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The Kings Bay periscope ( 11-29-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00280

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00280


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Turkey wants missilesCountrys defense of southern border with Syria at issue e U.S. will work closely with its NATO allies to determine the best way to respond to a recent request from Turkey for Patriot missile support, a defense ocial said Nov. 21. Turkey is seeking to deploy the Patriot missiles along its south eastern border in an eort to de-escalate crisis conditions due to the civil war in neighboring Syria, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said in a statement. e deployment would be de fensive only, Rasmussen said. It will in no way support a no-y zone or any oensive operation. Defense Secretary Leon E. Pa netta said in a Nov. 15 Voice of America interview that the U.S. was talking with Turkey about the threats to its security. Turkey is obviously facing a dicult situation as refugees pour into their country and theyre threatened by the instability in Syria, he said. Few gridiron rivalries oer deeper foundations or greater prestigee rivalry kicked o 122 years ago, when Cadet Den nis Mahan Michie accepted a challenge from the Naval Academy and the two squads faced o on e Plain at West Point on November 29, 1890. Navy had been playing organized football since 1879, and came out on top of the newly-established Army squad. Ever since, through those many years of intense cheers, unforgettable plays and climactic moments, the Army-Navy rivalry has been etched into the minds of countless fans and followers. All it takes is a visit to West Point or Annapolis, where everything from the nely manicured hedges to the chant following grace-before-meals proclaims Beat Navy or Beat Army, to understand how deeply ingrained this rivalry ac tually is. Even the history of the 10 times that the game was not played tells the story of Army-Navy passion. e game was canceled once, in 1909, when Army canceled its entire schedule after the death of Cadet Eugene Byrne in the game against Har vard, twice during World War I in 1917 and 1918 on orders from the War Department and twice when the academies could not agree on player eligibility stan dards, in 1928 and 1929. However, the longest and perhaps most telling inter ruption, from 1894-1898, occurred only a few years after the rivalrys inception. Following a reputed incident between a Rear Admiral and a Brigadier General, which nearly led to a duel after the 1893 Navy victory, President Gover Cleveland called a Cabinet meeting in late February 1894. When the meeting ended, Secretary of the Navy Hill Up Periscope TVs The Worlds Most Interesting Man imposter! Page 9 NJROTC visit Camden County H.S. unit comes to Kings Bay Page 4 Santa arriving Winter Wonderland, Dolphin Store visits soon Pages 3, 12 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Adventures Unleashed starts on zip line New Kings Bay program continues with Dec. 1 activities at Etowah ParkNavy Adventures Unleashed, a cross programming endeavor with Outdoor Recreation and Liberty, escorted eight active duty sailors on their rst NAU Ex cursion to e Canyons, Zip Line and Canopy Tours, in Ocala, Fla., Saturday, Nov. 17. e 3-hour expedition included a mini ground school and guided trip along an engineered network of nine zip cables. e adrenaline lled experience sent participants sailing past enormous cli walls, ying over huge lakes and travers ing along two rope bridges. e tour concluded with a one-way down rappel o the last perch. Following the initial tour participants were given the opportunity to be among the rst to experience the Super Zip Flor idas longest and fastest zip line. Unlike the traditional zip, the Super Zip sends you in a prone superman position at speeds up to 50 mph. A dinner stop on the way home topped o a full day of fun and adventure. Rugged Recreation Uprising is the next Navy Adventures Unleashed program, set for Dec. 1 at Etowah Park. is free event will begin with a 9 a.m. o-road trail run. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Vehicle crushes victim Army-Navy Game 113th meeting 3 p.m., Dec. 8, CBS First game 1890: Navy 24, Army 0 Last year Navy 27, Army 21 All-time series Football: Navy, 52-49-7 All-sports: Navy, 957-727-40 Heisman Trophy winners: Army, Doc Blanchard 1945, Glenn Davis 1945, Pete Dawkins 1958; Navy, Joe Bellino 1960, Roger Staubach 1963 Army-Navy still a college football heavyweight Fireghters quick response prevents rolling-car fatality At approximately 11:30 a.m., the tranquil atmosphere was in terrupted by the sound of sirens and air horns as re vehicles sped towards Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay base housing, where a life literally hung in the balance. It was Friday Nov. 9, the begin ning of a long awaited Veterans Day weekend, and most base personnel were look ing for ward to the weekends festivities in honor of our nations vet erans. en NSB Kings Bay Emer gency Dispatch Center rang out the Kings Bay Fire and Emer gency Services Department to a report of a victim trapped be neath a car. While in route, Chief 2, Assis tant Fire Chief Joe Orona, received and ur gent update from the Dispatch Center. He was informed that a vehicle had apparently come For certain we saved a life today. Fire Chief Freddie Thompson NSB Kings Bay Fire Department

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 After completing an analysis of industry and employment trends, the Defense Department has embarked on a pilot program to help service members obtain civilian profes sional credentials, the departments director of training readiness and strategy told reporters at a Nov. 20 press conference. Frank C. DiGiovanni said ve occupational areas were selected for the pilot program aircraft mechanic, automotive mechanic, health care, supply and logistics, and truck driver. A total of 17 military specialties are covered under these ve areas, which align with Department of La bors standard occupational classications, he noted. To select the occupations, he said, the department looked at the private sector for areas where there would be average or better growth coincid ing with high numbers of projected job openings. What weve asked the services to do is to look at those ve areas, look at their specic military occu pational codes, marry them up and get some people into the pilot pro gram, DiGiovanni said. e program began in October, he said, and as it progresses, ocials will examine whether existing military training is sucient to qualify service members for civilian cre dentials. Where the current training is found to be insucient, DiGiovanni added, the department will deter mine if the program can be adjusted or if training from external sources is necessary. Training is just part of career de velopment, however. Some of these licenses and credentials require a certain level of experience to qual ify, he said. So, the program will eventually assess service members at various stages in their military ca reers, he said. Military ocials also will assess the programs success from the per spective of the three key participant groups, DiGiovanni said. e rst is the individual, he said. Did they feel they got what they needed to go out and com pete? e second group, technical schools and supervisors, will be sur veyed to determine whether meet ing the requirements of a civilian certication program helped them or if it created additional challenges, DiGiovanni said. As the service members involved in the pilot program transition from military service to civilian life, a third group, employers, will be sur veyed, he said. Wed have to go to some of the industry folks and say, e fact that [service members] were able to get some of these licenses or credentials while on military service, did that help in your decision to hire an in dividual? What kind of employee are they? he said. For us, the objective really is honoring the service of our service members and helping them while theyre in the service to profession alize and expand their knowledge in these occupational areas, Di Giovanni said. e programs second aim is to determine whether conducting this type of training through the services is cost-eective, he said. Other options could include voca tional training through the Depart ment of Labor or Veterans Aairs, he added. e pilot is one of several DOD Credentialing and Licensing Task Force initiatives, said Eileen Lainez, a spokesperson for the Defense De partment. Were looking at how we can bet ter document and translate military training and experience so that ci vilian credentialing agencies and states can better understand the na ture of military training and award appropriate credit, she said. Industry has told us that mili tary members bring several advan tages to the table, DiGiovanni said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Exchange Bonus Bucks Dec. 8Bonus Bucks are back at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exchange this holiday season. From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 8, customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchan dise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of ve Bonus Bucks will be is sued to customers per single transaction. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobac co, alcohol, NEX and third-party gift cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange. com do not apply. One coupon will be redeem able on a transaction of $50 or more. A maximum of ve coupons can be used on a transac tion of $250 or more. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Saturday, Dec. 1, Christmas in the Park; Saturday, Dec. 8, Tour our Town/Tour of Homes; Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tuesday, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For additional information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp.HHS launches smoking Web siteHealth and Human Services has launched BeTobaccoFree.gov, a Web site providing onestop access to the best and most up-to-date tobacco-related information from across its agencies. is consolidated resource includes general information on tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods on how to quit.Union re-enactors at Ft. ClinchFort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will host a Union Garrison event Saturday, Dec. 1 and Sunday, Dec. 2. Living historian la dies will be preparing a Christmas tree and dec orating the mantles for the holiday season. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. Now hear this! e Navy is taking steps to address several issues that are aecting its sailors, the chief of naval operations said Nov. 16 in Washington, D.C. Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert spoke at a National Press Club lun cheon. Upward trends in sexual assaults and suicides are chief among the is sues the Navy is tackling, the admi ral said. Sexual assault is a safety issue, Greenert said. Im troubled that we havent moved forward to limit and really reverse the trend of these events during my time here. Ev erybody deserves a safe place to work, he said. We have to treat it as a crime, because thats what it is. e admiral also said hes con cerned with the increase in the number of suicides in the Navy. A few years ago, we had about 13 suicides per 100,000 [personnel], now its 15 per 100,000, so were creeping up, he acknowledged. We have to empower our sailors to be able to deal with stress. We have to look out for each other and we have to embed in all of our shipmates to make sure that, if somebody is reaching out, were ready to take care of them. e rate of operations is higher than he expected it would be at this time last year, Greenert said, and the Navy needs to reconcile how to continue to support that. is may result in adjustments to training and maintenance plans, he said. e Navy needs to look at the oper ations tempo with particular attention to its sailors, he continued. We call that individual tempo ITEM PO which is the measurement of what each sailors requirements are for going to sea [and] coming back, as opposed to the unit. I think its important to the health of the force. e admiral said hes satised with the overall manning of ships at sea. But, he noted, the balance of skilled personnel and leader ship needs to be adjusted to ensure that, as the Navy responds to the increased operational tempo, it has the right people in the right place at the right time.Navy tackles sexual assault, suicide CNO Credentialing program under way DOD Credentialing Defense Department ocials are sending a new spouse survey to se lect active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an interview with the Pen tagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a pro gram analyst with the Pentagons military community and family pol icy oce, discussed how these sur veys aect future programs serving military families. e Active Duty Spouse Survey is a survey thats sent out to a rep resentative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spouses to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences back to us here in the Department of Defense. e departments rst spouse sur vey was in 2006, and the rst activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. e department now surveys active-du ty spouses in even-numbered years and reserve-component spouses in odd-numbered years. e new active-duty spouse sur vey launches today and will be in the eld for about three months, as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. e questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spouses, Fly nn said. ings like [permanent change-of-station] moves, your ex periences with deployment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military pro grams. Flynn said these results are ana lyzed and used to make decisions on policies and programs to continue to better serve military families. In 2010, we learned that 85 per cent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; however, 26 percent of those spouses were unemployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and education support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feed back to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide decisions about family pro grams in an era of budget challenges. e government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really impor tant that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what pro grams theyre using and what pro grams theyre benetting from. DOD leaders want to make re ally good choices about what pro grams to keep and which programs to beef up to continue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide ocials with an under standing of spouses experiences in all services. In this survey, its all brought together so we can under stand across the board whats happening -where services might look dierent and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the impor tance of spouses participating in these surveys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this survey, she said. Whats really important about that is if youre selected to DOD spouse survey needs response Defense Department

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A Sailor assigned to Navy Medicines recognized global leader in op erational and aviation sur vival training rendered aid to a runner during mile 14 of the 8th Annual Pensac ola Marathon, Nov. 11. Navy Medicine Operational Training Center Career Counselor Hos pital Corpsman 1st Class Robert Crampton, an avid runner competing in his eighth marathon, spent nearly 20 minutes assist ing another runner at the 14-mile mark, in an eort he said was simply in stinctual for any medical professional. Were trained as [hos pital] corpsmen to respond, he said. Being ready for anything that might happen is some thing ingrained in every corpsman, something that starts in A school. e runner was okay, but the situation could have been much worse. As Crampton neared the 14-mile mark, slight ly more than halfway through the race, he saw another runner doubled over on the ground. He immediately took charge, calming the 50-year-old woman while assessing what possibly could be wrong. ere was another guy there who turned out to be a young Marine trying to help, he said. I identied myself as a corpsman, and he immediately backed o and asked me if I needed any help. Crampton identied the runner as dehydrated and experiencing intense muscle fatigue, something he attributed to the wom an over-exerting herself during the race, a novice mistake. He instructed and as sisted the woman in rais ing her arms over her head to open her airway in an eort to help increase the ow of blood and oxygen through her body, while instructing the woman to attempt deep breathing exercises. He remained with the woman until emergency response crews arrived, spending nearly 20 min utes rendering assistance during an event where seconds dictate an out come. An experienced marathoner, Crampton said novice runners can some times over-exert themselves during an actual distance race, becoming over anxious to complete what many times they have set too high as a per sonal goal. I know I couldve run a better race, but I also know that making sure the individuals around me are safe is what I should do, he said. Employers consider service members and veterans to be diligent, ecient and reliable, he said. Service members and veterans report that their military experience provided them with leadership and problem-solv ing skills, adaptability and the ability to work in teams, he added. In many industries the training and experience they have in the military gives them a jump start, he said. However, civilian employers also re port that translating military skills to civilian job experience is one of the big gest challenges of hiring employees with military experience, Lainez continued. Civilian credentials provide a means of doing this translation.DOD e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is celebrating the sea son by hosting a Cookies with Santa open house Saturday. While adults shop an array of subma rineand Navy-themed items, children can visit with Santa at the store. e open house is 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 1, for special Saturday shopping hours. Along with the great submarine-themed gifts that e Dolphin Store sells, you can nd salepriced Hallmark gifts and cards from a generous local Hallmark store dona tion and enjoy some cook ies. e Dolphin Store is at the base library, 918 James Madison Rd., Building 1066, next to the confer ence center. Its open 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and urs days, and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Additionally, the store will be open the rst Sat urday of each month, starting Dec. 1, with a spe cial holiday shopping day on Saturday, Dec. 15. e store will be closed Dec. 22 to Jan. 4. e Dolphin Store is a non-prot store and 100 percent of the proceeds are donated to e Dolphin Scholarship Foun dation. e Dolphin Store is open year-round and managed and staed by volunteers. e Dolphin Store of fers gift and souvenir items that can be hard to nd elsewhere. e stores merchandise includes Navy and submarine-related items, clothing, jew elry, home decor, house hold items, gift ware, baby items, toys and more. Most items have submarine or Navy insignias, and some of the items can be personalized and/or cus tom designed. A large portion of the inventory is handcrafted by vendors both local and around the country. e store managers are always looking for new items and consignors that t the stores theme. e store is available for Family Readiness Group meetings, Meet and Greets, and other special functions. e Dolphin Store asks that groups give a minimum of two weeks notice to coordinate vol unteers and accommodate the request. e Dolphin Store man agers would like to thank the volunteers who have made it possible to ex pand hours and help the store grow. Anyone inter ested in volunteering can contact the store and re quest more information. Assistant managers, trunk show helpers, marketing helpers, technical support and store sales sta are sought. Volunteers can work in the store, at special events and or donate their talents. Talk to Jhem or Rachel, or e-mail kbdolphin store@hotmail.com, if you are interested in helping at e Dolphin Store. All four active-duty services and ve of the six reserve components met or exceeded their recruiting goals for scal 2012, ocials an nounced Nov. 19. e Army Reserve shortfall was the result of precision recruiting, which was implemented in an eort to rebalance the force. All four active services met or ex ceeded their numerical accession goals for scal 2012: Army: 60,490 accessions, for 104 percent of its goal of 58,000; Navy: 36,329 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 36,275; Marine Corps: 30,514 acces sions, for 100 percent of its goal of 30,500; Air Force: 29,037 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 29,037. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force all exhibited strong re tention through scal 2012. Five of the six reserve components met or exceeded their numerical ac cession goals for scal 2012: Army Reserve: 26,041 accessions, for 97 percent of its goal of 26,875; Army National Guard: 47,997 accessions, for 104 percent of its goal of 46,000; Navy Reserve: 8,269 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 8,255; Marine Corps Reserve: 8,910 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 8,910; Air National Guard: 9,437 acces sions, for 115 percent of its goal of 8,210; Air Force Reserve: 8,116 acces sions, for 101 percent of its goal of 8,031. All reserve components are on target to achieve their scal attrition goals.Military meets recruiting quotasDolphin Store hosts Cookies with Santaparticipate in this survey, youre representing, es sentially, 10 spouses who have similar backgrounds as you do. Flynn explained select ed families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. e survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she said. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of ex periences of military life. It is really important that people take this survey seriously, and give us their feedback. e survey is re ally your opportunity to get your feedback all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.Spouse Corpsman aids distressed runner THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Camden County H.S. NJROTC visits SECURITY FORCE AND SEABEES Photos by SCOTT BASSETT

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 5 in the Trident Lakes Golf Course Hospitality Room. Medals will be awarded for top nishers. e day will include a 3-versus-3 paintball tournament. You can sign-up at Outdoor Recreation, all equipment will be provided free of charge. ose wishing to use their own equipment must receive approval from the Outdoor Recre ation sta. Strongman competitions, Kids in the Dirt Run Challenge, bounce hous es, halo jump, rock climb ing wall, food, family and friends is sure to make this a day to Unleash the out sider in you. For more information or to volunteer, like NAU on Facebook mwrkings bay or contact NAU at 5739869. out gear and struck, rolled over and dragged the vic tim beneath it. To compound the ur gency of the situation, the only bystander was strug gling to prevent the ve hicle from rolling further down the driveway over the victim, which could prove fatal. Faced with unpredict able circumstancesn, Oro na ordered responding apparatus to step it up and increase response speed. And, he requested that Trauma One Life Flight from Shands Jacksonville, Fla., be placed on standby for immediate launch. e rst KBFD appara tus arrived on scene within two minutes of being dispatched. Engine 2s Fireghter omas Martin assumed initial command of the scene. As reghters dis mounted the apparatus, they could hear screams from the victim, whom they observed trapped be neath the car as a bystand er was frantically trying to keep the car from moving. Martin, KBFDs heavy rescue subject matter expert, immediately directed reghters to de ploy and stabilize the car by placing the gear lever in park, applying the park brake and holding it in place until wheel chocks were applied. Crews used the Fast Jack-High-Lift Extrication Jack and High Air Pressure Lifting Bags to lift the ve hicle o the victim. e vehicle was stabilized by applying stack able cribbing as vehicle rose o the victim. Within a minute of the rst crews arrival, Orona arrived on scene and as sumed incident command. He immediately contacted dispatch and ordered the launch of Trauma One. Seconds behind him was the KBFD Advanced Life Support Ambulance and the 75-foot Quint. KBFD paramedics as sisted in the delicate extri cation of the victim from beneath the car, and ex pertly delivered and sus tained, advanced life sup port. ey immobilized the patient, treated appar ent injuries and loaded her in the ambulance for transport to the helipad. Amazingly, the entire extrication process took just two minutes. We have responded to a wide variety of seri ous events where life and property were signicant ly threatened, Fire Chief Freddie ompson said. My reghters never cease to amaze me. e entire operation from start to nish was eciently ac complished. e seamless transition from rescue, to medical care, to airlift was simply remarkable. For certain we saved a life to day. I am extremely proud to be their re chief. Assistant Chief Fire Pre vention Kim Maxwell and his inspectors had already prepared the helipad for the Trauma 1 landing. We work as a team. When we heard that Trau ma 1 was in route, me and my inspectors immediately responded to the helipad and completed the FOD (foreign object damage) walk and switched on the landing zone lights, Maxwell said. Within 13 minutes the victim had been rescued, medically stabilized and transported to the helipad for emergency medical air transport. A few minutes later, Trauma 1 landed, and with the assistance of the KBFD team, the pa tient was loaded on the helicopter and en route to Shands Jacksonville Trau ma Center. Zip ey have asked that we work with them to try to see what we can do to give them some missile defense capability, he continued. And we are working with them. And our hope is that we can help provide that kind of assistance. If approved, the deployment would be un dertaken in accordance with NATOs standing air defense plan, Rasmussen said. It is up to the indi vidual NATO countries that have available Patri ots Germany, the Neth erlands and the United States to decide if they can provide them for de ployment in Turkey and for how long. We will remain in close dialogue with our NATO allies as we work through this request for support. We take Turkeys concerns very seriously, the de fense ocial said. Twenty years is the re tirement goal for many young Marines, but one Marines time in service nearly doubles that mark. With 37 years in the Marine Corps, the Grand Old Man of Regimental Combat Team 7, Lt. Col. Jerey J. Kenney, intended to re tire during 2003. But as the war against terrorism continued, he said, he couldnt say good bye while other Marines were serving in combat. I just couldnt retire during a war, said Kenney, who serves as ocer in charge of the teams Afghan security force. I thought I could help with my experience. Kenney joined the Ma rine Corps in 1975 with, he says now, no intention of re-enlisting. After serv ing with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, he de cided to stay in because he enjoyed being a platoon sergeant with his Marines and hoped to earn a spot in Marine Reconnais sance. When I joined, I want ed to do four years and get out, said Kenney, who hails from Hartford, Conn. Four years turned into 37 for Kenney. From his days with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, to his current assignmnet with RCT-7, he has served with 2nd Marines, 7th Marines, 8th Marines, Marine Corps Recruiting Command twice, Marine Corps secu rity guard duty, 1st Recon naissance Battalion, in fantry ocer course twice, and the 15th Marine Expe ditionary Unit. Kenney, 55, is what Ma rines call a mustang. He served his rst 12 years as an enlisted Marine and was commissioned as an ocer in 1987. Kenney uses his experience as a prior-enlisted member to mentor and teach the Ma rines around him. He can relate to the younger enlisted Marines, said Maj. Rudy Salcido, commander of the regiments Headquarters Company. He brings a wealth of knowledge to the table. Hes able to mentor down from the ju nior Marine all the way up to the senior ocers the same way. Salcido, from Tucson, Ariz., said when he attend ed infantry ocer course during 2001, Kenney was the director of the course. He set the example, Salcido said of Kenney. Every time he stepped in, he did it at the right time. As a student, I could tell it was leadership at its nest. Salcido noted he considers Kenney one of his role models and still comes to him for advice. Ive seen him mentor some of my other men tors, Salcido said. ats what he is hes a lifelong mentor. Being well-respected by his fellow Marines does not make Kenney immune to the good-natured ribbing Marines often share. ey make jokes about me knowing Chesty Puller or Dan Daly, Kenney said. eyll see the old recruit ing pictures from World War II and ask me if that helmet was comfortable. e Marine Corps celebrated its 237th birthday on Nov. 10. As is tradition, Kenney received the rst piece of cake as the oldest Marine present. It is a familiar custom. is will be my third [Marine Corps] birthday as the oldest Marine, said Kenney. I was kind of ex pecting it this year. Many Marines will nev er be part of the birthday cake-cutting ceremony. e oldest Marine receives the rst piece of cake and the youngest receives the second. Kenney can recall both experiences. I joined when I was 17, Kenney said. My rst two years in the Corps, I was the youngest Marine at the ceremony. I will denitely retire before 2015. I dont want to hit that 40-year mark. ary A. Herbert and Sec retary of War Daniel S. Lamont, issued general orders to their respective Academies stating that other teams would be al lowed to visit Annapolis and West Point to conduct football games, but the Army and Navy football teams were prohibited in engaging in games elsewhere. In other words, Army and Navy were restricted to home games and, con sequently, from playing each other. For the next ve years, the explosive rivalry was defused. In 1899, Philadelphia was chosen as a neutral locale to host the ArmyNavy Game and begin the rivalry anew. Franklin Field was the site of this game, and through the 20th and now 21st century, Municipal Stadium and later JFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., and in Philadelphia Veter ans Stadium and Lincoln Financial Field have all staged Army-Navy. As the rivalry has moved into the new millennium, Philadelphia has contin ued to be the primary host of the storied series and the home of the game.MissileRescueFootballAer 37 years, Grand Old Man mentors young Marines

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This work shop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 3, 10, 17 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a cer tificate. A minimum of six par ticipants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered Dec. 5The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 11Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 11. For more information, call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Armys Apache gets upgraded e Defense Acquisi tion Board decision re garding full-rate produc tion for the Apache Block III helicopter program was announced Oct. 24, by Army ocials at a brieng in Washington, D.C. Additionally, Apache project manager Col. Jef frey Hager conrmed that the Apache Block III is being re-designated as an AH-64E model. e announcement event was attended by 20 media members representing national and industry related publica tions. According to the Apache Project Oce, the Defense Acquisition Board, or DAB, granted approval for full-rate production, or FRP, in August and the Air Force communicated the model designation change in a September memo to the Army. Actions are underway to begin implementation of the E model designation for subsequent use by the military and industry. e DABs decision really secured Apache production for the next several years, Hager said. Weve got scal require ments, but securing that production through a full-rate production decision was just huge for this program. Its probably the single largest decision that weve had since Block Is and Block IIs went into production. Its that mon umental. One of the other key components, Hager said, that resulted in the DAB decision is the fact that the Block III had been desig nated an ACAT C program. Were no longer a D program and therefore dont need DOD over sight. Our Army acquisi tion executive, Ms. Heidi Shyu, is in charge of the Apache program and the development production that we have for Block III as we go forward from this point. So that was a big designation for us, Hager said. e designation of the E model, he added, ac curately recognizes the aircrafts advancements including an Improved Drive System, increased engine capabilities, technologically advanced composite main rotor blades and sensor en hancements. At the end of the day, the only real measure of how well a system is per forming falls to the user and how easy or dicult the aircraft is to maintain, said Col. John Lynch, At tack/Reconnaissance TRADOC capabilities manager. Basically, the Block III exceeded expec tations that were laid out on the sustainment side. Upgrades to the aircraft over previous models include advanced rotor blades and signicantly increased aircraft han dling, performance and agility at higher altitudes. Situational awareness is enhanced with electrooptical and infrared sen sors for the operational benet of aviators and battleeld commanders. e Apache eet con tinues to do very well in Afghanistan and Kuwait, Lynch said. Its has main tained an over 80 percent readiness rate while aver aging over 60 ight hours per month. Were almost at one million combat ight hours with the Apache. First delivered in Octo ber 2011, Apache Block III helicopters are in produc tion at the Boeing Company in Mesa, Ariz. Fielding of the AH-64E will occur over the next decade. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordi nating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the man dated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their com mand and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 17 to 20. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 4, 11, 18 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain sup port from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingSeparation Transition GPS Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or con templating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 3 to 7. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Dec. 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Dec. 11. It provides an over view of local and national employment trends and recommends strat egies to expand your job search net work. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Dec. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This inter active workshop addresses the mili tary culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Dec. 10. Registration is required. Call 5734513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a sys tematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foun dation to newly forming or re-ener gizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 7. For more information and to register call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or class room and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presenta tions to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a pre sentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty per sonnel. FFSC Midshipmen aid Sandy relief eort Twenty-four Naval Academy midshipmen volunteered on anks giving to help with Hurricane Sandy relief in New Jersey as part of a Midshipmen Action Group project. Accompanied by Lt. Cmdr. John Woods, an Academy oceanography instructor, the midshipmen worked with the American Red Cross to transfer relief products between regional aide sta tions. e midshipmen helped remove debris from area residences damaged by the storm and load trucks with cleaning supplies for delivery to areas on the shore. e Midshipmen Action Group volunteers more than 20,000 hours a year to local and national com munity service eorts. e trip hits close to home for Woods, who is originally from Lavallette, N.J., a beach town that has seen a lot of devastation from Hurricane Sandy. I am hoping to make a small step towards prog ress to getting our beach town back, Woods said. e motivation from the group of midshipmen who gave up their leave over anksgiving to come out and help complete strang ers, just because they wanted to, is overwhelming. e midshipmen ac knowledged that giving up their anksgiving holiday was a sacrice but an easy one to make under the cir cumstances. When I rst heard of the opportunity to go and help out with the Hurri cane Sandy relief eorts, I couldnt think of anything else I wanted to do over my anksgiving break, Midshipman 2nd Class Philip Solt said. I could not stop thinking about all the people who were still struggling in getting the basic essentials food, water and shelter. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 7

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Im not The Most Interesting Man in the World. But I am fed up with this old goat coming on during foot ball games and telling me he is and making brag gadocio claims of doing stuff he, quite obviously, never did but was written for him to say by some marketing joker; all the while insinuating that if I drink beer from Mexico I will be interesting too. Come on, man! So I did a scientific survey to find out who people really think is The Most Interesting Man in the World. Here it is: Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MA3 Kelli Boesch Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Clarksville, Tenn. Channing Tatum. Hes talented in so many different ways it makes him interesting. Robert Quinones Retired Navy El Paso, Texas Colin Powell. I admired him in his time on the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his work on active duty and his books. Lance Cpl. Lukas Johnson Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Dalton, Ohio Felix Baumgartner. Hes done so many things. He free jumped from 120,000 feet in the air. Stephanie Baggio Family member Atlanta My husband, because hes so amazing and funny, and I love him. Senior Rate Petty Officer Stephen Hutchins HMS Vigiliant Cornwell, England The WikiLeaks fellow, Julian Assange. Hes very strange and every body wants to extradite and arrest him. EM1 Chris Hand USS Georgia Gold Aiken, S.C. I dont know who it is, but its not the guy on the TV commercial. Policy targets space junk e new Defense De partment space policy, updated to reect the fastgrowing use and sometimes misuse of the space domain, addresses issues of safety, sustainability and security in space for the 21st century and be yond. e policy, signed Oct. 18, 2012, by Deputy De fense Secretary Ashton B. Carter, follows the release in 2010 of President Barack Obamas National Space Policy, and in 2011 of the National Security Space Strategy, the rst such strategy to be cosigned by the defense sec retary and the director of national intelligence. DODs space policy also reects the 2012 DOD Strategic Guidance, which acknowledged growth in the number of spacefaring nations and threats. According to the guidance, the United States will continue to lead global eorts with allies and partners to as sure access to and use of the global commons of space by strengthening international norms of responsible behavior and maintaining interoperable military capabilities. For the DOD, space sys tems are extremely criti cal to ground navigation, smart bomb precision, and to relay unmanned aerial vehicle feeds to troops. Space also is nec essary for early warnings of missile launches and for keeping the president connected to U.S. nuclear forces. In an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service, Dr. John F. Plumb, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for space policy, described the policys main points. One of the international norms of responsible be havior will target a growing problem for space faring nations space debris. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 9

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Pirates Cove menus New devices, applications sought Service members could be downloading applications for government BlackBerrys, iPhones, Androids and other mobility devices by the beginning of next year, said Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert E. Wheeler, the deputy chief information ocer for the department. e goal, he said, is to have the military app store set up by early 2013. It all depends on if we get a good bid, Wheeler explained in an inter view. e request for procurement closes out at the end of the year, and it should not take long to put the store in play once the decision is made, he added. Wheeler said the needs of the de partment are at the core of the re quest. Were looking at things from a three-bin perspective, he added. e rst bin, he said, contains mo bility devices that dont need to con nect with a DOD ocial or classied network. ese include devices used for training, communications in an unclassied nonsecure realm, research and so on, he said. He said the second bin holds those devices that are connected to the secure but unclassied network. Today, these are mainly BlackBer rys, Wheeler said, but there are pilot programs incorporating Androids, iPhones and tablets in this bin. e third group connects with the classied network, he said. e departments future app store will feature applications ap propriate for each bin, the general said, and he expects the security performance of these items will change to encompass DODs strict needs. DOD personnel use 271,000 BlackBerrys alone, he noted, and Research In Motion, the Canadian company that developed BlackBer rys, has a security protocol the department approves. We hope other companies devel op this, Wheeler said. Overall, he said, the larger issue is as we move forward with technol ogy, were trying to make sure we are making it less costly to DOD, were trying to make it more secure and were trying to jump the productiv ity curve here. Jumping the curve is key for the department and to do that, Wheeler said, the department needs to get these devices into the hands of the young men and women to whom they are second nature. e so-called digital generation is developing new uses for these de vices every day, the general noted, and this has bridged into the tactical world, as well. ese devices have uses far be yond just talking to each other and e-mail, he said. e department is basically go ing for diversity in our products, and that goes back to trying to get the best price for the government and nding the most secure device, he said. So we will have a family of options that dont favor any one device. A Sailor from Commander, Sub marine Group 2 spent part of his anksgiving holiday speaking with more than 120 students at the George M. Davis Elementary School in New Rochelle. Yeoman 2nd Class Jose Almonte, who was advanced to rst class petty ocer in the recent advancement cycle, was asked by one special teacher, his mother, to speak at the elementary school. Indra Norberto, who teaches kin dergarten through rst grade at George M. Davis Elementary School, spoke about how proud she is of her sons service to the country. Im very proud of him as a mother because he is defending our coun try. Im also proud of his growth and how much his life has changed since entering the Navy, said Norberto, adding that for the past seven years she has been sharing stories of her sons service with her teaching col leagues. ey really looked forward to seeing him today, to not only con gratulate him on his advancement, but to thank him for his service. My school colleagues knew my son serves in the U.S. Navy mostly due to the stories I share with them,. ey asked me if he could come to day and speak with the third-grade students. Norberto added her sons service has inuence her 17-year old daugh ter, who is a senior in high school. My son has spoken to my daugh ter on many occasions about how the Navy has positively changed his life, she said Norberto. Almonte, who has previous spo ken with elementary and middle school students attending Groton and New London area schools, said he looked forward to helping out his mother, especially during the anksgiving holiday. When my mother found out that I had advanced to the next rank and I was returning home, she thought it was a great idea for me to meet with the students to essentially dis cuss my military service and what anksgiving means to me, said Al monte, who added his speaking en gagement also tied in well with the various educational projects the stu dents had been working on during November relating to both Veterans Day and anksgiving.Submariner lends helping hand to mom 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Winter in Wonderland will be 4 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8 at inside and outside of the Kings Bay Conference. ere are lots to do for the whole family, with an ice skating rink, holiday char acters, holiday train, inatables, halo jumper, games, crafts, cookies, cider and cocoa and the jolly old elf himself, Santa, arrives at 6 p.m. Additionally, e Grinch (PG) will be shown on the outdoor theater starting at 7 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Breakfast with Santa Its SSaturday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo ops with Santa so remember your camera. Story time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Exchange with a delicious breakfast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, sponsored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All partici pants are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Invitation for sealed bids Kings Bay Outdoor Adventure Center has the following equip ment in fair/poor working con dition: Jon Boat 16-foot No. 7475j667 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. 482H586 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. BF8173G192 in fair working con dition; Car Vehicle Trailer No. 447750 in poor working condi tion with following problems, some rust on trailer and two bad tires (tire info 22575R15). All the above equipment can be physi cally seen and sealed bid appli cations may be picked up at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 1029 Henry Stimson Road., Kings Bay, GA 31547. Make sure sealed bid is written on the bottom of the envelope and dropped off at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The sealed bids process will begin on at 9 a.m. Nov. 9 and they must be received or postmarked by Dec. 6. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Dec. 10. For more information, call the Outdoor Adventure Center man ager at (912) 573-8103 If you are the successful bidder you will be notified when and where you may pick-up your equipment. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christ mas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care pa trons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration begins Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registra tion begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 1, 2 Odd Life of Timothy Green Dec. 8, 9 e Santa Clause Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Winter in Wonderland Dec. 8 According to the NASA Orbit al Debris Program Oce, more than 21,000 pieces of orbital de bris larger than 10 centimeters exist in orbit, along with 500,000 smaller pieces and more than 1 million pieces smaller than 1 centimeter. Generally, the policy iden ties how DOD will promote international cooperation and commercial partnerships, drive changes within DOD space ar chitectures and acquisition pro cesses, and work to shape the space environment.Space 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Navy College educational information For the United States and its allies, ending the al-Qaida threat calls for a modied military foot print, close work with partners and continued U.S. involvement in re gions of the world where violent extremism has ourished, Defense Secre tary Leon E. Panetta said Nov. 20. Addressing a large audi ence here at the Center for a New American Security, the secretary discussed signicant national security challenges and oppor tunities ahead. He also outlined pri orities that characterize the approaching end of the longest period of sus tained armed conict in the nations history. e priorities, Panetta said, are ghting the war against al-Qaida and its aliates, ending the war in Afghanistan, implementing the new defense strategy, meeting scal responsibilities, counter ing nuclear proliferation, improving cybersecurity, achieving greater energy security, implementing the Asia-Pacic rebalance, and taking care of service members, veterans and military families. But tonight I wanted to focus on the goal that still remains at the top of the priority list, as it must. at goal that the presi dent made very clear that we have a responsi bility to disrupt, degrade, dismantle and ultimately defeat those who attacked America on 9/11 al-Qa ida, the secretary said. To protect Americans at home and over seas, he added, we need to continue to pursue al-Qaida wherever they go, whatever form they take, wherever they seek to hide. We must be con stantly vigilant, we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy. What will it take, he asked, to achieve the end of al-Qaida? e essential rst step is to nish the job that the United States and its co alition partners began in Afghanistan, he said, and we are on track to do that. As the United States and its NATO part ners agreed at the 2010 summit in Lisbon, Panetta said, Afghans must be re sponsible for their own se curity by the end of 2014. is transition will require continued commit ment by the international community and the Unit ed States to help Afghan forces achieve this goal, he added. We have come too far. We have invested too much blood and treasure not to nish the job, the secretary said. ere are no shortcuts, nor can we aord to turn away from this eort when we are so close to achieving success and preventing al-Qaida from ever returning to this historic epicenter for vio lent extremism. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, prolonged military and intelligence op erations have signicantly weakened al-Qaida, Panetta said. e terrorist groups most eective leaders are gone, its command and control has been degraded and its safe haven is shrinking, he added, but al-Qaida remains. We have slowed the primary cancer but we know that the cancer has also metastasized to other parts of the global body, the secretary said. Two examples of that spreading al-Qaida pres ence are Yemen and So malia. In Yemen, for example, the capabilities of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, are growing. is group has targeted the United States for attack and sowed vio lence and chaos in Yemen itself, Panetta said. We have struck back in an eort to disrupt and dis mantle this group through a very close partnership with the government of Ye men and the Yemenese themselves, he added. In Somalia, against the militant group al-Shaabab, progress also has been made, the secretary said, in large part because of an eective partnership between the United States and the African Union Mission in Somalia. But the challenge is far from over, Panetta said. President [Barack] Obama has made clear, we will ght not just through military means but by har nessing every element of American power mili tary, intelligence, diplo matic, law enforcement, nancial, economic and above all the power of our values as Americans, the secretary said. e second step in achieving the end of al-Qaida, Panetta said, involves maintaining pressure on al-Qaida in Pakistan, on AQAP in Ye men, and on al-Qaida-as sociated forces in Somalia. at means degrading the terrorists senior leadership, dismantling their organizational capabilities, remaining vigilant to ensure the threat does not reconstitute, and work ing to build the capacity of U.S. partners, including Pakistan, to confront these shared threats, he added. Despite challenges in the bilateral relation ship between the United States and Pakistan, the secretary said, one area in which our national interests continue to align is defeating the terrorists on Pakistan soil that threat en both of us. We remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. A third step is to prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al-Qaida elsewhere in the world that the group could use to at tack the United States or its interests, he said. e last decade of war has shown that coordinated eorts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al-Qaida has no place to hide, Pa netta told the audience. We will expand these eorts, including through support and partnership with governments in transition in the Middle East and North Africa, he added. is campaign against al-Qaida will largely take place outside declared combat zones, using a small-footprint approach that includes precision operations, partnered ac tivities with foreign special operations forces, and capacity building so that partner countries can be more eective in com bating terrorism on their own, the secretary said. DOD will work whenev er possible with local part ners, he added, support ing them with intelligence and resources they need to deter common threats. In Mali for example, Pa netta said, we are working with our partners in West ern Africa who are com mitted to countering the emerging threat to regional stability posed by AQIM. A fourth step needed to bring an end to al-Qaida involves investing in the future, he added, in new military and intelligence capabilities and security partnerships. As the size of the military shrinks, for example, spe cial operations will con tinue to ramp up, growing from 37,000 members on 9/11 to 64,000 today and 72,000 by 2017, the secretary noted. We are expanding our eet of Predator and Reaper [unmanned aerial ve hicles] over what we have today. ese enhanced capabilities will enable us to be more exible and agile against a threat that has grown more diuse, Panetta said. A nal point that too often takes a backseat to operations against al-Qaida, Panetta said, is how to prevent extremist ideolo gies from attracting new recruits. Over the past decade we have successfully directed our military and intelligence capabilities at ghting terrorism, he added. And yet we are still struggling to develop an eective approach to address the factors that attract young men and women to extreme ideologies, and to ensure that governments and societ ies have the capacity and the will to counter and reject violent extremism. To truly end the threat from al-Qaida, the secretary said, military force aimed at killing our en emy alone will never be enough. e United States must stay involved and invested through diplo macy, through develop ment, through education, through trade in those re gions of the world where violent extremism has ourished. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 13

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Turkey wants missilesCountrys defense of southern border with Syria at issue e U.S. will work closely with its NATO allies to determine the best way to respond to a recent request from Turkey for Patriot missile support, a defense ocial said Nov. 21. Turkey is seeking to deploy the Patriot missiles along its southeastern border in an eort to de-escalate crisis conditions due to the civil war in neighboring Syria, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said in a statement. e deployment would be defensive only, Rasmussen said. It will in no way support a no-y zone or any oensive operation. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in a Nov. 15 Voice of America interview that the U.S. was talking with Turkey about the threats to its security. Turkey is obviously facing a dicult situation as refugees pour into their country and theyre threatened by the instability in Syria, he said. Few gridiron rivalries oer deeper foundations or greater prestigee rivalry kicked o 122 years ago, when Cadet Dennis Mahan Michie accepted a challenge from the Naval Academy and the two squads faced o on e Plain at West Point on November 29, 1890. Navy had been playing organized football since 1879, and came out on top of the newly-established Army squad. Ever since, through those many years of intense cheers, unforgettable plays and climactic moments, the Army-Navy rivalry has been etched into the minds of countless fans and followers. All it takes is a visit to West Point or Annapolis, where everything from the nely manicured hedges to the chant following grace-before-meals proclaims Beat Navy or Beat Army, to understand how deeply ingrained this rivalry actually is. Even the history of the 10 times that the game was not played tells the story of Army-Navy passion. e game was canceled once, in 1909, when Army canceled its entire schedule after the death of Cadet Eugene Byrne in the game against Harvard, twice during World War I in 1917 and 1918 on orders from the War Department and twice when the academies could not agree on player eligibility standards, in 1928 and 1929. However, the longest and perhaps most telling interruption, from 1894-1898, occurred only a few years after the rivalrys inception. Following a reputed incident between a Rear Admiral and a Brigadier General, which nearly led to a duel after the 1893 Navy victory, President Gover Cleveland called a Cabinet meeting in late February 1894. When the meeting ended, Secretary of the Navy HillUp Periscope TVs The Worlds Most Interesting Man imposter! Page 9 NJROTC visit Camden County H.S. unit comes to Kings Bay Page 4 Santa arriving Winter Wonderland, Dolphin Store visits soon Pages 3, 12 Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Adventures Unleashed starts on zip line New Kings Bay program continues with Dec. 1 activities at Etowah ParkNavy Adventures Unleashed, a cross programming endeavor with Outdoor Recreation and Liberty, escorted eight active duty sailors on their rst NAU Excursion to e Canyons, Zip Line and Canopy Tours, in Ocala, Fla., Saturday, Nov. 17. e 3-hour expedition included a mini ground school and guided trip along an engineered network of nine zip cables. e adrenaline lled experience sent participants sailing past enormous cli walls, ying over huge lakes and traversing along two rope bridges. e tour concluded with a one-way down rappel o the last perch. Following the initial tour participants were given the opportunity to be among the rst to experience the Super Zip Floridas longest and fastest zip line. Unlike the traditional zip, the Super Zip sends you in a prone superman position at speeds up to 50 mph. A dinner stop on the way home topped o a full day of fun and adventure. Rugged Recreation Uprising is the next Navy Adventures Unleashed program, set for Dec. 1 at Etowah Park. is free event will begin with a 9 a.m. o-road trail run. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Vehicle crushes victim Army-Navy Game 113th meeting 3 p.m., Dec. 8, CBS First game 1890: Navy 24, Army 0 Last year Navy 27, Army 21 All-time series Football: Navy, 52-49-7 All-sports: Navy, 957-727-40 Heisman Trophy winners: Army, Doc Blanchard 1945, Glenn Davis 1945, Pete Dawkins 1958; Navy, Joe Bellino 1960, Roger Staubach 1963 Army-Navy still a college football heavyweight Fireghters quick response prevents rolling-car fatality At approximately 11:30 a.m., the tranquil atmosphere was interrupted by the sound of sirens and air horns as re vehicles sped towards Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay base housing, where a life literally hung in the balance. It was Friday Nov. 9, the beginning of a long awaited Veterans Day weekend, and most base personnel were looking forward to the weekends festivities in honor of our nations veterans. en NSB Kings Bay Emergency Dispatch Center rang out the Kings Bay Fire and Emergency Services Department to a report of a victim trapped beneath a car. While in route, Chief 2, Assistant Fire Chief Joe Orona, received and urgent update from the Dispatch Center. He was informed that a vehicle had apparently come For certain we saved a life today. Fire Chief Freddie Thompson NSB Kings Bay Fire Department

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2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 After completing an analysis of industry and employment trends, the Defense Department has embarked on a pilot program to help service members obtain civilian professional credentials, the departments director of training readiness and strategy told reporters at a Nov. 20 press conference. Frank C. DiGiovanni said ve occupational areas were selected for the pilot program aircraft mechanic, automotive mechanic, health care, supply and logistics, and truck driver. A total of 17 military specialties are covered under these ve areas, which align with Department of Labors standard occupational classications, he noted. To select the occupations, he said, the department looked at the private sector for areas where there would be average or better growth coinciding with high numbers of projected job openings. What weve asked the services to do is to look at those ve areas, look at their specic military occupational codes, marry them up and get some people into the pilot program, DiGiovanni said. e program began in October, he said, and as it progresses, ocials will examine whether existing military training is sucient to qualify service members for civilian credentials. Where the current training is found to be insucient, DiGiovanni added, the department will determine if the program can be adjusted or if training from external sources is necessary. Training is just part of career development, however. Some of these licenses and credentials require a certain level of experience to qualify, he said. So, the program will eventually assess service members at various stages in their military careers, he said. Military ocials also will assess the programs success from the perspective of the three key participant groups, DiGiovanni said. e rst is the individual, he said. Did they feel they got what they needed to go out and compete? e second group, technical schools and supervisors, will be surveyed to determine whether meeting the requirements of a civilian certication program helped them or if it created additional challenges, DiGiovanni said. As the service members involved in the pilot program transition from military service to civilian life, a third group, employers, will be surveyed, he said. Wed have to go to some of the industry folks and say, e fact that [service members] were able to get some of these licenses or credentials while on military service, did that help in your decision to hire an individual? What kind of employee are they? he said. For us, the objective really is honoring the service of our service members and helping them while theyre in the service to professionalize and expand their knowledge in these occupational areas, DiGiovanni said. e programs second aim is to determine whether conducting this type of training through the services is cost-eective, he said. Other options could include vocational training through the Department of Labor or Veterans Aairs, he added. e pilot is one of several DOD Credentialing and Licensing Task Force initiatives, said Eileen Lainez, a spokesperson for the Defense Department. Were looking at how we can better document and translate military training and experience so that civilian credentialing agencies and states can better understand the nature of military training and award appropriate credit, she said. Industry has told us that military members bring several advantages to the table, DiGiovanni said. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Teen Driver class set for Dec. 27Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Safety and Cape Fox will have a Teen Driver Improvement class 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 27, at Fluckey Hall, Building 1063, Room 127. It is the only teen class oered during the holidays and limited to 30 de pendents of active duty/reserve/retirees or De partment of Defense civilians. After enrollment, if your teen driver cannot attend, call to cancel so another can sign up. Teen drivers/future drivers need to have heir license or permit and should bring something to write with. e class does not fulll any of the State of Georgia requirements for teen drivers, but may help with insurance, depending on your provider. Call Dean Merrill, (912) 573-2525, or Russ Prothero, (912) 573-0414, for more information or to enroll.Bod Pod measures body fatNSB Kings Bay Health Promotion and Well ness has a new Bod Pod that uses air displace ment to measure what percentage of your body is fat and what is not. e procedure is accurate, fast and safe; taking only 15 minutes. Since it ac curately measures your weight and the amount of air your body displaces, minimal form-tting clothing is required; ideally a spandex swimsuit, single-layer compression shorts and/or a light weight jog bra and swim cap that is supplied. To schedule an appointment, call Health Pro motion and Wellness at 573-8626 or 573-4237.Exchange Bonus Bucks Dec. 8Bonus Bucks are back at the NSB Kings Bay Navy Exchange this holiday season. From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Dec. 8, customers will receive one $10 Bonus Bucks coupon for each $100 of merchan dise/service purchased, while coupon supplies last. A maximum of ve Bonus Bucks will be is sued to customers per single transaction. NEX Bonus Bucks will be redeemable in any NEX from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1, 2013, on all merchandise and services except uniforms, gasoline, tobac co, alcohol, NEX and third-party gift cards and concession merchandise. Purchases made on the All Services Catalog or myNavyExchange. com do not apply. One coupon will be redeem able on a transaction of $50 or more. A maximum of ve coupons can be used on a transac tion of $250 or more. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.St. Marys sets Christmas eventsSt. Marys has set the following Christmas sea son events: Saturday, Dec. 1, Christmas in the Park; Saturday, Dec. 8, Tour our Town/Tour of Homes; Dec. 13 to 16, St. Marys Little eater presents Where are you Christmas?, eatre by the Trax, 1100 Osborne St.; Tuesday, Dec. 18, Live Nativity. Tickets for Tour our Town/Tour of Homes are on sale. For additional information on any of the events, call (912) 882-4000 or visit www.stmaryswelcome.com.Marine Heritage offers awardsEach year the Marine Corps Heritage Founda tion presents awards for creative work of individ uals in preserving and promulgating the Marine Corps history, traditions and culture. Marines and civilians may submit their own entries or the work of others for consideration. Awards will be presented at the Foundations annual ceremony on April 20, 2013. Submissions deadline is Jan. 9, 2013. For a detailed list of the awards and submission requirements, visit: http://www. marineheritage.org/Awards.asp.HHS launches smoking Web siteHealth and Human Services has launched BeTobaccoFree.gov, a Web site providing onestop access to the best and most up-to-date tobacco-related information from across its agencies. is consolidated resource includes general information on tobacco, federal and state laws and policies, health statistics, and evidence-based methods on how to quit.Union re-enactors at Ft. ClinchFort Clinch State Park in Fernandina Beach, Fla., will host a Union Garrison event Saturday, Dec. 1 and Sunday, Dec. 2. Living historian la dies will be preparing a Christmas tree and dec orating the mantles for the holiday season. For additional information, contact the park at (904) 277-7274 or visit www.FloridaStateParks.org. Now hear this! e Navy is taking steps to address several issues that are aecting its sailors, the chief of naval operations said Nov. 16 in Washington, D.C. Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert spoke at a National Press Club luncheon. Upward trends in sexual assaults and suicides are chief among the issues the Navy is tackling, the admiral said. Sexual assault is a safety issue, Greenert said. Im troubled that we havent moved forward to limit and really reverse the trend of these events during my time here. Everybody deserves a safe place to work, he said. We have to treat it as a crime, because thats what it is. e admiral also said hes concerned with the increase in the number of suicides in the Navy. A few years ago, we had about 13 suicides per 100,000 [personnel], now its 15 per 100,000, so were creeping up, he acknowledged. We have to empower our sailors to be able to deal with stress. We have to look out for each other and we have to embed in all of our shipmates to make sure that, if somebody is reaching out, were ready to take care of them. e rate of operations is higher than he expected it would be at this time last year, Greenert said, and the Navy needs to reconcile how to continue to support that. is may result in adjustments to training and maintenance plans, he said. e Navy needs to look at the operations tempo with particular attention to its sailors, he continued. We call that individual tempo ITEMPO which is the measurement of what each sailors requirements are for going to sea [and] coming back, as opposed to the unit. I think its important to the health of the force. e admiral said hes satised with the overall manning of ships at sea. But, he noted, the balance of skilled personnel and leadership needs to be adjusted to ensure that, as the Navy responds to the increased operational tempo, it has the right people in the right place at the right time.Navy tackles sexual assault, suicide CNO Credentialing program under way DOD Credentialing Defense Department ocials are sending a new spouse survey to select active-duty families to assist in determining programs that best suit their needs. During an interview with the Pentagon Channel, Cathy Flynn, a program analyst with the Pentagons military community and family policy oce, discussed how these surveys aect future programs serving military families. e Active Duty Spouse Survey is a survey thats sent out to a representative sample of active-duty spouses every two years, she said. Its really a chance for spouses to give their feedback, their input, and their experiences back to us here in the Department of Defense. e departments rst spouse survey was in 2006, and the rst activeduty spouse survey was in 2008. e department now surveys active-duty spouses in even-numbered years and reserve-component spouses in odd-numbered years. e new active-duty spouse survey launches today and will be in the eld for about three months, as long as we get enough response, Flynn said. e questions cover all areas of military life things that we hope are important to the spouses, Flynn said. ings like [permanent change-of-station] moves, your experiences with deployment, your experiences with your children, your experiences with military programs. Flynn said these results are analyzed and used to make decisions on policies and programs to continue to better serve military families. In 2010, we learned that 85 percent of spouses want or need to work, she said. Of our population of spouses, 57 percent are in the labor force; however, 26 percent of those spouses were unemployed. So using that data really helped us to boost employment and education support programs for spouses. So it was really critical to have that feedback to have the facts to use with our leaders. Flynn said the survey will help to guide decisions about family pro grams in an era of budget challenges. e government is trying to make decisions about what programs to keep, she said. Its really important that we have the facts about what your experiences are like, what spouses lives are like, and what programs theyre using and what programs theyre benetting from. DOD leaders want to make really good choices about what programs to keep and which programs to beef up to continue supporting military families, Flynn added, and responses to the survey will inform those decisions. Each demographic is surveyed for all service branches, Flynn said, to provide ocials with an understanding of spouses experiences in all services. In this survey, its all brought together so we can understand across the board whats happening -where services might look dierent and where they look the same, Flynn said. Flynn emphasized the importance of spouses participating in these surveys to improve or sustain support programs. Its a random sample, and about one in 10 65,000 spouses will be invited to take this survey, she said. Whats really important about that is if youre selected to DOD spouse survey needs response Defense Department

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A Sailor assigned to Navy Medicines recognized global leader in operational and aviation survival training rendered aid to a runner during mile 14 of the 8th Annual Pensacola Marathon, Nov. 11. Navy Medicine Operational Training Center Career Counselor Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Robert Crampton, an avid runner competing in his eighth marathon, spent nearly 20 minutes assisting another runner at the 14-mile mark, in an eort he said was simply instinctual for any medical professional. Were trained as [hospital] corpsmen to respond, he said. Being ready for anything that might happen is something ingrained in every corpsman, something that starts in A school. e runner was okay, but the situation could have been much worse. As Crampton neared the 14-mile mark, slightly more than halfway through the race, he saw another runner doubled over on the ground. He immediately took charge, calming the 50-year-old woman while assessing what possibly could be wrong. ere was another guy there who turned out to be a young Marine trying to help, he said. I identied myself as a corpsman, and he immediately backed o and asked me if I needed any help. Crampton identied the runner as dehydrated and experiencing intense muscle fatigue, something he attributed to the woman over-exerting herself during the race, a novice mistake. He instructed and assisted the woman in raising her arms over her head to open her airway in an eort to help increase the ow of blood and oxygen through her body, while instructing the woman to attempt deep breathing exercises. He remained with the woman until emergency response crews arrived, spending nearly 20 minutes rendering assistance during an event where seconds dictate an outcome. An experienced marathoner, Crampton said novice runners can sometimes over-exert themselves during an actual distance race, becoming over anxious to complete what many times they have set too high as a personal goal. I know I couldve run a better race, but I also know that making sure the individuals around me are safe is what I should do, he said. Employers consider service members and veterans to be diligent, ecient and reliable, he said. Service members and veterans report that their military experience provided them with leadership and problem-solving skills, adaptability and the ability to work in teams, he added. In many industries the training and experience they have in the military gives them a jump start, he said. However, civilian employers also report that translating military skills to civilian job experience is one of the biggest challenges of hiring employees with military experience, Lainez continued. Civilian credentials provide a means of doing this translation.DOD e Dolphin Store Kings Bay is celebrating the season by hosting a Cookies with Santa open house Saturday. While adults shop an array of submarineand Navy-themed items, children can visit with Santa at the store. e open house is 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 1, for special Saturday shopping hours. Along with the great submarine-themed gifts that e Dolphin Store sells, you can nd salepriced Hallmark gifts and cards from a generous local Hallmark store donation and enjoy some cookies. e Dolphin Store is at the base library, 918 James Madison Rd., Building 1066, next to the conference center. Its open 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and ursdays, and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Additionally, the store will be open the rst Saturday of each month, starting Dec. 1, with a special holiday shopping day on Saturday, Dec. 15. e store will be closed Dec. 22 to Jan. 4. e Dolphin Store is a non-prot store and 100 percent of the proceeds are donated to e Dolphin Scholarship Foundation. e Dolphin Store is open year-round and managed and staed by volunteers. e Dolphin Store offers gift and souvenir items that can be hard to nd elsewhere. e stores merchandise includes Navy and submarine-related items, clothing, jewelry, home decor, household items, gift ware, baby items, toys and more. Most items have submarine or Navy insignias, and some of the items can be personalized and/or custom designed. A large portion of the inventory is handcrafted by vendors both local and around the country. e store managers are always looking for new items and consignors that t the stores theme. e store is available for Family Readiness Group meetings, Meet and Greets, and other special functions. e Dolphin Store asks that groups give a minimum of two weeks notice to coordinate volunteers and accommodate the request. e Dolphin Store managers would like to thank the volunteers who have made it possible to expand hours and help the store grow. Anyone interested in volunteering can contact the store and request more information. Assistant managers, trunk show helpers, marketing helpers, technical support and store sales sta are sought. Volunteers can work in the store, at special events and or donate their talents. Talk to Jhem or Rachel, or e-mail kbdolphinstore@hotmail.com, if you are interested in helping at e Dolphin Store. All four active-duty services and ve of the six reserve components met or exceeded their recruiting goals for scal 2012, ocials announced Nov. 19. e Army Reserve shortfall was the result of precision recruiting, which was implemented in an eort to rebalance the force. All four active services met or exceeded their numerical accession goals for scal 2012: Army: 60,490 accessions, for 104 percent of its goal of 58,000; Navy: 36,329 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 36,275; Marine Corps: 30,514 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 30,500; Air Force: 29,037 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 29,037. e Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force all exhibited strong retention through scal 2012. Five of the six reserve components met or exceeded their numerical accession goals for scal 2012: Army Reserve: 26,041 accessions, for 97 percent of its goal of 26,875; Army National Guard: 47,997 accessions, for 104 percent of its goal of 46,000; Navy Reserve: 8,269 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 8,255; Marine Corps Reserve: 8,910 accessions, for 100 percent of its goal of 8,910; Air National Guard: 9,437 accessions, for 115 percent of its goal of 8,210; Air Force Reserve: 8,116 accessions, for 101 percent of its goal of 8,031. All reserve components are on target to achieve their scal attrition goals.Military meets recruiting quotasDolphin Store hosts Cookies with Santaparticipate in this survey, youre representing, essentially, 10 spouses who have similar backgrounds as you do. Flynn explained selected families will be invited by mail to take the survey or can participate online. e survey takes 20 to 30 minutes to complete, she added. It takes a little bit of time, because there are a lot of areas to cover, she said. Were trying to cover the entire breadth of ex periences of military life. It is really important that people take this survey seriously, and give us their feedback. e survey is re ally your opportunity to get your feedback all the way up to the leaders in the Department of Defense.Spouse Corpsman aids distressed runner THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 Camden County H.S. NJROTC visits SECURITY FORCE AND SEABEES Photos by SCOTT BASSETT

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 5 in the Trident Lakes Golf Course Hospitality Room. Medals will be awarded for top nishers. e day will include a 3-versus-3 paintball tournament. You can sign-up at Outdoor Recreation, all equipment will be provided free of charge. ose wishing to use their own equipment must receive approval from the Outdoor Recreation sta. Strongman competitions, Kids in the Dirt Run Challenge, bounce houses, halo jump, rock climbing wall, food, family and friends is sure to make this a day to Unleash the outsider in you. For more information or to volunteer, like NAU on Facebook mwrkingsbay or contact NAU at 5739869. out gear and struck, rolled over and dragged the victim beneath it. To compound the urgency of the situation, the only bystander was struggling to prevent the vehicle from rolling further down the driveway over the victim, which could prove fatal. Faced with unpredict able circumstancesn, Oro na ordered responding apparatus to step it up and increase response speed. And, he requested that Trauma One Life Flight from Shands Jacksonville, Fla., be placed on standby for immediate launch. e rst KBFD apparatus arrived on scene within two minutes of being dispatched. Engine 2s Fireghter omas Martin assumed initial command of the scene. As reghters dismounted the apparatus, they could hear screams from the victim, whom they observed trapped beneath the car as a bystander was frantically trying to keep the car from moving. Martin, KBFDs heavy rescue subject matter expert, immediately directed reghters to deploy and stabilize the car by placing the gear lever in park, applying the park brake and holding it in place until wheel chocks were applied. Crews used the Fast Jack-High-Lift Extrication Jack and High Air Pressure Lifting Bags to lift the vehicle o the victim. e vehicle was stabilized by applying stackable cribbing as vehicle rose o the victim. Within a minute of the rst crews arrival, Orona arrived on scene and assumed incident command. He immediately contacted dispatch and ordered the launch of Trauma One. Seconds behind him was the KBFD Advanced Life Support Ambulance and the 75-foot Quint. KBFD paramedics assisted in the delicate extrication of the victim from beneath the car, and expertly delivered and sustained, advanced life support. ey immobilized the patient, treated apparent injuries and loaded her in the ambulance for transport to the helipad. Amazingly, the entire extrication process took just two minutes. We have responded to a wide variety of serious events where life and property were signicantly threatened, Fire Chief Freddie ompson said. My reghters never cease to amaze me. e entire operation from start to nish was eciently accomplished. e seamless transition from rescue, to medical care, to airlift was simply remarkable. For certain we saved a life today. I am extremely proud to be their re chief. Assistant Chief Fire Prevention Kim Maxwell and his inspectors had already prepared the helipad for the Trauma 1 landing. We work as a team. When we heard that Trauma 1 was in route, me and my inspectors immediately responded to the helipad and completed the FOD (foreign object damage) walk and switched on the landing zone lights, Maxwell said. Within 13 minutes the victim had been rescued, medically stabilized and transported to the helipad for emergency medical air transport. A few minutes later, Trauma 1 landed, and with the assistance of the KBFD team, the patient was loaded on the helicopter and en route to Shands Jacksonville Trauma Center. Zip ey have asked that we work with them to try to see what we can do to give them some missile defense capability, he continued. And we are working with them. And our hope is that we can help provide that kind of assistance. If approved, the deployment would be undertaken in accordance with NATOs standing air defense plan, Rasmussen said. It is up to the individual NATO countries that have available Patriots Germany, the Netherlands and the United States to decide if they can provide them for deployment in Turkey and for how long. We will remain in close dialogue with our NATO allies as we work through this request for support. We take Turkeys concerns very seriously, the defense ocial said. Twenty years is the retirement goal for many young Marines, but one Marines time in service nearly doubles that mark. With 37 years in the Marine Corps, the Grand Old Man of Regimental Combat Team 7, Lt. Col. Jerey J. Kenney, intended to retire during 2003. But as the war against terrorism continued, he said, he couldnt say goodbye while other Marines were serving in combat. I just couldnt retire during a war, said Kenney, who serves as ocer in charge of the teams Afghan security force. I thought I could help with my experience. Kenney joined the Marine Corps in 1975 with, he says now, no intention of re-enlisting. After serving with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, he decided to stay in because he enjoyed being a platoon sergeant with his Marines and hoped to earn a spot in Marine Reconnaissance. When I joined, I wanted to do four years and get out, said Kenney, who hails from Hartford, Conn. Four years turned into 37 for Kenney. From his days with 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, to his current assignmnet with RCT-7, he has served with 2nd Marines, 7th Marines, 8th Marines, Marine Corps Recruiting Command twice, Marine Corps security guard duty, 1st Reconnaissance Battalion, infantry ocer course twice, and the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. Kenney, 55, is what Marines call a mustang. He served his rst 12 years as an enlisted Marine and was commissioned as an ocer in 1987. Kenney uses his experience as a prior-enlisted member to mentor and teach the Marines around him. He can relate to the younger enlisted Marines, said Maj. Rudy Salcido, commander of the regiments Headquarters Company. He brings a wealth of knowledge to the table. Hes able to mentor down from the junior Marine all the way up to the senior ocers the same way. Salcido, from Tucson, Ariz., said when he attended infantry ocer course during 2001, Kenney was the director of the course. He set the example, Salcido said of Kenney. Every time he stepped in, he did it at the right time. As a student, I could tell it was leadership at its nest. Salcido noted he considers Kenney one of his role models and still comes to him for advice. Ive seen him mentor some of my other mentors, Salcido said. ats what he is hes a lifelong mentor. Being well-respected by his fellow Marines does not make Kenney immune to the good-natured ribbing Marines often share. ey make jokes about me knowing Chesty Puller or Dan Daly, Kenney said. eyll see the old recruit ing pictures from World War II and ask me if that helmet was comfortable. e Marine Corps celebrated its 237th birthday on Nov. 10. As is tradition, Kenney received the rst piece of cake as the oldest Marine present. It is a familiar custom. is will be my third [Marine Corps] birthday as the oldest Marine, said Kenney. I was kind of expecting it this year. Many Marines will never be part of the birthday cake-cutting ceremony. e oldest Marine receives the rst piece of cake and the youngest receives the second. Kenney can recall both experiences. I joined when I was 17, Kenney said. My rst two years in the Corps, I was the youngest Marine at the ceremony. I will denitely retire before 2015. I dont want to hit that 40-year mark. ary A. Herbert and Secretary of War Daniel S. Lamont, issued general orders to their respective Academies stating that other teams would be allowed to visit Annapolis and West Point to conduct football games, but the Army and Navy football teams were prohibited in engaging in games elsewhere. In other words, Army and Navy were restricted to home games and, consequently, from playing each other. For the next ve years, the explosive rivalry was defused. In 1899, Philadelphia was chosen as a neutral locale to host the ArmyNavy Game and begin the rivalry anew. Franklin Field was the site of this game, and through the 20th and now 21st century, Municipal Stadium and later JFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., and in Philadelphia Veterans Stadium and Lincoln Financial Field have all staged Army-Navy. As the rivalry has moved into the new millennium, Philadelphia has continued to be the primary host of the storied series and the home of the game.MissileRescueFootballAer 37 years, Grand Old Man mentors young Marines

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pressure and many other items can cause undo stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This workshop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Dec. 20. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Dec. 26Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Dec. 26. It can help you focus on identifying the feel ings anger hides and explore behaviors helpful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Dec. 3, 10, 17 and 31. Enrollment in this six-week class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Pre-marital workshop offered Dec. 5The Fleet & Family Support Center is offering a workshop for pre-marital counseling for couples that are contemplat ing marriage. The workshop is designed to address couples interested in enriching their future through improved communication, problem-solving skills, financial planning and realistic expectations of mar riage. The class is designed to meet all clinical counseling requirements. The workshop is scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 5. Registration is required, and childcare is not available. For more information call 573-4512.Smooth Move Workshop scheduled for Dec. 11Smooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be 2 to 4 p.m., Dec. 11. For more information, call 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops Armys Apache gets upgraded e Defense Acquisition Board decision regarding full-rate production for the Apache Block III helicopter program was announced Oct. 24, by Army ocials at a brieng in Washington, D.C. Additionally, Apache project manager Col. Jeffrey Hager conrmed that the Apache Block III is being re-designated as an AH-64E model. e announcement event was attended by 20 media members representing national and industry related publications. According to the Apache Project Oce, the Defense Acquisition Board, or DAB, granted approval for full-rate production, or FRP, in August and the Air Force communicated the model designation change in a September memo to the Army. Actions are underway to begin implementation of the E model designation for subsequent use by the military and industry. e DABs decision really secured Apache production for the next several years, Hager said. Weve got scal requirements, but securing that production through a full-rate production decision was just huge for this program. Its probably the single largest decision that weve had since Block Is and Block IIs went into production. Its that monumental. One of the other key components, Hager said, that resulted in the DAB decision is the fact that the Block III had been designated an ACAT C program. Were no longer a D program and therefore dont need DOD oversight. Our Army acquisition executive, Ms. Heidi Shyu, is in charge of the Apache program and the development production that we have for Block III as we go forward from this point. So that was a big designation for us, Hager said. e designation of the E model, he added, accurately recognizes the aircrafts advancements including an Improved Drive System, increased engine capabilities, technologically advanced composite main rotor blades and sensor enhancements. At the end of the day, the only real measure of how well a system is performing falls to the user and how easy or dicult the aircraft is to maintain, said Col. John Lynch, Attack/Reconnaissance TRADOC capabilities manager. Basically, the Block III exceeded expectations that were laid out on the sustainment side. Upgrades to the aircraft over previous models include advanced rotor blades and signicantly increased aircraft handling, performance and agility at higher altitudes. Situational awareness is enhanced with electrooptical and infrared sensors for the operational benet of aviators and battleeld commanders. e Apache eet continues to do very well in Afghanistan and Kuwait, Lynch said. Its has maintained an over 80 percent readiness rate while averaging over 60 ight hours per month. Were almost at one million combat ight hours with the Apache. First delivered in October 2011, Apache Block III helicopters are in production at the Boeing Company in Mesa, Ariz. Fielding of the AH-64E will occur over the next decade. 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordi nating mandated, annual awareness training, maintaining and providing current information on and referral to base and community programs for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 17 to 20. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group will meet every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is scheduled for 10 a.m. to noon, Dec. 4, 11, 18 and 26. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain sup port from others, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Separation Transition GPS class upcomingSeparation Transition GPS Transition GPS is a seminar for those separating, retiring or con templating leaving the military. The five day seminar provides information on benefits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Separation Transition GPS is 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dec. 3 to 7. You must be registered by Command Career Counselor. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Dec. 11A job search workshop will be 1 to 3 p.m., Dec. 11. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.Expectant Family Workshop comingExpectant Families can receive training on second Wednesday of every other month to ease the adjustment to a newborn baby. Information will be provided about WIC, Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and various other benefits and services available to expectant parents, along with answers to your questions. Frequent breaks offered for the comfort of expectant moms. The next class is 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Dec. 13. Registration is required. Call 573-4512.Spouse 101 helps new Navy wives adjustSpouse 101 provides information to new Navy spouses to support, enhance and ease their transition into the military lifestyle. This interactive workshop addresses the military culture and terminology, and gives tools to access installation and local community resources. The workshop is 9 a.m. to noon, Dec. 10. Registration is required. Call 5734513.Family Readiness Group training scheduledThis course is designed in a systematic user-friendly format and is focused on ensuring that you have the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively provide a solid foundation to newly forming or re-energizing existing Family Readiness Groups. This training is 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Dec. 6 and 7. For more information and to register call 5734513.Department of Veterans Affairs visits baseA Department of Veterans Affairs representative for Kings Bay is in the office from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Appointments are required. Service members wish ing to participate in the Benefits Delivery at Discharge program should be within 60 to 180 days of discharge or retirement and be available for an exam by the VA. To set up an appointment, call Katherine Fernandez at 573-4506.Fleet and Family offers classes on siteThe Fleet and Family Support Center will take most of its regular workshops on the road if a unit can furnish a conference room or classroom and guarantee a minimum of five participants. Additionally, personnel will tailor presenta tions to cover a units General Military Training requirements when those requirements deal with human resources and social issues. Counselors also can create a presentation in response to a units area of special concerns. Personnel are available to participate within areas of expertise in the indoctrination of newly assigned personnel and family members of active duty personnel. FFSC Midshipmen aid Sandy relief eort Twenty-four Naval Academy midshipmen volunteered on anksgiving to help with Hurricane Sandy relief in New Jersey as part of a Midshipmen Action Group project. Accompanied by Lt. Cmdr. John Woods, an Academy oceanography instructor, the midshipmen worked with the American Red Cross to transfer relief products between regional aide stations. e midshipmen helped remove debris from area residences damaged by the storm and load trucks with cleaning supplies for delivery to areas on the shore. e Midshipmen Action Group volunteers more than 20,000 hours a year to local and national community service eorts. e trip hits close to home for Woods, who is originally from Lavallette, N.J., a beach town that has seen a lot of devastation from Hurricane Sandy. I am hoping to make a small step towards progress to getting our beach town back, Woods said. e motivation from the group of midshipmen who gave up their leave over anksgiving to come out and help complete strangers, just because they wanted to, is overwhelming. e midshipmen acknowledged that giving up their anksgiving holiday was a sacrice but an easy one to make under the circumstances. When I rst heard of the opportunity to go and help out with the Hurricane Sandy relief eorts, I couldnt think of anything else I wanted to do over my anksgiving break, Midshipman 2nd Class Philip Solt said. I could not stop thinking about all the people who were still struggling in getting the basic essentials food, water and shelter. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 7

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Im not The Most Interesting Man in the World. But I am fed up with this old goat coming on during football games and telling me he is and making braggadocio claims of doing stuff he, quite obviously, never did but was written for him to say by some marketing joker; all the while insinuating that if I drink beer from Mexico I will be interesting too. Come on, man! So I did a scientific survey to find out who people really think is The Most Interesting Man in the World. Here it is: Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho MA3 Kelli Boesch Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Clarksville, Tenn. Channing Tatum. Hes talented in so many different ways it makes him interesting. Robert Quinones Retired Navy El Paso, Texas Colin Powell. I admired him in his time on the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his work on active duty and his books. Lance Cpl. Lukas Johnson Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Dalton, Ohio Felix Baumgartner. Hes done so many things. He free jumped from 120,000 feet in the air. Stephanie Baggio Family member Atlanta My husband, because hes so amazing and funny, and I love him. Senior Rate Petty Officer Stephen Hutchins HMS Vigiliant Cornwell, England The WikiLeaks fellow, Julian Assange. Hes very strange and everybody wants to extradite and arrest him. EM1 Chris Hand USS Georgia Gold Aiken, S.C. I dont know who it is, but its not the guy on the TV commercial. Policy targets space junk e new Defense Department space policy, updated to reect the fastgrowing use and sometimes misuse of the space domain, addresses issues of safety, sustainability and security in space for the 21st century and beyond. e policy, signed Oct. 18, 2012, by Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter, follows the release in 2010 of President Barack Obamas National Space Policy, and in 2011 of the National Security Space Strategy, the rst such strategy to be cosigned by the defense secretary and the director of national intelligence. DODs space policy also reects the 2012 DOD Strategic Guidance, which acknowledged growth in the number of spacefaring nations and threats. According to the guidance, the United States will continue to lead global eorts with allies and partners to assure access to and use of the global commons of space by strengthening international norms of responsible behavior and maintaining interoperable military capabilities. For the DOD, space systems are extremely critical to ground navigation, smart bomb precision, and to relay unmanned aerial vehicle feeds to troops. Space also is necessary for early warnings of missile launches and for keeping the president connected to U.S. nuclear forces. In an interview with the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service, Dr. John F. Plumb, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for space policy, described the policys main points. One of the international norms of responsible behavior will target a growing problem for spacefaring nations space debris. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 9

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Pirates Cove menus New devices, applications sought Service members could be downloading applications for government BlackBerrys, iPhones, Androids and other mobility devices by the beginning of next year, said Air Force Maj. Gen. Robert E. Wheeler, the deputy chief information ocer for the department. e goal, he said, is to have the military app store set up by early 2013. It all depends on if we get a good bid, Wheeler explained in an interview. e request for procurement closes out at the end of the year, and it should not take long to put the store in play once the decision is made, he added. Wheeler said the needs of the department are at the core of the request. Were looking at things from a three-bin perspective, he added. e rst bin, he said, contains mobility devices that dont need to connect with a DOD ocial or classied network. ese include devices used for training, communications in an unclassied nonsecure realm, research and so on, he said. He said the second bin holds those devices that are connected to the secure but unclassied network. Today, these are mainly BlackBerrys, Wheeler said, but there are pilot programs incorporating Androids, iPhones and tablets in this bin. e third group connects with the classied network, he said. e departments future app store will feature applications appropriate for each bin, the general said, and he expects the security performance of these items will change to encompass DODs strict needs. DOD personnel use 271,000 BlackBerrys alone, he noted, and Research In Motion, the Canadian company that developed BlackBerrys, has a security protocol the department approves. We hope other companies develop this, Wheeler said. Overall, he said, the larger issue is as we move forward with technology, were trying to make sure we are making it less costly to DOD, were trying to make it more secure and were trying to jump the productivity curve here. Jumping the curve is key for the department and to do that, Wheeler said, the department needs to get these devices into the hands of the young men and women to whom they are second nature. e so-called digital generation is developing new uses for these devices every day, the general noted, and this has bridged into the tactical world, as well. ese devices have uses far beyond just talking to each other and e-mail, he said. e department is basically going for diversity in our products, and that goes back to trying to get the best price for the government and nding the most secure device, he said. So we will have a family of options that dont favor any one device. A Sailor from Commander, Submarine Group 2 spent part of his anksgiving holiday speaking with more than 120 students at the George M. Davis Elementary School in New Rochelle. Yeoman 2nd Class Jose Almonte, who was advanced to rst class petty ocer in the recent advancement cycle, was asked by one special teacher, his mother, to speak at the elementary school. Indra Norberto, who teaches kindergarten through rst grade at George M. Davis Elementary School, spoke about how proud she is of her sons service to the country. Im very proud of him as a mother because he is defending our country. Im also proud of his growth and how much his life has changed since entering the Navy, said Norberto, adding that for the past seven years she has been sharing stories of her sons service with her teaching colleagues. ey really looked forward to seeing him today, to not only congratulate him on his advancement, but to thank him for his service. My school colleagues knew my son serves in the U.S. Navy mostly due to the stories I share with them,. ey asked me if he could come today and speak with the third-grade students. Norberto added her sons service has inuence her 17-year old daughter, who is a senior in high school. My son has spoken to my daughter on many occasions about how the Navy has positively changed his life, she said Norberto. Almonte, who has previous spoken with elementary and middle school students attending Groton and New London area schools, said he looked forward to helping out his mother, especially during the anksgiving holiday. When my mother found out that I had advanced to the next rank and I was returning home, she thought it was a great idea for me to meet with the students to essentially discuss my military service and what anksgiving means to me, said Almonte, who added his speaking engagement also tied in well with the various educational projects the students had been working on during November relating to both Veterans Day and anksgiving.Submariner lends helping hand to mom 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Winter in Wonderland will be 4 to 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8 at inside and outside of the Kings Bay Conference. ere are lots to do for the whole family, with an ice skating rink, holiday characters, holiday train, inatables, halo jumper, games, crafts, cookies, cider and cocoa and the jolly old elf himself, Santa, arrives at 6 p.m. Additionally, e Grinch (PG) will be shown on the outdoor theater starting at 7 p.m. For more information, call (912) 573-9492. Breakfast with Santa Its SSaturday, Dec. 15, at the Kings Bay Conference Center. Tickets are on sale at Information, Tickets and Travel or the Kings Bay Navy Exchange, for $5 per person over 12 years old, $3 per child 12 and under and children 2 and under free with a paying adult. Breakfast will be served 8 to 10 a.m. with Santa arriving at 9 until 10:30 a.m. for photo ops with Santa so remember your camera. Story time with Mrs. Claus, holiday characters, and a holiday movie are all part of the enjoyment. Join the fun this year with MWR and the Kings Bay Navy Exchange with a delicious breakfast. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, sponsored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All participants are encouraged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Invitation for sealed bids Kings Bay Outdoor Adventure Center has the following equip ment in fair/poor working con dition: Jon Boat 16-foot No. 7475j667 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. 482H586 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. BF8173G192 in fair working con dition; Car Vehicle Trailer No. 447750 in poor working condi tion with following problems, some rust on trailer and two bad tires (tire info 22575R15). All the above equipment can be physi cally seen and sealed bid appli cations may be picked up at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 1029 Henry Stimson Road., Kings Bay, GA 31547. Make sure sealed bid is written on the bottom of the envelope and dropped off at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The sealed bids process will begin on at 9 a.m. Nov. 9 and they must be received or postmarked by Dec. 6. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Dec. 10. For more information, call the Outdoor Adventure Center man ager at (912) 573-8103 If you are the successful bidder you will be notified when and where you may pick-up your equipment. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center is Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but closed Christmas and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration begins Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registration begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids Every Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. are: Dec. 1, 2 Odd Life of Timothy Green Dec. 8, 9 e Santa Clause Dec. 15, 16 Disneys A Christmas Carol Dec. 22, 23 Christmas Story and Dec. 29, 30 Ice Age: Continental Drift Additionally, during Winter Break will be Dec. 21 Polar Express, Dec. 26 Home Alone, Dec. 27 Home Alone 2: Alone in New York and Dec. 28 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaur. e movie schedule also is listed in Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page. All youths under 18 years of age must be accom panied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after the sched uled start time no one comes in, the movie area will be available for open viewing. For the latest information, call (912) 573-4548.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Winter in Wonderland Dec. 8 According to the NASA Orbital Debris Program Oce, more than 21,000 pieces of orbital debris larger than 10 centimeters exist in orbit, along with 500,000 smaller pieces and more than 1 million pieces smaller than 1 centimeter. Generally, the policy identies how DOD will promote international cooperation and commercial partnerships, drive changes within DOD space architectures and acquisition processes, and work to shape the space environment.Space 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Navy College educational information For the United States and its allies, ending the al-Qaida threat calls for a modied military footprint, close work with partners and continued U.S. involvement in regions of the world where violent extremism has ourished, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Nov. 20. Addressing a large audience here at the Center for a New American Security, the secretary discussed signicant national security challenges and opportunities ahead. He also outlined priorities that characterize the approaching end of the longest period of sustained armed conict in the nations history. e priorities, Panetta said, are ghting the war against al-Qaida and its aliates, ending the war in Afghanistan, implementing the new defense strategy, meeting scal responsibilities, countering nuclear proliferation, improving cybersecurity, achieving greater energy security, implementing the Asia-Pacic rebalance, and taking care of service members, veterans and military families. But tonight I wanted to focus on the goal that still remains at the top of the priority list, as it must. at goal that the president made very clear that we have a responsibility to disrupt, degrade, dismantle and ultimately defeat those who attacked America on 9/11 al-Qaida, the secretary said. To protect Americans at home and overseas, he added, we need to continue to pursue al-Qaida wherever they go, whatever form they take, wherever they seek to hide. We must be constantly vigilant, we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy. What will it take, he asked, to achieve the end of al-Qaida? e essential rst step is to nish the job that the United States and its coalition partners began in Afghanistan, he said, and we are on track to do that. As the United States and its NATO part ners agreed at the 2010 summit in Lisbon, Panetta said, Afghans must be responsible for their own security by the end of 2014. is transition will require continued commitment by the international community and the United States to help Afghan forces achieve this goal, he added. We have come too far. We have invested too much blood and treasure not to nish the job, the secretary said. ere are no shortcuts, nor can we aord to turn away from this eort when we are so close to achieving success and preventing al-Qaida from ever returning to this historic epicenter for violent extremism. In Afghanistan and Pakistan, prolonged military and intelligence operations have signicantly weakened al-Qaida, Panetta said. e terrorist groups most eective leaders are gone, its command and control has been degraded and its safe haven is shrinking, he added, but al-Qaida remains. We have slowed the primary cancer but we know that the cancer has also metastasized to other parts of the global body, the secretary said. Two examples of that spreading al-Qaida presence are Yemen and Somalia. In Yemen, for example, the capabilities of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, are growing. is group has targeted the United States for attack and sowed violence and chaos in Yemen itself, Panetta said. We have struck back in an eort to disrupt and dis mantle this group through a very close partnership with the government of Ye men and the Yemenese themselves, he added. In Somalia, against the militant group al-Shaabab, progress also has been made, the secretary said, in large part because of an eective partnership between the United States and the African Union Mission in Somalia. But the challenge is far from over, Panetta said. President [Barack] Obama has made clear, we will ght not just through military means but by harnessing every element of American power military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, nancial, economic and above all the power of our values as Americans, the secretary said. e second step in achieving the end of al-Qaida, Panetta said, involves maintaining pressure on al-Qaida in Pakistan, on AQAP in Yemen, and on al-Qaida-associated forces in Somalia. at means degrading the terrorists senior leadership, dismantling their organizational capabilities, remaining vigilant to ensure the threat does not reconstitute, and working to build the capacity of U.S. partners, including Pakistan, to confront these shared threats, he added. Despite challenges in the bilateral relation ship between the United States and Pakistan, the secretary said, one area in which our national interests continue to align is defeating the terrorists on Pakistan soil that threat en both of us. We remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. A third step is to prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al-Qaida elsewhere in the world that the group could use to attack the United States or its interests, he said. e last decade of war has shown that coordinated eorts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al-Qaida has no place to hide, Pa netta told the audience. We will expand these eorts, including through support and partnership with governments in transition in the Middle East and North Africa, he added. is campaign against al-Qaida will largely take place outside declared combat zones, using a small-footprint approach that includes precision operations, partnered activities with foreign special operations forces, and capacity building so that partner countries can be more eective in combating terrorism on their own, the secretary said. DOD will work whenever possible with local partners, he added, supporting them with intelligence and resources they need to deter common threats. In Mali for example, Pa netta said, we are working with our partners in West ern Africa who are com mitted to countering the emerging threat to regional stability posed by AQIM. A fourth step needed to bring an end to al-Qaida involves investing in the future, he added, in new military and intelligence capabilities and security partnerships. As the size of the military shrinks, for example, special operations will continue to ramp up, growing from 37,000 members on 9/11 to 64,000 today and 72,000 by 2017, the secretary noted. We are expanding our eet of Predator and Reaper [unmanned aerial vehicles] over what we have today. ese enhanced capabilities will enable us to be more exible and agile against a threat that has grown more diuse, Panetta said. A nal point that too often takes a backseat to operations against al-Qaida, Panetta said, is how to prevent extremist ideologies from attracting new recruits. Over the past decade we have successfully directed our military and intelligence capabilities at ghting terrorism, he added. And yet we are still struggling to develop an eective approach to address the factors that attract young men and women to extreme ideologies, and to ensure that governments and societies have the capacity and the will to counter and reject violent extremism. To truly end the threat from al-Qaida, the secretary said, military force aimed at killing our enemy alone will never be enough. e United States must stay involved and invested through diplomacy, through development, through education, through trade in those regions of the world where violent extremism has ourished. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012 13

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 29, 2012