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The Kings Bay periscope ( 12-06-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00281

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00281


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Up Periscope Oh boy! Get ready for crazy Christmas gifts! Page 11 Giving thanks Marines Security Force enjoys a holiday feast Page 4 Whale ahoy Coast Guard safeguards endangered species Page 15Bowl-bound Navy sails against Army Saturday Wyoming Dolphin pins two ocersLt. j.g. Marquette Leveque rst female to earn honor A Sailor assigned to the Gold Crew of the Ohio-class guidedmissile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) was scheduled to become one of the rst female unre stricted line ocers to qualify in submarines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g Marquette Leveque, along with fellow Wyoming o cer Lt. j.g. Kyle McFadden, were to receive their submarine Dol phins during a ceremony at Na val Submarine Base Kings Bay at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Because of press deadline, more on this story will be in next weeks Periscope. Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., has been assigned to Wyo USS Florida in Diego Garcia Named to executive board of state military aairs committee Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership, has been named to the Executive Board of Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. McNeill will be responsible for all Navy and Coast Guard issues in Georgia. She is joined Mike Quinlan of Atlanta, Marine Corps issues, Gary Jones of Columbus, Army, and Major Gen. Bob McMahan (USAF, Ret.), Air Force. e executive board had their its meeting at the governors mansion earlier this month. I am excited about the new focus of the Georgia Military Af fairs committee,McNeill said. We will be working with Sec retary Ball and the Governor to fulll the mission of GMACC. We will work toward increasing mission value and the support for our military in Georgia. McNeill has been a member of GMACC since its inception in 1995, serving under the past four governors. To better serve Georgias mili tary installations and improve their quality of life, GMACC works to: Utilize all available resources to protect these important facil ities during Base Realignment and Closure and enhance their military operations Provide eective solutions to create and foster long-term economic development strate gies in the cities and regions supporting military bases Engage state and federal o cials, industry leaders and key stakeholders and provide essential tools to understand the pub lic and private sector needs of Georgias military communities Expand the development of Georgias defense industries Georgias military presence includes three Army bases, two Air Force bases, a Navy base and a Marine base, and ranks among the top ve in the nation. ese installations together generate approximately $20 billion in economic impact, in cluding salaries, contracts and revenue generated. In addition, eight of the top 10 defense contractors in the United States have operations in Georgia, including Lock heed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics Gulfstream, Raytheon, BAE Sys tems, United Technologies Pratt & Whitney, L-3 Communica tions and SAIC. With this massive presence, the state ranks fth in the Unit ed States for total Department of Defense military, civilian di rect-hire, reserve and National Guard employment. Robins Air Force Base alone, McNeill anchors prestigious state post We will work toward increasing mission value and the support for our military in Georgia. Shelia McNeill Georgia Military Affairs Coordinating Committee Commander-InChiefs Trophy at stake in PhiladelphiaArmy and Navy will meet on the gridiron for the 113th time when they square o on Satur day at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. Kicko is set for 3:10 p.m. Eastern. e winner of the ArmyNavy game will take home the Commander-In-Chiefs Trophy, which is presented annually to the winner of the football com petition among the three ma jor Service Academies and is named in honor of the President of the United States. Navy has won the trophy 12 times, while Army has claimed it six times. is years game marks the rst time since 2005 that the trophy was on the line in the Army-Navy game and just the sixth time since the trophys inception in 1972. Navy is 2-3 all-time against Army when the two teams met with the trophy on the line. Navy enters the contest look ing to defeat Army for a seriesrecord 11th straight year. Before Navy started this historical run, the longest winning streak in the series, which was rst played in 1890, was ve games, by both teams. Navy has out-scored Army, 349-112 during its 10-game win ning streak. e Mids have won 13 of the last 15 games against Army dating back to 1997. Navy head football coach Ken Niumatalolo is trying to become just the third coach in school his tory to start his coaching career at Navy with a 5-0 record against Army. Paul Johnson turned in a 6-0 mark against West Point (2002-07), while Wayne Hardin won his rst ve games (195963) before losing. CBS Sports will start its cover age at 2:30 p.m. with a 30-minute pregame show followed by the 113th playing of the ArmyNavy game at 3 p.m. with Verne Lundquist, Gary Danielson and Tracy Wolfson calling the action. Navys four losses this season (Notre Dame, Penn State, San Jose State and Troy) have come at the hands of opponents who are a combined 35-13 (.729). Notre Dame (12-0) is ranked No. 1 in the country and will play in the BCS National Cham pionship Game, while San Jose State (10-2) is ranked 24th in the country. Navy has played six bowl eli gible teams this year (counting Penn State who will not be go ing to a bowl due to NCAA sanc tions) and compiled a 3-3 record against the six programs. e Mids defeated Air Force (6-6), Central Michigan (6-6) and East Carolina (8-4) and lost to Notre Dame (12-0), Penn State (8-4) and San Jose State (10-2). Senior outside linebacker Keegan Wetzel scored a perfect 1600 on his SAT and is believed to be the only current FBS player in the country to accomplish such a feat. He carries a 3.89 GPA in systems engineering and is an Academic All-America candidate. Wetzel has also been a force on the eld for the Midshipmen, recording 63 tackles (fourth most on the team), a team-high 13.5 tackles for a loss, a teamhigh six sacks, has forced a fumble and recovered a fumble. He is just two sacks away from third on Navys single-season sacks list. Keenan Reynolds is the rst freshman to start at quarterback for Navy since Jim Kubiak start ed ve games in 1991. Mean Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 e Navy Lodge is the perfect place to stay during the holidays, even for visiting guests of mili tary members. Navy Lodges save military families and friends 45 percent compared to other ho tels and there are no extra person charges. Navy Lodges are the perfect place for guests of military members to stay during the holidays, said Navy Lodge Kings Bay gen eral manager, Linda Bird. We of fer a great value considering our spacious guest rooms, kitchens and other guest comfort ameni ties. Guests can also enjoy a free breakfast in the morning along with free Internet access. Every Navy Lodge guest room oers queen-sized beds, Internet access, and a kitchenette com plete with microwave and refrig erator. Navy Lodges also oer con venient on-base parking, guest laundry facilities, as well as handicapped accessible and all non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges are conveniently located near other on base ame nities, such as the gym, pool, res taurants, and the Navy Exchange minimart. As an added convenience, select Navy Lodges allow dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight to stay when traveling with their owners. Check with the Navy Lodge for more details. To make a reservation for any of the 40 Navy Lodges worldwide, call toll free at (800) 628-9466 or log onto www.navy-lodge.com. For other military lodging op tions, go to www.dodlodging.net. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Exchange Bonus Bucks Dec. 8Bonus Bucks are back at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exchange this holiday season. From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 8, customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchan dise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of ve Bonus Bucks will be is sued to customers per single transaction. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobac co, alcohol, NEX and third-party gift cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange. com do not apply. One coupon will be redeem able on a transaction of $50 or more. A maximum of ve coupons can be used on a transac tion of $250 or more. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Saturday, Dec. 8, Tour our Town/ Tour of Homes; Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tues day, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For addition al information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.Free Jax holiday concert offeredJacksonville Symphony and Chorus Holiday Pops will host a Navy League Benet Concert at 2 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 9 at the Times Union Center in Jacksonville, Fla. e event is free for active duty in uniform with an ID. Bring a new unwrapped toy for the Salvation Army Christ mas Drive and receive a voucher for two free Symphony tickets for a subsequent perfor mance. Call Bill Cosnotti at (904) 356-0426 for tickets. Now hear this! Navy Lodge rolls out holiday carpet Navy Lodge Defense Department ocials are sending a new spouse survey to se lect active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an interview with the Pen tagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a pro gram analyst with the Pentagons military community and family pol icy oce, discussed how these sur veys aect future programs serving military families. e Active Duty Spouse Survey is a survey thats sent out to a rep resentative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spouses to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences back to us here in the Department of Defense. e departments rst spouse sur vey was in 2006, and the rst activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. e department now surveys active-du ty spouses in even-numbered years and reserve-component spouses in odd-numbered years. e new active-duty spouse sur vey launches today and will be in the eld for about three months, as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. e questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spouses, Fly nn said. ings like [permanent change-of-station] moves, your ex periences with deployment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military pro grams. Flynn said these results are ana lyzed and used to make decisions on policies and programs to continue to better serve military families. In 2010, we learned that 85 per cent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; however, 26 percent of those spouses were unemployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and education support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feed back to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide decisions about family pro grams in an era of budget challeng es. e government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really impor tant that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what pro grams theyre using and what pro grams theyre benetting from. DOD leaders want to make re ally good choices about what pro grams to keep and which programs to beef up to continue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide ocials with an under standing of spouses experiences in all services. In this survey, its all brought together so we can under stand across the board whats happening where services might look dierent and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the impor tance of spouses participating in these surveys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this sur vey, she said. Whats really impor tant about that is if youre selected to participate in this survey, youre representing, essentially, 10 spouses who have similar backgrounds as you do. Flynn explained selected families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. e survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she said. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of experiences of military life. It is really important that people take this survey seriously, and give us their feedback. e survey is really your opportunity to get your feed back all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.DoD spouse survey needs response Defense Department Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership, has an nounced the appointment of Barrett King to chair the TCP Forums and Tours Committee. King replaces Marty Klumpp, who has been named interim act ing president of the Camden County Chamber of Commerce. Klumpp will remain on the board of e Camden Partnership. King, a resident of St. Marys for more than 14 years, served until 2002 as Camden County Adminis trator, and later with the City of Jack sonville as a senior budget analyst and then deputy director and chief nance ocer for the Jacksonville Public Library System. He is also retired from the U.S. Army as a Colonel, with service be ginning in 1969 in assignments that took him to ve continents, includ ing Southwest Asia, and culminating with service as Chief of Public Af fairs for U.S. Army Central in Kuwait and Iraq in 2006. His civilian experience includes more than 10 years as a journalist, including reporter and editor for e Atlanta Constitution and managing editor for e Rockdale Citizen He has had public relations experience with National Bank of Georgia, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Education. Barretts solid background in both the military and the community, and especially his work in the communi cations eld, make him an excellent person to take over this committee, McNeill said. He also serves as a member of the Military Community Aairs Committee with the Camden Chamber of Commerce. e close association with the chamber will help bring military and civilian vol unteers together and merge our ef forts throughout the community. e Camden Partnerships vi sion is to be the primary resource and preferred partner in military/ community issues. Its mission is to advocate, support and strengthen military missions, and improve the quality of life for our military mem bers by enhancing military and community partnerships. TCP also is involved heavily in sustaining and enhancing the qual ity of life of all residents in the area. Non-military benets that result from TCP actions are aimed at im proving the success of this commu nity for individuals and businesses, by providing better educational opportunities, greater long-term sta bility, and economic development and growth. e Camden Partnership desires that this community become a place where our young people can grow, develop, and nd meaningful longterm employment, as well as person al and professional fulllment. As chair of the Forums and Tours Committee, one of Kings primary roles is to enhance the relations between local military and civilian communities. is is the fourth year the partnership has sponsored fo rums and base tours intended to ed ucate personnel inside and outside the base on what each community does and how they interact. e forums and tours are open to the public, but do require reserva tions so attendees can be identied to security for base access. e fo rum and tour dates are published in the local newspaper. TCP also hosts the annual A Community that Cares event with key note speakers and an annual Hon oring our Elected Ocials reception to promote military and civilian un derstanding.King takes partnership appointment Camden Partnership

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e Army and the Na tional Football League are working together to im prove awareness of traumatic brain injury and increase research into its causes, prevention and treatment. e top lead ers of both organizations Army Chief of Sta Gen. Ray Odierno and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell met at the U.S. Military Academy Aug. 30 to discuss the issue and sign a letter of agreement to continue sharing resources to combat TBI. ey were joined by a panel of soldiers and re tired NFL players who have had concussions while serving on the bat tleeld and the playing eld. About 200 cadets also attended, as well as representatives from Army medicine. Odierno explained how some of the best traits in soldiers can sometimes prevent them from seeking help following concussions. Mental and physical toughness, discipline, team over self and stress ing the importance of resilience are fundamental to the cultures of both the NFL and the Army, Odierno said. We have the Warrior Ethos, reinforced by the Soldiers Creed. ese seless traits, he said, make it particularly dicult for individuals to come forward and iden tify physical and mental issues, especially mental.. We are seeking to ed ucate both players and soldiers about TBI, to empower them to seek treatment both on the bat tleeld and playing eld, Odierno said. e Army and NFL are continuing their dialogue and sharing of research on TBI, said Odierno, citing examples of joint eorts at monitoring TBI, including placing special sensors in the helmets of soldiers and NFL players that can detect a possible concussion fol lowing trauma to the head. NFL players and sol diers are now coordinat ing strategies and using special types of tests to determine if a concussion has occurred, added Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, chair, Department of Neurologi cal Surgery, University of Washington. He expects research to continue to re duce TBI. e NFL commissioner then addressed the cadets. You are the future lead ers of Army, Goodell said. Together, we can make a big dierence, sharing medical research, and helping players and ght ers and bringing a greater awareness to society as well. I believe we can change our cultures, with athletes and soldiers shar ing their experiences. e cultural shift to which Goodell referred is the reluctance of many football players and sol diers to ask for help after receiving concussions. A frank conversation needs to take place at the lowest levels, with the people most powerful in soldiers lives not me, but their platoon ser geants and rst sergeants, Odierno said. Soldiers must be made to realize that there will not be retri bution of any kind for ask ing for help. Sometimes the NCOs must make the decision for the soldiers and not penalize them, said Army Sta Sgt. Shawn Hibbard, addressing the reluctance of many soldiers to seek help on their own. When I got blown up I felt like, Hey, Im mentally still in the ght. at NCO must check those injured and remove them from the ght so they can get bet ter. Hibbard said he suf fered concussions himself during recent combat op erations, but was reluctant to seek help. Maj. Christopher Molino, who also suered a concussion during re cent combat operations, agreed that small unit leaders must step in and take charge. Removing yourself is counterintui tive to soldiers instincts. ats why good leader ship is important. Former NFL player Troy Vincent said he had a con cussion on the football eld so severe, that he was unconscious and didnt recall the event. No one got him to seek help, he explained. ey protected me with some play calls and didnt expose my weakness at the time, he said. e coach told me that 70 per cent of you is better than 100 percent of the second string [players], meaning that despite losing 30 per cent of his ability to play due to concussion, he was still better than many of the uninjured players. Vincent was a cor nerback for the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, Bualo Bills and Washington Redskins. Bart Oates, who also suered a concussion on the playing eld, agreed that the mindset is hard to change. He played center for the New York Giants and San Francisco 49ers. Goodell said that old school mentality of not asking for help will no longer be tolerated. He stressed the importance of accountability. Myself, the coaches and other members of this organization have a responsibility to make the lives of players better, both on and o the eld, he said, adding that he hopes those in other sports, especially young athletes, get the message and provide proper lead ership and supervision. We need to learn to rely on the players to do the right thing; to raise their hand if they need help or ask others to seek assis tance, he said. Someone needs to say Hey, youre not feeling too well, and allow medical personnel to make the call whether to stay in the game. e coaches or players should not make that call. You can play smart as well as tough. Seeking help is playing smart. Odierno agreed that more has to be done, despite recent policies and NFL joins helmet study THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 MARINE CORPS SECURITY FOR CE BATTALION ansgiving PHOTOS BY LT. WILLIAM GREEN 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5 home of Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, the 78th Air Base Wing, and more than 60 other units that make up a vital part of the Air Force team, is the largest industrial complex in Georgia, employing a workforce of about 25,000 civilians, contractors, and military members. Dobbins Air Reserve Base is also a signicant employer. An outstanding educational system of 86 fouryear colleges, universities and technical colleges, including the No. 2-ranked graduate aerospace engineering program in the country, as well as an av erage of 600 military per sonnel exiting the service each month, ensure Geor gia of a continuous work force pipeline in virtually every defense-related ar eas. while, he is just the third freshman in school his tory to start at quarterback (the other was Alton Griz zard in 1987). Reynolds is 5-1 as a starting quarterback with wins over Central Michi gan, Indiana, East Caro lina, Florida Atlantic and Texas State and a loss to Troy. He also came o the bench with Navy down eight points to Air Force and led the Mids to an overtime victory. e Midshipmen punched their ticket to the Dec. 29 Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl at AT&T Park in San Francisco with a 24-17 vic tory over Florida Atlantic on Nov. 3. It will be Navys 18th bowl appearance all-time, including its ninth in the last 10 years. e Mids will take on Arizona State. e 2-9 Black Knights destroyed Air Force (4121) and defeated Boston College (34-31) of the ACC while suering losses to San Diego State (42-7), Northern Illinois (41-40), Wake Forest (49-37), Stony Brook (23-3), Kent State (31-17), Eastern Michigan (48-38), Ball State (30-22), Rutgers (28-7) and Temple (63-32). Army is the No. 1 rushing team in the country, aver aging 369.8 yards per game. Senior quarterback Trent Steelman is 26th in the country in rushing, averaging 104.7 yards per game, and 22nd in scor ing, averaging 9.1 points per game. He has rushed for a school-record 1,152 yards and a programrecord 44-career rushing touchdowns, passing Army Heisman Trophy winner Glenn Davis. Slot back Raymond Ma ples has rushed for 1,059 yards and two touchdowns on 196 carries and ranks 36th in the nation in rushing. CBS Sports Network will air the Army-Navy Special Presented by USAA on Friday at 7 p.m. ET as the network looks ahead to Saturdays game. CBS Sports Network also will air two special editions of Inside College Football on Saturday prior to the game. Inside College Football Army-Navy March On presented by USAA is noon to 1:30 p.m., ET and Inside College Football Army-Navy Tail gate presented by USAA is 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., ET. Hosts Adam Zucker and Brent Stover will be joined at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia by ana lysts Randy Cross, Brian Jones and Ron Zook, as well as special guests from the academies. e March On Special features the March-On of the Brigade of Midship men and Corps of Cadets as they march onto Lin coln Financial Field, while Army-Navy Tailgate previews the game with indepth news and analysis, as well as interviews from both head coaches.FootballMcNeill Armed Forces blood drive Army-Navy Game 113th meeting 3 p.m., Dec. 8, CBS First game 1890: Navy 24, Army 0 Last year Navy 27, Army 21 All-time series Football: Navy, 52-49-7 All-sports: Navy, 957-727-40 Heisman Trophy winners: Army, Doc Blanchard 1945, Glenn Davis 1945, Pete Dawkins 1958; Navy, Joe Bellino 1960, Roger Staubach 1963 Navy senior safety Traves Bush will wear a special patch for this years ArmyNavy game and in the Kraft Fight Hun ger Bowl, in memory of Navy Lt. Charles Silva. Silva was a 77-year old Vietnam vet who was beaten and killed by three youths in Chesapeake, Va. this fall. According to the Hampton Pilot, Silva was violently attacked on Sept. 27 after telling three young men they were trespassing and that they could not ride their all-terrain vehicles on the property. He passed away from inju ries on Oct. 23. Former Navy defensive lineman Chris Reaghard (`95) was a friend of the family and reached out to see if anybody would be willing to wear Silvas patch as a tribute. Bush quickly accepted. Silva played college football at Brown and served his country dur ing the Cuban Missle Crisis and Vietnam War. Bush will be wear ing Silvas F-8 Crusaders patch, which was Silvas favorite according to his son, Ken.Player honors vet ming since November 2011. Along with Leveque, two additional female of cers assigned to USS Maine (SSBN 741), an Ohio-class guided-missile submarine based out of Bangor, Wash., received their dolphins during a separate ceremony Dec. 5 at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. Pie faces for CFC Spelling bee winners First

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Winter in Wonderland will be 4 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8 at inside and outside of the Kings Bay Conference. ere are lots to do for the whole family, with an ice skating rink, holiday char acters, holiday train, inatables, halo jumper, games, crafts, cookies, cider and cocoa and the jolly old elf himself, Santa, arrives at 6 p.m. Additionally, e Grinch (PG) will be shown on the outdoor theater starting at 7 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Breakfast with Santa Its Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo ops with Santa so remember your camera. Story time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Exchange with a delicious breakfast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Happy New Years Bash at Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 8 p.m., Monday, Dec. 31, to 1 a.m., Jan. 1, its a great time for family and friends, so grab a whole lane and toast in the New Year. the cost is $20 per person or $100 for a lane up to six people, including a champagne toast, party favors, five hours of bowling and shoes. Reservations are recommended. Walk-ins are welcome, too, with a special price is $3 a game per person and $2 for shoe rental. During the evening, Dominos Pizza will be offering a special from 8 p.m. to midnight of any size, any way for $10. Call (912) 573-9492 to reserve your spot NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on See Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christ mas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care pa trons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration began Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registra tion begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 8, 9 e Santa Clause Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol, Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift. Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone, Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Winter in Wonderland Dec. 8 directives designed to protect the health of soldiers.Army Directive-Type Memorandum 09-033, for instance, stipulates that soldiers have a minimum of 24 hours of downtime and get a medical clearance before returning to duty follow ing a blast or vehicle incident.Maj. Sarah Goldman, program director of Army Traumatic Brain Injury at the Oce of the Surgeon General, emphasized that seeking help more often than not does not take a soldier out of the ght. She said more than 13,000 service members sustained some form of concus sion since 2010 and 95 percent were returned to duty. Odierno, who played high school football, admitted that he likely would not have sought medical attention for a concus sion. I wouldnt have taken myself out. Someone else would have had to. He added that kind of thinking is wrong. I worry about our leaders more than anyone else. eyre the ones who feel the burden of leadership and responsibility. eyre the ones who wont take themselves out of the ght. Im asking that leaders look after leaders, he implored. First ser geants looking after NCOs, ser geants major looking after com manders, senior commanders looking out for junior commanders. Weve got to have a bond to take care of each other.Helmet 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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e Defense Depart ment continues its as sistance with Hurricane Sandy recovery eorts, Pentagon Press Secretary George E. Little said in Washington, D.C., Nov. 27. About 1,000 National Guardsmen and more than 300 Army Corps of Engineers personnel re main in New York and New Jersey, he said. Our personnel have made a signicant contribution to the recovery ef fort, Little said. Since the storm struck, the Army Corps of En gineers has installed 198 power generators in critical locations, and re moved over 475 million gallons of water at 14 stra tegic sites the equivalent of 720 Olympic-sized swimming pools. eyve also removed more than 340,000 cubic yards of de bris, he said. In addition, more than 9 million gallons of fuel and more than 6 million meals have been delivered to aected areas by the Defense Logistics Agency, Little said. e fact that DOD can carry out such large-scale operations while simultaneously conducting operations in Afghanistan and around the world is a testament to the depart ments high level of readi ness and its ability to plan for a wide range of poten tial contingencies, he said. I point this out because if Congress does not en act defense authorization legislation for scal year 2013 in a timely fashion, it could seriously hamper our ability to plan and to operate, Little said. A number of adverse situations will arise if Con gress fails to pass the 2013 Defense Authorization Act, he said. For example, impor tant new military construction projects, including critical infrastructure upgrades, could not be initiated, he said. Authorities to provide counterterrorism support to law enforcement agen cies and several important counter-narcotics author ities, including support to the government of Colom bia, would expire, Little said. For service members, bonuses and special in centive pay would end, Little said, hurting troop morale and potentially impacting recruiting and retention. ese examples explain why beyond prevent ing sequestration one of Defense Secretary Leon E. Panettas highest priorities for the current Congressional session is for lawmakers to pass the defense authorization bill, he said. In the coming days, it is his hope that Congress comes together to help this department accom plish this mission by act ing on this critical legisla tion, Little said. Hurricane Sandy stretches budget THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Six men hoisted the American ag over Iwo Jima during World War II, but contrary to popular belief, not all were Ma rines. John Bradley, a Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class, was one of the heroic men that day, and his name and valiant actions live on at the Navy Field Medical Training Battalion aboard Camp Johnson. More than 1,500 Navy personnel receive training through FMTB each year, made possible by dedicat ed instructors striving for their students excellence. Upon completion of their basic school, hos pitalmen travel to FMTB for a grueling eight-week course. To get their students prepared for deployments, the instructors with FMTB issue hospitalmen ve written tests, a practical application with casualty assessment and a slew of hikes ranging from two to eight miles. We turn blue-side hos pitalmen into green-side corpsmen, said Petty O cer 2nd Class Daniel Lowderman, a medical advisor with FMTB. We prepare them for the Marine Corps and combat medicine. ree hundred students pass through each class, and with a 10 percent at trition rate, the best part of his job is seeing students who begin the course poorly but are able to hold their heads high during graduation, said Lowder man. After having two students from his rst class come back with combat action ribbons on top of their deployment ribbons, Lowderman said he was very surprised because they left practically brand new. Ive done six deployments, two being combat deployments, and Ive had nothing but phenomenal corpsmen, said Sta Sgt. Joseph Medina, a military advisor for FMTB. I came here so I can still mold and develop young minds before they are sent to active combat zones. e school is very team work and leadership oriented. If an individual in a billeted position is not performing to required standards, instructors may replace them with a junior sailor in order to encour age advancement. We like to emphasize and stress the importance of working together, said Medina. If we go on a run and the students stay in a group on their own, I am impressed by the fact they chose to do it by them selves instead of me yelling at them to. e training battalion has a lab with simulated, fully-functional casualties that spew fake blood, allow training with air tubes and even have mock inju ries in order to prepare the students. All corpsmen are com bat ready after graduation from FMTB but may also receive additional exten sive training before de ploying. ey will get sent to the Los Angeles trauma cen ters for live tissue train ing, said Petty Ocer 1st Class Rachel Kerner. ere are burn victims and individuals with gun shot wounds; its the clos est we can get to combat related injuries while in the U.S. e FMTB School for hospitalmen learning to be transformed into corpsmen is always full of students, but its the in structors who make it all possible for combat-ready individuals to reach de ployable units. Navy Corpsman school busy place these days Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 9

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I have a photo of myself as a child at my maternal grandparents house by the Christmas tree playing a drum set. But I dont remember ever having a drum set. Its like the thing disappeared after we left my grand parents house. How could such a thing happen? As an adult, my mother gave ex-1 and myself a nicely wrapped, boxed selection of canned vegetables and Read brand salads. You shoulda seen ex-1s face. Thanks, ma. That went over like a lead zeppelin, just like you planned it. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MASN Tom Pellowe Security Force Battalion Alton, N.H. I got a big box from my grandparents, and inside was box after box until a little one had a Tootsie Roll. They just wanted to see me unwrap boxes. Firefighter Joshua Ruller NSB Fire Department Gloversville, N.Y. My mother-in-law bought me a ghost hunter kit. It was kinda outta the blue. MA3 Damaria Pittman Security Force Battalion Columbia, Miss. My grandmother gave me a suit like she wore, with sequins and big shoulder pads and a hat. I just cried. Kelvin Harris Retired Navy Montgomery, Ala. I got a foot massager from my kids that I didnt ask for. It seemed like a last-minute We gotta get dad something thing. Lance Cpl. Ben Corbett Security Force Battalion Exter, N.H. This was strange. I got a cane from my grandfather. I was 21, and it had an eagle on it with a sign hanging out of its mouth that said, Thanks for nothing. MA3 Gregory Turner Security Force Battalion Shreveport, La. I get a lot of crazy things. I got a Worlds Best Mom key chain. Fallaw e Navy hoisted an X47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator on board aircraft car rier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Nov. 26, in preparation for an unmanned aircrafts rst, carrierbased testing. A team from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program oce (PMA-268) embarked Truman to conduct tests and demonstrations. e X-47B which boasts a wingspan of more than 62 feet, wider than that of an F/A-18 Super Hornet will demonstrate seam less integration into car rier ight deck operations through various tests. During each demonstration, the X-47B will be controlled remotely via a hand-held control display unit. Truman will be the rst modern aircraft carrier to host test operations for an unmanned aircraft. Capt. Jaime Engdahl, N-UCAS program manager, said the X-47Bs delivery aboard Truman was among the most historic moments in the programs history. is is a very important moment for the X-47B, said Engdahl. e mo ment the aircraft set down on Trumans deck was the moment it ocially met the eet. Cmdr. Kevin Watkins, N-UCASs ight test direc tor, agreed with Engdahls sentiment. Bringing the X-47B aboard Truman is a big milestone for the pro gram, Watkins said. Weve been testing the aircraft for the last several years and to nally put it on a ship is so exciting. If Unmanned aircra tests on carrier THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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Leaders from the Af ghan Women Coalition Against Corruption host ed a shura Nov. 19 with Kabuls leading religious scholars, members of par liament and members of International Security As sistance Forces Shafayat, to discuss dierent ways of addressing womens rights and corruption in Afghanistan. Shura attendees brought their concerns and ideas to the table resulting in an energetic dialogue, which all participants hope will lead to future and contin ued discussion in the fu ture. Amina Mustaqim and Mohboba Saraj, co-found ers of AWCAC, organized this Shura to begin a dia logue with the religious leaders of Afghanistan about the aects of cor ruption on Afghan women. More than 50 partici pants attended. Islam is an integral part of Afghan society. It is AWCACs belief that uniting with reli gious scholars to speak out about the dishonor of corruption and violence against women will help advance the cause of womens rights in Afghan istan. AWCAC came together as a way to ask Afghans if they would support us in this endeavor and as means to unite, Mustaqim and Saraj said. If we as women of Af ghanistan cannot control and stop corruption, the corruption will destroy us [women], Saraj said. I have asked religious scholars to stand rm with us in countering religious corruption and speak out about what a bad action this is in Islam. We will nd a way to work togeth er and root out corruption for a better Afghanistan. Brig. Gen. Flemming Agerskov, deputy director for the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force Shafayat spoke of ISAFs continued support in countering corruption in Afghanistan. I can see here in Af ghanistan a strong culture and strong Islam, and I re spect that, said Brig. Gen. Agerskov. e religious leaders present are here to address Islams view of women. ISAF supports the ght against corruption. Uniting women and religion will help unite this great nation in the ght against corruption to make a better future for Afghanistan. is is your country, but ISAF will do what it can to help you in your quest to ght corrup tion. Shah Gul Rezayee, Af ghan Parliamentarian on Municipal Aairs spoke of womens constitutional rights, obligations and challenges during the shura. e rights of women are clearly outlined in the constitution but yet we are still seeing violations, Rezayee said. I would like to suggest in this meeting it is due to lack of support, not fermenting of the law that women continue to be victims. With the coop eration and collaboration of the [religious] scholars and groups like AWCAC and others, we will prevail against these violations against women and de ter corruption to ensure a better future for Afghanistan. Kamaludin Hamid, a professor of religious studies at Kabul University, concluded the shura by saying, Religious schol ars are a means of com municating between the people and Allah. No Is lamic scholar can stand by and watch the violence against women, it is not Islamic. Our responsibility is to prevent it. We must take more action; we must work together with those who are against these bad actions. Women lobby for rights Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta Nov. 29 laid out three missions for the post-2014 troop presence in Afghanistan, and also made it clear the U.S. is not arming rebels ghting to topple the Assad regime in Syria. During a joint press conference in Washing ton, D.C., with visiting Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak, Panetta was asked what the focus in Afghanistan should be following the transition to Afghan-led security and U.S. drawdown. e fundamental mis sion in Afghanistan is to establish [a nation] that can secure and govern itself and ensure that alQaida, never again, nds a safe haven within Af ghanistan from which to conduct attacks on the United States or any other country, he said. e goal for remaining troops, Panetta said, is an enduring presence that will direct itself towards three important missions. One is obviously [coun terterrorism] to ensure that we continue to go after whatever al-Qaida targets remain in Afghanistan, he said. Although we clearly have had an impact on their presence in Afghani stan, the fact is that they continue to show up, and intelligence continues to indicate that they are looking for some kind of capability to be able to go into Afghanistan as well, Panetta said. He noted that forces have to be con tinually vigilant to protect against the terrorist groups resurgence. So thats going to be the fundamental thrust of the CT eort in the enduring presence, Panetta said. We also are going to con tinue to have a train-andassist mission to help develop the capability of the Afghan Army. e third mission will be to continue to provide some enabling capability so that we can provide the support needed for our forces as well, he said. Panetta noted the nec essary troop levels to ac complish these missions is exactly whats being discussed now. In addition to discuss ing Afghanistan, the defense secretary also re-emphasized that the Panetta outlines post-2014 plans 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop tem per tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to fig ure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 10, 17 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 11Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 11. For more information, call 573-4513. SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 17 to 20. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 11, 18 and 26. This work shop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Job search workshop scheduled for Dec. 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Dec. 11. It pro vides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search net work. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Dec. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive work shop addresses the military cul ture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Dec. 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regu lar workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, person nel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can cre ate a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to par ticipate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty person nel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops these tests are successful, they will prove that the future for un manned aircraft is wide open. Lt. Cmdr. Larry Tarver, Tru mans aircraft handling ocer, who helped coordinate the X47Bs on-load, said his Sailors are eager to participate in the aircrafts testing. It means a lot to our crew to be part of naval history, Tarver said. We have Sailors who re ceived additional training to safely move the X-47B and they are excited to play a part in its testing. While technical challenges are to be expected when intro ducing the new system to a car riers ight deck, Engdahl said he expects the tests to be suc cessful citing strong teamwork between his team and Trumans crew. e support from Truman has been phenomenal and its going to continue to take close cooperation between the car riers Sailors and the UCAS-D team to make these demonstra tions successful, Engdahl said. To operate large, unmanned aircraft o of a carrier, from anywhere in the world, will be a key capability for the Navy after these tests are successful. e X-47B test will be con ducted over a three week pe riod which will include in-port and underway demonstrations aboard Truman.Test THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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Its been nearly 70 years since the end of World War II, but for 87-year-old U.S. Army veteran Gilbert Unger, some memories refuse to fade. I was so nave then, said Unger of his 19-yearold self, admitting that at the time he didnt realize he was making history. As a Jewish Soldier I was a needle in a haystack. ere were very few of us. His legacy, however, comes not from his eth nicity, but for his self less service dedicated to refugees at the close of the war. Unger was a machine gunner assigned with the 90th Infantry Division during World War II. First landing on the beach in Normandy shortly after D-Day, Unger and his unit continued to ght during the Battle of the Bulge, moving on to Ger many and what was then Czechoslovakia. For more than a year, he was in daily contact with the enemy. Some units would disengage, but not us, Unger said. As the war ended, he was reassigned to Head quarters Company as a clarinet player in the Army Band and sent to Weiden, a small German town 13 miles east of the Grafen woehr Training Area. Unger, along with his son, Philip Unger, and daughter, Amy Ramer, visited the training area, Oct. 26, to relive histo ry. He reminisced fond ly about his rst arrival to Weiden in 1945. I remember it was a really nice, neat little town. It was not dam aged, I saw no evidence of bombing, Unger said. But it was the ladies of the town that inuenced his impression the most. ey were all wearing lipstick, he said with one eyebrow raised. It had been awhile since we had seen such a thing. Unger was not im mune to the destruction of the war. His division liberated the concentration camp at Flos senbuerg, Germany, on April 28, 1945. He received a Purple Heart for injuries sus tained in combat when a piece of shrapnel from an anti-personnel bomb lodged into his thigh although he claims that wasnt his worst injury; he witnessed death and saw his enemy up close. It wasnt until his ar rival to Weiden, however, that the residual eventu ality of war stared Unger in the face. Jewish refugees would pass through searching for family, searching for anyone, Unger said. Since there werent any particular duties for me to do, I spent the time trying to do what I could for them. Weiden acted as a dis tribution point for refu gees from the East trying to nd their way west said Unger, adding that most would travel on to Palestine after passing through Weiden. We had big signs, ki osks, and on them were lists of names where peo ple could see after their relatives where they went, what happened to them, Unger said. Most of them did not recon nect with family, but we still posted their infor mation and gathered supplies for their jour ney. And we did this on our own. It was not part of our duty. Unger said he felt a connection with the ref ugees, becoming quite friendly with many of the passersby, although, he recounted, he never pried into their personal lives. I never asked what their background was, if they were ever prisoners of war or in a concentra tion camp. I never asked and the subject never came up, Unger said. I just helped them focus on the recovery. A reported 500,000 American Jews fought during World War II, making up roughly 3 per cent of the Army, accord ing to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. An obvious minority, Unger said he often felt discrimination, but kept his sights on the freedom and well-being of the persecuted minorities. All I can say is I was very, very proud of the way I handled myself in all situations to bring pride to both my outt and myself. Some things you never forget, he said. Vet recalls World War II e chief of naval opera tions presented the Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale Leadership Award to two commanders at the Pen tagon in the Hall of Heroes Nov. 27. Adm. Jonathan Greenert presented the annual award, which is presented to two active duty commanding ocers below the rank of captain, to Cmdr. Chase Patrick, representing the Pacic Fleet, and Cmdr. Brian Sittlow, representing the Atlantic Fleet. Patrick and Sittlow were presented the award due to their leadership, per sonal initiative and exemplary performance and contribution to the overall success of the operational units they command. I talked to the [win ners] today and they both said Its not about me, its about the people I serve with, Greenert said. [But] whats really special about this award is that it encompasses perfor mance, as well as charac ter ... it is peer nominated. Someone had to sit down and write a one-page syn opsis about why these men deserve this award ... ey inspire and epito mize what Stockdale was about. Greenert went on to describe the two success ful commanding ocers and credited their spouses who, like all military hus bands and wives, bear much of the burden of military service. Patrick took command of USS Chafee (DDG 90), stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hi., in 2010. He has earned the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, ve Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medals and three Navy and Ma rine Corps Achievement Medals. It is humbling to be chosen for this award, Patrick said. To be an ef fective leader you have to care about each individual Sailor. If you put your all into being a good leader for them, I have found that theyll put their all into giving you the best possi ble eort. Its a team eort, and a team award. Sittlow, reported aboard the USS Boise (SSN 764) in 2010. He has earned numerous awards for his service, but said he is most proud of the unit awards that the submarines he has served on have earned dur ing deployed operations. Both awardees were nominated by their peers and were recommended by their eet command ers for consideration by a panel of senior ocers. Stockdale winners named 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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e Coast Guard is a key protector of our nations critical marine habitats and the endangered spe cies dependent on them. ese ocean resources are particularly important to those in the 14th Coast Guard District. e district is home to four marine national monuments and two na tional marine sanctuaries, more than any other region in the United States. e services stewardship role cannot be per formed alone however and partnerships are important in protecting vul nerable marine species. Recently, crews from the Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmo spheric Administration and the State of Hawaiis Division of Conservation and Resources Enforce ment, from the Depart ment of Land and Natural Resources, partnered to gether to protect humpback whales as they make their annual migration to Hawaiian waters. It is certainly benecial to have the Coast Guard, NOAA and DOCARE working together with the same goal of protecting these marine mammals, said Eric Roberts, the 14th Districts marine mammal response manager. By combining our resources, we are better prepared to protect this endangered species in a way that helps keep both the animals and Hawaiis mariners safe. Humpback whale season is generally from No vember to May with the peak season occurring during the months of Jan uary and March. Whales come to the Ha waiian Islands to mate, calve and nurse their young and return to Alas ka in the summer months because Hawaiis waters are relatively nutrient-free and too warm to support enough of the humpbacks food to sustain them yearround. e whales must mi grate back to colder water to feed and rebuild their blubber supply. Since the 2009 to 2010 humpback whale season, the Coast Guard has conducted Operation Kohola Guardian. e operation involves coordinated joint patrols of the sanctuary during the peak months. rough Operation Ko hola Guardian, the Coast Guard aims to protect both the safety of mariners as well as the endangered humpback whales. We are so fortunate to have the humpbacks visit Hawaii each year, said Elia Herman, sanctuary co-manager with the De partment of Land and Nat ural Resources. But with that comes added respon sibility, and we all need to continue to work together to ensure the laws are followed and both whales and people are protected. ere are several whale collisions near the Hawaiian Islands every year. Boaters can take proactive measures to ensure their safety as well as the safety of the whales. Keeping a boats speed down when whales are known to be in the area is one step mariners can take. Mariners should also maintain a sharp lookout at all times. Weighing an average of 45 tons, a collision with a humpback whale can be catastrophic. While on patrol, Coast Guard boats and air crews scan the area for signs of whales. If whales are sighted, crews alert near by mariners to ensure they remain away. It is also illegal to ap proach within 100 yards of a whale and aircraft are prohibited from y ing within 1,000 feet of a whale. Protecting humpback whales in Hawaii requires the work of multiple agencies. e Coast Guard, NOAA and the state of Hawaiis DOCARE all play important roles, that when combined, result in bet ter protection for whales in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, said Sanctuary Superintendent Malia Chow, from NOAA. It is truly a multi-agency eort. e Coast Guards ef forts to protect humpback whales are not limited to surface patrols. Coast Guardsmen act as rst responders to entanglements and other marine mammal distress calls. Coast Guardsmen at tend regular training fo cusing on large whale en tanglement response and we are permitted to act on behalf of NOAA in certain circumstances, Roberts said. is provides our members with the tech nical knowledge to as sess the extent of the en tanglements and attached satellite tracking gear as needed. Additionally, our boat operators receive ex tensive training on safe approach techniques to limit the risks to both the animals and our response personnel. Citizens are asked to report injured or entangled marine mammals to the Coast Guard on VHF channel 16. Reporting can also be done by calling (808) 842-2600 or by con tacting the NOAA sheries hotline at (800) 853-1964. Coast Guard protects Hawaiian humpbacksUnited States has had no involvement in equipping rebel forces in Syria with weapons or surface-to-air missiles. With regards to Syria, let me say, unequivocally, that we have not provided any of those kinds of mis siles to the opposition forces located in Syria, Panetta said. We do provide non-lethal assis tance to the opposition. We obviously are continuing to work on hu manitarian relief to the refugees that have been impacted, he added. Panetta noted the U.S., with assistance from Israel and other countries in the region, also continues to monitor ghting in areas with chemical or biologi cal weapons sites. Plans Nearly 12,000 past and current crew members, family and friends attended the inactivation of aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Dec. 1 at Naval Sta tion Norfolk, Va. Enterprise, the worlds rst nuclear powered aircraft carrier, recently com pleted its 25th and nal deployment and returned to its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled inactivation, held prior to the ships terminal ooad pro gram and subsequent decommissioning. e inactivation ceremony was the last ocial public event for the ship, and served as a celebration of life for the ship and the Sailors who served aboard. e Chief of Naval Operations, the Commander of United States Fleet Forc es, nine of twenty-three prior command ing ocers, many decorated war heroes, and thousands of Enterprise veterans at tended the event. e name Enterprise will live on as the ocially passed the name to CVN-80, the third Ford class carrier and the ninth ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name. Commissioned on November 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds rst nuclear-powered aircraft car rier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacic Ocean, and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Mis sile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enter prise was there. On September 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long de ployment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the rst strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. More than 100,000 Sailors and Marines have served aboard Enterprise during its lifetime, which has included every major conict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. It has been home ported in Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk, Va., and has conduct ed operations in every region of the world.First nuke carrier inactivated THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 15

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e Stockdale Leader ship award is an annual award and is presented to two commissioned ocers who are in command of a single ship, subma rine, aviation squadron, or operational warfare unit. It was established in honor of Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale. His dis tinguished naval career symbolizes the highest standards of excellence in both personal example and leadership. Candidates must be nominated by peers who themselves must be eligible for the award. Stockdale was a Naval Academy graduate and a pilot. In September 1965, he ejected out of his A-4E Skyhawk over North Viet nam and for eight years was held prisoner and fre quently tortured. In 1976, he received the Medal of Honor. He served as president of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., from October 1977 until August 1979. Stockdale died in 2005 and is buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. As full integration of the Infantry Automatic Rie into the Marine Corps ar senal becomes complete, the M249 Light Machine Gun, formerly the Squad Automatic Weapon, slowly fades into the history of the Corps. e SAW has seen ac tion since 1984 and has protected Marines since. Replaced by an automatic rie of similar size and weight of the M16A4 ser vice rie already issued to rank and le Marines, the familiarity with the new weapon is almost instant. e IAR has fewer moving parts than the SAW does making it a lot more grunt friendly, said Lance Cpl. Tyler Shaulis, an IAR gunner with 4th Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7. It has a direct piston system, so there are fewer jams. It stays cleaner, longer with less carbon build up after its been red. e muscle memory stays the same with it as it would an M16. If an IAR gunner goes down, any Marine could grab the weapon and lay down accurate suppres sive re without thinking twice. For the Marines at this austere forward operat ing base, the change has been a positive one, with only a few minor sugges tions for the new rie is sued to them before they deployed during early Oc tober. Its a huge improvement to have a more ac curate weapon, said Sta Sgt. Mathew Henderson, the platoon commander of Personal Security Detachment, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines, currently on his fourth combat deployment. We want to broad en the application of its use. For instance, using an IAR in a sniper platoon in stead of a SAW would be a huge advantage. To potentially lower costs, Marines with the battalion are looking at ways to implement the IAR in place of a more expen sive weapon already in use. is weapon platform could be used as multipurpose weapon system in the infantry squad, i.e., using an IAR as an automatic rie and as a des ignated marksman rie, said Chief Warrant O cer 2 Chris Jones, infantry weapons ocer, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines. In the cur rent ght when there is a limited exposure and a eeting target that blends in with the local popu lace, it is more important to have a more accurate rie with a better optic. If you can get (positive iden tication) faster, you can kill the enemy rather than a weapon that provides audible suppression. Au dible suppression being the bullets hitting every where but on target, and the enemy only hearing the sounds of gunre. In a time of scal re straints, one rie potentially serving two purposes would be huge, said Jones from Sullivan, Ind. Although the SAW will be missed by some of the saltier Marines who have used it before, the IAR brings about a new breed of machine gunner and the squad he supports with it. Were going back to what we had in WWII with the Browning Automatic Rie, Henderson said. Since the 1980s, we gave the infantry squad the light machine gun, and now were having another shift in the Marine Corps to get back to what we were doing right the rst time. IAR sending SAW into retirement mode Stockdale THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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Up Periscope Oh boy! Get ready for crazy Christmas gifts! Page 11 Giving thanks Marines Security Force enjoys a holiday feast Page 4 Whale ahoy Coast Guard safeguards endangered species Page 15Bowl-bound Navy sails against Army Saturday Wyoming Dolphin pins two ocersLt. j.g. Marquette Leveque rst female to earn honor A Sailor assigned to the Gold Crew of the Ohio-class guidedmissile submarine USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) was scheduled to become one of the rst female unrestricted line ocers to qualify in submarines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g Marquette Leveque, along with fellow Wyoming ocer Lt. j.g. Kyle McFadden, were to receive their submarine Dolphins during a ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Because of press deadline, more on this story will be in next weeks Periscope. Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., has been assigned to Wyo USS Florida in Diego Garcia Named to executive board of state military aairs committee Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership, has been named to the Executive Board of Georgia Military Aairs Coordinating Committee. McNeill will be responsible for all Navy and Coast Guard issues in Georgia. She is joined Mike Quinlan of Atlanta, Marine Corps issues, Gary Jones of Columbus, Army, and Major Gen. Bob McMahan (USAF, Ret.), Air Force. e executive board had their its meeting at the governors mansion earlier this month. I am excited about the new focus of the Georgia Military Affairs committee,McNeill said. We will be working with Secretary Ball and the Governor to fulll the mission of GMACC. We will work toward increasing mission value and the support for our military in Georgia. McNeill has been a member of GMACC since its inception in 1995, serving under the past four governors. To better serve Georgias military installations and improve their quality of life, GMACC works to: Utilize all available resources to protect these important facilities during Base Realignment and Closure and enhance their military operations Provide eective solutions to create and foster long-term economic development strategies in the cities and regions supporting military bases Engage state and federal ocials, industry leaders and key stakeholders and provide essential tools to understand the public and private sector needs of Georgias military communities Expand the development of Georgias defense industries Georgias military presence includes three Army bases, two Air Force bases, a Navy base and a Marine base, and ranks among the top ve in the nation. ese installations together generate approximately $20 billion in economic impact, including salaries, contracts and revenue generated. In addition, eight of the top 10 defense contractors in the United States have operations in Georgia, including Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics Gulfstream, Raytheon, BAE Systems, United Technologies Pratt & Whitney, L-3 Communications and SAIC. With this massive presence, the state ranks fth in the United States for total Department of Defense military, civilian direct-hire, reserve and National Guard employment. Robins Air Force Base alone, McNeill anchors prestigious state post We will work toward increasing mission value and the support for our military in Georgia. Shelia McNeill Georgia Military Affairs Coordinating Committee Commander-InChiefs Trophy at stake in PhiladelphiaArmy and Navy will meet on the gridiron for the 113th time when they square o on Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. Kicko is set for 3:10 p.m. Eastern. e winner of the ArmyNavy game will take home the Commander-In-Chiefs Trophy, which is presented annually to the winner of the football competition among the three major Service Academies and is named in honor of the President of the United States. Navy has won the trophy 12 times, while Army has claimed it six times. is years game marks the rst time since 2005 that the trophy was on the line in the Army-Navy game and just the sixth time since the trophys inception in 1972. Navy is 2-3 all-time against Army when the two teams met with the trophy on the line. Navy enters the contest looking to defeat Army for a seriesrecord 11th straight year. Before Navy started this historical run, the longest winning streak in the series, which was rst played in 1890, was ve games, by both teams. Navy has out-scored Army, 349-112 during its 10-game winning streak. e Mids have won 13 of the last 15 games against Army dating back to 1997. Navy head football coach Ken Niumatalolo is trying to become just the third coach in school history to start his coaching career at Navy with a 5-0 record against Army. Paul Johnson turned in a 6-0 mark against West Point (2002-07), while Wayne Hardin won his rst ve games (195963) before losing. CBS Sports will start its coverage at 2:30 p.m. with a 30-minute pregame show followed by the 113th playing of the ArmyNavy game at 3 p.m. with Verne Lundquist, Gary Danielson and Tracy Wolfson calling the action. Navys four losses this season (Notre Dame, Penn State, San Jose State and Troy) have come at the hands of opponents who are a combined 35-13 (.729). Notre Dame (12-0) is ranked No. 1 in the country and will play in the BCS National Championship Game, while San Jose State (10-2) is ranked 24th in the country. Navy has played six bowl eligible teams this year (counting Penn State who will not be going to a bowl due to NCAA sanctions) and compiled a 3-3 record against the six programs. e Mids defeated Air Force (6-6), Central Michigan (6-6) and East Carolina (8-4) and lost to Notre Dame (12-0), Penn State (8-4) and San Jose State (10-2). Senior outside linebacker Keegan Wetzel scored a perfect 1600 on his SAT and is believed to be the only current FBS player in the country to accomplish such a feat. He carries a 3.89 GPA in systems engineering and is an Academic All-America candidate. Wetzel has also been a force on the eld for the Midshipmen, recording 63 tackles (fourth most on the team), a team-high 13.5 tackles for a loss, a teamhigh six sacks, has forced a fumble and recovered a fumble. He is just two sacks away from third on Navys single-season sacks list. Keenan Reynolds is the rst freshman to start at quarterback for Navy since Jim Kubiak started ve games in 1991. MeanCheck us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 e Navy Lodge is the perfect place to stay during the holidays, even for visiting guests of military members. Navy Lodges save military families and friends 45 percent compared to other hotels and there are no extra person charges. Navy Lodges are the perfect place for guests of military members to stay during the holidays, said Navy Lodge Kings Bay general manager, Linda Bird. We offer a great value considering our spacious guest rooms, kitchens and other guest comfort amenities. Guests can also enjoy a free breakfast in the morning along with free Internet access. Every Navy Lodge guest room oers queen-sized beds, Internet access, and a kitchenette complete with microwave and refrigerator. Navy Lodges also oer convenient on-base parking, guest laundry facilities, as well as handicapped accessible and all non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges are conveniently located near other on base amenities, such as the gym, pool, restaurants, and the Navy Exchange minimart. As an added convenience, select Navy Lodges allow dogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight to stay when traveling with their owners. Check with the Navy Lodge for more details. To make a reservation for any of the 40 Navy Lodges worldwide, call toll free at (800) 628-9466 or log onto www.navy-lodge.com. For other military lodging options, go to www.dodlodging.net. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Exchange Bonus Bucks Dec. 8Bonus Bucks are back at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exchange this holiday season. From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 8, customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchan dise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of ve Bonus Bucks will be is sued to customers per single transaction. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobac co, alcohol, NEX and third-party gift cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange. com do not apply. One coupon will be redeem able on a transaction of $50 or more. A maximum of ve coupons can be used on a transac tion of $250 or more. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Saturday, Dec. 8, Tour our Town/ Tour of Homes; Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tues day, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For addition al information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp.Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselhoff at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net.Free Jax holiday concert offeredJacksonville Symphony and Chorus Holiday Pops will host a Navy League Benet Concert at 2 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 9 at the Times Union Center in Jacksonville, Fla. e event is free for active duty in uniform with an ID. Bring a new unwrapped toy for the Salvation Army Christmas Drive and receive a voucher for two free Symphony tickets for a subsequent performance. Call Bill Cosnotti at (904) 356-0426 for tickets. Now hear this! Navy Lodge rolls out holiday carpet Navy Lodge Defense Department ocials are sending a new spouse survey to select active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an interview with the Pentagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a program analyst with the Pentagons military community and family policy oce, discussed how these surveys aect future programs serving military families. e Active Duty Spouse Survey is a survey thats sent out to a representative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spouses to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences back to us here in the Department of Defense. e departments rst spouse survey was in 2006, and the rst activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. e department now surveys active-duty spouses in even-numbered years and reserve-component spouses in odd-numbered years. e new active-duty spouse survey launches today and will be in the eld for about three months, as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. e questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spouses, Flynn said. ings like [permanent change-of-station] moves, your experiences with deployment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military programs. Flynn said these results are analyzed and used to make decisions on policies and programs to continue to better serve military families. In 2010, we learned that 85 percent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; however, 26 percent of those spouses were unemployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and education support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feedback to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide decisions about family programs in an era of budget challenges. e government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really important that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what programs theyre using and what programs theyre benetting from. DOD leaders want to make really good choices about what programs to keep and which programs to beef up to continue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide ocials with an understanding of spouses experiences in all services. In this survey, its all brought together so we can understand across the board whats happening where services might look dierent and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the importance of spouses participating in these surveys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this survey, she said. Whats really important about that is if youre selected to participate in this survey, youre representing, essentially, 10 spouses who have similar backgrounds as you do. Flynn explained selected families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. e survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she said. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of experiences of military life. It is really important that people take this survey seriously, and give us their feedback. e survey is really your opportunity to get your feed back all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.DoD spouse survey needs response Defense Department Sheila McNeill, president of e Camden Partnership, has announced the appointment of Barrett King to chair the TCP Forums and Tours Committee. King replaces Marty Klumpp, who has been named interim acting president of the Camden County Chamber of Commerce. Klumpp will remain on the board of e Camden Partnership. King, a resident of St. Marys for more than 14 years, served until 2002 as Camden County Administrator, and later with the City of Jacksonville as a senior budget analyst and then deputy director and chief nance ocer for the Jacksonville Public Library System. He is also retired from the U.S. Army as a Colonel, with service beginning in 1969 in assignments that took him to ve continents, including Southwest Asia, and culminating with service as Chief of Public Affairs for U.S. Army Central in Kuwait and Iraq in 2006. His civilian experience includes more than 10 years as a journalist, including reporter and editor for e Atlanta Constitution and managing editor for e Rockdale Citizen He has had public relations experience with National Bank of Georgia, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Education. Barretts solid background in both the military and the community, and especially his work in the communi cations eld, make him an excellent person to take over this committee, McNeill said. He also serves as a member of the Military Community Aairs Committee with the Camden Chamber of Commerce. e close association with the chamber will help bring military and civilian vol unteers together and merge our ef forts throughout the community. e Camden Partnerships vision is to be the primary resource and preferred partner in military/ community issues. Its mission is to advocate, support and strengthen military missions, and improve the quality of life for our military members by enhancing military and community partnerships. TCP also is involved heavily in sustaining and enhancing the quality of life of all residents in the area. Non-military benets that result from TCP actions are aimed at improving the success of this community for individuals and businesses, by providing better educational opportunities, greater long-term stability, and economic development and growth. e Camden Partnership desires that this community become a place where our young people can grow, develop, and nd meaningful longterm employment, as well as person al and professional fulllment. As chair of the Forums and Tours Committee, one of Kings primary roles is to enhance the relations between local military and civilian communities. is is the fourth year the partnership has sponsored forums and base tours intended to educate personnel inside and outside the base on what each community does and how they interact. e forums and tours are open to the public, but do require reservations so attendees can be identied to security for base access. e forum and tour dates are published in the local newspaper. TCP also hosts the annual A Community that Cares event with keynote speakers and an annual Hon oring our Elected Ocials reception to promote military and civilian understanding.King takes partnership appointment Camden Partnership

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e Army and the National Football League are working together to improve awareness of traumatic brain injury and increase research into its causes, prevention and treatment. e top leaders of both organizations Army Chief of Sta Gen. Ray Odierno and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell met at the U.S. Military Academy Aug. 30 to discuss the issue and sign a letter of agreement to continue sharing resources to combat TBI. ey were joined by a panel of soldiers and retired NFL players who have had concussions while serving on the battleeld and the playing eld. About 200 cadets also attended, as well as representatives from Army medicine. Odierno explained how some of the best traits in soldiers can sometimes prevent them from seeking help following concussions. Mental and physical toughness, discipline, team over self and stressing the importance of resilience are fundamental to the cultures of both the NFL and the Army, Odierno said. We have the Warrior Ethos, reinforced by the Soldiers Creed. ese seless traits, he said, make it particularly dicult for individuals to come forward and identify physical and mental issues, especially mental.. We are seeking to educate both players and soldiers about TBI, to empower them to seek treatment both on the battleeld and playing eld, Odierno said. e Army and NFL are continuing their dialogue and sharing of research on TBI, said Odierno, citing examples of joint eorts at monitoring TBI, including placing special sensors in the helmets of soldiers and NFL players that can detect a possible concussion fol lowing trauma to the head. NFL players and soldiers are now coordinating strategies and using special types of tests to determine if a concussion has occurred, added Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, chair, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington. He expects research to continue to reduce TBI. e NFL commissioner then addressed the cadets. You are the future leaders of Army, Goodell said. Together, we can make a big dierence, sharing medical research, and helping players and ghters and bringing a greater awareness to society as well. I believe we can change our cultures, with athletes and soldiers sharing their experiences. e cultural shift to which Goodell referred is the reluctance of many football players and soldiers to ask for help after receiving concussions. A frank conversation needs to take place at the lowest levels, with the people most powerful in soldiers lives not me, but their platoon sergeants and rst sergeants, Odierno said. Soldiers must be made to realize that there will not be retribution of any kind for asking for help. Sometimes the NCOs must make the decision for the soldiers and not penalize them, said Army Sta Sgt. Shawn Hibbard, addressing the reluctance of many soldiers to seek help on their own. When I got blown up I felt like, Hey, Im mentally still in the ght. at NCO must check those injured and remove them from the ght so they can get better. Hibbard said he suffered concussions himself during recent combat operations, but was reluctant to seek help. Maj. Christopher Molino, who also suered a concussion during recent combat operations, agreed that small unit leaders must step in and take charge. Removing yourself is counterintuitive to soldiers instincts. ats why good leadership is important. Former NFL player Troy Vincent said he had a concussion on the football eld so severe, that he was unconscious and didnt recall the event. No one got him to seek help, he explained. ey protected me with some play calls and didnt expose my weakness at the time, he said. e coach told me that 70 percent of you is better than 100 percent of the second string [players], meaning that despite losing 30 percent of his ability to play due to concussion, he was still better than many of the uninjured players. Vincent was a cornerback for the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, Bualo Bills and Washington Redskins. Bart Oates, who also suered a concussion on the playing eld, agreed that the mindset is hard to change. He played center for the New York Giants and San Francisco 49ers. Goodell said that old school mentality of not asking for help will no longer be tolerated. He stressed the importance of accountability. Myself, the coaches and other members of this organization have a responsibility to make the lives of players better, both on and o the eld, he said, adding that he hopes those in other sports, especially young athletes, get the message and provide proper leadership and supervision. We need to learn to rely on the players to do the right thing; to raise their hand if they need help or ask others to seek assistance, he said. Someone needs to say Hey, youre not feeling too well, and allow medical personnel to make the call whether to stay in the game. e coaches or players should not make that call. You can play smart as well as tough. Seeking help is playing smart. Odierno agreed that more has to be done, despite recent policies and NFL joins helmet study THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 MARINE CORPS SECURITY FORCE BATTALION ansgiving PHOTOS BY LT. WILLIAM GREEN 2012

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 5 home of Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, the 78th Air Base Wing, and more than 60 other units that make up a vital part of the Air Force team, is the largest industrial complex in Georgia, employing a workforce of about 25,000 civilians, contractors, and military members. Dobbins Air Reserve Base is also a signicant employer. An outstanding educational system of 86 fouryear colleges, universities and technical colleges, including the No. 2-ranked graduate aerospace engineering program in the country, as well as an average of 600 military personnel exiting the service each month, ensure Georgia of a continuous workforce pipeline in virtually every defense-related areas. while, he is just the third freshman in school history to start at quarterback (the other was Alton Grizzard in 1987). Reynolds is 5-1 as a starting quarterback with wins over Central Michigan, Indiana, East Carolina, Florida Atlantic and Texas State and a loss to Troy. He also came o the bench with Navy down eight points to Air Force and led the Mids to an overtime victory. e Midshipmen punched their ticket to the Dec. 29 Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl at AT&T Park in San Francisco with a 24-17 victory over Florida Atlantic on Nov. 3. It will be Navys 18th bowl appearance all-time, including its ninth in the last 10 years. e Mids will take on Arizona State. e 2-9 Black Knights destroyed Air Force (4121) and defeated Boston College (34-31) of the ACC while suering losses to San Diego State (42-7), Northern Illinois (41-40), Wake Forest (49-37), Stony Brook (23-3), Kent State (31-17), Eastern Michigan (48-38), Ball State (30-22), Rutgers (28-7) and Temple (63-32). Army is the No. 1 rushing team in the country, aver aging 369.8 yards per game. Senior quarterback Trent Steelman is 26th in the country in rushing, averaging 104.7 yards per game, and 22nd in scoring, averaging 9.1 points per game. He has rushed for a school-record 1,152 yards and a programrecord 44-career rushing touchdowns, passing Army Heisman Trophy winner Glenn Davis. Slot back Raymond Maples has rushed for 1,059 yards and two touchdowns on 196 carries and ranks 36th in the nation in rushing. CBS Sports Network will air the Army-Navy Special Presented by USAA on Friday at 7 p.m. ET as the network looks ahead to Saturdays game. CBS Sports Network also will air two special editions of Inside College Football on Saturday prior to the game. Inside College Football Army-Navy March On presented by USAA is noon to 1:30 p.m., ET and Inside College Football Army-Navy Tailgate presented by USAA is 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., ET. Hosts Adam Zucker and Brent Stover will be joined at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia by analysts Randy Cross, Brian Jones and Ron Zook, as well as special guests from the academies. e March On Special features the March-On of the Brigade of Midshipmen and Corps of Cadets as they march onto Lincoln Financial Field, while Army-Navy Tailgate previews the game with indepth news and analysis, as well as interviews from both head coaches.FootballMcNeill Armed Forces blood drive Army-Navy Game 113th meeting 3 p.m., Dec. 8, CBS First game 1890: Navy 24, Army 0 Last year Navy 27, Army 21 All-time series Football: Navy, 52-49-7 All-sports: Navy, 957-727-40 Heisman Trophy winners: Army, Doc Blanchard 1945, Glenn Davis 1945, Pete Dawkins 1958; Navy, Joe Bellino 1960, Roger Staubach 1963 Navy senior safety Traves Bush will wear a special patch for this years ArmyNavy game and in the Kraft Fight Hun ger Bowl, in memory of Navy Lt. Charles Silva. Silva was a 77-year old Vietnam vet who was beaten and killed by three youths in Chesapeake, Va. this fall. According to the Hampton Pilot, Silva was violently attacked on Sept. 27 after telling three young men they were trespassing and that they could not ride their all-terrain vehicles on the property. He passed away from injuries on Oct. 23. Former Navy defensive lineman Chris Reaghard (`95) was a friend of the family and reached out to see if anybody would be willing to wear Silvas patch as a tribute. Bush quickly accepted. Silva played college football at Brown and served his country during the Cuban Missle Crisis and Vietnam War. Bush will be wearing Silvas F-8 Crusaders patch, which was Silvas favorite according to his son, Ken.Player honors vet ming since November 2011. Along with Leveque, two additional female ofcers assigned to USS Maine (SSBN 741), an Ohio-class guided-missile submarine based out of Bangor, Wash., received their dolphins during a separate ceremony Dec. 5 at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. Pie faces for CFC Spelling bee winners First

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Winter in Wonderland will be 4 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8 at inside and outside of the Kings Bay Conference. ere are lots to do for the whole family, with an ice skating rink, holiday characters, holiday train, inatables, halo jumper, games, crafts, cookies, cider and cocoa and the jolly old elf himself, Santa, arrives at 6 p.m. Additionally, e Grinch (PG) will be shown on the outdoor theater starting at 7 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Breakfast with Santa Its Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo ops with Santa so remember your camera. Story time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Exchange with a delicious breakfast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Happy New Years Bash at Rack-N-Roll Lanes From 8 p.m., Monday, Dec. 31, to 1 a.m., Jan. 1, its a great time for family and friends, so grab a whole lane and toast in the New Year. the cost is $20 per person or $100 for a lane up to six people, including a champagne toast, party favors, five hours of bowling and shoes. Reservations are recommended. Walk-ins are welcome, too, with a special price is $3 a game per person and $2 for shoe rental. During the evening, Dominos Pizza will be offering a special from 8 p.m. to midnight of any size, any way for $10. Call (912) 573-9492 to reserve your spot NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on See Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, basketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christmas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration began Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registration begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 8, 9 e Santa Clause Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol, Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift. Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone, Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Winter in Wonderland Dec. 8 directives designed to protect the health of soldiers.Army Directive-Type Memorandum 09-033, for instance, stipulates that soldiers have a minimum of 24 hours of downtime and get a medical clearance before returning to duty following a blast or vehicle incident.Maj. Sarah Goldman, program director of Army Traumatic Brain Injury at the Oce of the Surgeon General, emphasized that seeking help more often than not does not take a soldier out of the ght. She said more than 13,000 service members sustained some form of concussion since 2010 and 95 percent were returned to duty. Odierno, who played high school football, admitted that he likely would not have sought medical attention for a concussion. I wouldnt have taken myself out. Someone else would have had to. He added that kind of thinking is wrong. I worry about our leaders more than anyone else. eyre the ones who feel the burden of leadership and responsibility. eyre the ones who wont take themselves out of the ght. Im asking that leaders look after leaders, he implored. First ser geants looking after NCOs, ser geants major looking after com manders, senior commanders looking out for junior commanders. Weve got to have a bond to take care of each other.Helmet 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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e Defense Department continues its assistance with Hurricane Sandy recovery eorts, Pentagon Press Secretary George E. Little said in Washington, D.C., Nov. 27. About 1,000 National Guardsmen and more than 300 Army Corps of Engineers personnel remain in New York and New Jersey, he said. Our personnel have made a signicant contribution to the recovery effort, Little said. Since the storm struck, the Army Corps of Engineers has installed 198 power generators in critical locations, and removed over 475 million gallons of water at 14 strategic sites the equivalent of 720 Olympic-sized swimming pools. eyve also removed more than 340,000 cubic yards of debris, he said. In addition, more than 9 million gallons of fuel and more than 6 million meals have been delivered to aected areas by the Defense Logistics Agency, Little said. e fact that DOD can carry out such large-scale operations while simultaneously conducting operations in Afghanistan and around the world is a testament to the departments high level of readiness and its ability to plan for a wide range of potential contingencies, he said. I point this out because if Congress does not enact defense authorization legislation for scal year 2013 in a timely fashion, it could seriously hamper our ability to plan and to operate, Little said. A number of adverse situations will arise if Congress fails to pass the 2013 Defense Authorization Act, he said. For example, important new military construction projects, including critical infrastructure upgrades, could not be initiated, he said. Authorities to provide counterterrorism support to law enforcement agencies and several important counter-narcotics authorities, including support to the government of Colombia, would expire, Little said. For service members, bonuses and special incentive pay would end, Little said, hurting troop morale and potentially impacting recruiting and retention. ese examples explain why beyond preventing sequestration one of Defense Secretary Leon E. Panettas highest priorities for the current Congressional session is for lawmakers to pass the defense authorization bill, he said. In the coming days, it is his hope that Congress comes together to help this department accomplish this mission by acting on this critical legislation, Little said. Hurricane Sandy stretches budget THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 7

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8 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Six men hoisted the American ag over Iwo Jima during World War II, but contrary to popular belief, not all were Marines. John Bradley, a Navy Petty Ocer 2nd Class, was one of the heroic men that day, and his name and valiant actions live on at the Navy Field Medical Training Battalion aboard Camp Johnson. More than 1,500 Navy personnel receive training through FMTB each year, made possible by dedicated instructors striving for their students excellence. Upon completion of their basic school, hospitalmen travel to FMTB for a grueling eight-week course. To get their students prepared for deployments, the instructors with FMTB issue hospitalmen ve written tests, a practical application with casualty assessment and a slew of hikes ranging from two to eight miles. We turn blue-side hospitalmen into green-side corpsmen, said Petty Ocer 2nd Class Daniel Lowderman, a medical advisor with FMTB. We prepare them for the Marine Corps and combat medicine. ree hundred students pass through each class, and with a 10 percent attrition rate, the best part of his job is seeing students who begin the course poorly but are able to hold their heads high during graduation, said Lowderman. After having two students from his rst class come back with combat action ribbons on top of their deployment ribbons, Lowderman said he was very surprised because they left practically brand new. Ive done six deployments, two being combat deployments, and Ive had nothing but phenomenal corpsmen, said Sta Sgt. Joseph Medina, a military advisor for FMTB. I came here so I can still mold and develop young minds before they are sent to active combat zones. e school is very teamwork and leadership oriented. If an individual in a billeted position is not performing to required standards, instructors may replace them with a junior sailor in order to encourage advancement. We like to emphasize and stress the importance of working together, said Medina. If we go on a run and the students stay in a group on their own, I am impressed by the fact they chose to do it by themselves instead of me yelling at them to. e training battalion has a lab with simulated, fully-functional casualties that spew fake blood, allow training with air tubes and even have mock injuries in order to prepare the students. All corpsmen are combat ready after graduation from FMTB but may also receive additional extensive training before deploying. ey will get sent to the Los Angeles trauma centers for live tissue training, said Petty Ocer 1st Class Rachel Kerner. ere are burn victims and individuals with gunshot wounds; its the closest we can get to combat related injuries while in the U.S. e FMTB School for hospitalmen learning to be transformed into corpsmen is always full of students, but its the instructors who make it all possible for combat-ready individuals to reach deployable units. Navy Corpsman school busy place these days Fight Cancer.St. Jude is working to defeat childhood cancer and other deadly diseases. A CFC Participant provided as a public service. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 9

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10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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I have a photo of myself as a child at my maternal grandparents house by the Christmas tree playing a drum set. But I dont remember ever having a drum set. Its like the thing disappeared after we left my grand parents house. How could such a thing happen? As an adult, my mother gave ex-1 and myself a nicely wrapped, boxed selection of canned vegetables and Read brand salads. You shoulda seen ex-1s face. Thanks, ma. That went over like a lead zeppelin, just like you planned it. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MASN Tom Pellowe Security Force Battalion Alton, N.H. I got a big box from my grandparents, and inside was box after box until a little one had a Tootsie Roll. They just wanted to see me unwrap boxes. Firefighter Joshua Ruller NSB Fire Department Gloversville, N.Y. My mother-in-law bought me a ghost hunter kit. It was kinda outta the blue. MA3 Damaria Pittman Security Force Battalion Columbia, Miss. My grandmother gave me a suit like she wore, with sequins and big shoulder pads and a hat. I just cried. Kelvin Harris Retired Navy Montgomery, Ala. I got a foot massager from my kids that I didnt ask for. It seemed like a last-minute We gotta get dad something thing. Lance Cpl. Ben Corbett Security Force Battalion Exter, N.H. This was strange. I got a cane from my grandfather. I was 21, and it had an eagle on it with a sign hanging out of its mouth that said, Thanks for nothing. MA3 Gregory Turner Security Force Battalion Shreveport, La. I get a lot of crazy things. I got a Worlds Best Mom key chain. Fallaw e Navy hoisted an X47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator on board aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Nov. 26, in preparation for an unmanned aircrafts rst, carrierbased testing. A team from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program oce (PMA-268) embarked Truman to conduct tests and demonstrations. e X-47B which boasts a wingspan of more than 62 feet, wider than that of an F/A-18 Super Hornet will demonstrate seamless integration into carrier ight deck operations through various tests. During each demonstration, the X-47B will be controlled remotely via a hand-held control display unit. Truman will be the rst modern aircraft carrier to host test operations for an unmanned aircraft. Capt. Jaime Engdahl, N-UCAS program manager, said the X-47Bs delivery aboard Truman was among the most historic moments in the programs history. is is a very important moment for the X-47B, said Engdahl. e moment the aircraft set down on Trumans deck was the moment it ocially met the eet. Cmdr. Kevin Watkins, N-UCASs ight test director, agreed with Engdahls sentiment. Bringing the X-47B aboard Truman is a big milestone for the program, Watkins said. Weve been testing the aircraft for the last several years and to nally put it on a ship is so exciting. If Unmanned aircra tests on carrier THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 11

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Leaders from the Afghan Women Coalition Against Corruption hosted a shura Nov. 19 with Kabuls leading religious scholars, members of parliament and members of International Security Assistance Forces Shafayat, to discuss dierent ways of addressing womens rights and corruption in Afghanistan. Shura attendees brought their concerns and ideas to the table resulting in an energetic dialogue, which all participants hope will lead to future and continued discussion in the future. Amina Mustaqim and Mohboba Saraj, co-founders of AWCAC, organized this Shura to begin a dialogue with the religious leaders of Afghanistan about the aects of corruption on Afghan women. More than 50 participants attended. Islam is an integral part of Afghan society. It is AWCACs belief that uniting with religious scholars to speak out about the dishonor of corruption and violence against women will help advance the cause of womens rights in Afghanistan. AWCAC came together as a way to ask Afghans if they would support us in this endeavor and as means to unite, Mustaqim and Saraj said. If we as women of Afghanistan cannot control and stop corruption, the corruption will destroy us [women], Saraj said. I have asked religious scholars to stand rm with us in countering religious corruption and speak out about what a bad action this is in Islam. We will nd a way to work together and root out corruption for a better Afghanistan. Brig. Gen. Flemming Agerskov, deputy director for the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force Shafayat spoke of ISAFs continued support in countering corruption in Afghanistan. I can see here in Afghanistan a strong culture and strong Islam, and I respect that, said Brig. Gen. Agerskov. e religious leaders present are here to address Islams view of women. ISAF supports the ght against corruption. Uniting women and religion will help unite this great nation in the ght against corruption to make a better future for Afghanistan. is is your country, but ISAF will do what it can to help you in your quest to ght corruption. Shah Gul Rezayee, Afghan Parliamentarian on Municipal Aairs spoke of womens constitutional rights, obligations and challenges during the shura. e rights of women are clearly outlined in the constitution but yet we are still seeing violations, Rezayee said. I would like to suggest in this meeting it is due to lack of support, not fermenting of the law that women continue to be victims. With the cooperation and collaboration of the [religious] scholars and groups like AWCAC and others, we will prevail against these violations against women and deter corruption to ensure a better future for Afghanistan. Kamaludin Hamid, a professor of religious studies at Kabul University, concluded the shura by saying, Religious scholars are a means of communicating between the people and Allah. No Islamic scholar can stand by and watch the violence against women, it is not Islamic. Our responsibility is to prevent it. We must take more action; we must work together with those who are against these bad actions. Women lobby for rights Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta Nov. 29 laid out three missions for the post-2014 troop presence in Afghanistan, and also made it clear the U.S. is not arming rebels ghting to topple the Assad regime in Syria. During a joint press conference in Washington, D.C., with visiting Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak, Panetta was asked what the focus in Afghanistan should be following the transition to Afghan-led security and U.S. drawdown. e fundamental mission in Afghanistan is to establish [a nation] that can secure and govern itself and ensure that alQaida, never again, nds a safe haven within Afghanistan from which to conduct attacks on the United States or any other country, he said. e goal for remaining troops, Panetta said, is an enduring presence that will direct itself towards three important missions. One is obviously [counterterrorism] to ensure that we continue to go after whatever al-Qaida targets remain in Afghanistan, he said. Although we clearly have had an impact on their presence in Afghanistan, the fact is that they continue to show up, and intelligence continues to indicate that they are looking for some kind of capability to be able to go into Afghanistan as well, Panetta said. He noted that forces have to be continually vigilant to protect against the terrorist groups resurgence. So thats going to be the fundamental thrust of the CT eort in the enduring presence, Panetta said. We also are going to continue to have a train-andassist mission to help develop the capability of the Afghan Army. e third mission will be to continue to provide some enabling capability so that we can provide the support needed for our forces as well, he said. Panetta noted the necessary troop levels to accomplish these missions is exactly whats being discussed now. In addition to discussing Afghanistan, the defense secretary also re-emphasized that the Panetta outlines post-2014 plans 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Preregistration is required. Call 5734512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 10, 17 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 11Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 11. For more information, call 573-4513. SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 17 to 20. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 11, 18 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 5734512.Job search workshop scheduled for Dec. 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Dec. 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search net work. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Dec. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides infor mation to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Dec. 10. Registration is required. Call 573-4513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wishing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 5734506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presentations to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops these tests are successful, they will prove that the future for unmanned aircraft is wide open. Lt. Cmdr. Larry Tarver, Trumans aircraft handling ocer, who helped coordinate the X47Bs on-load, said his Sailors are eager to participate in the aircrafts testing. It means a lot to our crew to be part of naval history, Tarver said. We have Sailors who received additional training to safely move the X-47B and they are excited to play a part in its testing. While technical challenges are to be expected when introducing the new system to a carriers ight deck, Engdahl said he expects the tests to be successful citing strong teamwork between his team and Trumans crew. e support from Truman has been phenomenal and its going to continue to take close cooperation between the carriers Sailors and the UCAS-D team to make these demonstrations successful, Engdahl said. To operate large, unmanned aircraft o of a carrier, from anywhere in the world, will be a key capability for the Navy after these tests are successful. e X-47B test will be conducted over a three week period which will include in-port and underway demonstrations aboard Truman.Test THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 13

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Its been nearly 70 years since the end of World War II, but for 87-year-old U.S. Army veteran Gilbert Unger, some memories refuse to fade. I was so nave then, said Unger of his 19-yearold self, admitting that at the time he didnt realize he was making history. As a Jewish Soldier I was a needle in a haystack. ere were very few of us. His legacy, however, comes not from his ethnicity, but for his selfless service dedicated to refugees at the close of the war. Unger was a machine gunner assigned with the 90th Infantry Division during World War II. First landing on the beach in Normandy shortly after D-Day, Unger and his unit continued to ght during the Battle of the Bulge, moving on to Germany and what was then Czechoslovakia. For more than a year, he was in daily contact with the enemy. Some units would disengage, but not us, Unger said. As the war ended, he was reassigned to Head quarters Company as a clarinet player in the Army Band and sent to Weiden, a small German town 13 miles east of the Grafen woehr Training Area. Unger, along with his son, Philip Unger, and daughter, Amy Ramer, visited the training area, Oct. 26, to relive history. He reminisced fondly about his rst arrival to Weiden in 1945. I remember it was a really nice, neat little town. It was not damaged, I saw no evidence of bombing, Unger said. But it was the ladies of the town that inuenced his impression the most. ey were all wearing lipstick, he said with one eyebrow raised. It had been awhile since we had seen such a thing. Unger was not immune to the destruction of the war. His division liberated the concentration camp at Flossenbuerg, Germany, on April 28, 1945. He received a Purple Heart for injuries sustained in combat when a piece of shrapnel from an anti-personnel bomb lodged into his thigh although he claims that wasnt his worst injury; he witnessed death and saw his enemy up close. It wasnt until his arrival to Weiden, however, that the residual eventuality of war stared Unger in the face. Jewish refugees would pass through searching for family, searching for anyone, Unger said. Since there werent any particular duties for me to do, I spent the time trying to do what I could for them. Weiden acted as a distribution point for refugees from the East trying to nd their way west said Unger, adding that most would travel on to Palestine after passing through Weiden. We had big signs, kiosks, and on them were lists of names where people could see after their relatives where they went, what happened to them, Unger said. Most of them did not reconnect with family, but we still posted their information and gathered supplies for their journey. And we did this on our own. It was not part of our duty. Unger said he felt a connection with the refugees, becoming quite friendly with many of the passersby, although, he recounted, he never pried into their personal lives. I never asked what their background was, if they were ever prisoners of war or in a concentration camp. I never asked and the subject never came up, Unger said. I just helped them focus on the recovery. A reported 500,000 American Jews fought during World War II, making up roughly 3 percent of the Army, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. An obvious minority, Unger said he often felt discrimination, but kept his sights on the freedom and well-being of the persecuted minorities. All I can say is I was very, very proud of the way I handled myself in all situations to bring pride to both my outt and myself. Some things you never forget, he said. Vet recalls World War II e chief of naval operations presented the Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale Leadership Award to two commanders at the Pentagon in the Hall of Heroes Nov. 27. Adm. Jonathan Greenert presented the annual award, which is presented to two active duty commanding ocers below the rank of captain, to Cmdr. Chase Patrick, representing the Pacic Fleet, and Cmdr. Brian Sittlow, representing the Atlantic Fleet. Patrick and Sittlow were presented the award due to their leadership, personal initiative and exemplary performance and contribution to the overall success of the operational units they command. I talked to the [winners] today and they both said Its not about me, its about the people I serve with, Greenert said. [But] whats really special about this award is that it encompasses performance, as well as character ... it is peer nominated. Someone had to sit down and write a one-page synopsis about why these men deserve this award ... ey inspire and epitomize what Stockdale was about. Greenert went on to describe the two successful commanding ocers and credited their spouses who, like all military husbands and wives, bear much of the burden of military service. Patrick took command of USS Chafee (DDG 90), stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hi., in 2010. He has earned the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, ve Navy and Marine Corps Commendation medals and three Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals. It is humbling to be chosen for this award, Patrick said. To be an effective leader you have to care about each individual Sailor. If you put your all into being a good leader for them, I have found that theyll put their all into giving you the best possible eort. Its a team eort, and a team award. Sittlow, reported aboard the USS Boise (SSN 764) in 2010. He has earned numerous awards for his service, but said he is most proud of the unit awards that the submarines he has served on have earned dur ing deployed operations. Both awardees were nominated by their peers and were recommended by their eet commanders for consideration by a panel of senior ocers. Stockdale winners named 14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012

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e Coast Guard is a key protector of our nations critical marine habitats and the endangered species dependent on them. ese ocean resources are particularly important to those in the 14th Coast Guard District. e district is home to four marine national monuments and two national marine sanctuaries, more than any other region in the United States. e services stewardship role cannot be performed alone however and partnerships are important in protecting vulnerable marine species. Recently, crews from the Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the State of Hawaiis Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement, from the Department of Land and Natural Resources, partnered together to protect humpback whales as they make their annual migration to Hawaiian waters. It is certainly benecial to have the Coast Guard, NOAA and DOCARE working together with the same goal of protecting these marine mammals, said Eric Roberts, the 14th Districts marine mammal response manager. By combining our resources, we are better prepared to protect this endangered species in a way that helps keep both the animals and Hawaiis mariners safe. Humpback whale season is generally from November to May with the peak season occurring during the months of January and March. Whales come to the Hawaiian Islands to mate, calve and nurse their young and return to Alaska in the summer months because Hawaiis waters are relatively nutrient-free and too warm to support enough of the humpbacks food to sustain them yearround. e whales must migrate back to colder water to feed and rebuild their blubber supply. Since the 2009 to 2010 humpback whale season, the Coast Guard has conducted Operation Kohola Guardian. e operation involves coordinated joint patrols of the sanctuary during the peak months. rough Operation Kohola Guardian, the Coast Guard aims to protect both the safety of mariners as well as the endangered humpback whales. We are so fortunate to have the humpbacks visit Hawaii each year, said Elia Herman, sanctuary co-manager with the Department of Land and Natural Resources. But with that comes added responsibility, and we all need to continue to work together to ensure the laws are followed and both whales and people are protected. ere are several whale collisions near the Hawaiian Islands every year. Boaters can take proactive measures to ensure their safety as well as the safety of the whales. Keeping a boats speed down when whales are known to be in the area is one step mariners can take. Mariners should also maintain a sharp lookout at all times. Weighing an average of 45 tons, a collision with a humpback whale can be catastrophic. While on patrol, Coast Guard boats and air crews scan the area for signs of whales. If whales are sighted, crews alert nearby mariners to ensure they remain away. It is also illegal to approach within 100 yards of a whale and aircraft are prohibited from ying within 1,000 feet of a whale. Protecting humpback whales in Hawaii requires the work of multiple agencies. e Coast Guard, NOAA and the state of Hawaiis DOCARE all play important roles, that when combined, result in better protection for whales in the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, said Sanctuary Superintendent Malia Chow, from NOAA. It is truly a multi-agency eort. e Coast Guards efforts to protect humpback whales are not limited to surface patrols. Coast Guardsmen act as rst responders to entanglements and other marine mammal distress calls. Coast Guardsmen attend regular training focusing on large whale entanglement response and we are permitted to act on behalf of NOAA in certain circumstances, Roberts said. is provides our members with the technical knowledge to assess the extent of the entanglements and attached satellite tracking gear as needed. Additionally, our boat operators receive extensive training on safe approach techniques to limit the risks to both the animals and our response personnel. Citizens are asked to report injured or entangled marine mammals to the Coast Guard on VHF channel 16. Reporting can also be done by calling (808) 842-2600 or by contacting the NOAA sheries hotline at (800) 853-1964. Coast Guard protects Hawaiian humpbacksUnited States has had no involvement in equipping rebel forces in Syria with weapons or surface-to-air missiles. With regards to Syria, let me say, unequivocally, that we have not provided any of those kinds of missiles to the opposition forces located in Syria, Panetta said. We do provide non-lethal assistance to the opposition. We obviously are continuing to work on humanitarian relief to the refugees that have been impacted, he added. Panetta noted the U.S., with assistance from Israel and other countries in the region, also continues to monitor ghting in areas with chemical or biological weapons sites. Plans Nearly 12,000 past and current crewmembers, family and friends attended the inactivation of aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Dec. 1 at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Enterprise, the worlds rst nuclear powered aircraft carrier, recently completed its 25th and nal deployment and returned to its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled inactivation, held prior to the ships terminal ooad program and subsequent decommissioning. e inactivation ceremony was the last ocial public event for the ship, and served as a celebration of life for the ship and the Sailors who served aboard. e Chief of Naval Operations, the Commander of United States Fleet Forces, nine of twenty-three prior commanding ocers, many decorated war heroes, and thousands of Enterprise veterans attended the event. e name Enterprise will live on as the ocially passed the name to CVN-80, the third Ford class carrier and the ninth ship in the U.S. Navy to bear the name. Commissioned on November 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the Big E was the worlds rst nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacic Ocean, and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On September 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deployment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big E once again took her place in history when she launched the rst strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom. More than 100,000 Sailors and Marines have served aboard Enterprise during its lifetime, which has included every major conict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. It has been home ported in Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk, Va., and has conduct ed operations in every region of the world.First nuke carrier inactivated THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 15

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e Stockdale Leadership award is an annual award and is presented to two commissioned ocers who are in command of a single ship, submarine, aviation squadron, or operational warfare unit. It was established in honor of Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale. His dis tinguished naval career symbolizes the highest standards of excellence in both personal example and leadership. Candidates must be nominated by peers who themselves must be eligible for the award. Stockdale was a Naval Academy graduate and a pilot. In September 1965, he ejected out of his A-4E Skyhawk over North Vietnam and for eight years was held prisoner and frequently tortured. In 1976, he received the Medal of Honor. He served as president of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., from October 1977 until August 1979. Stockdale died in 2005 and is buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. As full integration of the Infantry Automatic Rie into the Marine Corps arsenal becomes complete, the M249 Light Machine Gun, formerly the Squad Automatic Weapon, slowly fades into the history of the Corps. e SAW has seen action since 1984 and has protected Marines since. Replaced by an automatic rie of similar size and weight of the M16A4 service rie already issued to rank and le Marines, the familiarity with the new weapon is almost instant. e IAR has fewer moving parts than the SAW does making it a lot more grunt friendly, said Lance Cpl. Tyler Shaulis, an IAR gunner with 4th Platoon, Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7. It has a direct piston system, so there are fewer jams. It stays cleaner, longer with less carbon build up after its been red. e muscle memory stays the same with it as it would an M16. If an IAR gunner goes down, any Marine could grab the weapon and lay down accurate suppressive re without thinking twice. For the Marines at this austere forward operating base, the change has been a positive one, with only a few minor suggestions for the new rie issued to them before they deployed during early October. Its a huge improvement to have a more accurate weapon, said Sta Sgt. Mathew Henderson, the platoon commander of Personal Security Detachment, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines, currently on his fourth combat deployment. We want to broaden the application of its use. For instance, using an IAR in a sniper platoon instead of a SAW would be a huge advantage. To potentially lower costs, Marines with the battalion are looking at ways to implement the IAR in place of a more expen sive weapon already in use. is weapon platform could be used as multipurpose weapon system in the infantry squad, i.e., using an IAR as an automatic rie and as a designated marksman rie, said Chief Warrant Ocer 2 Chris Jones, infantry weapons ocer, 2nd Bn., 7th Marines. In the current ght when there is a limited exposure and a eeting target that blends in with the local populace, it is more important to have a more accurate rie with a better optic. If you can get (positive identication) faster, you can kill the enemy rather than a weapon that provides audible suppression. Audible suppression being the bullets hitting everywhere but on target, and the enemy only hearing the sounds of gunre. In a time of scal restraints, one rie potentially serving two purposes would be huge, said Jones from Sullivan, Ind. Although the SAW will be missed by some of the saltier Marines who have used it before, the IAR brings about a new breed of machine gunner and the squad he supports with it. Were going back to what we had in WWII with the Browning Automatic Rie, Henderson said. Since the 1980s, we gave the infantry squad the light machine gun, and now were having another shift in the Marine Corps to get back to what we were doing right the rst time. IAR sending SAW into retirement mode Stockdale THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, December 6, 2012 17

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