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The Kings Bay periscope ( 12-13-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00282

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00282


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Navy Adventures Unleashed event inspires competition Whos the strongest? Whos the fastest? ose questions and more were answered when Navy Ad ventures Unleashed Kings Bays breakout event Rugged Recreation Uprising was Saturday at Etowah Park. Members of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay community chose to be outsiders and test themselves with a day of competitions and challenges. By adding the challenge ele ment to the event, we were able to capture a new audience and offer some thing for ev eryone, ranging from the single Sailor to families, Navy Adven tures Unleashed Kings Bay coor dinator Michele Miki Gilbert said. It was a day of smack talk and friendly competition. e feedback was overwhelmingly positive and left participants asking, whens the next one? e morning began with a 5K run through the woods of Etowah Park, which included a series of obstacles in addition to the uneven ter rain. Runners found themselves hop ping over downed trees, dodging limbs or climbing un der cargo nets. Following the run, the park was open for patrons to climb the rock wall or try Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and RecreKings Bay volunteers spread holiday cheer at VA medical center Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel volunteered a day for giving Dec. 4 whey they traveled to Carl Vinson Veterans Administration Medical Center in Dublin, Ga. For more than 20 years, Sailors and Marines from various commands aboard the Kings Bay area have taken the journey to Dublin to spend time with the men and women of prior military generations at the center. is trip is a good opportu nity for our service members to give back to the men and women who have served before them, said Chap lain Lt. Lara Byrd, Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay coordinator of the trip. Holiday time Best wishes to all! The Periscope will return Jan. 10 Big hit Band of TRF members rocks Guantanamo Bay Page 11 Santas here St. Nick visits Kids Party, Winter Wonderland Page 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Rugged Recreation Uprising brings out the best Correct choice lessonTrident Ret Facility drives home drunk driving dangers Do you want the .25 or the comatose? You just took out ve pedes trians! at was more than just a little fender bender! ese and more were phrases used during Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Ret Facilitys November Safety Training. e topic? Drunk driving. e location? e TRF admin parking lot. Mode of instruction? Vision impairment goggles and Drunk Buster Pedal Karts. Wanting to try an interac tive approach to the standard, Power Point training without having to take the actual risks, STS2 Ryan Perdew researched ways to make this training have the lasting impact the Navy al ways intends. He realized that providing a controlled environ ment where Sailors and their shipmates could most accurately experience the eects of alcohol impairment, without fear of consequences, would open ev eryones eyes. TRF Sailors rst stood on the straight line of a parking spot and donned one of two pairs of Vision Impairment Goggles in their choice of a .15 Blood Alco First qualied female sub ocers receive Dolphins ree Sailors assigned to USS Wyo ming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the rst female unrestricted line ocers to qualify in submarines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during separate ceremo nies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In or der to re ceive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Ocer of the Deck and Engineering Ocer of the Watch, perform damage control functions, and demonstrate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fel low Gold Crew ocer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. Mc Fadden, partici pated in a ceremony presided by Cmdr. Christo pher Nash, commanding ocer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of USS Wyoming. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque USS Wyoming (Blue) By nature we are all a bit competitive. Michele Miki Gilbert NAU Kings Bay For many of the residents, this is the only visitor they see during the holidays. Chaplain Lt. Lara Byrd NSB Kings Bay ChapelFor those who served

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Major changes announced Dec. 6 to the Transition Assistance Pro gram will revolutionize the way the military prepares people leaving the services, with mandatory participation in programs throughout their military careers to help set them up for a successful transition. e redesigned program, called Transition Goals Planning Success or Transition GPS, was unveiled by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. It is a multi-agency response to President Barack Obamas call to improve career readiness for sepa rating service members, explained Susan S. Kelly, principal director of the Defense Departments Transi tion to Veterans Program Oce. e president hinted at the mostsweeping change to the Transition Assistance Program in two decades during a speech this summer to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Obama called it the centerpiece to a broader federal eort to help ser vice members transition to civilian life and to reduce veterans unem ployment. During the three-phase rollout of the Transition GPS program that will continue through 2014, the many, but often disconnected, activities conducted across the U.S. govern ment to support veterans and their families will be melded into one comprehensive eort, Kelly said. e Defense Department and de partments of Veterans Aairs and Labor aligned their most success ful programs to deliver better and more comprehensive services to help make service members career ready for civilian employment, of cials said. ey reached out to the Depart ment of Education to integrate the latest teaching methods and tapped into the resources of the Oce of Personnel Management and the Small Business Administration. One of the biggest changes in the new program is that participation is no longer voluntary. Based on a law that took eect Nov. 21, service members can no longer opt out of the transition as sistance program. All, including reservists and Guardsmen demobilized after 180 days of active duty, must now attend specic training sessions and take concrete steps to prepare for separa tion. During phase one of the rollout, being implemented immediately, all separating service members will re ceive counseling about Department of Veterans benets, Kelly said. In addition, most will be required to at tend newly revamped employment workshops run by the Department of Labor. ese workshops incorporate new curriculum such as how to explore career interests, use search tools to nd job opportunities, write a re sume, interview for a position and negotiate a salary, said John Moran, DOLs deputy assistant secretary for Veterans Employment and Training Service. While fullling the congressional mandate to reach out to all separat ing service members, the interagen cy team went a step beyond the law to further enhance the eort, Kelly said. Separating service members must now take nancial planning train ing, and complete a 12-month bud get that factors in the cost of where they decide to live after leaving the military. ey must evaluate how their military-acquired education, training and experience translate into civilian career qualications and prepare an individual transition plan. e task force ran a pilot program last summer at seven installations to evaluate this core curriculum, gathering assessments from about 950 military members who participated. Many in the pilot programs found it eye-opening, Kelly said. e seven pilot sites continue to oer the DOL workshops, but the instruction will be available servicewide by January, Moran said. e programs second phase, to be tested during 2013 and implement ed by the years end, establishes re quirements for separating service members who plan to go on to col lege or technical or career training or to start their own businesses. ose electing higher education or other training will be required to show an acceptance letter from that institution, or have an application lled out and ready to submit, Kelly said. ey also will be required to establish a contact with a counselor to follow up with after leaving the military. Also during phase two, service members who hope to become entrepreneurs will be required to connect with the Small Business Administration for help in drafting and evaluating their small business plans. e nal phase of the rollout to be implemented by the end of 2014 will integrate transition preparation throughout the service members military career. e idea, Kelly ex plained, is to begin preparations for transition long before a service member prepares to leave the mili THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Kings Bay MOOA meets Dec. 18e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Associations monthly dinner meet ing will start at 5:30 p.m., Dec. 18 at Osprey Covs Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. e guest speaker will be Gregory J. Whitney, director of Jackson ville National Cemetery in Jacksonville, Fla. Cost for the meal is $20. For reservations, by Dec. 14 contact Capt. Orren Couch (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tuesday, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For additional information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp. Now hear this! Applications for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society educational scholarships and interest-free loans for the 2013-to-2014 academic year are now available and can be down loaded at www.nmcrs.org/educa tion. Students eligible to apply include spouses or children (under the age of 23) of Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Are retired Died on active duty or in a retired status Consideration for selection is based on scholastic ability and nancial need. Applicants must be graduating high school seniors or full-time minimum 12 credit hours college students working toward their rst undergraduate de gree. Applications must be received at NMCRS by May 1, 2013 unless the due date on the application states otherwise. During these tough economic times, our educational assistance continues to help Navy and Marine Corps families reach their goal of at tending college, said Beverly Lang don, NMCRS Education Program manager. e NMCRS Education Program has provided scholarships and in terest-free loans totaling more than $60 million to more than 50,000 stu dents over the last 30 years. It is based on the Societys mission to provide nancial, educational and other assistance. e program is supported en tirely by donations and bequests to NMCRS. For more information on the NMCRS Education Program, visit www.nmcrs.org/education or email education@nmcrs.org. Since 1904, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has provided nancial assistance and education to active duty and retired members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members and survivors when in need. Headquartered in Arlington, Vir ginia, the Society is a non-prot, charitable organization that is staed by nearly 3,500 volunteers, and a small cadre of employees, in oces around the world ashore and aboard ships.NMCRS has help with college funds Navy-Marine Relief Transition Assistance is mandatory Transition Assistance As a young child I always dreamed big and believed in sitting upon Santas knee, but only after watching the Macys Thanksgiving day Parade, since I am a turkey baby. But I digress. In North Carolina growing up in a decent-size town called Gastonia, I wanted a particular item one year. A bicycle. So when I think of Christ mas wishes, I can never forget that year when my Christmas wish came true. ere on Christmas morning I wouldnt go to sleep and got my mom up very, very, very early, not even sure she went to sleep was a beautiful banana-seat blue bicycle, complete with horn and basket. Well, just like the song lyrics, written by Linda ompson-Jenner in Grown up Christmas List, Im all grown up now, all ve-feet-one of me anyway, and I still need help somehow. Maybe some of you are thinking the same thing. Not just for a world in need, but my heart still can dream cant yours? I dream of no more lives being apart by hate and that time would truly heal all hearts from the years that life has given. And for sure everyone needs a friend, and right would always win. But no one knows what the right side is all the time. Sorry, not even the chiefs have all the answers. But if love would never end, then just maybe we could still believe that even if nothing appeared under our Christmas trees, that the greatest package doesnt have a bow, in fact that our human souls could receive the blessing of peace three-hundred, sixty-ve or six days a year. Families could nd a way to heal through the hurt caused by one another. is is not the innocence of youth, but the intentional eort given by each one. e truth of love would be ever present in our hearts and souls, because we found a way to live out our Christmas wishes all year long, our belief in something higher. And that is my grown-up Christmas wish. Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay Chapel A grown-up Christmas wish for all

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e Pearl Harbor Sur vivors Association Tide water Chapter 2 hosted an Annual Pearl Harbor Survivors Remembrance Ceremony at Joint Expedi tionary Base Little CreekFort Story, Dec. 7. Twelve survivors at tended the ceremony, which marks the 71st an niversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor that claimed the lives of more than 2,300 service members and prompted the United States to enter World War II. ey are ordinary people, yet extraordi nary people who helped lead this great country through sheer tragedy, to resounding victory, said Capt. Charles Stuppard, commander JEB. ey worked, raised their families and lived amongst us. ey are who reporter Tom Brokaw rightfully titled his bestselling book, e Greatest Generation. Lt. Gen. John M. Paxton Jr., commander, Marine Forces Command and the guest speaker during the ceremony, echoed that same sentiment during his speech. e strength of America is in that we keep having the next greatest generation, he said. So I assure the 12 of you today that your service was no ble, your sacrice doesnt go unrecognized and that we remember your ship mates. e ceremony, which was held at the Pearl Har bor Monument on JEB, commenced at 12:55 p.m., the exact time the 1941 at tack began. e monument was built and dedicated in 1990 by the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. An expansion to the monument was completed in 2001 and included the ad dition of 184 names of lo cal survivors of the attack. e fact that these 12 survivors, and indeed many of their mates from the Second World War, labored through those next ve years and went through those sacrices, went through that service, saw that death and de struction and bore those physical or emotional scars themselves is an in dication that the greatness of this nation and an in dication of the ideals that those 12 men represented on the 7th of December when they were wearing the cloth of our nation, Paxton said. As part of the commem oration, a simple 8-bell ceremony was performed during which the survi vors stated their name, rank and the command to which they were assigned in 1941. e ceremony also included a wreath laying and 21-gun salute. e ceremony was great today, said Ernest Davenport, a survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack and 21-year Navy veteran. It was one of the best Ive ever attended out here. During his famous speech after the attack, Pres. Franklin Delano Roosevelt said, With condence in our armed forces, with the unbound ing determination of our people, we will gain the in evitable triumph. So help us God. Japan formally surren dered aboard USS Mis souri while anchored in Tokyo Bay the morning of Sept. 2, 1945, nearly four years after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Adm. James A. Wineld, Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta spoke during the ceremony at the National World War II Memorial. e attack shocked the nation but it also stirred a quiet and peace-loving people to action, Win nefeld said. Today the U.S. military is involved in another conict half-a-world away, as the result of a dif ferent surprise attack on American soil that killed nearly 3,000 of our fellow Americans in one day, the admiral said, referring to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. tary. e end state that we are shooting for is to em bed this across the military lifecycle, she said. Each service will de velop a plan designat ing points along a service members career path for this training, Kelly said. Danny Pummill from the VA called the Transi tion GPS program an un precedented interagency eort that ensures service members have the time and resources to prepare for a smooth transition from the military. It will help the nations newest veterans live up to their destinies as the next greatest generation, he said. If we do this right, this is our opportunity to once again transform America, Pummill said.Tap Pearl Harbor recalled at memorials Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 e volunteers handed out 161 do nation bags to veterans and talked and listened about military experiences past and present. e bags contained personal items, such as a tooth brush and paste, dis posable razors, shampoo and deodor ant. ey also included pens, enve lopes, writing pads, assorted games and other useful contents. is is a time where I set aside my needs and focus on the needs of oth ers, Byrd said. For many of the residents this is the only visitor they see during the holidays. Not only is the visit a good morale booster for the vets and sta, but it gives the sta an in-depth look at what the next generation of veterans will look like. Seeing active duty military at our medical center inspires our sta be cause it allows them to make a con crete connection between their work and the needs of the next generation of veterans that they will care for, said Frank Jordan, Carl Vinson Veterans Administration Medical Center Public Aairs supervisor. It also inspires our veterans, since most of them are very much concerned to make sure that the next generation is cared for as well. Seeing active duty military at our medical center inspires our staff ... Frank Jordan Carl Vinson Public AffairsVinson

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 5 Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young ocers earned the right to lead the next generation of subma rine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully repre sent the future of our nations technical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualied subma riner onboard the ballistic missile sub marine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the submarine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the jour ney to come, Leveque said. I could not have accomplished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Bos ton, joined two other Blue Crew ocers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Ocer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine ship mate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. e Commanding ocer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four ne of cers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. ey are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submariners that have gone before us as qualied in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line ocers and sev en supply ocers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each completed strategic deterrent pa trols aboard their respective submarines. Qualifying is a huge accomplishment for any submariner, and it feels no dier ent for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to nally be a member of this elite community. Im particularly grateful to my crew, ocers and enlisted, for supporting me and holding me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualied sub marine ocer. Cowan said qualication in subma rines is more of a personal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of submarine life and has you per form so many skills that when I take a step back and look at everything that I have done and what this qualication means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowledge and the instinct to perform safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its missions. Ul timately, it is a monumental mark of the condence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and ac ceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats be ginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Ocer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line ocers under instruction graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charles ton, S.C., and underwent naval nuclear prototype training.Leveque PSD chili cookoff Navy Adventures Unleashed Kings BayRugged Recreation UprisingStrong Man WinnersIron Cross Womens Division: 1, Alisa Andrews, 2, Anjelica Ruiz, 3, Kayla Proper Mens Division: 1, Rick Gilbert, 2, Gerardo Oliver, 3, Anthony Harris Tire Toss Womens Division: 1, Anjelica Ruiz, 2, Alisa Andrews Mens Division: 1, Brett Gilbert, 2, Rick Gilbert, 3, Brandon Gilbert Gator Push Womens Division: 1, Alisa Andrews Mens Division: 1, Alonzo Dunkentell, 2, Zackariah Bonneau, 3, Gerardo Oliver5K Off-Road Challenge WinnersWomen Under 19: 1, Asia Sumrall, 2, Alyssa Merletti, 3, Alena Sumrall Men Under 19: 1, Tim Hutton, 2, Evan Roe, 3, Roman Merletti Women 20 to 29: 1, Kayla Proper,2, Samatha Miller, 3, Alyssa Phelps Men 20 to 29: 1, Woody Georges, 2, Joel Sorto, 3, Christopher Conner Women 30 to 39: 1, Lara Byrd, 2,Holly Merletti, 3 Samantha Zamuido Men 30 to 39: *1, Nicholas Hamlin, 2, Eugene Reale, 3,Eric Delgado Women 40 and Up: *1, Laura Williams, 2, Wendy Melody, 3, Paula Necaise Men 40 and Up: 1, Rick Gilbert, 2, Rhett Jaehn, 3, Jason Emley *Top Overall Female and Male Trail Bike Prize Winners: Camron Langley, Grace Baer, Shawn Quigley Volunteers: MA2 Gerardo Oliver-Baez, MM3 Cody Kenens, MM3 Zackariah Bonneau, MM3 Thomas LaMaster, MM3 James Rewis, MASR Alisa Andrews, MASN Mackenzie Beekman, MA3 Derek Hansen, MASN Matthew Rosales, Anthony Harris, MASN Kayla Proper, MACM Paula Necaise, PO3 Camron Langley, MA2 Christopher Conner, Andrew Barclay, Braylee Gilbert, Leah Register, Cmdr. Rick Gilbert, Darryl Blake, Shawn McCormick, Courtney Ax NMCRS volunteer honored ations new Halo Jumper. Nine teams took part in the double elimination 3-versus-3 Paintball Tour nament, strategizing and executing battle plans in the inatable arena set up by Kings Bay Outdoor Recreation. Surviving six rounds, Team No Sleep shot its way into the nals, edging out e Under achievers to take home the gold. e MWR Sports De partment added an ele ment of toughness to the day with their series of Strong Man Challenges. e Tire Toss, Iron Cross and Gator Push had fans cheering and contestants struggling as they pushed their physical limits to outlast their competition. With competitions being oered to teams (paintball) and individuals (Strong Man) all were equal draws and most par ticipated in multi events, starting with the morning 5K, Gilbert said. In addition all the events oered entertainment for the bystanders and families. It was nice to see kids cheer for parents and then the adults cheer for the kids. MWRs new Halo Jumper was also a big hit with kids of all ages, Its sure to be a attraction of its own at future events. Not to be outdone by the adults, kids literally jumped into the action with the Kids in the Dirt Challenge Run. Parents were able run alongside of their younger ones and encourage them to complete the mile long course. Taking part in the event entitled participants to enter a drawing for a 20inch mountain bike. If getting dirty wasnt in the cards, many took ad vantage of the inatable bouncy houses, slides and Frisbee golf, Plus a free hotdog lunch. Overall this was a day of camaraderie and good cheer, Gilbert said. Patrons were happy to have a change of venue at Etowah Park and enjoyed being outdoors. We are always encouraging kids to go outside. Adults need outside time too. People came to participate, had fun and stayed the duration. ats a success in my book. MWR events would not be possible without the help of volunteers. Rugged Recreation Uprising is no exception. e MWR sta thanks all who helped make this day possible. Visit the Facebook page mwrkingsbay to check out the many photos of the day. For more information on Navy Adventures Unleashed events, call 5739869.Uprising

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e morning Col. Greg ory Pappy Boyington went missing in action, he was leading the Black Sheep of Marine Fighter Squadron 214 on a ghter sweep over Rabaul, near Papua New Guinea, cross ing 200 miles of enemy waters and territory. As they broke through the clouds to attack the Japanese, they were am bushed from above before the rest of their squadron could join the battle. Pappys wingman, Capt. George Ashum, was hit and was being chased down. Pappy did every thing he could to get the Japanese to back o and by so doing put his own aircraft in danger. Ashums plane burst into ames and a moment later crashed into the sea. Pappys situation wasnt much better as he was forced to land in the water. Wounded, Pappy stayed in the water until dark when he was picked up by a Japanese submarine. e Japanese held Pap py prisoner for 20months. While a prisoner of war, Pappy was awarded the Medal of Honor for his ac tions between September 1943, and January 1944. e medal citation reads that Pappy was consistent ly outnumbered he struck at the enemy with daring and courageous persis tence, leading his squadron into combat with dev astating results to Japanese ship ping, shore instal lations and aerial forces. Resolute in his eorts to inict crippling damage on the enemy, Pappy led a formation of twenty-four ghters against the Japanese on Oct. 17, 1943, and boldly challenged them to send up planes. Under his command, American ghters shot down 20 enemy craft without the loss of a single plane. Pappy Boyington has 26 conrmed kills and is tied for the top Marine Corps Ace pilot with Capt. Jo seph Foss. Pappy was born in Coeur dAlene, Idaho, Dec. 4, 1912. He wrestled and swam in college and worked in mining and logging camps during summer. He started ying while in college. He received his com mission as a second lieu tenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve June 1934. A year later, he enlisted in the Volunteer Marine Corps Reserve and was commissioned to second lieutenant. He didnt stay long. Pappy wanted to join the ght in China against the Japanese. He left the Marine Corps in 1941 to ght with the Flying Tigers a volunteer ghter squadron in China. While there, Pappy shot down six Japanese planes, which gave him the lead over other American aces who didnt join the ght until after Pearl Harbor. After he returned to the Marine Corps in 1943, Pappy formed the Black Sheep Squadron. ey gave him the nickname Pappy be cause he was older than most of the pilots. After the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Pappy was liberated along with other prisoners on Aug. 29, 1945. He died Jan. 11, 1988. Pappy, a Marine legend e Defense Depart ment has received guid ance from the Oce of Management and Budget and is now planning for sequestration, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Dec. 5. Speaking during a press availability, Little stressed the department still hopes Congress will be able to avoid sequestration that would take eect Jan. 2, 2013. We are consulting with the Oce of Management and Budget and have been instructed to pursue internal planning on se questration, Little said. We are at the very start. We dont have all of the details rmed up. Natu rally, we hope very much that sequestration will be avoided. We dont want to go o the scal cli. DOD ocials believe it is prudent to begin the planning process. OMB delivered the guidance this week. We are going to have to do some detailed planning at some point on the numbers and the specific conse quences of seques tration, which weve anticipated and already talked about, Little said. Senior defense ocials, led by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, have warned Congress since the Budget Control Act was passed that sequestration would be a disaster for national security. Essentially, the process would cut the DOD bud get by $500 billion. is would be on top of the $487 billion in cuts already planned. Ocials also warn that sequestration would blow the bottom out of the defense strategic guidance released earlier this year. DOD used the guidance to plan the scal 2013 defense budget. If this is triggered, even in light of this absurd mechanism that was created to avoid absurdities, our intent is to not imple ment sequestration in an absurd way inside the Department of Defense, Little said. He said that the eects of sequestration will not begin all at once on Jan. 2, 2013. Rather, he believes the department will have some months at the be ginning of 2013 to put in place directives and poli cies to carry out the law. We expect in our plan ning eorts to identify not just numbers, but how we communicate to our 3-million-plus workforce, to prepare them for what may come down the pike, he said. e military manpower portions of the defense budget are exempt from sequestration, but Little promised to communicate with all segments of the DOD workforce in the weeks ahead. Hopefully, Congress will come to resolution on sequestration, but we have looked at those impacts and will plan against them, he said. Sequestration planned American and Iraqi of cials signed a memorandum of understanding Dec. 6 in Baghdad that will make it easier for the two countries to work to gether. e memo was one result of the Defense and Se curity Joint Coordination Committee that met Dec. 5 and 6 in the Iraqi capital. Undersecretary of Defense for Policy James N. Miller, acting Iraqi Defense Minister Saadoun al-Dlimi and acting Undersecretary of State for International Security Rose Gottemoeller participated in the meeting. e committee dis cussed eorts to strength en security cooperation between the two nations, ocials said. is includes enhancing Iraqs security capabilities and modernizing Iraqi forces. Iraq is buying F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft and M-1 Abrams tanks from the United States, among other programs. ese procurements in clude spare parts, training, maintenance help and other considerations. e ocials also dis cussed regional issues and the ongoing conict in neighboring Syria. e memorandum of understanding, signed by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Dlimi, cov ers the range of U.S.-Iraqi defense cooperation and covers the next ve years. is includes high-level military-to-military visits, professional military education cooperation, coun terterrorism cooperation and the development of defense intelligence capabilities.U.S., Iraq sign agreement 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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General Dynamics NASSCO held a keel laying ceremony for the future USNS John Glenn (MLP 2), Dec. 4, in San Diego, Calif. MLP 2 is the second ship in the Mobile Land ing Platform program that will provide the Navy with the capability to transfer vehicles and equipment at sea and to interface with surface connectors to deliver the vehicles and equipment ashore. e ships name honors the Hon. John Glenn, a decorated Marine Corps pilot, who was in atten dance for the ceremony. A distinguished astro naut, the rst American to orbit the Earth and a former U.S. Senator from Ohio, Glenn ew 59 com bat missions during his service with the Marine Corps in World War II, and a combined 90 missions over the course of two tours in the Korean War. It is tting that this ship is named in honor of a transformative gure like Senator John Glenn, said Capt. Henry Stevens, Stra tegic Sealift and eater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Oce, Ships. MLP will be the centerpiece of the Navys seabasing capability and transform how the Navy and Marine Corps team operates from the sea. e keel was co-au thenticated by Lyn Glenn, ships sponsor, and Helen Toolan, spouse of Lieutenant General John A. Toolan, Jr., USMC, Com manding General I Marine Expeditionary Force. MLP will have a maxi mum speed of 15 knots and range of 9500 nauti cal miles. At 837 feet long, MLP displaces more than 80,000 tons when loaded. e ship with its modu lar core capability set includes a 25,000 sq. ft. raised vehicle deck, sideport ramp, large mooring fenders, and berths for up to three Landing Craft Air Cushioned vessels.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 17 and 31. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center through out the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 18 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share expe riences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Ship honors John Glenns memory THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 7

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hol Content or .25 BAC. en they were told to walk the line. With his shipmates looking on and jeering from the side, ND2 Seth Foos walked what he thought was a straight line, until he removed his goggles and saw he had veered almost 2 feet o in his 15-foot journey. I really thought I was walking just ne, Foos said. I put one foot in front of the other and was balanced. I couldnt be lieve I was only looking through .15 BAC and was that far o. As if the debacle of try ing to walk in a straight line werent enough to take participants down a few notches, the training wasnt complete until ev eryone put on the goggles. But, instead of walking in a straight line, some sat behind the wheel of a pedal kart and proceeded to attempt navigating a multi-turn course marked with orange cones, also known as pedestrians. As in real-life situa tions, each Sailor began with complete control of the cart as they drove the course without impair ment goggles. Once they had the chance to drive normally, they donned a pair of impairment goggles and drove the course once more. What a complete dierence the goggles made, TRFs ATO/FPO, CWO3 Billy Butler said. My peripheral vision and depth perception were non-existent and my abil ity to judge kart place ment between the cones went completely out the window. TRF CMDCM Allan Quatro was pleased with the impression left by this training. You can teach Sailors in the classroom about the dangers of drinking and driving, but the rsthand experience is price less, Quatro said. With the holiday season just around the corner, TRF is committed to providing the highest quality training to our Sailors, to bring them all back safe, encouraging them to remember this experience, to make a plan before they go out, and to stick to that plan because once they leave the safety of this parking lot, there are very real consequences for their actions. Trident Refit Facilitys spirit banner Richardson Lesson 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Obama picks AustinPresident Barack Obama intends to nominate Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, cur rently the vice chief of sta of the Army, to succeed Marine Corps Gen. James N. Mat tis as the next com mander of U.S. Central Com mand, De fense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Dec. 6. Austin is one of the militarys most seasoned combat leaders, the sec retary said, and will bring an important combination of strategic thinking, regional knowledge and proven judgment to one of the most critical posts in the department. Austin was the nal commander of U.S. Forces Iraq, holding that position from Sept. 1, 2010, until the command was dises tablished Dec. 18, 2011. During his nal deploy ment to Iraq, Gen. Austin led our military eorts at a particularly important time, overseeing the draw down of U.S. forces and equipment while simultaneously helping to ensure that hard-fought security gains were preserved and that Iraqis could secure and govern themselves, Panetta said. Austins previous commands include the 3rd Infantry Division, with whom he earned a Silver Star for valor for actions in the early months of the war in Iraq. In 1975, ex-1 took our daughter and went home for Christmas. So I put out word on my ship that every body was invited Christmas Eve to our one-bedroom apartment in Ocean View, Va. About 30 guys showed up and filled the tiny place with Christmas spirit, via bottles and cans. Everybody had a great time, and there was no trouble. Early in the morning my bed was full, so I found a place to sleep in the walk-in closet. When I woke up Christmas Day, I couldnt move because there were snoring Sailors everywhere on the floor. All the emp ties were under the tree. It wasnt bare like it had been before. It looked like Recycling Santa came! Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MM2 Phillip Cooper Trident Refit Facility Hazel Green, Ala. We played Dirty Santa, where you wrap a pres ent, pick a number and pick a present. My broth er and I got in a fight over a car wash kit. Wally Cooper Retired Army Black River Falls, Wis. I dont know. Im kind of a bah humbug guy, because Christmas (spirit) should be every day of the year. SW2 Andres Hoven CBMU 202 Edina, Minn. When I was six years old, I got a puppy. Tyeisha Duncan Family member Laurel, Miss. My sister ate all of Santa Claus cookies. Staff Sgt. Randi Burke Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Foley, Ala. My first Christmas with my husband as a family. Our first Christmas I gave birth to a son, but he was deployed and missed it. Ray Parks Submarine Group Ten Needville, Texas During the Cold War I spent Christmas on a diesel submarine and enjoyed my birthday, all in one. Four-man Face for Radio draws crowd at Naval Station What would you do if you were oered a once in a lifetime opportunity to board a plane bound for Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and to do the one thing that you love to do in support of the troops who are on the front lines, as well as the ones who can no longer ght? Youd pack your bags! Retired Navy Senior Chief and current Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Trident Ret Facil ity Administrator Alan Hupp Huppmann and his band mates from Hupp N Ray and Face for Radio did just that. ere is nothing like getting on stage and put ting some energy out there through music, then hav ing that energy come back to you from the crowd, Huppmann said. ere is no other feeling in the world like it. Huppmann is the lead vocal ist of the two bands that lit the Guantanamo Bay nights on re and satiated the crowds musical appetite. Opening a four-day concert extravaganza, the duo of Hupp N Ray enter tained the Marines and Sailors of Git mo with acoustic rendi tions of timehonored classics that had the fans on their feet and singing along into the night. e enthusiasm was palpable and had the audience clamoring for more when the nal note was played for the evening. With three more days of musical euphoria in store for the Gitmo residents, the anticipation had already risen to a feverish level.TRF members rock Gitmo In the past year, we wrote a song specifi cally for the Wounded Warrior Project. Alan Hupp Huppmann Band member and NSB Kings Bay TRF administrator THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 11

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Winter Wonderland and Kids Christmas Party Skating in style at Winter Wonderland at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Photos by MC2 Cory Rose and courtesy of MWR Santa arrives at the Kids Christmas Party. Christmas characters at Winter Wonderland. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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NATO foreign ministers have agreed to Turkeys re quest for Patriot anti-mis sile batteries to defend the country against possible airstrikes from neighbor ing Syria. e decision came Dec. 4 during the rst of two days of meetings at al liance headquarters in Brussels, with ministers saying the goal is to de fend the population and territory of Turkey and contribute to the de-esca lation of the crisis along the alliances border. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen described the situation along Turkeys southeast border with Syria as one of grave concern, adding that NATO stands in full solidarity with Turkey. e Patriot missiles are expected to be supplied by the United States, Ger many and the Netherlands and would remain under the operational command of the alliances supreme allied commander for Eu rope. e decision comes as the civil war in Syria in tensies and amid new concerns in Washington over the status of the Syr ian governments stocks of chemical and biological weapons. In recent weeks, Syrian rockets and shells have landed on the Turkish side of the border, killing sever al people, a development that Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has said raises concerns that the Syrian conict could spill over into other countries in the region. e Turkish government has supported Syr ias opposition, and as an alliance member had requested that NATO provide the U.S.-built Patriot air defense system to deter further threats to its terri tory. NATO ocials stress that use of the missiles will be purely defensive. Ras mussen emphasized that the system will in no way be used to support a no-y zone over Syria, as some have proposed. NATOs decision to approve Turkeys request comes a day after the United States said it was growing increasingly concerned that Syrian President Bashar Assads regime might be considering using its stocks of chemical weapons against its own people. Yesterday, President Barack Obama issued a direct warning to the Syrian leader that any use of chemical or biologi cal weapons would be unacceptable. ere will be consequences, and you will be held accountable, Obama said. Patriots bound for Turkey Angels deliver Marine presentse Navy Flight Dem onstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, transformed the squadrons C-130 Hercules, aectionately known as Fat Albert, into a modern-day Santas sleigh in support of the U.S Ma rine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program, bringing the joy of Christmas to numerous children in the Northeast who were aected by Superstorm Sandy. e Blue Angel crew, who left from their home base of Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., made stops in Atlanta and Washington to pick up toys on the way to Joint Base Mc Guire-Dix-Lakehurst in Wrightstown, N.J., where the toys would answer the need for childrens gifts in this area of the country. For many residents of the Northeast, Superstorm Sandy has put celebrating the holidays on the back burner, replaced by a dif ferent set of priorities. One family in particu lar was invited to the joint base aireld so the Toys for Tots eort could bring some Christmas joy to their children. Heather and Peter Sa bey, whose entire rst oor of their home in Toms River, N.J. was ooded during the storm, said their daily activities are now tied up with try ing to restore some sense of normalcy to their lives and the lives of their chil dren. e Sabeys say they are busy taking care of recov ery eorts in their home and driving kids to and from school so the holiday season has taken on a dif ferent meaning this year. Going Christmas shop ping for our kids has taken the back seat to us making calls to insurance com panies and trying to get our lives back, Heather said. So I think receiving Christmas presents thanks to Toys for Tots today is go ing to be huge for our kids to feel the love and the joy of the season from all over the country. Peter said the Toys for Tots eort takes a lot of burden o them and other parents in the area who are unable to provide a typical Christmas to their children this year because of the devastation from the storm. Its great to see people come together during this time of hardship, he said. Its also great to see that not only my kids but many kids in the commu nity here are going to get that Christmas they hoped for thanks to Toys for Tots. Blue Angel Command ing Ocer/Flight Leader Cmdr. Tom Frosch said supporting the Toys for Tots eort in the North east is an honor, especially in response to the devas tation brought upon by Superstorm Sandy. Its simply a matter of taking the opportunity to do what we can for those in need, Frosch said. It wasnt a question of whether we could support this outstanding cause, but rather, how soon we could provide support and get toys to the children. President and Chief Executive Ocer for the Marines Toys for Tots Foundation, retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Pete Os man, stated that having a working relationship with the Blue Angels serves a vital mission for the Toys for Tots program. eres a great visibility in the Blue Angels pro gram as far as it being a community outreach program much like Toys for Tots is, Osman said. So it really is a natural t hav ing the Blue Angels lend their support to Toys for Tots. Among the crew of Blue Angels who made the trip for this mission were some active-duty service members originally from the Northeast, giving this trip a special meaning to them. Logistics Specialist 2nd Class William Kelly, a supervisor in the Blue Angels Supply Department, was visiting family in New Jersey and rode out the early days of the storm in his familys home. He and his wife, Kaydee, had to drive to an airport in Pennsylvania to get a ight back to work at the Florida-based squadron. He was eager to take this special trip to N.J. to assist in the eort. My family and I are thankful we made it through the storm unharmed and without much loss of property other than losing power and water, Kelly said. But I cant imagine how the children in this area feel having possibly lost their home or school or even THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 13

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Pirates Cove menus Veterans Moving For ward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the pup pies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog We hope you enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. A good Service Dog has to be of sound mind and body. e body part comes from my parents. In earlier stories I mentioned my Canadian roots. My mom Jasmine was was awarded her champi onship title from the Canadian Kennel Club and was shown in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatch ewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia, so she saw a lot of the country. My mom and I are a lot alike. We both like to trav el. With all those awards and her breeding, a suitor had to be found for my Mom. at turned out to be Indy, an American golden from Maryland. Both of them are Eng lish-type Golden Retriev ers and are very beautiful. at is why I am so hand some and my sister Lori, also a Veterans Moving Forward puppy-intraining, is so pretty. We were born in Janu ary 2011 after a major snowstorm. My siblings and I were all born within just over an hour, which is almost unheard of as it sometimes it takes all night for a litter to be born. When we were very young there were lots of noises around us, like mu sic, ocean waves, children laughing, planes, trains, sirens, jack hammers and more. My rst human Mom played lots of nois es for us and would ring a cowbell, hit a Chinese gong, bang pots, drop things and do funny ex ercises with each of us to stimulate our brains and bodies. It was only when I was a few months older and visiting New York City that I saw a human in the side walk and that jack ham mering noise was coming from him. And you know what? I was not at all scared. I just looked at him and thought of my Mom and litter mates. e man did look a little weird. As we grew older, it was safe for us to leave our pen, and we were taken outside. Oh my, that was dierent. In late February the cold air smelled totally dierent. One day there was this strange white stu out there. It was cold on our paws, but we were curious so we would launch our selves into the u and it just smushed under us. It was fun, but we got cold pretty quickly, so the most wonderful thing about the snow was af ter that there were warm, clean towels for us to cud dle in. Each of us got our towel wrapped around us and then we were placed in a basket to snuggle deeply into with each other and those great towels. We fell asleep for a while to have a pup nap. Yeah, we really enjoy our naps. For some rea son humans have catnaps. Why dont humans have pup naps? A very special thing kept happening whether we were in the whelping room, the kitchen pen or when we went outside. We had visitors. We were more popular than Prince William and the Kate the Duchess of Cambridge. Best of all were the visits from Veterans Moving For ward. As days went by, we grew big and strong. I was chosen to be the male who would be donated and trained to help Sol diers and veterans. My rst human dad, Ar nold, is a lieutenant colo nel in the Royal Canadian Air Force, and my rst human mom, Maureen, serves too. Before I was born they decided that it would be wonderful to commit one of the pups into training to be a ser vice dog for a veteran. My siblings were going to families to be pets, so at rst I wondered why I wasnt worthy of being a pet. en it dawned on me, and to this day I real ize that Lori and I were the most important and special pups, who would work with veterans and wounded Soldiers. Wow, what a special life to be chosen to serve those who chose to serve. As I continued to grow, I learned being half Canadian has some perks. I was invited to visit the Cana dian Embassy in Washing ton, D.C. Not just any dog gets that invitation. Just me. I sat perfectly when I was introduced by Lt. Col. Kettenacker to everyone. I met lots of important humans there and shook a few paws with humans too. e embassy was like nothing I had ever been to before. ere were many beautiful pieces of art. I enjoyed walking around with the humans and get ting to go out on the spe cial balcony overlooking the U.S. Capitol. e fresh air up there was nice too. Someone teased me and said they knew I was Canadian by my bark. Sometimes when I bark it comes out woof eh. Looking back on my adventures as a pup, I do miss my rst family. I hat ed to see everyone go, but I fell in love with all of my new family. It is good to be part of so many families canine, human, Veterans Moving Forward, Coast Guard, Canadian and other ser vice dogs.Nathan and his heritage Life of a Service Dog Part 5 a loved one to the storm. And to have this happen right before Christmas is especially sad. Coming on this trip to help out and bring a little Christmas joy to them was something I jumped at soon as I heard about it. For the past three years the Blue Angels squadron has own toys and gifts to varied parts of the country in support of the Toys for Tots mission. And while the Blue Angels mission consists of being ambassadors of good will representing the U.S. military, this mis sion was very special to the crew involved due to the holiday season and the many children whose Christmas is all but nonexistent. Toys 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Breakfast with Santa is Sat urday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo oportunities with Santa so remember your camera. Sto ry time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Ex change with a delicious break fast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Happy New Years Bash at Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 8 p.m., Monday, Dec. 31, to 1 a.m., Jan. 1, its a great time for fam ily and friends, so grab a whole lane and toast in the New Year. the cost is $20 per person or $100 for a lane up to six people, including a champagne toast, party favors, five hours of bowl ing and shoes. Reservations are recommended. Walk-ins are welcome, too, with a special price is $3 a game per person and $2 for shoe rental. During the evening, Dominos Pizza will be offering a special from 8 p.m. to midnight of any size, any way for $10. Call (912) 573-9492 to reserve your spot NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on See Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christ mas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care pa trons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration began Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registra tion began Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Breakfast with Santa Dec. 15 If you liked this, make sure you come out to the Face for Radio concert. It will be something like this, only bigger, Ray Hetchka and Vic Deacon, Hupps bandmates, added. Ready to be entertained, the crowd for the Face for Radio concert was remark able. Word of the bands talent spread quickly on the tiny base and even a premiere of the new Twi light movie wasnt enough to keep the fans from rocking into the night. e band played all-time favorites from Creedence Clearwater Revival, e Rolling Stones, e Beatles, ZZ Top, Led Zeppelin and Stevie Ray Vaughan along with a mix of 80s, 90s and current radio hits. Cover songs are songs that we love Huppmann said. Our specic set lists are songs that have stood the test of musical great ness for 30 years ... songs that bridge age gaps. Ev eryone loves these kinds of songs. We get to put our spin on them and throw it out there and see the crowds reaction. Every member of the band gave thanks to the troops for having the opportunity to play at Gitmo, calling it an honor and a special experience in their careers. During the Hupp N Ray concert, as well as the Face for Radio concert, an acoustic guitar covered with the names of fallen service members graced the stage. We started putting the names on this guitar and it has sort of turned into a memorial for us, Huppmann said. We take to every show. Its become a really special thing. Lead vocalist Huppmann explained the bands con nection and appreciation for service members. In the past year, we wrote a song specically to try to raise money for the Wounded Warrior Project, Huppmann said. We play this song at every gig, and 100 percent of our tip jar goes to the Wounded War rior Project. e song is called Simple Prayer, and was inspired by a very good friend of the band, a Navy Lieuten ant Commander who deployed to Afghanistan in February 2012 and was a regular participant in the Run for the Fallen. e deeply moving song praises service members and asks protection for their families. While he is away on duty, the band continues to play, raising money for the Wounded Warrior Project and making plans to throw their friend a great homecoming party. Hopefully, too, they will be able to present him with a check for a large amount to be donated to the Wounded Warrior Project. For more information on the Song for the Fallen project, visit www.song forthefallen.org.Band THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Navy and Arizona State will meet on the gridiron for the rst time at the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl on Dec. 29 at AT&T Park in San Francisco. is will be Navys 18th bowl appearance and the ninth in the last 10 years. e game will kick at 4 p.m. E.T. in San Francisco and will be televised by ESPN2. We are excited to have the opportunity to select Arizona State to meet Navy in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl on Dec. 29, bowl executive director and co-founder Gary Ca valli said. It promises to be an intriguing matchup between two high-scor ing, high-prole teams. Navy has won seven of its last eight games, and ASU also nished strong with a come-from-behind win over Arizona in the Territorial Cup. We look forward to welcoming the Midshipmen and Sun Devil players and coaches, as well as thousands of their fans, and providing them with a memorable experience in San Fran cisco. e Sun Devils nished the regular season 7-5, with a 5-4 record in the Pac-12, including a 41-34 victory over in-state rival Arizona. Arizona State scored 24 fourth quar ter points to rally from a 10-point decit in that game as running back Marion Grice carried 18 times for a career-high 156 yards and three touch downs. Arizona State is an out standing football team with great players on both sides of the ball, said Navy head football coach Ken Niumatalolo. We have played a very tough sched ule this year and there is no doubt that Arizona State will be as talented as any team weve faced. Arizona State head coach Todd Graham said the annual goal for every college football team is to have a successful season and play in a bowl game. We are very proud to have reached that goal by participating in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl against a worthy opponent such as the U.S. Naval Academy, Graham said. It will be an honor to travel to and par ticipate in this wonderful Bowl experience in one of Americas great cities. Led by junior QB Tay lor Kelly, Arizona State was third in the Pac-12 in scoring oense, averag ing 36.4 points per game. e Sun Devils were also formidable defensively, ranking second [to Pac12 champion Stanford] in allowing only 350.8 yards per contest. Kelly (224-340-2,77225 TD-9 INT) completed 65.9% of his pass attempts while throwing for an av erage 231 yards per game. Five receivers caught 33 or more passes on the year, led by WR Chris Coyle (53659-5 TD). Arizona State ranked rst overall against the pass, permitting just 178.8 yards per game through the air in the passing-con scious Pac-12 Conference. e Sun Devils addi tionally picked o 20 pass es in 12 games, returning three for touchdowns. Part of that success is at tributed to a front seven that ranked second in the Pac-12 with 48 sacks. Junior defensive tackle Will Sutton was named the Pat Tillman Pac-12 Defen sive Player of the Year de spite missing a portion of the season due to injury. He had a team-leading 10.5 sacks while totaling 58 stops. Senior DE Brandon Magee was the Pac-12s second-leading tackler, with 104 stops that also featured 6.5 sacks. He had 17 tackles against Arizona. Based on our visit in 2004, we have seen rst hand that the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl is a magnicent overall environment and event, said Na val Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk. e city of San Francisco, the stadium, the hospitality from the community, the bowl administration and the beauty of Northern California present as ne a postseason experi ence as we could possibly enjoy. e Academy is sincerely grateful to Gary Cavalli and his sta for in viting us back and setting the stage for our team to earn an enjoyable trip to the West Coast and an in spiring matchup against a great Arizona State team. Tickets for the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl are on sale now at www.navys ports.com. Tickets can also be purchased by calling 1-800-US4-NAVY or at the Ricketts Hall Box Oce. Ticket prices are $25 (Upper Level End Zone), $40 (Upper Level Corner), $50 (Upper Level Sideline and Lower Level End Zone and Corner), $60 (Lower Level Sideline and Sideline Bleacher behind the team bench) and $75 (Club). e only way to sit with the Navy contingent is to buy your tickets through the Navy ticket oce. Fans can also purchase tickets to sponsor mid shipmen and enlisted per sonnel and their families for $50 per ticket. Donated tickets are 100 percent tax deductible. We strongly encour age Navy fans to buy their bowl tickets directly from the Naval Academy Ath letic Association, Gladchuk said. It is very im portant for this game and for future Navy bowl con siderations for our fans to purchase tickets through the NAAA.Midshipmen meet Arizona State in Dec. 29 bowl Navy scuttles ArmyNavy can hook an anchor to the Commander-inChiefs Trophy and bring it to Annapolis. Keenan Reynolds extended Navys dominance against Army, scoring the winning touchdown late in the fourth quarter in a 17-13 victory in the 113th rivalry game Saturday. Navy (8-4) beat Army for the 11th straight time and won the Commander-in-Chiefs Trophy awarded to the team with the best record in games among the three service academies. Army and Navy each beat Air Force, putting the prestigious trophy up for grabs in the regular-season nale for the rst time since 2005. It means everything, Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. ats our No. 1 goal, to get the Commanderin-Chiefs Trophy. Im just so happy for these guys. Army (2-10) hasnt hoisted the CIC trophy since 1996. e Black Knights came close, but Navy recovered a late fumble, and Reynolds 8-yard rushing score made it 17-13. In front of 69,607 fans and Vice President Joe Biden at Lincoln Financial Field, Navy caught a break when Army missed a late eld goal attempt. Reynolds quickly found brandon Turner down the sideline for a 49-yard gain. Reynolds then escaped a rush and followed with the 8-yard touchdown run with 4:41 left in the game. Unlike previous game over the last decade, the Black Knights were in this one until the nal drive. Army had driven to the 14 when fullback Larry Dixon fumbled on a sloppy exchange. Navy recovered and the Midshipmen went wild and rushed the eld. e CIC trophy was coming back to the Naval Academy for a record 13th time after a two-year stint at Air Force. Before Navy started its 11-game winning streak, the longest one in the series, started in 1890, was only ve games for either team. Its hard to do, Niumatalolo said. Its hard to beat anybody in a rivalry game, but to do it that long just speaks volumes about the guys in the white jerseys. Navy not only won 10 straight, but pretty much dominated the Black Knights, winning games in 2007 and 2008 by a combined 74-3 score. Navys 27-21 win last season was the tightest mar gin since the winning streak started. Last year was just a start at nudging closer toward ending the win ning streak. Cadets even brought one of those oversized goofy cutouts of Bidens head to show o during the game. e Midshipmen played with Ra stickers on the back of their helmets as a salute to injured thirdstring quarterback Ralph Montalvo, who remained in a medically-induced coma after he was critically in jured in a car accident near his home last on anks giving night. Navy College educational information

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Navy Adventures Unleashed event inspires competition Whos the strongest? Whos the fastest? ose questions and more were answered when Navy Adventures Unleashed Kings Bays breakout event Rugged Recreation Uprising was Saturday at Etowah Park. Members of the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay community chose to be outsiders and test themselves with a day of competitions and challenges. By adding the challenge element to the event, we were able to capture a new audience and offer some thing for everyone, ranging from the single Sailor to families, Navy Adventures Unleashed Kings Bay coordinator Michele Miki Gilbert said. It was a day of smack talk and friendly competition. e feedback was overwhelmingly positive and left participants asking, whens the next one? e morning began with a 5K run through the woods of Etowah Park, which included a series of obstacles in addition to the uneven terrain. Runners found themselves hopping over downed trees, dodging limbs or climbing under cargo nets. Following the run, the park was open for patrons to climb the rock wall or try Kings Bays Morale, Welfare and RecreKings Bay volunteers spread holiday cheer at VA medical center Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay personnel volunteered a day for giving Dec. 4 whey they traveled to Carl Vinson Veterans Administration Medical Center in Dublin, Ga. For more than 20 years, Sailors and Marines from various commands aboard the Kings Bay area have taken the journey to Dublin to spend time with the men and women of prior military generations at the center. is trip is a good opportunity for our service members to give back to the men and women who have served before them, said Chap lain Lt. Lara Byrd, Naval Sub marine Base Kings Bay coordinator of the trip. Holiday time Best wishes to all! The Periscope will return Jan. 10 Big hit Band of TRF members rocks Guantanamo Bay Page 11 Santas here St. Nick visits Kids Party, Winter Wonderland Page 12Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Rugged Recreation Uprising brings out the best Correct choice lessonTrident Ret Facility drives home drunk driving dangers Do you want the .25 or the comatose? You just took out ve pedestrians! at was more than just a little fender bender! ese and more were phrases used during Naval Submarine Base Kings Bays Trident Ret Facilitys November Safety Training. e topic? Drunk driving. e location? e TRF admin parking lot. Mode of instruction? Vision impairment goggles and Drunk Buster Pedal Karts. Wanting to try an interactive approach to the standard, Power Point training without having to take the actual risks, STS2 Ryan Perdew researched ways to make this training have the lasting impact the Navy always intends. He realized that providing a controlled environment where Sailors and their shipmates could most accurately experience the eects of alcohol impairment, without fear of consequences, would open everyones eyes. TRF Sailors rst stood on the straight line of a parking spot and donned one of two pairs of Vision Impairment Goggles in their choice of a .15 Blood AlcoFirst qualied female sub ocers receive Dolphins ree Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the rst female unrestricted line ocers to qualify in submarines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their submarine Dolphins during separate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Ocer of the Deck and Engineering Ocer of the Watch, perform damage control functions, and demonstrate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew ocer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, partici pated in a ceremony presided by Cmdr. Christo pher Nash, commanding ocer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of USS Wyoming. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque USS Wyoming (Blue) By nature we are all a bit competitive. Michele Miki Gilbert NAU Kings Bay For many of the residents, this is the only visitor they see during the holidays. Chaplain Lt. Lara Byrd NSB Kings Bay ChapelFor those who served

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Major changes announced Dec. 6 to the Transition Assistance Program will revolutionize the way the military prepares people leaving the services, with mandatory participation in programs throughout their military careers to help set them up for a successful transition. e redesigned program, called Transition Goals Planning Success or Transition GPS, was unveiled by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Veterans Aairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. It is a multi-agency response to President Barack Obamas call to improve career readiness for separating service members, explained Susan S. Kelly, principal director of the Defense Departments Transition to Veterans Program Oce. e president hinted at the mostsweeping change to the Transition Assistance Program in two decades during a speech this summer to the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Obama called it the centerpiece to a broader federal eort to help service members transition to civilian life and to reduce veterans unemployment. During the three-phase rollout of the Transition GPS program that will continue through 2014, the many, but often disconnected, activities conducted across the U.S. government to support veterans and their families will be melded into one comprehensive eort, Kelly said. e Defense Department and departments of Veterans Aairs and Labor aligned their most successful programs to deliver better and more comprehensive services to help make service members career ready for civilian employment, ofcials said. ey reached out to the Department of Education to integrate the latest teaching methods and tapped into the resources of the Oce of Personnel Management and the Small Business Administration. One of the biggest changes in the new program is that participation is no longer voluntary. Based on a law that took eect Nov. 21, service members can no longer opt out of the transition assistance program. All, including reservists and Guardsmen demobilized after 180 days of active duty, must now attend specic training sessions and take concrete steps to prepare for separation. During phase one of the rollout, being implemented immediately, all separating service members will receive counseling about Department of Veterans benets, Kelly said. In addition, most will be required to attend newly revamped employment workshops run by the Department of Labor. ese workshops incorporate new curriculum such as how to explore career interests, use search tools to nd job opportunities, write a resume, interview for a position and negotiate a salary, said John Moran, DOLs deputy assistant secretary for Veterans Employment and Training Service. While fullling the congressional mandate to reach out to all separating service members, the interagency team went a step beyond the law to further enhance the eort, Kelly said. Separating service members must now take nancial planning training, and complete a 12-month budget that factors in the cost of where they decide to live after leaving the military. ey must evaluate how their military-acquired education, training and experience translate into civilian career qualications and prepare an individual transition plan. e task force ran a pilot program last summer at seven installations to evaluate this core curriculum, gathering assessments from about 950 military members who participated. Many in the pilot programs found it eye-opening, Kelly said. e seven pilot sites continue to oer the DOL workshops, but the instruction will be available servicewide by January, Moran said. e programs second phase, to be tested during 2013 and implemented by the years end, establishes requirements for separating service members who plan to go on to college or technical or career training or to start their own businesses. ose electing higher education or other training will be required to show an acceptance letter from that institution, or have an application lled out and ready to submit, Kelly said. ey also will be required to establish a contact with a counselor to follow up with after leaving the military. Also during phase two, service members who hope to become entrepreneurs will be required to connect with the Small Business Administration for help in drafting and evaluating their small business plans. e nal phase of the rollout to be implemented by the end of 2014 will integrate transition preparation throughout the service members military career. e idea, Kelly explained, is to begin preparations for transition long before a service member prepares to leave the miliTHEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Kings Bay MOOA meets Dec. 18e Kings Bay Chapter of the Military Ocers of America Associations monthly dinner meet ing will start at 5:30 p.m., Dec. 18 at Osprey Covs Morgan Grill, St. Marys Road. e guest speaker will be Gregory J. Whitney, director of Jackson ville National Cemetery in Jacksonville, Fla. Cost for the meal is $20. For reservations, by Dec. 14 contact Capt. Orren Couch (USN, Ret.) at (912) 729-2389 or at orren.crouch@tds.net.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tuesday, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For additional information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp. Now hear this! Applications for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society educational scholarships and interest-free loans for the 2013-to-2014 academic year are now available and can be downloaded at www.nmcrs.org/education. Students eligible to apply include spouses or children (under the age of 23) of Sailors and Marines who: Are on active duty Are retired Died on active duty or in a retired status Consideration for selection is based on scholastic ability and nancial need. Applicants must be graduating high school seniors or full-time minimum 12 credit hours college students working toward their rst undergraduate degree. Applications must be received at NMCRS by May 1, 2013 unless the due date on the application states otherwise. During these tough economic times, our educational assistance continues to help Navy and Marine Corps families reach their goal of attending college, said Beverly Langdon, NMCRS Education Program manager. e NMCRS Education Program has provided scholarships and interest-free loans totaling more than $60 million to more than 50,000 students over the last 30 years. It is based on the Societys mission to provide nancial, educational and other assistance. e program is supported entirely by donations and bequests to NMCRS. For more information on the NMCRS Education Program, visit www.nmcrs.org/education or email education@nmcrs.org. Since 1904, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has provided nancial assistance and education to active duty and retired members of the United States Navy and Marine Corps, their eligible family members and survivors when in need. Headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, the Society is a non-prot, charitable organization that is staed by nearly 3,500 volunteers, and a small cadre of employees, in oces around the world ashore and aboard ships.NMCRS has help with college funds Navy-Marine Relief Transition Assistance is mandatory Transition Assistance As a young child I always dreamed big and believed in sitting upon Santas knee, but only after watching the Macys Thanksgiving day Parade, since I am a turkey baby. But I digress. In North Carolina growing up in a decent-size town called Gastonia, I wanted a particular item one year. A bicycle. So when I think of Christmas wishes, I can never forget that year when my Christmas wish came true. ere on Christmas morning I wouldnt go to sleep and got my mom up very, very, very early, not even sure she went to sleep was a beautiful banana-seat blue bicycle, complete with horn and basket. Well, just like the song lyrics, written by Linda ompson-Jenner in Grown up Christmas List, Im all grown up now, all ve-feet-one of me anyway, and I still need help somehow. Maybe some of you are thinking the same thing. Not just for a world in need, but my heart still can dream cant yours? I dream of no more lives being apart by hate and that time would truly heal all hearts from the years that life has given. And for sure everyone needs a friend, and right would always win. But no one knows what the right side is all the time. Sorry, not even the chiefs have all the answers. But if love would never end, then just maybe we could still believe that even if nothing appeared under our Christmas trees, that the greatest package doesnt have a bow, in fact that our human souls could receive the blessing of peace three-hundred, sixty-ve or six days a year. Families could nd a way to heal through the hurt caused by one another. is is not the innocence of youth, but the intentional eort given by each one. e truth of love would be ever present in our hearts and souls, because we found a way to live out our Christmas wishes all year long, our belief in something higher. And that is my grown-up Christmas wish. Chaplains Corner By Lt. Catherine Pace NSB Kings Bay Chapel A grown-up Christmas wish for all

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e Pearl Harbor Survivors Association Tidewater Chapter 2 hosted an Annual Pearl Harbor Survivors Remembrance Ceremony at Joint Expeditionary Base Little CreekFort Story, Dec. 7. Twelve survivors attended the ceremony, which marks the 71st anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor that claimed the lives of more than 2,300 service members and prompted the United States to enter World War II. ey are ordinary people, yet extraordinary people who helped lead this great country through sheer tragedy, to resounding victory, said Capt. Charles Stuppard, commander JEB. ey worked, raised their families and lived amongst us. ey are who reporter Tom Brokaw rightfully titled his bestselling book, e Greatest Generation. Lt. Gen. John M. Paxton Jr., commander, Marine Forces Command and the guest speaker during the ceremony, echoed that same sentiment during his speech. e strength of America is in that we keep having the next greatest generation, he said. So I assure the 12 of you today that your service was noble, your sacrice doesnt go unrecognized and that we remember your shipmates. e ceremony, which was held at the Pearl Harbor Monument on JEB, commenced at 12:55 p.m., the exact time the 1941 attack began. e monument was built and dedicated in 1990 by the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. An expansion to the monument was completed in 2001 and included the addition of 184 names of local survivors of the attack. e fact that these 12 survivors, and indeed many of their mates from the Second World War, labored through those next ve years and went through those sacrices, went through that service, saw that death and destruction and bore those physical or emotional scars themselves is an indication that the greatness of this nation and an indication of the ideals that those 12 men represented on the 7th of December when they were wearing the cloth of our nation, Paxton said. As part of the commemoration, a simple 8-bell ceremony was performed during which the survivors stated their name, rank and the command to which they were assigned in 1941. e ceremony also included a wreath laying and 21-gun salute. e ceremony was great today, said Ernest Davenport, a survivor of the Pearl Harbor attack and 21-year Navy veteran. It was one of the best Ive ever attended out here. During his famous speech after the attack, Pres. Franklin Delano Roosevelt said, With condence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph. So help us God. Japan formally surrendered aboard USS Missouri while anchored in Tokyo Bay the morning of Sept. 2, 1945, nearly four years after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Adm. James A. Wineld, Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta spoke during the ceremony at the National World War II Memorial. e attack shocked the nation but it also stirred a quiet and peace-loving people to action, Winnefeld said. Today the U.S. military is involved in another conict half-a-world away, as the result of a different surprise attack on American soil that killed nearly 3,000 of our fellow Americans in one day, the admiral said, referring to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. tary. e end state that we are shooting for is to embed this across the military lifecycle, she said. Each service will develop a plan designating points along a service members career path for this training, Kelly said. Danny Pummill from the VA called the Transition GPS program an unprecedented interagency eort that ensures service members have the time and resources to prepare for a smooth transition from the military. It will help the nations newest veterans live up to their destinies as the next greatest generation, he said. If we do this right, this is our opportunity to once again transform America, Pummill said.Tap Pearl Harbor recalled at memorials Fight Deadly Childhood Diseases.A CFC Participant provided as a public service.800-822-6344 www.stjude.org THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 e volunteers handed out 161 donation bags to veterans and talked and listened about military experiences past and present. e bags contained personal items, such as a tooth brush and paste, disposable razors, shampoo and deodorant. ey also included pens, envelopes, writing pads, assorted games and other useful contents. is is a time where I set aside my needs and focus on the needs of others, Byrd said. For many of the residents this is the only visitor they see during the holidays. Not only is the visit a good morale booster for the vets and sta, but it gives the sta an in-depth look at what the next generation of veterans will look like. Seeing active duty military at our medical center inspires our sta because it allows them to make a concrete connection between their work and the needs of the next generation of veterans that they will care for, said Frank Jordan, Carl Vinson Veterans Administration Medical Center Public Aairs supervisor. It also inspires our veterans, since most of them are very much concerned to make sure that the next generation is cared for as well. Seeing active duty military at our medical center inspires our staff ... Frank Jordan Carl Vinson Public AffairsVinson

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 5 Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young ocers earned the right to lead the next generation of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations technical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualied submariner onboard the ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the submarine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accomplished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew ocers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Ocer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. e Commanding ocer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four ne ofcers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. ey are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submariners that have gone before us as qualied in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line ocers and seven supply ocers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each completed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective submarines. Qualifying is a huge accomplishment for any submariner, and it feels no dierent for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to nally be a member of this elite community. Im particularly grateful to my crew, ocers and enlisted, for supporting me and holding me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualied submarine ocer. Cowan said qualication in submarines is more of a personal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of submarine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at everything that I have done and what this qualication means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowledge and the instinct to perform safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its missions. Ultimately, it is a monumental mark of the condence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Ocer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line ocers under instruction graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and underwent naval nuclear prototype training.Leveque PSD chili cookoff Navy Adventures Unleashed Kings BayRugged Recreation UprisingStrong Man WinnersIron Cross Womens Division: 1, Alisa Andrews, 2, Anjelica Ruiz, 3, Kayla Proper Mens Division: 1, Rick Gilbert, 2, Gerardo Oliver, 3, Anthony Harris Tire Toss Womens Division: 1, Anjelica Ruiz, 2, Alisa Andrews Mens Division: 1, Brett Gilbert, 2, Rick Gilbert, 3, Brandon Gilbert Gator Push Womens Division: 1, Alisa Andrews Mens Division: 1, Alonzo Dunkentell, 2, Zackariah Bonneau, 3, Gerardo Oliver5K Off-Road Challenge WinnersWomen Under 19: 1, Asia Sumrall, 2, Alyssa Merletti, 3, Alena Sumrall Men Under 19: 1, Tim Hutton, 2, Evan Roe, 3, Roman Merletti Women 20 to 29: 1, Kayla Proper,2, Samatha Miller, 3, Alyssa Phelps Men 20 to 29: 1, Woody Georges, 2, Joel Sorto, 3, Christopher Conner Women 30 to 39: 1, Lara Byrd, 2,Holly Merletti, 3 Samantha Zamuido Men 30 to 39: *1, Nicholas Hamlin, 2, Eugene Reale, 3,Eric Delgado Women 40 and Up: *1, Laura Williams, 2, Wendy Melody, 3, Paula Necaise Men 40 and Up: 1, Rick Gilbert, 2, Rhett Jaehn, 3, Jason Emley *Top Overall Female and Male Trail Bike Prize Winners: Camron Langley, Grace Baer, Shawn Quigley Volunteers: MA2 Gerardo Oliver-Baez, MM3 Cody Kenens, MM3 Zackariah Bonneau, MM3 Thomas LaMaster, MM3 James Rewis, MASR Alisa Andrews, MASN Mackenzie Beekman, MA3 Derek Hansen, MASN Matthew Rosales, Anthony Harris, MASN Kayla Proper, MACM Paula Necaise, PO3 Camron Langley, MA2 Christopher Conner, Andrew Barclay, Braylee Gilbert, Leah Register, Cmdr. Rick Gilbert, Darryl Blake, Shawn McCormick, Courtney Ax NMCRS volunteer honored ations new Halo Jumper. Nine teams took part in the double elimination 3-versus-3 Paintball Tournament, strategizing and executing battle plans in the inatable arena set up by Kings Bay Outdoor Recreation. Surviving six rounds, Team No Sleep shot its way into the nals, edging out e Underachievers to take home the gold. e MWR Sports Department added an element of toughness to the day with their series of Strong Man Challenges. e Tire Toss, Iron Cross and Gator Push had fans cheering and contestants struggling as they pushed their physical limits to outlast their competition. With competitions being oered to teams (paintball) and individuals (Strong Man) all were equal draws and most participated in multi events, starting with the morning 5K, Gilbert said. In addition all the events oered entertainment for the bystanders and families. It was nice to see kids cheer for parents and then the adults cheer for the kids. MWRs new Halo Jumper was also a big hit with kids of all ages, Its sure to be a attraction of its own at future events. Not to be outdone by the adults, kids literally jumped into the action with the Kids in the Dirt Challenge Run. Parents were able run alongside of their younger ones and encourage them to complete the mile long course. Taking part in the event entitled participants to enter a drawing for a 20inch mountain bike. If getting dirty wasnt in the cards, many took advantage of the inatable bouncy houses, slides and Frisbee golf, Plus a free hotdog lunch. Overall this was a day of camaraderie and good cheer, Gilbert said. Patrons were happy to have a change of venue at Etowah Park and enjoyed being outdoors. We are always encouraging kids to go outside. Adults need outside time too. People came to participate, had fun and stayed the duration. ats a success in my book. MWR events would not be possible without the help of volunteers. Rugged Recreation Uprising is no exception. e MWR sta thanks all who helped make this day possible. Visit the Facebook page mwrkingsbay to check out the many photos of the day. For more information on Navy Adventures Unleashed events, call 5739869.Uprising

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e morning Col. Gregory Pappy Boyington went missing in action, he was leading the Black Sheep of Marine Fighter Squadron 214 on a ghter sweep over Rabaul, near Papua New Guinea, crossing 200 miles of enemy waters and territory. As they broke through the clouds to attack the Japanese, they were ambushed from above before the rest of their squadron could join the battle. Pappys wingman, Capt. George Ashum, was hit and was being chased down. Pappy did everything he could to get the Japanese to back o and by so doing put his own aircraft in danger. Ashums plane burst into ames and a moment later crashed into the sea. Pappys situation wasnt much better as he was forced to land in the water. Wounded, Pappy stayed in the water until dark when he was picked up by a Japanese submarine. e Japanese held Pappy prisoner for 20months. While a prisoner of war, Pappy was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions between September 1943, and January 1944. e medal citation reads that Pappy was consistently outnumbered he struck at the enemy with daring and courageous persistence, leading his squadron into combat with devastating results to Japanese ship ping, shore instal lations and aerial forces. Resolute in his eorts to inict crippling damage on the enemy, Pappy led a formation of twenty-four ghters against the Japanese on Oct. 17, 1943, and boldly challenged them to send up planes. Under his command, American ghters shot down 20 enemy craft without the loss of a single plane. Pappy Boyington has 26 conrmed kills and is tied for the top Marine Corps Ace pilot with Capt. Joseph Foss. Pappy was born in Coeur dAlene, Idaho, Dec. 4, 1912. He wrestled and swam in college and worked in mining and logging camps during summer. He started ying while in college. He received his commission as a second lieutenant in the Coast Artillery Reserve June 1934. A year later, he enlisted in the Volunteer Marine Corps Reserve and was commissioned to second lieutenant. He didnt stay long. Pappy wanted to join the ght in China against the Japanese. He left the Marine Corps in 1941 to ght with the Flying Tigers, a volunteer ghter squadron in China. While there, Pappy shot down six Japanese planes, which gave him the lead over other American aces who didnt join the ght until after Pearl Harbor. After he returned to the Marine Corps in 1943, Pappy formed the Black Sheep Squadron. ey gave him the nickname Pappy be cause he was older than most of the pilots. After the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Pappy was liberated along with other prisoners on Aug. 29, 1945. He died Jan. 11, 1988. Pappy, a Marine legend e Defense Department has received guidance from the Oce of Management and Budget and is now planning for sequestration, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Dec. 5. Speaking during a press availability, Little stressed the department still hopes Congress will be able to avoid sequestration that would take eect Jan. 2, 2013. We are consulting with the Oce of Management and Budget and have been instructed to pursue internal planning on sequestration, Little said. We are at the very start. We dont have all of the details rmed up. Naturally, we hope very much that sequestration will be avoided. We dont want to go o the scal cli. DOD ocials believe it is prudent to begin the planning process. OMB delivered the guidance this week. We are going to have to do some detailed planning at some point on the numbers and the specific conse quences of seques tration, which weve anticipated and already talked about, Little said. Senior defense ocials, led by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Sta Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, have warned Congress since the Budget Control Act was passed that sequestration would be a disaster for national security. Essentially, the process would cut the DOD budget by $500 billion. is would be on top of the $487 billion in cuts already planned. Ocials also warn that sequestration would blow the bottom out of the defense strategic guidance released earlier this year. DOD used the guidance to plan the scal 2013 defense budget. If this is triggered, even in light of this absurd mechanism that was created to avoid absurdities, our intent is to not implement sequestration in an absurd way inside the Department of Defense, Little said. He said that the eects of sequestration will not begin all at once on Jan. 2, 2013. Rather, he believes the department will have some months at the beginning of 2013 to put in place directives and policies to carry out the law. We expect in our planning eorts to identify not just numbers, but how we communicate to our 3-million-plus workforce, to prepare them for what may come down the pike, he said. e military manpower portions of the defense budget are exempt from sequestration, but Little promised to communicate with all segments of the DOD workforce in the weeks ahead. Hopefully, Congress will come to resolution on sequestration, but we have looked at those impacts and will plan against them, he said. Sequestration planned American and Iraqi ofcials signed a memorandum of understanding Dec. 6 in Baghdad that will make it easier for the two countries to work together. e memo was one result of the Defense and Security Joint Coordination Committee that met Dec. 5 and 6 in the Iraqi capital. Undersecretary of Defense for Policy James N. Miller, acting Iraqi Defense Minister Saadoun al-Dlimi and acting Undersecretary of State for International Security Rose Gottemoeller participated in the meeting. e committee discussed eorts to strengthen security cooperation between the two nations, ocials said. is includes enhancing Iraqs security capabilities and modernizing Iraqi forces. Iraq is buying F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft and M-1 Abrams tanks from the United States, among other programs. ese procurements include spare parts, training, maintenance help and other considerations. e ocials also discussed regional issues and the ongoing conict in neighboring Syria. e memorandum of understanding, signed by Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Dlimi, covers the range of U.S.-Iraqi defense cooperation and covers the next ve years. is includes high-level military-to-military visits, professional military education cooperation, counterterrorism cooperation and the development of defense intelligence capabilities.U.S., Iraq sign agreement 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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General Dynamics NASSCO held a keel laying ceremony for the future USNS John Glenn (MLP 2), Dec. 4, in San Diego, Calif. MLP 2 is the second ship in the Mobile Landing Platform program that will provide the Navy with the capability to transfer vehicles and equipment at sea and to interface with surface connectors to deliver the vehicles and equipment ashore. e ships name honors the Hon. John Glenn, a decorated Marine Corps pilot, who was in attendance for the ceremony. A distinguished astronaut, the rst American to orbit the Earth and a former U.S. Senator from Ohio, Glenn ew 59 combat missions during his service with the Marine Corps in World War II, and a combined 90 missions over the course of two tours in the Korean War. It is tting that this ship is named in honor of a transformative gure like Senator John Glenn, said Capt. Henry Stevens, Strategic Sealift and eater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Oce, Ships. MLP will be the centerpiece of the Navys seabasing capability and transform how the Navy and Marine Corps team operates from the sea. e keel was co-authenticated by Lyn Glenn, ships sponsor, and Helen Toolan, spouse of Lieutenant General John A. Toolan, Jr., USMC, Commanding General I Marine Expeditionary Force. MLP will have a maximum speed of 15 knots and range of 9500 nautical miles. At 837 feet long, MLP displaces more than 80,000 tons when loaded. e ship with its modular core capability set includes a 25,000 sq. ft. raised vehicle deck, sideport ramp, large mooring fenders, and berths for up to three Landing Craft Air Cushioned vessels.Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 17 and 31. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 18 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Ship honors John Glenns memory THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 7

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hol Content or .25 BAC. en they were told to walk the line. With his shipmates looking on and jeering from the side, ND2 Seth Foos walked what he thought was a straight line, until he removed his goggles and saw he had veered almost 2 feet o in his 15-foot journey. I really thought I was walking just ne, Foos said. I put one foot in front of the other and was balanced. I couldnt believe I was only looking through .15 BAC and was that far o. As if the debacle of trying to walk in a straight line werent enough to take participants down a few notches, the training wasnt complete until everyone put on the goggles. But, instead of walking in a straight line, some sat behind the wheel of a pedal kart and proceeded to attempt navigating a multi-turn course marked with orange cones, also known as pedestrians. As in real-life situations, each Sailor began with complete control of the cart as they drove the course without impairment goggles. Once they had the chance to drive normally, they donned a pair of impairment goggles and drove the course once more. What a complete dierence the goggles made, TRFs ATO/FPO, CWO3 Billy Butler said. My peripheral vision and depth perception were non-existent and my ability to judge kart placement between the cones went completely out the window. TRF CMDCM Allan Quatro was pleased with the impression left by this training. You can teach Sailors in the classroom about the dangers of drinking and driving, but the rsthand experience is priceless, Quatro said. With the holiday season just around the corner, TRF is committed to providing the highest quality training to our Sailors, to bring them all back safe, encouraging them to remember this experience, to make a plan before they go out, and to stick to that plan because once they leave the safety of this parking lot, there are very real consequences for their actions. Trident Refit Facilitys spirit banner Richardson Lesson 8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 9

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Obama picks AustinPresident Barack Obama intends to nominate Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin III, cur rently the vice chief of sta of the Army, to succeed Marine Corps Gen. James N. Mat tis as the next commander of U.S. Central Com mand, De fense Secretary Leon E. Panetta announced Dec. 6. Austin is one of the militarys most seasoned combat leaders, the secretary said, and will bring an important combination of strategic thinking, regional knowledge and proven judgment to one of the most critical posts in the department. Austin was the nal commander of U.S. Forces Iraq, holding that position from Sept. 1, 2010, until the command was disestablished Dec. 18, 2011. During his nal deployment to Iraq, Gen. Austin led our military eorts at a particularly important time, overseeing the drawdown of U.S. forces and equipment while simultaneously helping to ensure that hard-fought security gains were preserved and that Iraqis could secure and govern themselves, Panetta said. Austins previous commands include the 3rd Infantry Division, with whom he earned a Silver Star for valor for actions in the early months of the war in Iraq. In 1975, ex-1 took our daughter and went home for Christmas. So I put out word on my ship that every body was invited Christmas Eve to our one-bedroom apartment in Ocean View, Va. About 30 guys showed up and filled the tiny place with Christmas spirit, via bottles and cans. Everybody had a great time, and there was no trouble. Early in the morning my bed was full, so I found a place to sleep in the walk-in closet. When I woke up Christmas Day, I couldnt move because there were snoring Sailors everywhere on the floor. All the emp ties were under the tree. It wasnt bare like it had been before. It looked like Recycling Santa came! Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MM2 Phillip Cooper Trident Refit Facility Hazel Green, Ala. We played Dirty Santa, where you wrap a present, pick a number and pick a present. My brother and I got in a fight over a car wash kit. Wally Cooper Retired Army Black River Falls, Wis. I dont know. Im kind of a bah humbug guy, because Christmas (spirit) should be every day of the year. SW2 Andres Hoven CBMU 202 Edina, Minn. When I was six years old, I got a puppy. Tyeisha Duncan Family member Laurel, Miss. My sister ate all of Santa Claus cookies. Staff Sgt. Randi Burke Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Foley, Ala. My first Christmas with my husband as a family. Our first Christmas I gave birth to a son, but he was deployed and missed it. Ray Parks Submarine Group Ten Needville, Texas During the Cold War I spent Christmas on a diesel submarine and enjoyed my birthday, all in one. Four-man Face for Radio draws crowd at Naval Station What would you do if you were oered a once in a lifetime opportunity to board a plane bound for Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and to do the one thing that you love to do in support of the troops who are on the front lines, as well as the ones who can no longer ght? Youd pack your bags! Retired Navy Senior Chief and current Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Trident Ret Facility Administrator Alan Hupp Huppmann and his band mates from Hupp N Ray and Face for Radio did just that. ere is nothing like getting on stage and putting some energy out there through music, then having that energy come back to you from the crowd, Huppmann said. ere is no other feeling in the world like it. Huppmann is the lead vocalist of the two bands that lit the Guantanamo Bay nights on re and satiated the crowds musical appetite. Opening a four-day concert extravaganza, the duo of Hupp N Ray enter tained the Marines and Sailors of Gitmo with acoustic rendi tions of timehonored classics that had the fans on their feet and singing along into the night. e enthusiasm was palpable and had the audience clamoring for more when the nal note was played for the evening. With three more days of musical euphoria in store for the Gitmo residents, the anticipation had already risen to a feverish level.TRF members rock Gitmo In the past year, we wrote a song specifi cally for the Wounded Warrior Project. Alan Hupp Huppmann Band member and NSB Kings Bay TRF administrator THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 11

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Winter Wonderland and Kids Christmas Party Skating in style at Winter Wonderland at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Photos by MC2 Cory Rose and courtesy of MWR Santa arrives at the Kids Christmas Party. Christmas characters at Winter Wonderland. 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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NATO foreign ministers have agreed to Turkeys request for Patriot anti-missile batteries to defend the country against possible airstrikes from neighboring Syria. e decision came Dec. 4 during the rst of two days of meetings at alliance headquarters in Brussels, with ministers saying the goal is to defend the population and territory of Turkey and contribute to the de-escalation of the crisis along the alliances border. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen described the situation along Turkeys southeast border with Syria as one of grave concern, adding that NATO stands in full solidarity with Turkey. e Patriot missiles are expected to be supplied by the United States, Germany and the Netherlands and would remain under the operational command of the alliances supreme allied commander for Europe. e decision comes as the civil war in Syria intensies and amid new concerns in Washington over the status of the Syrian governments stocks of chemical and biological weapons. In recent weeks, Syrian rockets and shells have landed on the Turkish side of the border, killing several people, a development that Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has said raises concerns that the Syrian conict could spill over into other countries in the region. e Turkish government has supported Syrias opposition, and as an alliance member had requested that NATO provide the U.S.-built Patriot air defense system to deter further threats to its territory. NATO ocials stress that use of the missiles will be purely defensive. Rasmussen emphasized that the system will in no way be used to support a no-y zone over Syria, as some have proposed. NATOs decision to approve Turkeys request comes a day after the United States said it was growing increasingly concerned that Syrian President Bashar Assads regime might be considering using its stocks of chemical weapons against its own people. Yesterday, President Barack Obama issued a direct warning to the Syrian leader that any use of chemical or biological weapons would be unacceptable. ere will be consequences, and you will be held accountable, Obama said. Patriots bound for Turkey Angels deliver Marine presentse Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, transformed the squadrons C-130 Hercules, aectionately known as Fat Albert, into a modern-day Santas sleigh in support of the U.S Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program, bringing the joy of Christmas to numerous children in the Northeast who were aected by Superstorm Sandy. e Blue Angel crew, who left from their home base of Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., made stops in Atlanta and Washington to pick up toys on the way to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Wrightstown, N.J., where the toys would answer the need for childrens gifts in this area of the country. For many residents of the Northeast, Superstorm Sandy has put celebrating the holidays on the back burner, replaced by a different set of priorities. One family in particular was invited to the joint base aireld so the Toys for Tots eort could bring some Christmas joy to their children. Heather and Peter Sabey, whose entire rst oor of their home in Toms River, N.J. was ooded during the storm, said their daily activities are now tied up with trying to restore some sense of normalcy to their lives and the lives of their children. e Sabeys say they are busy taking care of recovery eorts in their home and driving kids to and from school so the holiday season has taken on a different meaning this year. Going Christmas shopping for our kids has taken the back seat to us making calls to insurance companies and trying to get our lives back, Heather said. So I think receiving Christmas presents thanks to Toys for Tots today is going to be huge for our kids to feel the love and the joy of the season from all over the country. Peter said the Toys for Tots eort takes a lot of burden o them and other parents in the area who are unable to provide a typical Christmas to their children this year because of the devastation from the storm. Its great to see people come together during this time of hardship, he said. Its also great to see that not only my kids but many kids in the community here are going to get that Christmas they hoped for thanks to Toys for Tots. Blue Angel Commanding Ocer/Flight Leader Cmdr. Tom Frosch said supporting the Toys for Tots eort in the Northeast is an honor, especially in response to the devastation brought upon by Superstorm Sandy. Its simply a matter of taking the opportunity to do what we can for those in need, Frosch said. It wasnt a question of whether we could support this outstanding cause, but rather, how soon we could provide support and get toys to the children. President and Chief Executive Ocer for the Marines Toys for Tots Foundation, retired U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Pete Osman, stated that having a working relationship with the Blue Angels serves a vital mission for the Toys for Tots program. eres a great visibility in the Blue Angels program as far as it being a community outreach program much like Toys for Tots is, Osman said. So it really is a natural t having the Blue Angels lend their support to Toys for Tots. Among the crew of Blue Angels who made the trip for this mission were some active-duty service members originally from the Northeast, giving this trip a special meaning to them. Logistics Specialist 2nd Class William Kelly, a supervisor in the Blue Angels Supply Department, was visiting family in New Jersey and rode out the early days of the storm in his familys home. He and his wife, Kaydee, had to drive to an airport in Pennsylvania to get a ight back to work at the Florida-based squadron. He was eager to take this special trip to N.J. to assist in the eort. My family and I are thankful we made it through the storm unharmed and without much loss of property other than losing power and water, Kelly said. But I cant imagine how the children in this area feel having possibly lost their home or school or even THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 13

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Pirates Cove menus Veterans Moving Forward provides veterans with therapy and service dogs and amongst the puppies they are raising to help veterans cope with various injuries is an assistance dog in training that is near and dear to our hearts. His name is Nathan, in honor of Petty Ocer 3rd Class Nathan Bruckenthal. Compass is sharing Nathans journey from birth, through his puppy years and into his nal stages of training in the series Life of a Service Dog We hope you enjoy Nathans story as he goes from a clumsy puppy to a focused service animal ready to serve our nations veterans. A good Service Dog has to be of sound mind and body. e body part comes from my parents. In earlier stories I mentioned my Canadian roots. My mom Jasmine was was awarded her championship title from the Canadian Kennel Club and was shown in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia, so she saw a lot of the country. My mom and I are a lot alike. We both like to travel. With all those awards and her breeding, a suitor had to be found for my Mom. at turned out to be Indy, an American golden from Maryland. Both of them are English-type Golden Retrievers and are very beautiful. at is why I am so handsome and my sister Lori, also a Veterans Moving Forward puppy-intraining, is so pretty. We were born in January 2011 after a major snowstorm. My siblings and I were all born within just over an hour, which is almost unheard of as it sometimes it takes all night for a litter to be born. When we were very young there were lots of noises around us, like music, ocean waves, children laughing, planes, trains, sirens, jack hammers and more. My rst human Mom played lots of noises for us and would ring a cowbell, hit a Chinese gong, bang pots, drop things and do funny exercises with each of us to stimulate our brains and bodies. It was only when I was a few months older and visiting New York City that I saw a human in the sidewalk and that jack hammering noise was coming from him. And you know what? I was not at all scared. I just looked at him and thought of my Mom and littermates. e man did look a little weird. As we grew older, it was safe for us to leave our pen, and we were taken outside. Oh my, that was dierent. In late February the cold air smelled totally dierent. One day there was this strange white stu out there. It was cold on our paws, but we were curious so we would launch ourselves into the u and it just smushed under us. It was fun, but we got cold pretty quickly, so the most wonderful thing about the snow was after that there were warm, clean towels for us to cuddle in. Each of us got our towel wrapped around us and then we were placed in a basket to snuggle deeply into with each other and those great towels. We fell asleep for a while to have a pup nap. Yeah, we really enjoy our naps. For some reason humans have catnaps. Why dont humans have pup naps? A very special thing kept happening whether we were in the whelping room, the kitchen pen or when we went outside. We had visitors. We were more popular than Prince William and the Kate the Duchess of Cambridge. Best of all were the visits from Veterans Moving Forward. As days went by, we grew big and strong. I was chosen to be the male who would be donated and trained to help Soldiers and veterans. My rst human dad, Arnold, is a lieutenant colonel in the Royal Canadian Air Force, and my rst human mom, Maureen, serves too. Before I was born they decided that it would be wonderful to commit one of the pups into training to be a service dog for a veteran. My siblings were going to families to be pets, so at rst I wondered why I wasnt worthy of being a pet. en it dawned on me, and to this day I realize that Lori and I were the most important and special pups, who would work with veterans and wounded Soldiers. Wow, what a special life to be chosen to serve those who chose to serve. As I continued to grow, I learned being half Canadian has some perks. I was invited to visit the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. Not just any dog gets that invitation. Just me. I sat perfectly when I was introduced by Lt. Col. Kettenacker to everyone. I met lots of important humans there and shook a few paws with humans too. e embassy was like nothing I had ever been to before. ere were many beautiful pieces of art. I enjoyed walking around with the humans and getting to go out on the special balcony overlooking the U.S. Capitol. e fresh air up there was nice too. Someone teased me and said they knew I was Canadian by my bark. Sometimes when I bark it comes out woof eh. Looking back on my adventures as a pup, I do miss my rst family. I hated to see everyone go, but I fell in love with all of my new family. It is good to be part of so many families canine, human, Veterans Moving Forward, Coast Guard, Canadian and other service dogs.Nathan and his heritage Life of a Service Dog Part 5 a loved one to the storm. And to have this happen right before Christmas is especially sad. Coming on this trip to help out and bring a little Christmas joy to them was something I jumped at soon as I heard about it. For the past three years the Blue Angels squadron has own toys and gifts to varied parts of the country in support of the Toys for Tots mission. And while the Blue Angels mission consists of being ambassadors of good will representing the U.S. military, this mission was very special to the crew involved due to the holiday season and the many children whose Christmas is all but nonexistent. Toys 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012

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Breakfast with Santa is Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo oportunities with Santa so remember your camera. Story time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Exchange with a delicious breakfast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Happy New Years Bash at Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 8 p.m., Monday, Dec. 31, to 1 a.m., Jan. 1, its a great time for family and friends, so grab a whole lane and toast in the New Year. the cost is $20 per person or $100 for a lane up to six people, including a champagne toast, party favors, five hours of bowling and shoes. Reservations are recommended. Walk-ins are welcome, too, with a special price is $3 a game per person and $2 for shoe rental. During the evening, Dominos Pizza will be offering a special from 8 p.m. to midnight of any size, any way for $10. Call (912) 573-9492 to reserve your spot NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on See Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christmas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration began Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registration began Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone, Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Breakfast with Santa Dec. 15 If you liked this, make sure you come out to the Face for Radio concert. It will be something like this, only bigger, Ray Hetchka and Vic Deacon, Hupps bandmates, added. Ready to be entertained, the crowd for the Face for Radio concert was remarkable. Word of the bands talent spread quickly on the tiny base and even a premiere of the new Twi light movie wasnt enough to keep the fans from rocking into the night. e band played all-time favorites from Creedence Clearwater Revival, e Rolling Stones, e Beatles, ZZ Top, Led Zeppelin and Stevie Ray Vaughan along with a mix of 80s, 90s and current radio hits. Cover songs are songs that we love Huppmann said. Our specic set lists are songs that have stood the test of musical greatness for 30 years ... songs that bridge age gaps. Everyone loves these kinds of songs. We get to put our spin on them and throw it out there and see the crowds reaction. Every member of the band gave thanks to the troops for having the opportunity to play at Gitmo, calling it an honor and a special experience in their careers. During the Hupp N Ray concert, as well as the Face for Radio concert, an acoustic guitar covered with the names of fallen service members graced the stage. We started putting the names on this guitar and it has sort of turned into a memorial for us, Huppmann said. We take to every show. Its become a really special thing. Lead vocalist Huppmann explained the bands con nection and appreciation for service members. In the past year, we wrote a song specically to try to raise money for the Wounded Warrior Project, Huppmann said. We play this song at every gig, and 100 percent of our tip jar goes to the Wounded Warrior Project. e song is called Simple Prayer, and was inspired by a very good friend of the band, a Navy Lieutenant Commander who deployed to Afghanistan in February 2012 and was a regular participant in the Run for the Fallen. e deeply moving song praises service members and asks protection for their families. While he is away on duty, the band continues to play, raising money for the Wounded Warrior Project and making plans to throw their friend a great homecoming party. Hopefully, too, they will be able to present him with a check for a large amount to be donated to the Wounded Warrior Project. For more information on the Song for the Fallen project, visit www.songforthefallen.org.Band THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 15

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Navy and Arizona State will meet on the gridiron for the rst time at the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl on Dec. 29 at AT&T Park in San Francisco. is will be Navys 18th bowl appearance and the ninth in the last 10 years. e game will kick at 4 p.m. E.T. in San Francisco and will be televised by ESPN2. We are excited to have the opportunity to select Arizona State to meet Navy in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl on Dec. 29, bowl executive director and co-founder Gary Cavalli said. It promises to be an intriguing matchup between two high-scoring, high-prole teams. Navy has won seven of its last eight games, and ASU also nished strong with a come-from-behind win over Arizona in the Territorial Cup. We look forward to welcoming the Midshipmen and Sun Devil players and coaches, as well as thousands of their fans, and providing them with a memorable experience in San Francisco. e Sun Devils nished the regular season 7-5, with a 5-4 record in the Pac-12, including a 41-34 victory over in-state rival Arizona. Arizona State scored 24 fourth quarter points to rally from a 10-point decit in that game as running back Marion Grice carried 18 times for a career-high 156 yards and three touchdowns. Arizona State is an outstanding football team with great players on both sides of the ball, said Navy head football coach Ken Niumatalolo. We have played a very tough schedule this year and there is no doubt that Arizona State will be as talented as any team weve faced. Arizona State head coach Todd Graham said the annual goal for every college football team is to have a successful season and play in a bowl game. We are very proud to have reached that goal by participating in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl against a worthy opponent such as the U.S. Naval Academy, Graham said. It will be an honor to travel to and participate in this wonderful Bowl experience in one of Americas great cities. Led by junior QB Taylor Kelly, Arizona State was third in the Pac-12 in scoring oense, averaging 36.4 points per game. e Sun Devils were also formidable defensively, ranking second [to Pac12 champion Stanford] in allowing only 350.8 yards per contest. Kelly (224-340-2,77225 TD-9 INT) completed 65.9% of his pass attempts while throwing for an average 231 yards per game. Five receivers caught 33 or more passes on the year, led by WR Chris Coyle (53659-5 TD). Arizona State ranked rst overall against the pass, permitting just 178.8 yards per game through the air in the passing-conscious Pac-12 Conference. e Sun Devils additionally picked o 20 passes in 12 games, returning three for touchdowns. Part of that success is attributed to a front seven that ranked second in the Pac-12 with 48 sacks. Junior defensive tackle Will Sutton was named the Pat Tillman Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year despite missing a portion of the season due to injury. He had a team-leading 10.5 sacks while totaling 58 stops. Senior DE Brandon Magee was the Pac-12s second-leading tackler, with 104 stops that also featured 6.5 sacks. He had 17 tackles against Arizona. Based on our visit in 2004, we have seen rst hand that the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl is a magnicent overall environment and event, said Naval Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk. e city of San Francisco, the stadium, the hospitality from the community, the bowl administration and the beauty of Northern California present as ne a postseason experience as we could possibly enjoy. e Academy is sincerely grateful to Gary Cavalli and his sta for inviting us back and setting the stage for our team to earn an enjoyable trip to the West Coast and an inspiring matchup against a great Arizona State team. Tickets for the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl are on sale now at www.navys ports.com. Tickets can also be purchased by calling 1-800-US4-NAVY or at the Ricketts Hall Box Oce. Ticket prices are $25 (Upper Level End Zone), $40 (Upper Level Corner), $50 (Upper Level Sideline and Lower Level End Zone and Corner), $60 (Lower Level Sideline and Sideline Bleacher behind the team bench) and $75 (Club). e only way to sit with the Navy contingent is to buy your tickets through the Navy ticket oce. Fans can also purchase tickets to sponsor midshipmen and enlisted personnel and their families for $50 per ticket. Donated tickets are 100 percent tax deductible. We strongly encourage Navy fans to buy their bowl tickets directly from the Naval Academy Athletic Association, Gladchuk said. It is very important for this game and for future Navy bowl considerations for our fans to purchase tickets through the NAAA.Midshipmen meet Arizona State in Dec. 29 bowl Navy scuttles ArmyNavy can hook an anchor to the Commander-inChiefs Trophy and bring it to Annapolis. Keenan Reynolds extended Navys dominance against Army, scoring the winning touchdown late in the fourth quarter in a 17-13 victory in the 113th rivalry game Saturday. Navy (8-4) beat Army for the 11th straight time and won the Commander-in-Chiefs Trophy awarded to the team with the best record in games among the three service academies. Army and Navy each beat Air Force, putting the prestigious trophy up for grabs in the regular-season nale for the rst time since 2005. It means everything, Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo said. ats our No. 1 goal, to get the Commanderin-Chiefs Trophy. Im just so happy for these guys. Army (2-10) hasnt hoisted the CIC trophy since 1996. e Black Knights came close, but Navy recovered a late fumble, and Reynolds 8-yard rushing score made it 17-13. In front of 69,607 fans and Vice President Joe Biden at Lincoln Financial Field, Navy caught a break when Army missed a late eld goal attempt. Reynolds quickly found brandon Turner down the sideline for a 49-yard gain. Reynolds then escaped a rush and followed with the 8-yard touchdown run with 4:41 left in the game. Unlike previous game over the last decade, the Black Knights were in this one until the nal drive. Army had driven to the 14 when fullback Larry Dixon fumbled on a sloppy exchange. Navy recovered and the Midshipmen went wild and rushed the eld. e CIC trophy was coming back to the Naval Academy for a record 13th time after a two-year stint at Air Force. Before Navy started its 11-game winning streak, the longest one in the series, started in 1890, was only ve games for either team. Its hard to do, Niumatalolo said. Its hard to beat anybody in a rivalry game, but to do it that long just speaks volumes about the guys in the white jerseys. Navy not only won 10 straight, but pretty much dominated the Black Knights, winning games in 2007 and 2008 by a combined 74-3 score. Navys 27-21 win last season was the tightest margin since the winning streak started. Last year was just a start at nudging closer toward ending the winning streak. Cadets even brought one of those oversized goofy cutouts of Bidens head to show o during the game. e Midshipmen played with Ra stickers on the back of their helmets as a salute to injured thirdstring quarterback Ralph Montalvo, who remained in a medically-induced coma after he was critically injured in a car accident near his home last on anksgiving night. Navy College educational information

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