bag from the March of Dimes. In celebra tion of its 75th anniversary,the March of Dimes provided newborn gift bags to the rst baby born at hospitals across the state of Georgia. Maximus was delivered by Joanne Altringer, CNM, a certied nurse midwife practicing with board-certied obstetri cian/gynecologist Eva di Lorenzo, M.D. at Camden OB/GYN. Altringer, who has been delivering babies at Camden for 10 years, also delivered the couples twoyear-old daughter, Viktoria. Each year, more than 700 babies are born at the Camden Campus Maternity Care Center, which features state-ofthe-art medical care in a warm, familyfriendly environment. Newest boot joins the sub force Armed Forces ink joint licensing with Microso Cli deal aected paychecksSocial Security boost adjusts amounts for military, civil servicee legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that postponed the scal cli means changes to military and civil ian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service ocials said. e legislation increases So cial Security withholding taxes to 6.2 percent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 percent. e increase in Social Security withholding taxes aects both military and civilian paychecks, ocials said. For civilian employees, o cials said, this will mean a 2 per cent reduction in net pay. For military personnel, changes to net pay are aected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allowances for housing, subsistence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readiness ocials said. For military members, Social Security withholding is located on their leave and earnings state ment in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal In surance Contributions Act. DoD civilians will see the change on their leave and earn ings statement under OASDI for old age, survivors, and dis ability insurance. Reserve component members Nam soldier would become rst former enlisted to man post President Barack Obama an nounced his nominations to serve as the next leaders of the Defense Department and Cen tral Intelligence Agency Jan. 7. At a White House news con ference, Obama announced his selection of Chuck Hagel to be next defense secretary and John Brennan as the next CIA director. If conrmed by the Senate, Hagel will replace Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta, who con rmed his plans to retire. Brennan, if conrmed, will replace David H. Petraeus, who resigned as CIA director in No vember. Chuck Hagel is the leader that our troops deserve, Obama said. He is an American patriot. He enlisted in the Army and volunteered for Vietnam. As a young private, and then sergeant, he served with honor alongside his own brother. Hagel, 66, a former senator from Nebraska, earned two Pur ple Hearts as an infantry squad leader in the Vietnam War. He later co-founded a cellular tele phone company. Obama said Hagels brother rescued him when he was in jured by shrapnel, and that Hagel did the same when his brother was wounded later, not ing that his nominee to lead the Pentagon still bears the scars and shrapnel for battles he fought in our name. Chuck Hagels leadership of our military would be historic, the president said. Hed be the rst person of enlisted rank to serve as secretary of defense, one of the few secretaries who have been wounded in war, and the rst Vietnam veteran to lead Combat vet nominated for defense boss

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss starts Jan. 24January is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutri tion and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! Ship Shape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Regis tered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Kings Bay VITA starts Jan. 22e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay begins Jan. 22. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Le gal Services Oce located in the back of the oce at the library. Military Officers meet Jan. 22e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Of cers of America Associations monthly din ner meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 15 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Capt. Dave Reilly USN (Ret.), national director for the U.S. Navy League, is guest speaker. Cost for the meal is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.), at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net by Jan. 11.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that measures body fat. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237. Now hear this! Applications for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society educational scholarships and interest-free loans for the 2013-to-2014 academic year are now available and can be down loaded at www.nmcrs.org/educa tion. Students eligible to apply include spouses or children (under the age of 23) of Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Are retired Died on active duty or in a retired status Consideration for selection is based on scholastic ability and nancial need. Applicants must be graduating high school seniors or full-time minimum 12 credit hours college students working toward their rst undergraduate de gree. Applications must be received at NMCRS by May 1, 2013 unless the due date on the application states otherwise. During these tough economic times, our educational assistance continues to help Navy and Marine Corps families reach their goal of at tending college, said Beverly Lang don, NMCRS Education Program manager. e NMCRS Education Program has provided scholarships and in terest-free loans totaling more than $60 million to more than 50,000 stu dents over the last 30 years. It is based on the Societys mission to provide nancial, educational and other assistance. e program is supported en tirely by donations and bequests to NMCRS. For more information on the NMCRS Education Program, visit www.nmcrs.org/education or email education@nmcrs.org. Since 1904, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has provided nancial assistance and education to active duty and retired members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members and survivors when in need. Headquartered in Arlington, Vir ginia, the Society is a non-prot, charitable organization that is staed by nearly 3,500 volunteers, and a small cadre of employees, in oces around the world ashore and aboard ships.NMCRS has help with college funds Navy-Marine Relief Although the state of Washington has recently updated the law on the use of marijuana, essentially de criminalizing use for civilians, Zero Tolerance drug policy regulations remain unaected for Sailors. e Zero Tolerance drug poli cy was implemented after a fatal crash of an EA-6B Prowler on board USS Nimitz in 1981, killing 14 crew members and injuring 45 others. Autopsies were performed and sev eral members of the ight deck crew tested positive for marijuana. Following this discovery, thenPresident Ronald Reagan instituted a Zero Tolerance drug policy across all of the U.S. Armed Forces. As a result regular, random uri nalysis drug checks are conducted on all military personnel. Marijuana can stay in the sys tem for up to 30 days depending on the persons metabolism, dosage and method of consumption, said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class David Johnson. Because its lipid-based, it can stay in the fat cells for a long period of time, whereas water-based substances would ow through very quickly. Marijuana, or cannabis, induces multiple psychological aects to the users mental state. Being under the inuence of marijuana can result in slow reac tion speed and poor judgment, and can negatively aect operational success, said Legalman 1st Class Michael Lightsey. In the case of an emergency, people could get hurt. You dont want anyone to be high while operating a jet. Illegal or wrongful use, posses sion, sale, transfer of controlled sub stances, or any attempt to commit drug oenses results in maximum punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which includes forfeiture of a half months pay for two months, reduction in rank, courts martial, three days con nement on bread and water (for E-3 and below Sailors), 45 days of extra duty and 45 days on restric tion or 60 days of restriction and dis charge from military service. Aside from the typical punish ment that follows drug use, there are collateral consequences to get ting kicked out of the military, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Anderson, Nimitz command judge advocate. Aside from increasing the diculty of nding a job, you also lose your G.I Bill. Its not a good idea for Sailors to dabble with marijuana because its not worth it. Before you eat that pot brownie, ask yourself if its worth losing $90,000.Zero Tolerance remains as policy Judge Advocate It is a large misconception that in dividuals who seek counseling ser vices are crazy or weak. In fact, they are individuals who realize they need help. Individuals seek counseling for a wide range of concerns, including break up of a romantic relationship, family problems, relational problems with a partner, roommate or friend, stress management, anger management, grief and loss, lack of motivation, work-related problems, parenting issues and more. e counseling relationship is a professional one and is very dier ent from a relationship with a par ent, partner or friend. A counselor will attempt to help you to cope with problems, enhance personal growth and increase self by establishing a positive and trusting relationship. In order to remain professional and objective, a counselor will likely not disclose personal information about him or herself. Counselors provide a comfort able, nonjudgmental and safe envi ronment to share personal struggles and receive feedback and tools for how to help overcome challenges. At the Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, we have six licensed clinical counselors, one of whom specializes in working with children. e counselors provide short term eight to 12 sessions solutionfocused counseling at no charge. ere is a daily intake counselor on call who has a clear schedule, standing ready if someone is having an emergency. It is possible to talk to someone immediately. Counselors also are available for consultation with supervisors, Om budsmen or peers. Common misconceptions of counseling: Counseling is only for people that are crazy or that need to be institutionalized at a counselor will tell you what you should or should not do at seeking counseling is a sign of weakness Counseling requires a long-term commitment Facts about counseling: Counseling benefits many types of people; those with chronic prob lems and those dealing with situ ational concerns Counselors will respect your autonomy and help you make your own decisions To make an appointment or for more information on Fllet and Fam ily Support Center Kings Bay Coun seling Services, call (912) 573-4512.Dont be afraid to see a counselor FFSC, Kings Bay Air Force CIO and chief of information dominance. is contract award cul minates over a years worth of great teaming be tween the Air Force, Army and DISA, and ultimately the Air Force will see a cost avoidance of about $50 million a year. Michael E. Krieger, Army deputy CIO, said the Army will save more than $70 million each year for the span of the agreement. e Army Contract ing Command negotiated terms that met the com plex technical and securi ty requirements for Army, the Air Force and DISA, Krieger said. Navy Rear Adm. David G. Simpson, DISAs vice director and senior procurement executive, also expressed condence in the joint venture, noting overall savings of more than 10 percent for the life of the agreement. [e agreement] gives us a good way of bringing the volume of the govern ments purchase to bear and reducing the time and eort that Microsoft needs to spend negotiating across the government, Simpson said. Bottom line: lower price for great er value. e admiral explained that the license advances DODs continued focus on mobile computing. [e agreement] recognizes the shift to mobility, Simpson said. Microsoft is committed to making sure that the technology within the agreement has a mobile-rst focus, and we expect to begin to take advantage of Microsofts mobile oerings as part of our enterprise mobility ecosystem. Ocials said the agreement provides software assurance benets which will oer Army organizations additional training and consulting services. DeVries said standard ization and predictability have been vital to reduc ing and controlling costs. is deal and future ventures will enable DOD to work with a variety of vendors to develop prod ucts that meet acceptable security standards while enabling the organizations to have as much ex ibility and capability as possible, he said. the department. Obama noted Hagels dedication to service members and their fami lies, and said his experiences give him the ability to relate to troops. In Chuck Hagel, our troops see a decorated combat veteran of charac ter and strength. ey see one of their own, Obama said. Chuck is a champi on of our troops, veterans and our military families. With Chuck, our troops will always know just like Sergeant Hagel was there for his own brother Secretary Hagel will be there for you. Hagels experience includes stints as deputy administrator for the Veter ans Administration now the Veterans Aairs Department and as CEO and president of the USO. He served in the Senate from 1997 to 2009, where he was a member of the foreign relations and intelligence committees. Hagel currently is a pro fessor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He also is chairman of the Atlantic Council and co-chairman of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board. Obama called Brennan one of our nations most skilled and respected intelligence professionals. Brennan, a 57-year-old New Jersey native, is the deputy national security advisor for homeland se curity and counterterror ism. During his years at the CIA, he worked as a Near East and South Asia analyst, served as station chief in Saudi Arabia, and directed the National Counterterrorism Center.Defense Microso 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Timely turtle rescue success It was an emergency wildlife rescue mission. A bunch of sick, cold Northeast turtles were stuck in Cape Cod trying to swim south andneeded a quick lift to Florida. e Coast Guard heeded the call with a C-130J Hercu les based out of Elizabeth City, N.C. I know were just the bus drivers, said Lt. Jon McCormack, pilot for the C-130J turtle transport ight. However, were happy to be able to help and make a dierence in bringing these sea turtles so they can be safe and thrive in their natural en vironment. As part of our support ing our living marine re source missions, the Coast Guard works with federal and state partners in times of need such as when ani mals are stranded or entangled. More than two dozen New England Aquari um sta, volunteers and Coast Guard crew braved the cold to quickly load up the airplane at Cape Cod, Mass., with 35 coldstranded endangered turtles nested in blan ket-lined fruit boxes and makeshift pet crates. For tracking, each turtle had a painted white num ber on its shell. e 70-pound Logger head and the smaller ve to 10-pound Kemps Ridley turtles are in various stages of recovery from pneumonia and hypothermia. A record stranding of more than 200 sea turtles o the Northeast coast in early winter exceeded the New England Aquariums capacity to house the nearly comatose reptiles. Sensing urgency, the National Oceanic and At mospheric Administration Fisheries Northeast Stranding Network facilitated a request for the emergency ight. If it were not for the USCG transport of 35 tur tles to Florida we would be in a series crisis for reha bilitation space for these endangered and threat ened sea turtles, said Connie Merigo, director of the rescue department at the New England Aquarium. Sea turtles continue to strand here in Massachusetts almost 20 more in the past few days. An hour later, as the C-130s ramp slowly closed shut, aquarium sta and Coast Guard crews standing on the runway waved their farewells to the airplane and its precious cargo bound south for the Sunshine State. Touching down at sun ny 80-degree Orlando, Fla., a motorcade of ve aquariums and marine wildlife centers, including SeaWorld Orlando, lined up by the plane ramp. As soon as the bright sunshine and warmth hit THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Armed Forces Holidays in the

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 2012 in photos Two Coast Guard screening vessels escort USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) to sea en route from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Jan. 18. Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber Lt. Lori Campbell of Naval Branch Clinic Belle Chasse carries a young girl transported from Port Sulphur, La., by a Louisiana Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk to Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, New Orleans, Sept. 1 following Hurricane Isaac. Air Force photo by Daniel P. Farrell Staff Sgt. Michael Cornelio pays respect after placing a wreath at a grave marking during Wreaths Across America at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Dec. 15 DOD photo by Sebastain Sciotti Jr.

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the turtles, they stirred restlessly in their crates and boxes while being car ried out. On the ground, the numbered reptiles were sorted through rosters and quickly claimed as adopt ees. e turtles were nally home, as they should be, for the holidays. In a few months, theyll be re leased back to the wild. Aside from being beau tiful creatures, the impor tance of sea turtles cannot be underestimated. ey are an integral part of the marine ecosystem helping to restore beach habitat, to manage sea vegeta tion and are crucial to the predator-prey food chain. By helping to protect and rescue endangered and threatened marine wildlife, the Coast Guard supports its living marine resource missions, said Capt. Mark Ogle, Atlan tic Area future operations branch chief. e preser vation of sea turtles is vital to the health of our oceans and sheries. Inherent to their na ture, sea turtles grow up to learn how to swim, but for this special mission, they learned how to y.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Jan. 17. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Jan. 14 and 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 to 25. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and val ues as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this work shop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in com pleting a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of manag ing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 22. Registration is required. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the fed eral employment process, sala ries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Jan. 11. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 15, 22 and 29. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 14 to 18. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for Jan. 16A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 16. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Jan. 17. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Financial planning for deployment Jan. 15This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will pro vide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 15. Registration is recom mended. For more information, call 573-9783.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops will be the rst to see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS ocials said. Changes will be reect ed in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay ad justments in their January mid-month paycheck and will be reected on the January leave and earnings statement. DOD civilians will see social security withhold ing changes reected in paychecks based on the pay period ending Dec. 29, 2012, for pay dates begin ning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully.Pay Turtle 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Come to the Naval Subma rine Base Kings Bay Fitness Complex for its Resolution Solution 2013 Open House at 4 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 14. See the new tness class schedule, with the grand opening of the Moms & Tots Work out Room, plus new at Health Promotions e Bod Pod. Meet and greet the trainers. At 6 p.m. try out all the classes in an EXA-on! For more information contact the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. One Pitch Softball Tournament Saturday, Jan. 12 at the softball field complex, its $200 per team, and is open to all authorized patrons, 18 years old and older. The for mat will be double elimina tion. ASA, local rules, with one pitch with strike mat will apply. Teams must provide their own balls (.44 core/375 compres sion). ASA approved bats only. Trophies awarded for first and second place teams, plus cash prizes. Pre-register by stopping at sports office or by calling (912) 573-8908. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reserv ists, $30 for one family mem ber per month, $40 for 2 fam ily members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family mem bers per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip Saturday, Jan. 26, leave the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Unleashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault rifle w/all day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. Theres a spe cial $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends together for a full day of live action. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skee ball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. with Brave Jan. 12 and 13, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur Jan. 18, Ice Age: Continental Drift Jan. 19 and 20, Where the Wild ings Are Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be avail able for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Resolution Solution is Jan. 14 Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29This two-hour workshop pro vides in-depth training on look ing for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the impor tant dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and highpressure sales tactics. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information, call 573-9783.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? is workshop can help you de velop a realistic spending plan and family budget. It will be 9 to 11 a.m., Jan. 23. Call 573-4513 for more information.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guaran tee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC Did you know? Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 7

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I am going to make my prediction a light-hearted one and talk football. As a Redskin fan it was a heartbreaker to see them get beat Sunday, but it was nice to see them in the playoffs. I will make my predictions for the NFC and AFC Championships. For the NFC Championship, the Green Bay Packers and the Atlanta Falcons will play. The AFC Championship will be between the Denver Broncos and the New England Patriots. Lets see how close I can get with this.MT1 Scott Butler USS Alaska Gold St. Marys The world will not end in 2013. Bill Wesselhoff Civilian contractor Rock Island, Ill. I predict I will fly to Boise, Idaho, for a patriotic reunion with my shipmates on the Fourth of July. Jacob McCray Family member Cape Canaveral, Fla. More advanced robots will be built to help people in their everyday lives. Stephanie Butler Family member Shrewbury, Mass. Im hoping for job opportunities. UTCN Angiulli Davalos CBMU 202 Miami I will deploy to South America in the new year. Bruce McDonald Retired Navy Shawmut, Ala. Ill have to wait and see what the politicians are going to do in the new year before I make any decisions. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose Schwarzkopf remembered President Barack Obama, Defense Sec retary Leon E. Panetta and Joint Chiefs Chair man Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey praised the ser vice and legacy of retired Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who passed away Dec. 27 at age 78. Schwarzkopf was a Viet nam veteran and one of the architects of the west ern anking movement that helped to defeat the Iraqi army during the Gulf War in early 1991. As the commander of U.S. Central Command, Schwarzkopf led the inter national coalition assem bled by then-President George H.W. Bush that expelled Iraqi troops who had invaded Kuwait in August 1990. e four-star general and West Point graduate retired in August 1991 af ter 35 years of Army ser vice. Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Fla., of complica tions from pneumonia, according to press reports. Obama saluted Schwar zkopfs service in a state ment issued Dec. 27. With the passing of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, weve lost an Ameri can original, Obama stated. From his deco rated service in Vietnam to the historic liberation of Kuwait and his lead ership of United States Central Command, Gen. Schwarzkopf stood tall for the country and Army he loved. Our prayers are with the Schwarzkopf family, who tonight can know that his legacy will endure in a nation that is more secure because of his patriotic service. Panetta also honored the general. e men and women of the Department of De fense join me in mourning the loss of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, whose 35 years of service in uniform left an indelible imprint on the United States mili tary and on the country, Panetta said in a state ment. e son of a deco rated Army ocer, Gen. Schwarzkopf followed his THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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January phase open for PCS orders e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase is scheduled to begin Jan. 10, and remain open until 5 a.m. Jan. 22 for Sailors in their perma nent change of station or ders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the webbased program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when it is time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy. mil or from the CMS/ID like at www.npc.navy.mi. Sailors are in their or ders negotiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected rota tion date. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a Septem ber 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sail ors with an August 2013 PRD. ese Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the ap plication phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is typically 10 days, allow ing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss op tions with their family and chain of command before making applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing busi ness rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertise ments in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their or ders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assign ment of their choice by us ing all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, plat form and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always at tempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, eet readi ness requirements are the guiding factor in ll ing billets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore ow guidelines outlined in NA VADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Pro gram to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily as signed another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty some place else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bu reau of Naval Personnel are advertised each ap plication cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when match ing Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, quali cations, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, dur ing the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been se lected for orders. e Navy will join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encour aged to reect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day O! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contri butions to American history and civil rights by participating in military and community events. Dr. King was the chief spokes man for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the footsteps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon completion of grad uate studies at Boston Univer sity, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instrumental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. e boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was un constitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 separate times for his participa tion in civil rights activities. Although King spent the ma jority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empowerment, love and peace, which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, his attention and eorts also included ghting economic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King jour neyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. In honor of Kings unnished eorts, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established by Presi dent Ronald Reagan in 1983. e rst observance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. In 1992, President George H.W. Bush proclaimed the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed ev ery year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, des ignating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of national volunteer service. All commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of Kings contributions to Ameri can history and civil rights through participation in military and community events and volunteerism within their commu nities and worldwide. Navy to mark Martin Luther King Jan. 21 Amidst their busy schedule, recruits of Company G, 2nd Recruit Train ing Battalion, stacked their weapons and neatly led into a classroom aboard Marine Corps Recruit De pot San Diego, Dec. 10. Once in the classroom, they quickly settled in and the academic instructor introduced himself before starting the hour-long class with a clip of the movie Pearl Harbor. Today in class we were taught about World War II, said Recruit Spencer Goodrun, Platoon 2155, Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. We learned about the role of the Marine Corps, the dif ferent battles and Marines that received awards for heroic actions. During the Marine Corps History III class, the instructor spoke about Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Guam, Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Learning about the struggles and triumphs Marines faced through history is important because it helps recruits gain a dierent perspective, ac cording to Goodrun. ere are six phases of Marine Corps history classes which encompass everything from the birth of the Marine Corps to the recent war in Iraq and cur rent operations in Afghanistan. However, the knowledge isnt only taught in the classroom. roughout training, drill instructors help re cruits review, understand and reinforce the informa tion learned which helps prepare them for the com prehensive test on Train ing Day 55. Its important for not only recruits to know this information but for Ma rines too, said Sgt. Pablo Montao, academic instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Bn. It keeps us up to date and fresh with how the Marine Corps came about, our traditions and history. It helps pass on our culture and instills pride in recruits and Ma rines alike. e pride also brings motivation to recruits and helps them gain new per spective to face dicult challenges, according to Montao.Recruits learn about many dierent sub jects throughout recruit training. We cover a wide spec trum of classes, said Montao. We teach ev erything from general mil itary studies and history to combat rst aid and nan cial classes. ese classes not only help set them up for a good Marine Corps career, they also help set them up in life. All of the knowledge gained in recruit training will stay with the recruits long after they graduate and become Marines. It makes me feel really good to know that I can leave an imprint on the recruits, Montaa said. I sat in these same seats six years ago and now Ive come full circle. Im stand ing at the podium teaching the recruits through my ex periences, its amazing. Corps history a core class Hurricane Sandy is two months over, but as 2013 opens, the New York Army National Guard is still helping people in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island who were aected by the storm. Working with local, state and federal agencies, Soldiers assigned to the 280-member Team Sandy continue to go door to door checking on the status of the people recovering from the devastation and collecting data to better help the Of ce of Emergency Management, or OEM. With so many homes ruined by the ood ing of hurricane Sandy, the data is invalu able when sending resources out into the boroughs. Citizen-Soldiers go out in teams of two and knock on the doors of houses in a designated area. Each Soldier has a form and a series of questions to ask the hom eowner. We started with the forms and collect ed data from the building managers, said 1st Lt. Malinda Vazquez, the planning of cer, and a resident of Queens, N.Y. Now, we are going door to door, checking on the well-being of each resident and mak ing sure they are OK. e completed forms are uploaded manually each day and give OEM the in formation to help those most in need. e forms limited our ability to move the data because the information had to be input manually, and would take three to ve days for the information to reach the proper agency, said 2nd Lt. Anthony Migliore, of Smithtown, N.Y., the team operations ocer. Because of the time necessary for the information to reach local and state agencies, a new system was developed to make the information-gathering process more ecient. A new form that is lled out electronically using a tablet, can now can be sent to the database instantly and the information is automatically sent to the proper agency. Now that we have over 200 [electron ic] tablets, the information is transmit ted instantly to a centralized database managed by the Disaster Immediate Response Team, Migliore said. As we con tinue the operation, we are able to con gure the tablets to reect more detailed information. e New York National Guard has com pleted more than 96,000 door-to-door wellness checks and continues to rene the process to knock on more doors in less time. We are working closely with the New York City police department, re depart ment, AmeriCorps, FEMA, OEM and the mayors oce to make our data collec tion more ecient, Migliore said. Our maps are becoming more precise and the use of the electronic tablets makes our in formation gathering easier. e maps of each aected area are bro ken down by sectors and cells. Each sec tor is made up of an entire neighborhood and each cell is comprised of roughly ve city blocks. Each tablet is tracked to re cord the progress of the Soldiers on the ground throughout the day and changes are made to increase the streets covered during the nightly meetings. e ques tions are also rened to make informa tion gathering easier. We have developed eight teams to go door to door, said Master Sgt. Troy Haley, of Troy, the noncommissioned ocer for one of the teams. With those teams, we are able to provide information instantly and get help to the people most aected by the hurricane. We also provide food, water, blankets and comfort kits as we go. We are here to serve our fellow citizens during this crisis, said Col. Mark Leahey, of Rochester, N.H., the commander of Joint Task Force Sandy. We are here to let them know that they are not alone, and we will do everything we can to help them. Sandy cleanup continues 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus fathers legacy of service by enrolling in West Point in the 1950s. His bravery during two tours in Vietnam earned him three silver stars, and set him on the path to lead our troops into battle in Grenada, and then to take charge of the overall allied eort in the rst Gulf War as Commander of United States Central Command. Gen. Schwarzkopfs skilled leadership of that campaign liberated the Kuwaiti people and produced a de cisive victory for the allied coalition. In the aftermath of that war, Gen. Schwarz kopf was justly recognized as a brilliant strategist and inspiring leader. Today, we recall that enduring legacy and remember him as one of the great military giants of the 20th century, Panetta concluded. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said in a statement that he was saddened to learn of the passing of General Nor man Schwarzkopf, a fellow West Point graduate, for mer Centcom commander and one of the 20th cen turys nest soldiers and leaders. I join the civilian and military leaders of our country, and servicemen and women, past and pres ent, in mourning his death. Gen. Schwarzkopf em bodied the warrior spirit, serving with distinction in three conicts over his 35 years of dedicated ser vice. e hallmark of his remarkable career was the swift and decisive victory over Saddam Husseins forces after they invaded Kuwait. e thoughts and prayers of the Joint Chiefs and the Joint Force are with Gen. Schwarzkopfs family and friends. Secretary of the Army John McHugh and Chief of Sta of the Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno re leased a joint statement: Our nation has lost a soldier and statesman with the passing of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, it said. Our prayers are with his family as we honor the memories of a man dedi cated to family, his country and the many soldiers he led in war and peace. His life story touches on much of the fabric of our nations story, ensuring his memo ry will remain with us for generations. Our nation owes a great debt of grati tude to Gen. Schwarzkopf and our soldiers will hold a special place in their hearts for this great leader. While much will be writ ten in coming days of his many accomplishments, his most lasting and important legacies are the tremendous soldiers he trained and led. Schwarzkopf is survived by his wife, Brenda, and children Cynthia, Jessica and Christian.Remember THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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Northern Mali has be come a terrorist haven, and DOD will continue to work with local African nations and regional or ganizations to isolate and degrade the threat ema nating from the area, a senior defense ocial told Congress. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb and its aliates are using northern Mali as a safe haven, Amanda J. Dory, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for African aairs, said dur ing testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. e terror groups have established administrative centers and training bases in the area, Dory said. Our approach is to sup port Malis neighbors, to isolate the terrorist threat and to enable [the Economic Community of West African States] and others to degrade AQIM while working to restore Malian sover eignty, she said. DOD and inter agency part ners are working closely together to help this local and re gional eort, Dory said. In late March, the Malian military launched a coup against the govern ment. Regional nations and the U.S. initially imposed sanctions against the military junta. While local nations have recognized the interim gov ernment, the United States has not. e U.S. military cannot legally provide aid to any government de posed by a military coup. Northern Mali is a center for illicit tracking networks that include drugs, people and now ex tremism, Dory said. Beyond the obvious threat to Malis citizens and its neighbors, the growing terrorist presence in Mali also threatens U.S. citizens and interests in the region, to include the ability to attack embassies and conduct kidnapping operations, she said. ECOWAS will lead the military intervention in Northern Mali, and that regional group will work closely with the African Union, Dory said. e Department of Defense, through U.S. Africa Command, is actively sup porting the military plan ning eort, she said. is is very much an African-led process, Dory said. Our eorts are aimed at making our partners more capable of combating the terrorist threat in their territories, and providing better secu rity for their people. American assistance includes training and equipping African forces preparing to deploy to northern Mali, advice and additional planning sup port, Dory said.DOD targets North Mali Guard stays on boarder As many as 300 National Guardsmen will remain deployed along the U.S.Mexico border for another year as part of a border security partnership between the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security, according to a statement released by DHS Dec. 5. e deployment is part of a newly ex tended agreement to strengthen security and facilitate legitimate trade and travel, the statement said. National Guardsmen operate in sup port of some 18,500 U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents along the southwest border, enhancing surveillance through the use of air assets and state-of-the-art detection and monitoring capabilities in cluding aerial observation, photo imag ery and communications support. In the statement, DHS credited DOD support for the arrest of nearly 20,000 il legal immigrants and the seizure of more than 100,000 pounds of marijuana since March. A spokesperson for Customs and Border Protection said more than 330,000 illegal aliens have been appre hended along the U.S.-Mexico border during the rst nine months of this year, and more than 2 million pounds of marijuana and 6,000 pounds of cocaine have been seized. In 2010, President Barack Obama au thorized the temporary deployment of the National Guard along the southwest border to assist law enforcement with the interdiction of illegal aliens, drugs, weapons and money coming from Mexico. e commander of Navy Region Southeast presented a chief the Navy and Ma rine Corps Medal for heroism during a ceremony Jan. 3. Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) Bryain Williams of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Connement Facility Jacksonville received the presti gious presidential award from Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Williams for rescuing 4-month-old Jimmy Knight from a burn ing house May 11, 2010 in Jacksonville, Fla. Williams spoke about those intense minutes as he risked his life to save the young child. Melinda (Knight) came running out screaming her house was on re and she couldnt nd her baby in all the smoke, Williams said. I ran into the smokelled house and located Jimmy in his playpen. I picked him up and found my way back out the front door, handing the infant to my wife. en I heard Melinda yelling at the back door and went to help. During the confusion, I didnt tell her that I had rescued her son and assumed she had another child inside, he contin ued. So I tried to get in the back door but the ames were too intense. After a few minutes, everyone realized no one else was in the house and the baby was safe. As Scorby presented the award in front of Williams and Knights family members and Sailors from his command, he stat ed, Its an absolute honor and privilege for me to be here today and present this award. You dont see this award given very often. e only time Ive seen this award presented was after 9-11 for some of the rescues at the Pentagon. Chief, I cant say how much admiration and respect I have for what you did by putting your life on the line to save another human being.NAS Jax Sailor saves child Technology developed under the Defense Ad vanced Research Projects Agencys Wound Stasis System program resulted in 72 percent survival rate at three hours post-injury in testing e Department of De fenses medical system as pires to a standard known as the Golden Hour that dictates that troops wounded on the battleeld are moved to advancedlevel treatment facilities within the rst 60 minutes of being wounded. In advance of transport, initial battleeld medical care administered by rst responders is often critical to injured servicemem bers survival. In the case of internal abdominal injuries and resulting internal hemor rhaging, however, there is currently little that can be done to stanch bleeding before the patients reach necessary treatment facilities. e resulting blood loss often leads to death from what would other wise be potentially surviv able wounds. DARPA launched its Wound Stasis System program in 2010 in the hopes of nding a technological solution that could miti gate damage from internal hemorrhaging. As the program evolved, Wound Stasis performer Arsenal Medical, Inc. de veloped a foam-based product that can control hemorrhaging in a pa tients intact abdominal cavity for at least one hour, based on swine injury model data. e foam is designed to be adminis tered on the battleeld by a combat medic, and is easily removable by doc tors during surgical inter vention at an appropriate facility, as demonstrated in testing. Wound Stasis performers presented pre-clinical data on the foam treat ment at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Sur gery of Trauma in Kauai, Hawaii. ese data dem onstrated the ability of the foam to treat severe hem orrhage for up to three hours in a model of lethal liver injury. During testing, mini mally invasive application of the product reduced blood loss six-fold and in creased the rate of survival at three hours post-injury to 72 percent from the eight percent observed in controls. e foam is actually a polyurethane polymer that forms inside a pa tients body upon injec tion of two liquid phases, a polyol phase and an isocyanate phase, into the abdominal cavity. As the liquids mix, two reac tions are triggered. First, the mixed liquid expands to approximately 30 times its original volume while conforming to the surfac es of injured tissue. Second, the liquid transforms into solid foam capable of providing resis tance to intra-abdominal blood loss. e foam can expand through pooled and clotted blood and despite the signicant hy drostatic force of an active hemorrhage. In tests, removal of the foam took less than one minute following incision by a surgeon. e foam was removed by hand in a single block, with only minimal amounts remain ing in the abdominal cav ity, and with no signicant adherence of tissue to the foam. Features appearing in relief on the extracted foam showed conformal contact with abdominal tissues and partial encap sulation of the small and large bowels, spleen, and liver. Blood absorption was limited to near the surface of the foam; the inside of the foam block remained almost uniformly free of blood. Foam may stop bleeding 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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3-year, $617 million deal for up-to-date soware technologye Defense Department has leveraged the buying power of more than two million information technology users to award a three-year, $617 million joint enterprise license agreement for Microsoft products, defense ocials announced Dec. 28. e deal, led by the Army Contracting Command in collaboration with the Defense Information Systems Agency, the Army and the Air Force, demonstrates the best pricing DOD has received to date for Microsoft desktop and server software licenses, ocials said. eres a move afoot throughout the department to bring about eciencies in the [information technology] world, David L. DeVries, DOD deputy chief information ocer, told American Forces Press Service. We took a long, hard look at it realizing that the Department of Defense relies upon the network and upon information technology to do its business. Under the agreement, the Army, Air Force and DISA can begin using the newest versions of Microsoft products, including Microsoft Oce 2013, SharePoint 2013 and Windows 8, ofcials said, adding that Oce 2013 provides enhanced security and content management tools. e package has been customized to meet the specic security needs of the Defense Department. How do we bring about better eectiveness for the warghter, better improved security on the networks ... while reducing the cost of ownership? DeVries asked. We are the largest corporation out there, comprised of four military services. No one comes close to our scale, so when we talk about something that produces a standardized way of buying, installing and maintaining [enterprise software], thats a huge deal. Department ocials estimate savings could run into tens of millions over the course of several years through lower license and software assurance costs, ocials said. is eort is a signicant pathnder on how to do major contract awards for the Department of Defense, said Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael J. Basla, Up Periscope Fearless predictions for 2013 Page 9 Holiday hits The joy of the season celebrated by military Page 4 Best of 2012 Military photographers show their stuff Page 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Kings Bay chief, family welcome 2013s rst baby Vera and Heath Gilbert of Kingsland welcomed the newest addition to their family, Maximus Heath Gilbert, on New Years Day. Baby Maximus arrived at 9:57 a.m. at the Southeast Georgia Health System Camden Campus Maternity Care Center in St. Marys as Camden Countys rst baby of 2013. Maximus weighed in at 6 lbs., 2 oz., and measured 21 inches long. Mom was quite surprised to celebrate the delivery of little Maximus on New Years Day, since he was not due for another three weeks. Another cause for celebration was the arrival of her grandfather, Nikolay Atrashkevich, 74, from Russia. He wanted to meet his rst greatgrandson, she said, smiling. Maximus early birth also ensured his father, Heath, a Navy chief petty ocer at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, would have time to get to know him before being deployed next month. To welcome Maximus, the Health System presented the happy parents with a large gift basket full of gifts and baby care necessities from the Southeast Georgia Health System Camden Campus Gift Shop. e family also received a newborn gift bag from the March of Dimes. In celebration of its 75th anniversary,the March of Dimes provided newborn gift bags to the rst baby born at hospitals across the state of Georgia. Maximus was delivered by Joanne Altringer, CNM, a certied nurse midwife practicing with board-certied obstetrician/gynecologist Eva di Lorenzo, M.D. at Camden OB/GYN. Altringer, who has been delivering babies at Camden for 10 years, also delivered the couples twoyear-old daughter, Viktoria. Each year, more than 700 babies are born at the Camden Campus Maternity Care Center, which features state-ofthe-art medical care in a warm, familyfriendly environment. Newest boot joins the sub force Armed Forces ink joint licensing with Microso Cli deal aected paychecksSocial Security boost adjusts amounts for military, civil servicee legislation that President Barack Obama signed Jan. 2 that postponed the scal cli means changes to military and civilian paychecks, Defense Finance and Accounting Service ocials said. e legislation increases Social Security withholding taxes to 6.2 percent. For the past two years during the tax holiday the rate was 4.2 percent. e increase in Social Security withholding taxes aects both military and civilian paychecks, ocials said. For civilian employees, ocials said, this will mean a 2 percent reduction in net pay. For military personnel, changes to net pay are aected by a variety of additional factors such as increases in basic allowances for housing, subsistence, longevity basic pay raises and promotions. Service members could see an increase in net pay, no change or a decrease, military personnel and readiness ocials said. For military members, Social Security withholding is located on their leave and earnings statement in the blocks marked FICA taxes for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. DoD civilians will see the change on their leave and earnings statement under OASDI for old age, survivors, and disability insurance. Reserve component members Nam soldier would become rst former enlisted to man post President Barack Obama announced his nominations to serve as the next leaders of the Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency Jan. 7. At a White House news con ference, Obama announced his selection of Chuck Hagel to be next defense secretary and John Brennan as the next CIA director. If conrmed by the Senate, Hagel will replace Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta, who conrmed his plans to retire. Brennan, if conrmed, will replace David H. Petraeus, who resigned as CIA director in November. Chuck Hagel is the leader that our troops deserve, Obama said. He is an American patriot. He enlisted in the Army and volunteered for Vietnam. As a young private, and then sergeant, he served with honor alongside his own brother. Hagel, 66, a former senator from Nebraska, earned two Purple Hearts as an infantry squad leader in the Vietnam War. He later co-founded a cellular telephone company. Obama said Hagels brother rescued him when he was injured by shrapnel, and that Hagel did the same when his brother was wounded later, noting that his nominee to lead the Pentagon still bears the scars and shrapnel for battles he fought in our name. Chuck Hagels leadership of our military would be historic, the president said. Hed be the rst person of enlisted rank to serve as secretary of defense, one of the few secretaries who have been wounded in war, and the rst Vietnam veteran to lead Combat vet nominated for defense boss

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THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. ShipShape weight loss starts Jan. 24January is recognized nationally as Healthy Weight Month. Many people choose to make New Years Resolutions related to diet and exercise. ShipShape is an eight-week nutrition and weight management course starting on at 11 a.m., Jan. 24 in the Fitness Complex classroom. If you are ready to adopt a weightloss plan that you can comfortably follow and maintain for a lifetime, congratulations! ShipShape is your answer. Take the next step, and make a plan that will work for you. Call Registered Dietician Mary Beth Pennington, at 5734731 for more information on the program or to sign-up.Kings Bay VITA starts Jan. 22e IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, VITA, program at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay begins Jan. 22. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Naval Legal Services Oce located in the back of the oce at the library. Military Officers meet Jan. 22e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ofcers of America Associations monthly dinner meeting will begin with social hour at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 15 at Osprey Coves Morgans Grill, St. Marys Road, St. Marys. Capt. Dave Reilly USN (Ret.), national director for the U.S. Navy League, is guest speaker. Cost for the meal is $20 per person, payable by cash or check to KBMOAA. RSVP with Capt. Orren Crouch, USN (Ret.), at (912) 729-2389 or orren. crouch@tds.net by Jan. 11.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that measures body fat. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237. Now hear this! Applications for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society educational scholarships and interest-free loans for the 2013-to-2014 academic year are now available and can be downloaded at www.nmcrs.org/education. Students eligible to apply include spouses or children (under the age of 23) of Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Are retired Died on active duty or in a retired status Consideration for selection is based on scholastic ability and nancial need. Applicants must be graduating high school seniors or full-time minimum 12 credit hours college students working toward their rst undergraduate degree. Applications must be received at NMCRS by May 1, 2013 unless the due date on the application states otherwise. During these tough economic times, our educational assistance continues to help Navy and Marine Corps families reach their goal of attending college, said Beverly Langdon, NMCRS Education Program manager. e NMCRS Education Program has provided scholarships and interest-free loans totaling more than $60 million to more than 50,000 students over the last 30 years. It is based on the Societys mission to provide nancial, educational and other assistance. e program is supported entirely by donations and bequests to NMCRS. For more information on the NMCRS Education Program, visit www.nmcrs.org/education or email education@nmcrs.org. Since 1904, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has provided nancial assistance and education to active duty and retired members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members and survivors when in need. Headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, the Society is a non-prot, charitable organization that is staed by nearly 3,500 volunteers, and a small cadre of employees, in oces around the world ashore and aboard ships.NMCRS has help with college funds Navy-Marine Relief Although the state of Washington has recently updated the law on the use of marijuana, essentially decriminalizing use for civilians, Zero Tolerance drug policy regulations remain unaected for Sailors. e Zero Tolerance drug policy was implemented after a fatal crash of an EA-6B Prowler on board USS Nimitz in 1981, killing 14 crew members and injuring 45 others. Autopsies were performed and several members of the ight deck crew tested positive for marijuana. Following this discovery, thenPresident Ronald Reagan instituted a Zero Tolerance drug policy across all of the U.S. Armed Forces. As a result regular, random urinalysis drug checks are conducted on all military personnel. Marijuana can stay in the system for up to 30 days depending on the persons metabolism, dosage and method of consumption, said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class David Johnson. Because its lipid-based, it can stay in the fat cells for a long period of time, whereas water-based substances would ow through very quickly. Marijuana, or cannabis, induces multiple psychological aects to the users mental state. Being under the inuence of marijuana can result in slow reaction speed and poor judgment, and can negatively aect operational success, said Legalman 1st Class Michael Lightsey. In the case of an emergency, people could get hurt. You dont want anyone to be high while operating a jet. Illegal or wrongful use, possession, sale, transfer of controlled substances, or any attempt to commit drug oenses results in maximum punishment under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, which includes forfeiture of a half months pay for two months, reduction in rank, courts martial, three days connement on bread and water (for E-3 and below Sailors), 45 days of extra duty and 45 days on restriction or 60 days of restriction and discharge from military service. Aside from the typical punishment that follows drug use, there are collateral consequences to getting kicked out of the military, said Lt. Cmdr. Ryan Anderson, Nimitz command judge advocate. Aside from increasing the diculty of nding a job, you also lose your G.I Bill. Its not a good idea for Sailors to dabble with marijuana because its not worth it. Before you eat that pot brownie, ask yourself if its worth losing $90,000.Zero Tolerance remains as policy Judge Advocate It is a large misconception that individuals who seek counseling services are crazy or weak. In fact, they are individuals who realize they need help. Individuals seek counseling for a wide range of concerns, including break up of a romantic relationship, family problems, relational problems with a partner, roommate or friend, stress management, anger management, grief and loss, lack of motivation, work-related problems, parenting issues and more. e counseling relationship is a professional one and is very dierent from a relationship with a parent, partner or friend. A counselor will attempt to help you to cope with problems, enhance personal growth and increase self by establishing a positive and trusting relationship. In order to remain professional and objective, a counselor will likely not disclose personal information about him or herself. Counselors provide a comfortable, nonjudgmental and safe environment to share personal struggles and receive feedback and tools for how to help overcome challenges. At the Kings Bay Fleet and Family Support Center, we have six licensed clinical counselors, one of whom specializes in working with children. e counselors provide short term eight to 12 sessions solutionfocused counseling at no charge. ere is a daily intake counselor on call who has a clear schedule, standing ready if someone is having an emergency. It is possible to talk to someone immediately. Counselors also are available for consultation with supervisors, Ombudsmen or peers. Common misconceptions of counseling: Counseling is only for people that are crazy or that need to be institutionalized at a counselor will tell you what you should or should not do at seeking counseling is a sign of weakness Counseling requires a long-term commitment Facts about counseling: Counseling benefits many types of people; those with chronic problems and those dealing with situational concerns Counselors will respect your autonomy and help you make your own decisions To make an appointment or for more information on Fllet and Family Support Center Kings Bay Counseling Services, call (912) 573-4512.Dont be afraid to see a counselor FFSC, Kings Bay Air Force CIO and chief of information dominance. is contract award culminates over a years worth of great teaming between the Air Force, Army and DISA, and ultimately the Air Force will see a cost avoidance of about $50 million a year. Michael E. Krieger, Army deputy CIO, said the Army will save more than $70 million each year for the span of the agreement. e Army Contracting Command negotiated terms that met the complex technical and security requirements for Army, the Air Force and DISA, Krieger said. Navy Rear Adm. David G. Simpson, DISAs vice director and senior procurement executive, also expressed condence in the joint venture, noting overall savings of more than 10 percent for the life of the agreement. [e agreement] gives us a good way of bringing the volume of the governments purchase to bear and reducing the time and eort that Microsoft needs to spend negotiating across the government, Simpson said. Bottom line: lower price for greater value. e admiral explained that the license advances DODs continued focus on mobile computing. [e agreement] recognizes the shift to mobility, Simpson said. Microsoft is committed to making sure that the technology within the agreement has a mobile-rst focus, and we expect to begin to take advantage of Microsofts mobile oerings as part of our enterprise mobility ecosystem. Ocials said the agreement provides software assurance benets which will oer Army organizations additional training and consulting services. DeVries said standardization and predictability have been vital to reducing and controlling costs. is deal and future ventures will enable DOD to work with a variety of vendors to develop products that meet acceptable security standards while enabling the organizations to have as much exibility and capability as possible, he said. the department. Obama noted Hagels dedication to service members and their families, and said his experiences give him the ability to relate to troops. In Chuck Hagel, our troops see a decorated combat veteran of character and strength. ey see one of their own, Obama said. Chuck is a champion of our troops, veterans and our military families. With Chuck, our troops will always know just like Sergeant Hagel was there for his own brother Secretary Hagel will be there for you. Hagels experience includes stints as deputy administrator for the Veterans Administration now the Veterans Aairs Department and as CEO and president of the USO. He served in the Senate from 1997 to 2009, where he was a member of the foreign relations and intelligence committees. Hagel currently is a professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He also is chairman of the Atlantic Council and co-chairman of the Presidents Intelligence Advisory Board. Obama called Brennan one of our nations most skilled and respected intelligence professionals. Brennan, a 57-year-old New Jersey native, is the deputy national security advisor for homeland security and counterterrorism. During his years at the CIA, he worked as a Near East and South Asia analyst, served as station chief in Saudi Arabia, and directed the National Counterterrorism Center.Defense Microso 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Timely turtle rescue success It was an emergency wildlife rescue mission. A bunch of sick, cold Northeast turtles were stuck in Cape Cod trying to swim south andneeded a quick lift to Florida. e Coast Guard heeded the call with a C-130J Hercules based out of Elizabeth City, N.C. I know were just the bus drivers, said Lt. Jon McCormack, pilot for the C-130J turtle transport ight. However, were happy to be able to help and make a dierence in bringing these sea turtles so they can be safe and thrive in their natural environment. As part of our supporting our living marine resource missions, the Coast Guard works with federal and state partners in times of need such as when animals are stranded or entangled. More than two dozen New England Aquarium sta, volunteers and Coast Guard crew braved the cold to quickly load up the airplane at Cape Cod, Mass., with 35 coldstranded endangered turtles nested in blanket-lined fruit boxes and makeshift pet crates. For tracking, each turtle had a painted white number on its shell. e 70-pound Loggerhead and the smaller ve to 10-pound Kemps Ridley turtles are in various stages of recovery from pneumonia and hypothermia. A record stranding of more than 200 sea turtles o the Northeast coast in early winter exceeded the New England Aquariums capacity to house the nearly comatose reptiles. Sensing urgency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Northeast Stranding Network facilitated a request for the emergency ight. If it were not for the USCG transport of 35 turtles to Florida we would be in a series crisis for rehabilitation space for these endangered and threatened sea turtles, said Connie Merigo, director of the rescue department at the New England Aquarium. Sea turtles continue to strand here in Massachusetts almost 20 more in the past few days. An hour later, as the C-130s ramp slowly closed shut, aquarium sta and Coast Guard crews standing on the runway waved their farewells to the airplane and its precious cargo bound south for the Sunshine State. Touching down at sunny 80-degree Orlando, Fla., a motorcade of ve aquariums and marine wildlife centers, including SeaWorld Orlando, lined up by the plane ramp. As soon as the bright sunshine and warmth hit THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 Armed Forces Holidays in the

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 5 2012 in photos Two Coast Guard screening vessels escort USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) to sea en route from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Jan. 18. Navy photo by MC1 James Kimber Lt. Lori Campbell of Naval Branch Clinic Belle Chasse carries a young girl transported from Port Sulphur, La., by a Louisiana Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk to Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, New Orleans, Sept. 1 following Hurricane Isaac. Air Force photo by Daniel P. Farrell Staff Sgt. Michael Cornelio pays respect after placing a wreath at a grave marking during Wreaths Across America at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Dec. 15 DOD photo by Sebastain Sciotti Jr.

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the turtles, they stirred restlessly in their crates and boxes while being carried out. On the ground, the numbered reptiles were sorted through rosters and quickly claimed as adoptees. e turtles were nally home, as they should be, for the holidays. In a few months, theyll be released back to the wild. Aside from being beautiful creatures, the importance of sea turtles cannot be underestimated. ey are an integral part of the marine ecosystem helping to restore beach habitat, to manage sea vegetation and are crucial to the predator-prey food chain. By helping to protect and rescue endangered and threatened marine wildlife, the Coast Guard supports its living marine resource missions, said Capt. Mark Ogle, Atlantic Area future operations branch chief. e preservation of sea turtles is vital to the health of our oceans and sheries. Inherent to their nature, sea turtles grow up to learn how to swim, but for this special mission, they learned how to y.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Jan. 17. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Jan. 30Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Jan. 30. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Jan. 14 and 28. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 to 25. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Resume writing skills class upcomingThis class explores resume writing for todays job market. Resume items including skills, experience, education and values as well as simple, effective and easy to use resume formats that get job interviews. Parttime, full-time or permanent positions matters not, this workshop is for you. This program will assist the job seeker in completing a product that will get them in the door. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 3 p.m., Jan. 28. Registration is highly recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information, call 573-4513.Credit reports and scores workshop upcomingCredit has become a nor mal part of everyday personal financial management for most Americans. Used appropriately, it can be an excellent tool, but used the wrong way, it can bring the financial wheels of your life to a grinding halt for a long time. This two-hour workshop pro vides the importance of managing your credit. It will be at the Fleet and Family Support Center 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 22. Registration is required. For more information call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Jan. 28The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Jan. 28. For more information, contact at 573-4513.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries and benefits. Learn how to interpret job announcements and determine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be provided guidelines, information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 9 a.m. to noon, Jan. 11. Registration required by calling 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 15, 22 and 29. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingTransition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 14 to 18. Retirement Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 28 to Feb. 1. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 5734513.Job search workshop scheduled for Jan. 16A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 16. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include letter writing, transportation, temporary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Jan. 17. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more information call 5734513.Financial planning for deployment Jan. 15This workshop is to prepare you for deployment. It will provide you with a have a com prehensive to do list. This is suitable for active duty married and single service members, spouses. It provides information to help you prepare financially for deployment. This training is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Jan. 15. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing Sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 30 and 31. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops will be the rst to see potential changes in their net pay as a result of the law, DFAS ocials said. Changes will be reected in their January paychecks. Active duty military personnel will see pay adjustments in their January mid-month paycheck and will be reected on the January leave and earnings statement. DOD civilians will see social security withholding changes reected in paychecks based on the pay period ending Dec. 29, 2012, for pay dates beginning in January. DFAS stresses that all personnel should review pay statements carefully.Pay Turtle 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Come to the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Fitness Complex for its Resolution Solution 2013 Open House at 4 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 14. See the new tness class schedule, with the grand opening of the Moms & Tots Workout Room, plus new at Health Promotions e Bod Pod. Meet and greet the trainers. At 6 p.m. try out all the classes in an EXA-on! For more information contact the Fitness Complex at (912) 573-3990. One Pitch Softball Tournament Saturday, Jan. 12 at the softball field complex, its $200 per team, and is open to all authorized patrons, 18 years old and older. The for mat will be double elimina tion. ASA, local rules, with one pitch with strike mat will apply. Teams must provide their own balls (.44 core/375 compres sion). ASA approved bats only. Trophies awarded for first and second place teams, plus cash prizes. Pre-register by stopping at sports office or by calling (912) 573-8908. Tae Kwon Do Its at the Fitness Complex on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. for 7 year olds and under, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. for 8 to 12 year olds and 7:15 to 8:30 p.m. 13 year olds to adult. A free two-week introductory class plus the next two weeks is $22.50 for active duty, retiree and reservists, $25 per month for family members of active duty, retired and reservists, $30 for one family member per month, $40 for 2 family members per month, $60 for 3 family members per month, and $80 for 4 family members per month. DOD civilians, their family members and contrac tors is $35 for one member per month, $50 for two family members per month, $70 for three family members per month, and $90 for four family members per month. For more information, call the fitness complex at (912) 573-3990. Battalion Airsoft Arena Trip Saturday, Jan. 26, leave the Big EZ at 10 a.m. and join Navy Adventures Unleashed and Liberty for a day at Jacksonvilles Battalion Airsoft Arena. $35 includes transportation, entry fee, airsoft assault rifle w/all day full battery, ammo, safety gear and snacks. Theres a special $20 price for Liberty Active Duty Members. Get your friends together for a full day of live action. For more information contact NAU at (912) 573-9869. Daytona 500 tickets are now in Stop by Information, Ticket and Travel to purchase your race tickets. Petty Tower is $99, Lockhart Tower is $99, Superstretch Terrace is $62 and Fanzone is $53.50. For more information visit ITT or call (912) 573-8888, extension 8. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special The early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes with 15 percent off regular rates, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its only $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for all others. This offer is not valid on weekends or holidays. You may book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling (912) 573-8475 Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Rack-N-Roll Lanes gaming room has skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Free movies for kids are every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. with Brave Jan. 12 and 13, Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur Jan. 18, Ice Age: Continental Drift Jan. 19 and 20, Where the Wild ings Are Jan. 21 and Odd Life of Timothy Green Jan. 26 and 27. All youths under 18 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the scheduled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Free movie weekends Just for kids Liberty call Resolution Solution is Jan. 14 Car-buying strategies examined Jan. 29This two-hour workshop provides in-depth training on looking for a car, how not to get taken for a ride and the important dos and donts before you step onto the car lot. Topics include negotiating, trade-ins, discounts, financing and highpressure sales tactics. This training is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m., Jan. 29. Registration is recommended. For more information, call 573-9783.Spending Plan Workshop helps with budgetingDo you have trouble making it from one paycheck to the next? is workshop can help you develop a realistic spending plan and family budget. It will be 9 to 11 a.m., Jan. 23. Call 573-4513 for more information.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteFFSC will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guaran tee a minimum of ve partici pants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with hu man resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Person nel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC Did you know? Call 800-822-6344 or visit www.stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 7

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I am going to make my prediction a light-hearted one and talk football. As a Redskin fan it was a heartbreaker to see them get beat Sunday, but it was nice to see them in the playoffs. I will make my predictions for the NFC and AFC Championships. For the NFC Championship, the Green Bay Packers and the Atlanta Falcons will play. The AFC Championship will be between the Denver Broncos and the New England Patriots. Lets see how close I can get with this.MT1 Scott Butler USS Alaska Gold St. Marys The world will not end in 2013. Bill Wesselhoff Civilian contractor Rock Island, Ill. I predict I will fly to Boise, Idaho, for a patriotic reunion with my shipmates on the Fourth of July. Jacob McCray Family member Cape Canaveral, Fla. More advanced robots will be built to help people in their everyday lives. Stephanie Butler Family member Shrewbury, Mass. Im hoping for job opportunities. UTCN Angiulli Davalos CBMU 202 Miami I will deploy to South America in the new year. Bruce McDonald Retired Navy Shawmut, Ala. Ill have to wait and see what the politicians are going to do in the new year before I make any decisions. Up eriscope with MC2 Cory Rose Schwarzkopf remembered President Barack Obama, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Joint Chiefs Chairman Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey praised the service and legacy of retired Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who passed away Dec. 27 at age 78. Schwarzkopf was a Vietnam veteran and one of the architects of the western anking movement that helped to defeat the Iraqi army during the Gulf War in early 1991. As the commander of U.S. Central Command, Schwarzkopf led the international coalition assembled by then-President George H.W. Bush that expelled Iraqi troops who had invaded Kuwait in August 1990. e four-star general and West Point graduate retired in August 1991 after 35 years of Army service. Schwarzkopf died in Tampa, Fla., of complications from pneumonia, according to press reports. Obama saluted Schwarzkopfs service in a statement issued Dec. 27. With the passing of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, weve lost an American original, Obama stated. From his decorated service in Vietnam to the historic liberation of Kuwait and his leadership of United States Central Command, Gen. Schwarzkopf stood tall for the country and Army he loved. Our prayers are with the Schwarzkopf family, who tonight can know that his legacy will endure in a nation that is more secure because of his patriotic service. Panetta also honored the general. e men and women of the Department of Defense join me in mourning the loss of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, whose 35 years of service in uniform left an indelible imprint on the United States military and on the country, Panetta said in a statement. e son of a decorated Army ocer, Gen. Schwarzkopf followed his THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 9

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January phase open for PCS orders e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase is scheduled to begin Jan. 10, and remain open until 5 a.m. Jan. 22 for Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the webbased program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when it is time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at www.cmsid.navy. mil or from the CMS/ID like at www.npc.navy.mi. Sailors are in their orders negotiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected rotation date. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with an October 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a September 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD. ese Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is typically 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before making applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced last July in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised active-duty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, eet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, training availability, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. e Navy will join the nation in observing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan. 21. Navy commands are encour aged to reect on the recurring theme, Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On, Not A Day O! and increase their knowledge and awareness of Dr. Kings contri butions to American history and civil rights by participating in military and community events. Dr. King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism during the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. Following in the footsteps of his father, King entered the Christian ministry in February 1948 at the age of 19. He was ordained at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and in 1954, upon completion of graduate studies at Boston University, he accepted a call to serve at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. While ministering there, King became an instrumental leader in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, made famous by the arrest of Rosa Parks. e boycott lasted over a year and led to the 1956 District Court ruling that racial segregation on buses was unconstitutional. Over the course of his lifetime, King was arrested 30 separate times for his participation in civil rights activities. Although King spent the majority of his life preaching on the issues of social justice, empowerment, love and peace, which won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, his attention and eorts also included ghting economic injustice. On April 4, 1968, King journeyed to Memphis, Tenn., to help lead sanitation workers in a protest against low wages and intolerable working conditions. While standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel, King was shot and ultimately died. In honor of Kings unnished eorts, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1983. e rst observance was held Jan. 15, 1986, the anniversary of Kings birthday. In 1992, President George H.W. Bush proclaimed the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday would be observed every year on the third Monday of January. On Aug. 23, 1994 Congress passed the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday and Service Act, designating the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday as a day of national volunteer service. All commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of Kings contributions to American history and civil rights through participation in military and community events and volunteerism within their communities and worldwide. Navy to mark Martin Luther King Jan. 21 Amidst their busy schedule, recruits of Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, stacked their weapons and neatly led into a classroom aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 10. Once in the classroom, they quickly settled in and the academic instructor introduced himself before starting the hour-long class with a clip of the movie Pearl Harbor. Today in class we were taught about World War II, said Recruit Spencer Goodrun, Platoon 2155, Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. We learned about the role of the Marine Corps, the different battles and Marines that received awards for heroic actions. During the Marine Corps History III class, the instructor spoke about Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Guam, Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Learning about the struggles and triumphs Marines faced through history is important because it helps recruits gain a dierent perspective, according to Goodrun. ere are six phases of Marine Corps history classes which encompass everything from the birth of the Marine Corps to the recent war in Iraq and current operations in Afghanistan. However, the knowledge isnt only taught in the classroom. roughout training, drill instructors help recruits review, understand and reinforce the information learned which helps prepare them for the comprehensive test on Training Day 55. Its important for not only recruits to know this information but for Marines too, said Sgt. Pablo Montao, academic instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Bn. It keeps us up to date and fresh with how the Marine Corps came about, our traditions and history. It helps pass on our culture and instills pride in recruits and Marines alike. e pride also brings motivation to recruits and helps them gain new perspective to face dicult challenges, according to Montao.Recruits learn about many dierent subjects throughout recruit training. We cover a wide spectrum of classes, said Montao. We teach everything from general military studies and history to combat rst aid and nancial classes. ese classes not only help set them up for a good Marine Corps career, they also help set them up in life. All of the knowledge gained in recruit training will stay with the recruits long after they graduate and become Marines. It makes me feel really good to know that I can leave an imprint on the recruits, Montaa said. I sat in these same seats six years ago and now Ive come full circle. Im stand ing at the podium teaching the recruits through my ex periences, its amazing. Corps history a core class Hurricane Sandy is two months over, but as 2013 opens, the New York Army National Guard is still helping people in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island who were aected by the storm. Working with local, state and federal agencies, Soldiers assigned to the 280-member Team Sandy continue to go door to door checking on the status of the people recovering from the devastation and collecting data to better help the Ofce of Emergency Management, or OEM. With so many homes ruined by the ooding of hurricane Sandy, the data is invaluable when sending resources out into the boroughs. Citizen-Soldiers go out in teams of two and knock on the doors of houses in a designated area. Each Soldier has a form and a series of questions to ask the homeowner. We started with the forms and collected data from the building managers, said 1st Lt. Malinda Vazquez, the planning ofcer, and a resident of Queens, N.Y. Now, we are going door to door, checking on the well-being of each resident and making sure they are OK. e completed forms are uploaded manually each day and give OEM the information to help those most in need. e forms limited our ability to move the data because the information had to be input manually, and would take three to ve days for the information to reach the proper agency, said 2nd Lt. Anthony Migliore, of Smithtown, N.Y., the team operations ocer. Because of the time necessary for the information to reach local and state agencies, a new system was developed to make the information-gathering process more ecient. A new form that is lled out electronically using a tablet, can now can be sent to the database instantly and the information is automatically sent to the proper agency. Now that we have over 200 [electronic] tablets, the information is transmitted instantly to a centralized database managed by the Disaster Immediate Response Team, Migliore said. As we continue the operation, we are able to congure the tablets to reect more detailed information. e New York National Guard has completed more than 96,000 door-to-door wellness checks and continues to rene the process to knock on more doors in less time. We are working closely with the New York City police department, re department, AmeriCorps, FEMA, OEM and the mayors oce to make our data collection more ecient, Migliore said. Our maps are becoming more precise and the use of the electronic tablets makes our information gathering easier. e maps of each aected area are broken down by sectors and cells. Each sector is made up of an entire neighborhood and each cell is comprised of roughly ve city blocks. Each tablet is tracked to record the progress of the Soldiers on the ground throughout the day and changes are made to increase the streets covered during the nightly meetings. e questions are also rened to make information gathering easier. We have developed eight teams to go door to door, said Master Sgt. Troy Haley, of Troy, the noncommissioned ocer for one of the teams. With those teams, we are able to provide information instantly and get help to the people most aected by the hurricane. We also provide food, water, blankets and comfort kits as we go. We are here to serve our fellow citizens during this crisis, said Col. Mark Leahey, of Rochester, N.H., the commander of Joint Task Force Sandy. We are here to let them know that they are not alone, and we will do everything we can to help them. Sandy cleanup continues 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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Pirates Cove menus fathers legacy of service by enrolling in West Point in the 1950s. His bravery during two tours in Vietnam earned him three silver stars, and set him on the path to lead our troops into battle in Grenada, and then to take charge of the overall allied eort in the rst Gulf War as Commander of United States Central Command. Gen. Schwarzkopfs skilled leadership of that campaign liberated the Kuwaiti people and produced a de cisive victory for the allied coalition. In the aftermath of that war, Gen. Schwarz kopf was justly recognized as a brilliant strategist and inspiring leader. Today, we recall that enduring legacy and remember him as one of the great military giants of the 20th century, Panetta concluded. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey said in a statement that he was saddened to learn of the passing of General Nor man Schwarzkopf, a fellow West Point graduate, for mer Centcom commander and one of the 20th cen turys nest soldiers and leaders. I join the civilian and military leaders of our country, and servicemen and women, past and pres ent, in mourning his death. Gen. Schwarzkopf embodied the warrior spirit, serving with distinction in three conicts over his 35 years of dedicated service. e hallmark of his remarkable career was the swift and decisive victory over Saddam Husseins forces after they invaded Kuwait. e thoughts and prayers of the Joint Chiefs and the Joint Force are with Gen. Schwarzkopfs family and friends. Secretary of the Army John McHugh and Chief of Sta of the Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno released a joint statement: Our nation has lost a soldier and statesman with the passing of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, it said. Our prayers are with his family as we honor the memories of a man dedicated to family, his country and the many soldiers he led in war and peace. His life story touches on much of the fabric of our nations story, ensuring his memory will remain with us for generations. Our nation owes a great debt of gratitude to Gen. Schwarzkopf and our soldiers will hold a special place in their hearts for this great leader. While much will be written in coming days of his many accomplishments, his most lasting and important legacies are the tremendous soldiers he trained and led. Schwarzkopf is survived by his wife, Brenda, and children Cynthia, Jessica and Christian.Remember THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013 11

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Northern Mali has become a terrorist haven, and DOD will continue to work with local African nations and regional organizations to isolate and degrade the threat emanating from the area, a senior defense ocial told Congress. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb and its aliates are using northern Mali as a safe haven, Amanda J. Dory, the deputy assistant secretary of defense for African aairs, said during testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. e terror groups have established administrative centers and training bases in the area, Dory said. Our approach is to support Malis neighbors, to isolate the terrorist threat and to enable [the Economic Community of West African States] and others to degrade AQIM while working to restore Malian sover eignty, she said. DOD and inter agency part ners are working closely together to help this local and regional eort, Dory said. In late March, the Malian military launched a coup against the government. Regional nations and the U.S. initially imposed sanctions against the military junta. While local nations have recognized the interim gov ernment, the United States has not. e U.S. military cannot legally provide aid to any government de posed by a military coup. Northern Mali is a center for illicit tracking networks that include drugs, people and now extremism, Dory said. Beyond the obvious threat to Malis citizens and its neighbors, the growing terrorist presence in Mali also threatens U.S. citizens and interests in the region, to include the ability to attack embassies and conduct kidnapping operations, she said. ECOWAS will lead the military intervention in Northern Mali, and that regional group will work closely with the African Union, Dory said. e Department of Defense, through U.S. Africa Command, is actively supporting the military planning eort, she said. is is very much an African-led process, Dory said. Our eorts are aimed at making our partners more capable of combating the terrorist threat in their territories, and providing better security for their people. American assistance includes training and equipping African forces preparing to deploy to northern Mali, advice and additional planning support, Dory said.DOD targets North Mali Guard stays on boarder As many as 300 National Guardsmen will remain deployed along the U.S.Mexico border for another year as part of a border security partnership between the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security, according to a statement released by DHS Dec. 5. e deployment is part of a newly extended agreement to strengthen security and facilitate legitimate trade and travel, the statement said. National Guardsmen operate in support of some 18,500 U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents along the southwest border, enhancing surveillance through the use of air assets and state-of-the-art detection and monitoring capabilities including aerial observation, photo imagery and communications support. In the statement, DHS credited DOD support for the arrest of nearly 20,000 illegal immigrants and the seizure of more than 100,000 pounds of marijuana since March. A spokesperson for Customs and Border Protection said more than 330,000 illegal aliens have been apprehended along the U.S.-Mexico border during the rst nine months of this year, and more than 2 million pounds of marijuana and 6,000 pounds of cocaine have been seized. In 2010, President Barack Obama authorized the temporary deployment of the National Guard along the southwest border to assist law enforcement with the interdiction of illegal aliens, drugs, weapons and money coming from Mexico. e commander of Navy Region Southeast presented a chief the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for heroism during a ceremony Jan. 3. Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (Electrical) Bryain Williams of Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Connement Facility Jacksonville received the prestigious presidential award from Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. Williams for rescuing 4-month-old Jimmy Knight from a burning house May 11, 2010 in Jacksonville, Fla. Williams spoke about those intense minutes as he risked his life to save the young child. Melinda (Knight) came running out screaming her house was on re and she couldnt nd her baby in all the smoke, Williams said. I ran into the smokelled house and located Jimmy in his playpen. I picked him up and found my way back out the front door, handing the infant to my wife. en I heard Melinda yelling at the back door and went to help. During the confusion, I didnt tell her that I had rescued her son and assumed she had another child inside, he continued. So I tried to get in the back door but the ames were too intense. After a few minutes, everyone realized no one else was in the house and the baby was safe. As Scorby presented the award in front of Williams and Knights family members and Sailors from his command, he stat ed, Its an absolute honor and privilege for me to be here today and present this award. You dont see this award given very often. e only time Ive seen this award presented was after 9-11 for some of the rescues at the Pentagon. Chief, I cant say how much admiration and respect I have for what you did by putting your life on the line to save another human being.NAS Jax Sailor saves child Technology developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agencys Wound Stasis System program resulted in 72 percent survival rate at three hours post-injury in testing e Department of De fenses medical system as pires to a standard known as the Golden Hour that dictates that troops wounded on the battleeld are moved to advancedlevel treatment facilities within the rst 60 minutes of being wounded. In advance of transport, initial battleeld medical care administered by rst responders is often critical to injured servicemembers survival. In the case of internal abdominal injuries and resulting internal hemorrhaging, however, there is currently little that can be done to stanch bleeding before the patients reach necessary treatment facilities. e resulting blood loss often leads to death from what would otherwise be potentially survivable wounds. DARPA launched its Wound Stasis System program in 2010 in the hopes of nding a technological solution that could mitigate damage from internal hemorrhaging. As the program evolved, Wound Stasis performer Arsenal Medical, Inc. developed a foam-based product that can control hemorrhaging in a patients intact abdominal cavity for at least one hour, based on swine injury model data. e foam is designed to be administered on the battleeld by a combat medic, and is easily removable by doctors during surgical intervention at an appropriate facility, as demonstrated in testing. Wound Stasis performers presented pre-clinical data on the foam treatment at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma in Kauai, Hawaii. ese data demonstrated the ability of the foam to treat severe hemorrhage for up to three hours in a model of lethal liver injury. During testing, minimally invasive application of the product reduced blood loss six-fold and increased the rate of survival at three hours post-injury to 72 percent from the eight percent observed in controls. e foam is actually a polyurethane polymer that forms inside a patients body upon injection of two liquid phases, a polyol phase and an isocyanate phase, into the abdominal cavity. As the liquids mix, two reactions are triggered. First, the mixed liquid expands to approximately 30 times its original volume while conforming to the surfaces of injured tissue. Second, the liquid transforms into solid foam capable of providing resistance to intra-abdominal blood loss. e foam can expand through pooled and clotted blood and despite the signicant hydrostatic force of an active hemorrhage. In tests, removal of the foam took less than one minute following incision by a surgeon. e foam was removed by hand in a single block, with only minimal amounts remaining in the abdominal cavity, and with no signicant adherence of tissue to the foam. Features appearing in relief on the extracted foam showed conformal contact with abdominal tissues and partial encapsulation of the small and large bowels, spleen, and liver. Blood absorption was limited to near the surface of the foam; the inside of the foam block remained almost uniformly free of blood. Foam may stop bleeding 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, January 10, 2013

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