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The Kings Bay periscope ( 11-15-2012 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00278

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Kings Bay periscope
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 40 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Naval Submarine Base (Kings Bay, Ga.)
Publisher:
Ultra Type Inc.
Place of Publication:
Jacksonville Fla
Jacksonville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Navy-yards and naval stations -- Periodicals -- Georgia -- Kings Bay   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Georgia -- Camden -- Kings Bay
United States of America -- Florida -- Jacksonville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with v. 1, no. 1 (June 15, 1979).
Issuing Body:
Published for the Naval Submarine Support Base, Kings Bay, Ga.
General Note:
Description based on: Mar. 14, 1997; title from caption.
General Note:
Earlier issues published: Kings Bay, Ga. : Naval Submarine Support Base. Jacksonville, Fla. : Ultra Type Inc. <1997->
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Jan. 30, 1998.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 57252699
lccn - 2004233881
Classification:
lcc - VA70.G4 K56
System ID:
UF00098617:00278


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Allen under scrutinyDOD inspector general investigates ISAF Commandere Defense Department inspector general has opened an in vestigation of Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Nov. 13 in a statement. e statement said the FBI referred a matter involv ing Allen to the Defense Department on Nov. 11. Panetta directed that the mat ter be referred to the DOD IG for investigation and informed the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Com mittee. e House Armed Services Committee also has been notied, he said. While the matter is under in vestigation and before the facts are determined, General Allen will remain ISAF commander, Chamber of Commerce hosts 10th annual Military Appreciation LuncheonMore than 800 people witnessed the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce kick o its 10th Annual Military Appreciation Luncheon, Nov. 5, at Prime Osborn Con vention Center in Jacksonville, Fla., kick ing o Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Today is the rst day of ... a week long salute to the service and the sacrice of our military members, our veterans and family who support them, said Jackson ville Mayor Alvin Brown. I believe that is very appropriate, that the rst of what will be terric events planned this week is led by Jax Chambers. During the luncheon, Brown pledged the citys continued dedi cation to the military, highlighting that the military is a large part of Jacksonvilles economy and way of life. e military delivers an economic impact of 12.2 billion dollars here in Jack sonville, Brown said. In the city of Jack sonville, the military helps dene who we are and the high value we place on civic responsibility, service and sacrice. My administration is focused on making Jacksonville the most military friendly city in the nation. Keynote speaker Lt. Gen. William M. Faulkner, deputy commandant for Instal lations and Logistics United States Ma rines Corps, took the podium and highlighted programs the city provides for service members, veterans. He thanked the mayor and the city for their work on behalf of the military. Initiatives like your Jobs for Vets Web site designed to connect job seeking vet erans to veteran-friendly employers in the city, is an impressive template for other cities around the United States to emulate, Faulkner said. With the support of a grateful nation and proud and faithful Americans, such as the citizens of Jacksonville who recognize the sac rice of our brave warriors, were con dent that we continue to be ever faithful in meeting the nations need for military crisis response. As the luncheon concluded, the mas ter-of-ceremony 2012 Chamber Chair Chairman and President and CEO of e Main Street America Group Tom Van Berkel asked everyone to show their continued appreciation by going to a designated table at the luncheon to write postcards for service members serving overseas. Up Periscope Historic veteran leaders who have impressed Page 9 Coming home After 46 years, Nam MIA laid to rest Page 9 Sea Cadets International Exchange through participants eye Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Gators, Hoyas in Navy-Marine Classic Capt. Lawrence Hill new relief for Capt. Richard Verbeke Trident Ret Facility held a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 9. Capt. Lawrence D. Hill re lieved Capt. Richard E. Verbeke as the commanding ocer of TRF, responsible for multi-fac eted and complex planning, ex ecution and maintenance of ballisticmissile, guided-missile and fast attack submarines in the Atlantic Fleet. After receiving an introduction from Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, Verbeke, a Jeerson Township, N.J. native, said he received too much credit from the Admiral on his com mands success as he sat on the shoulders of giants. What I am most proud of here at TRF is having had the opportunity to command what I rmly believe to be the very best maintenance facility and having had the privilege to work with the most dedicated and excep tionally skilled artisans of TRFs work force, Verbeke said. During Verbekes tour, TRF has received the Meritorious Unit Commendation and has been an awardee in the CNO Jacksonville rolls out red carpet for military, veterans Game called at halime due to dew on basketball court on USS BataanSailors aboard the multipurpose am phibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attended the Navy-Marine Corps Clas sic basketball game between the Univer sity of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, at Naval Station May port, Nov. 9. However, before the players could n ish the contest, condensation on the court caused ocials to stop the game out of concern for player safety. e game came to a close after 20 min utes of playing time with the Florida Ga tors leading 27 to 23. We wanted to play, Georgetown Coach John ompson III told reporters. We saw a lot of things I thought we could capitalize on in the second half. But once I walked from the baseline to half-court, I realized this is not a safe surface. e kids safety, both their team and our team, means too much. Over the course of the preced ing week, Bataans ight deck was trans TRF changes command

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the secretary said. His leadership has been instrumental in achieving the signicant progress that ISAF, work ing alongside our Afghan partners, has made in bringing greater security to the Afghan people, Panetta added, and in ensuring that Afghanistan never again becomes a safe haven for terrorists. He is entitled to due pro cess in this matter. Allen took over as ISAF commander and com mander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan in July 2011. President Barack Obama recently nominated him to succeed Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis as command er of U.S. European Com mand and as NATOs su preme allied commander for Europe. Obama also nominated Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., now assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, to succeed Allen in Af ghanistan. Panetta said he has asked the president, who has agreed, to put Allens nomination on hold until the relevant facts are de termined. e secretary also said he has asked the ranking members of the Senate Armed Services Commit tee Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat from Michigan, and Sen. John McCain, a Republican from Arizona that they delay a conrmation hearing sched uled for Nov. 15 on Allens pending nomination. I respectfully requested that the Senate act prompt ly on [Dunfords] nomina tion, Panetta added. Panetta is traveling in the Asia-Pacic region. e developments come in the wake of for mer Army Gen. David H. Petraeus resignation as director of the Central Intel ligence Agency, Nov. 9. After being married for over 37 years, I showed ex tremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramari tal aair, Patraeus wrote in his resignation. Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organiza tion such as ours. Petraeus is one of the most well-known generals of the wars in Iraq and Af ghanistan. He commanded the 101st Airborne Division at the beginning of Operation Iraqi Free dom, the Multinational Security Transition Command-Iraq, Multinational Forces-Iraq, U.S. Central Command and NATOs International Security As sistance Force in Afghani stan. Petraeus retired from the Army in 2011 to become the director of the CIA. www.cia.gov and www. army.mil contributed to this report. e Career Management Sys tem Interactive Detailing application phase was scheduled to be gin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their permanent change of station or ders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to re view and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at www.cmside.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc. navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders ne gotiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected ro tation date. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second applica tion phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. ese Sailors may review ad vertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is typi cally 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss op tions with their family and chain of command before making ap plications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job ad vertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised activeduty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proac tive in getting an assignment of their choice by maximizing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Ocials recommend using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, plat form and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers must also follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or Cali fornia may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, pri oritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Com mand, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right expe rience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selec tion phase to see if they have been selected for orders. e Navy announced a new pro gram Nov. 5 to allow greater exibility for enlisted Sailors transitioning from Active Duty or Full Time Support to the Selected Reserve. According to NAVADMIN 329/12, the Active Component and Full Time Support to Selected Reserve Delayed Aliation Program allows Sailors to delay in-rate aliation with the Reserve Component for up to six months after their Soft Expiration of Active Service through a quota res ervation system. e program is targeted towards Sailors who desire a delay in their af liation into the Selected Reserves, or who are unable to obtain a SEL RES in-rate perform to serve quota at SEAOS. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the DAP pro gram is designed to streamline Sail ors transition between reserve and active service, while enabling the Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warghting needs. DAP enables this continuum by oering participating Sailors a ex ible aliation option, and helping to solidify Sailors reserve aliation decisions by providing them a pre dictable SELRES start date. By allowing Sailors more abil ity to time their transition into the reserves, this program will allow greater exibility for Active and FTS Sailors to extend their Navy careers, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Not only will this pro gram benet our people, it also en ables our Navy to retain the skills and talents of our highly-trained and experienced Sailors, making us more ready to meet the mission. Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP up to 90 days prior to their SEAOS through their chain of com mand. All separating AC and FTS Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP. Sailors will have up to six months from their AC/FTS separation to aliate with the SELRES. e number and timing of Sailors selected will be determined based on current and projected manning needs for the given rating. Sailors must also meet the age, service time, and physical qualications required of all those entering the SELRES. In return for a quota reservation, Sailors shall satisfactorily participate in a Voluntary Training Unit or a Variable Participation Unit of the Individual Ready Reserve. While in the IRR, Sailors may take advantage of continued benets such as Servicemembers Group Life Insurance, access to base com missaries and exchanges, and use of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation services. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay smoking policy includes regular smoking methods, smokeless to bacco and electronic nicotine deliv ery systems. e use of any form of electronic nicotine delivery system, for exam ple the E-Cigarette, E-Pipe, and ECigar, is governed by the no smok ing policy as they are considered tobacco products. e use of smokeless tobacco is prohibited during briengs, meet ings, classes, formations, inspec tions, while on watch and in all other situations listed above where proper decorum is required. e Fleet and Family Support Center, the Branch Medical Clinic Kings Bay and the Health and Well ness Center at the Fitness Center of fer current tobacco use information, cessations encouragement and professional assistance to those wishing to stop using tobacco. ey also ad dress the use of smokeless tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery sys tems and ensure that restrictions on smoking do not promote increased use of smokeless tobacco or the fun damentally unhealthy practice of swallowing its residue. Reminder, suitable receptacles for discarding smoking materials shall be provided in all areas where smoking is permitted. Only cigarette and cigar butts, other tobacco remnants and spent matches shall be placed in such receptacles. Outdoor-designated smoking areas shall be clearly dened and maintain the highest standard of housekeeping. In addition, smoking will not be permitted in the following areas: Within 100 feet of any explosiveladen rail car or vehicle. Inside NSB buildings, government owned vehicles, and in the immedi ate vicinity of facility entrances, exits and supply air intakes. Unoccupied spaces, attics, lofts, roofs and mechanical rooms. Transportations facilities, wood piers and wharfs, barges loaded with ammable or combustible materials, loading platforms and ramps, beds of trucks or trailers while loading or unloading com bustible materials, open storage areas and in station ambulances. Within 50 feet of ammable liq uids or ammable storage areas. Where plastic coating is being applied. Immediate vicinity of battery charging rooms. Within 50 feet of any vent from a gasoline or oil storage tank. Within 25 feet of grease pits, engine overhaul racks, solvent cleaning operations and oil drum storage rack. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.Free Thanksgiving at churchA free anksgiving Day meal will be served 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., ursday, Nov. 22, in Fel lowship Hall at St. Marys United Methodist Church, 106 East Conyers St. For more infor mation, call (912) 882-5505, ext. 4 or e-mail smumc@stmarysumc.org. Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think de serves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Safety says take care when smoking NSB Kings Bay Safety Flexibility added to transition cases Personnel Command New phase open for seeking PCS Personnel Command Allen 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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formed from a launching and landing zone for six dierent types of aircraft during ight quarters, to a basketball court with bleachers holding more than 1,000 people. e Navy-Marine Corps Classic was the highlight of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communities have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy. We are moving an amphibious ready group, including a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American peo ple, because when we are doing our job we are usu ally a long way from home. During the rst half of the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when the SECNAV re enlisted seven Sailors. Af ter the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the reenlistees. Fewer than one per cent of America serves in the uniform, they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, said SECNAV. ese seven Sailors who reen listed are some of the best we have. ank you everyone for making this event pos sible, said ompson. ank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable ex perience for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Players from both teams agreed the game was a small way for them to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing experi ence just to have the op portunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Por ter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and support the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the experience of the NavyMarine Corps basketball game. I thought the game was wonderful, said Cryptologic Technician Seaman Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium. Classic Shore Safety Award Pro gram for three consecutive years with a 34 percent reduction in safety mishaps. Hill, a Greensboro, N.C. native, previously served as deputy shipyard com mander at the Pearl Har bor Naval Shipyard. I ask three things of our Sailors and employees, Hill said. Be the best at what you do. Pursue your pro fessional development and continue to improve your self, which supports the continuous improvement of the command. Give back and fully support the community and environment we live and work in. e TRF team works to fulll one single mission; to provide quality indus trial and logistics support for the incremental over haul, modernization and repair of the Trident sub marines and to provide global submarine support. TRF THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Every summer, the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps sponsors numerous trainings all over the country. One of these trainings is the International Exchange Program. IEP allows cadets from all over the world a unique opportunity to visit each others countries and experience their cultures. e International Exchange Program makes the world a smaller place, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael L. Campbell, NSCC, director, InternaSea Cadets International Exchange Program Sea Cadet Megan Hendricks drives a DUKW in Boston Harbor. Photos by and courtesy of Megan Hendricks

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 5 tional Exchange Program of the US Naval Sea Cadet Corps. It creates friends for life and gives everyone who participates a better understanding of how similar we are. e program strengthens us as a global community. is year one of Kings Bay Division UNSCC cadets attended IEP at Naval Station Newport, RI. While I did not go to another country, there were plenty of opportunities to experience other cultures. e IEP program was fortunate to have more than 40 people visiting from other countries this year. ey included ocers and cadets from Canada, Bermuda, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Ghana, the Netherlands, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia. Capt. Ernest Chan, commanding ocer of the Hong Kong Sea Cadets, also was part of the as sembled group. ese people, covering a broad spectrum from around the globe brought together by the Inter national Sea Cadet Association, participated in a 14 day submer sion in American culture. During the training, cadets from all over the world experienced rsthand what it was like to live in America. From touring our nest cit ies, including Boston and New York, to our sodas and our snacks, the cadets were exposed to everything that is American, including our Independence Day. Some of them were amazed at how large our rework displays and other things are. Everything in America is so huge said Cadet 2Lt. Mustakim Shamima of Singapore. Even your roads are huge. Other cadets were more fascinated by our climate and weather. Upon picking up the Singapore cadets from the airport, Cadet Abdul Halim asked, Is it always so cold here? To contrast that, Cadet Bernadette Woodley of the United Kingdom asked, Is it always so hot? e trainings-packed days included a tour of Newport, R.I., and the Tall Ships, a tour the New London Submarine Base and simulators, the USS Nautilus Museum, the New London Coast Guard Academy, an overnight stay on the USS Massachusetts for Independence Day, as well as kayaking at Wood River and rock climbing at Rock Spot in Lincoln, R.I. Cadets even had the opportunity to see the Broadway play Mama Mia during their overnight stay in New York City. In all, it was an awesome experience for all the cadets in attendance, our American cadets and sta included. Is it always so cold here? Abdul Halim Singapore Sea Cadet Is it always so hot here? Bernadette Woodley United Kingdom Sea Cadet

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Dominos Pizza wants to say thanks for a great year. So on ursday, Nov. 15, Dominos will be oering a large one top ping pizza for $4.99! is oer is for carry out only and is good from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Nov. 15 only at the Kings Bay Dominos! Movie Under the Stars at 6 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 17 the new venue for the movie will be at the Adult Football Field, across from the Youth Soccer Fields. From the Stimson Gate, take the first right onto USS Daniel Boone Avenue, and then another first right onto USS Lewis & Clark Road to the parking area by the fields. Admission is free for Brave, rated PG. Dominos will be offer any size, any toppings pizza for $10. Bring your blankets, your lawn chairs and dont forget the kids. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, sponsored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All participants are encour aged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their fami lies. Authorized civilians, con tractors and guests will contin ue to pay appropriate fees for classes. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on week ends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Invitation for sealed bids Kings Bay Outdoor Adventure Center has the following equip ment in fair/poor working con dition: Jon Boat 16-foot No. 7475j667 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. 482H586 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. BF8173G192 in fair working condition; Car Vehicle Trailer No. 447750 in poor working con dition with following problems, some rust on trailer and two bad tires (tire info 22575R15). All the above equipment can be physi cally seen and sealed bid appli cations may be picked up at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 1029 Henry Stimson Road., Kings Bay, GA 31547. Make sure sealed bid is written on the bottom of the envelope and dropped off at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The sealed bids process will begin on at 9 a.m. Nov. 9 and they must be received or postmarked by Dec. 6. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Dec. 10. For more information, call the Outdoor Adventure Center manager at (912) 573-8103 If you are the successful bidder you will be notified when and where you may pick-up your equip ment. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center from Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but is closed Christmas Day and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care pa trons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration begins Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registra tion begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 17 and 18 is Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Pizza biz shows appreciation 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective meth od for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slat ed for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on iden tifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without ask ing them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, some times you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 19 and 26. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employ ment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be regis tered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Nov. 26The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navi gate successfully through finan cial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is sched uled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recom mended. For more information call 573-9783.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encour aged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to lim ited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deploy ment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maxi mized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a suc cessful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service person nel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the train ing are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries, benefits how to interpret job announcements and deter mine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 7

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Its still the week of Veterans Day, so I thought Id pose the question: Who is a famous American mili tary leader that you admire? One guy who impress es me is Army Gen. Billy Mitchell. This visionary air pioneer said he could build 1,000 bombers for the price of one battleship, and they could sink that battle ship. In 1921 he proved it, and the Navys relationship with the airplane began to turn a corner. Later, he was court-martialed for speaking his mind and resigned. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Tim Key Navy veteran Aiken, S.C. FDR (Franklin Delino Roosevelt), his leader ship, and he really helped turn the country around at a time when we needed it. Farran Fullilove Marine Corps veteran New York Robert E. Lee and his honesty and greatness. A lot of people dont know his history before the Civil War. Lt. j.g. Conor Shippee USS Florida Blue King George, Va. Adm. (James) Stockdale was in the Hanoi Hilton for 7 or 8 years. He exhibited leadership under the most extreme conditions and came home with honor. Lt. j.g. Don Mills USS Florida Blue Ashville, N.C. George Washington. It was one of our most hopeless times and he got the men to follow him, and we made it through. MASN Brian Fredette Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Syracuse, N.Y. Abraham Lincoln. He preserved the union. MASN Carl Martin Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Heavner, Okla. George Washington. What didnt he do? Vietnam MIA laid to rest An air commando who died when his C-123 Pro vider are ship was shot down over Ahn Khe, Viet nam, was laid to restOct. 26at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery, Texas. e 310th Air Comman do Squadron loadmaster, Airman 1st Class Jerry Mack Wall, 24, was killed when his plane was hit by enemy re and crashed into the central highlands, May 18, 1966. Until recently Wall, who was one of ve crew mem bers, was listed as Missing in Action. In an intense recovery operation, three of the other Airmens remains were recovered shortly af ter the crash by soldiers of the 7th Cavalry Regiment. e ight engineer, Bill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Moore, remains missing. I thought there was a possibility Jerry and Bill were still alive, said re tired Senior Master Sgt. Gary omas, a volunteer with Walls unit. at sit uation stuck with me for my whole life. at situation involved a small, tight-knit group of aircrew volunteers from various backgrounds. omas, a rst sergeant with the 14th Munitions and Maintenance Squadron, spent a few months with Wall. Wall trained omas and several oth ers as are kickersloading the 200 or so, 27 poundares. Jerry was so cool and calm, he was one heck of a guy, omas said. He had already been into bat tle and was highly trained. When I rst trained with him, it really shocked me to go into battle, and when he started going over how those ares could blow up and kill us ... eres a lot of heroism in the 310th Air Commandos. e night of the fateful crash, omas was sched uled to y, but was sidelined due to an ear infec tion. e lead scheduler, Master Sgt. Raymond C. Jajtner took his place. omas said everyone knew the danger of ying those missions, loaded with highly ammable magnesium ares. Walls ight was hit with a 40mm round according to wit ness statements. When youre in com bat and when you make friends, even if its for a very short time, its a real brotherhood, omas said. It never goes away. Air Commandos provided combat air patrol and airlift to the soldiers, delivering ammo, food, supplies and troops. ey also ew out wounded and killed in action GIs, as well as prisoners, but one of the most harrowing jobs was the candlestick mission. During those missions, loadmasters and are kickers would load, un load and drop hundreds of ares from the skies over southern Vietnam, illuminating the enemy. It was a reght, the Viet Cong loved to at tack, he said. We had B52s dropping bombs right outside our wings, ground artillery coming up, every body is unloading. It got to be like the 4th of July, but of course you were scared. e Defense Prisoner of War and Missing Per sonnel Oce notes that since 1973, the remains of more than 900 Americans killed in the Vietnam War have been identied and returned to their families for burial with full military honors. Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command conducted a mission in June 2007 and identied a site that was recommended for recovery. In March 2011 and March 2012 JPAC conducted recovery opera tions at the site and recov ered human remains and material evidence at the site, according to the press release. For more than a decade the United States has conducted joint eld activities with the govern ments of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia to recover the remains of missing Americans, according to their Web site. roughout those countries, teams continue to in vestigate crash and burial sites, as well as interview locals to gain additional knowledge. Today, more than 1,600 Americans re main unaccounted for from the conict. Im so very proud of my nation that persevered for so long in searching for my fathers remains, Lea Ann Wall McCann said. Its been a long journey home. omas and several of Walls family members greeted the ag-draped casket as it arrived to San Antonio Oct. 24, on Amer ican Airlines Flight 497. Passengers on the plane watched from their win dows as the re depart ment honored the ight with a water cannon salute and as the Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Honor Guard carried Walls remains to an awaiting hearse. Everyone involved in making this happen has been wonderful to our family, from the sergeant who escorted his body to San Antonio, to the VA and the VFW, to the color guard, Wall McCaansaid. Pirates Cove MIA 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Robotics contest big hit e Navys Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacic, For Inspi ration and Recognition of Science and Technology Lego League Qualifying Tournament at Eastlake High School in Chula Vis ta, Calif., was Nov. 4. SSC Pacic co-hosted the event with the National Defense Education Program, Eastlake Education Foundation, the Sweet water Union High School District, and Eastlake High Schools FIRST Robotics team, the TitanBOTs. is years tournament hosted 24 student teams from across San Diego County, with the outcome of the tournament deter mining who would move forward to the Southern California Championship Dec. 1 and 2 at the LEGO LAND California Resort. Rear Adm. Patrick H. Brady, commander of Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, was on hand to welcome students, their families and members of the commu nity to the event. Brady highlighted the importance of technology in support of the Navys mission, and the need for current students to pursue science, technology, engineering and math degrees, eventually replacing the current STEM workforce when they retire. Most of the 9,000 peo ple in my command have technical degrees but they will be eligible for retire ment near 2020, around the time that you will be graduating, said Brady, as he spoke to the audi ence. We need you to be the next generation that helps us take things to the bottom of the ocean, satel lites into space, and build stealth aircraft. Adding additional Navy air were SSC Pacics Color Guard and the Navy Band Southwest, along with more than 60 civilian and uniformed SPAWAR personnel who volunteered their time to act as speakers, judges, referees, coaches and mentors. Carmela Keeney, executive director at SSC Pacic, participated as one of the robot inspectors. Keeney noted how im pressed she was with the condence level of the students and their ap proach when it came to building their robots and communicating as a team. SSC Pacic is very interested in robotics, said Keeney. We use unmanned vehicles, unmanned undersea vehicles, ground vehicles, and air vehicles, so its great to see these kids inter est in robotics at a young age; their interest is very important to the Navy and Department of Defense. Once the opening cer emony was completed, robotics teams moved forward in their quest for triumph, competing in multiple rounds with each other until the top 12 were left to move onto the championship event. FLL is an international robotics program for students ages nine to 16 and is designed to provide children with an opportunity to explore science and technology while also dis covering employment op portunities, career paths and life skills. Every year, the pro gram focuses on a spe cic theme, around which teams design their required components. Senior Solutions is the theme of this years chal lenge, requiring FLL teams to solve a problem faced by seniors as they age. Groups competed in three areas, the Robot Game, Core Value s and the Research Project. SSC Pacic has a robust education outreach pro gram. is year, the organization sponsored 40 FLL teams, with 16 competing at this event. SSC Pacic collaborated with local organizations to sponsor the FLL Qualify ing Tournament as a ven ue for local teams to come together to compete in an entertaining environment to promote science, tech nology, engineering and math. Saudis visit Great Lakes Royal Saudi Naval Force members, in conjunction with, the Naval Education and Training Secu rity Assistance Field Activ ity toured the Navys only boot camp, Recruit Training Command, Nov. 7. e group consisted of seven naval ocers from the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, who toured RTC to observe Navy training and see how civilians are transformed into Sailors. e tour included Bat tle Stations 21, which is the culmination of eight weeks of training by re cruits. Battle Stations 21 is a grueling 12-hour test of a recruits skills in several shipboard scenarios, including reghting, com bating ooding and trans porting casualties. It is held on board the 210-foot-long Arleigh Burke-class destroyer replica, USS Trayer (BST-21), the Navys largest simulator. Rear Adm. Dawi Mo hammed Saad Al-Otaibi was the ranking ocer of the visiting delegation. He and his ocers are involved and responsible for their navys training in Saudi Arabia. Being able to compare training at RTC, along with follow-on instruc tion at A and C schools around the United States, with the training in Saudi Arabia is a major reason for the visit and for the NETSAFA course. What we have seen is a wonderful thing, said Al-Otaibi. I was most im pressed with Battle Stations 21 and the USS Trayer. e visiting ocers are part of the Saudi Arabia navys Technical Institute of Naval Tactics and the admiral is responsible for their recruit and training. NETSAFA classes also are given the opportunity to see ocer training at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., visit Of cer Training Command at Naval Station Newport, R.I., tour other secondary enlisted training at learning centers on Navy bases. e Saudi ocers also visited the USS Missouri Small Arms Marksmanship Trainer on RTC. While there they had the opportunity to see how recruits learn to handle and re the Navys standard issue M9 Berretta pistol and the Mossberg 500 12-gauge shotgun. SAMT uses red laser lights and pneumatic air to simulate the ring and hits on a computer target. After visiting SAMT they observed how recruits take their weapons fa miliarization and apply it ring actual weapons in the USS Wisconsin Live Fire Indoor Range. Before visiting SAMT and USS Wisconsin, the delegation toured the largest building on RTC, the Freedom Hall Physical Fitness Trainer. e 173,000-squarefoot three story structure is where every year more than 35,000 recruits run their Physical Fitness Assess ments, work out and hold Captains Cup competition. e delegation also vis ited a recruit barracks, or ship, to see where recruits live, study and eat. ey ended their visit at RTCs in-processing build ing where recruits begin their Navy careers, then a stop at the USS Indianap olis Combat Training Pool where recruits pass their third class swim qualica tions and nally a visit to the USS Chief Fire Fight ing Trainer where recruits learn about damage con trol and how to ght and extinguish shipboard res. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 In the United States, Vet erans Day pays homage to service men and women of the nations military, those who currently wear the uniform and those who came before. e day, which rst garnered national promi nence in 1919 when Presi dent Woodrow Wilson signed Armistice Day into eect, is to recognize those whose acts of courage, selessness, and heroism kept this country safe. If several Marines were asked to name a highprole Marine of the past, one whos done something of historic signicance, or someone to emulate, theres a high chance youll hear a common answer. e name would be Chesty Puller: an enlisted man, a commissioned of cer, a recipient of ve Navy Crosses and an over all hero in the Corps. Every recruit going through Marine Corps boot camp learns about those whove served be fore them. Marines are taught to emulate traits of those who have proven themselves to be heroes and exceptional, fearless leaders. Lt. Gen. Lewis Chesty Puller was the embodi ment of the traits Marines are taught to manifest. As a Marine for more than 30 years, from World War II to the Vietnam War, Puller became one of the most decorated and recogniz able gures in military history. He was cut from a dif ferent bolt of cloth. He ex emplied so many traits we want to follow, said Danny Strand, director of Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstows Safety and Emergency Services. He was one of the most deco rated Marines in history. His troops loved him too, the Deer Lodge, Tenn., native added. Many attribute Pullers exemplary leadership qualities to his ability to relate to the troops he led. Once an enlisted man himself, Puller made sure his Marines were well tak en care of. Chesty showed every one you didnt need a col lege education to lead Marines. He was one of them at one point so he under stood what they would go through, Strand said. I think this is why most people liked him as much as they did, he added. Puller was recognized for many dauntless tasks while serving in the Ma rine Corps. He was awarded his rst Navy Cross for leading his forces into engagements against superior numbers. roughout 1930, Puller led forces in the Nicara guan National Guard in several battles against bandits in which the out numbered national guard forces routed the enemy each time. In the entirety of 1930, Puller lost nine men. Subsequently, he was awarded four more Navy Crosses for equal feats of extraordinary heroism. Tales of valor such as these have made it easy for Ma rines to remember why hes become the gure he is today. With these many counts of bravery under his belt, it was only a matter of time before tall tales of Pullers deeds began to spread. ere are Marines today who have a hard time sep arating fact from ction. eres a lot of myth and legends that follow [Puller] now, said Sgt. Michael Pressler, an artillery mechanic with Fleet Support Division aboard MCLB Barstow. A lot of it has gotten blown way out of proportion but, with him, I could see how. Its hard to tell whats real and whats been fabricated, he added. Puller has become known for more than his acts of valor during his time serving. His words and actions out of battle have garnered him fans within the ranks as well. He held himself to a higher standard than anyone else he knew, said Strand. During his time, an accidental discharge of your weapon was twenty dollars. He once ned himself one hundred dol lars for one, the fellow mustang [enlisted man becoming commissioned as an ocer] and retired lieutenant colonel added. Although its hard to say whether the sayings are true, many people attribute some of their favorite quotes to Puller as well. My favorite quotes from Chesty are ones that have to do with common sense. Now, I know were not supposed to put our hands in our pockets but Chesty once said a Marine with cold hands and warm pockets is a fool, said Sgt. Jacey Marks, assistant training chief with Head quarters Battalion, MCLB Barstow. I mean, you dont go walking around with your hands in your pockets. ats not profes sional. Pullers approach to situations with common sense and understanding play a large role in the reasons service members hold him in high regard. Puller earned the respect from those he served with through the lessons he taught by word or ac tion and have stood the test of time. Its good men and women like this we honor on Veterans Day each year. A recent Iranian attack on a U.S. drone occurred over international waters, but the aircraft suered no damage and returned safely to base, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Nov. 8. Speaking to Pentagon reporters, Little said the Iranian aircraft red on the drone and followed it as it ew over the Arabian Gulf last week. I can conrm that on November 1, at approximately 4:50 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, an un armed, unmanned MQ-1 U.S. military aircraft conducting routine surveillance over the Arabian Gulf, was intercepted by an Iranian SU-25 Frogfoot aircraft and was red upon with guns, he said. e incident occurred over international waters, approximately 16 nautical miles o of the Iranian coastline, Little said. e MQ-1 was not hit, and re turned to its base safely. Little provided further details regarding the Iranian attack. e aircraft, once it came under re at approx imately the 16 nautical mile range, moved further out, he said. e Iranian aircraft continued to pur sue the MQ-1 for some pe riod of time before letting it return to base. We believe they red at least twice and made at least two passes, Little added. e press secretary conrmed both Congress and the White House were no tied of the incident, and the U.S. responded to Iran through the Swiss protec tive powers. e United States has communicated to the Iranians that we will continue to conduct surveillance ights over international waters, over the Arabian Gulf, consistent with long standing practices and our commitment to the securi ty of the region, Little said. Little emphasized the U.S. can respond using a wide range of options, from diplomatic to mili tary, to protect our mili tary assets and our forces in the region, and will do so when necessary. Our aircraft was never in Iranian airspace. It was always ying in interna tional airspace, he said. e internationally recognized territorial limit is 12 nautical miles o the coast, and we never entered the 12 nautical-mile limit. Little said Defense Department ocials believe this is the rst time an un manned aircraft has been shot at over international waters in the Arabian Gulf. ere is absolutely no question that the aircraft red on the U.S. military aircraft, he said. Corps salutes Puller on Vets Day Iran res on drone, every shot a miss

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Allen under scrutinyDOD inspector general investigates ISAF Commandere Defense Department inspector general has opened an investigation of Marine Corps Gen. John R. Allen, commander of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Nov. 13 in a statement. e statement said the FBI referred a matter involving Allen to the Defense Department on Nov. 11. Panetta directed that the matter be referred to the DOD IG for investigation and informed the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. e House Armed Services Committee also has been notied, he said. While the matter is under investigation and before the facts are determined, General Allen will remain ISAF commander, Chamber of Commerce hosts 10th annual Military Appreciation LuncheonMore than 800 people witnessed the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce kick o its 10th Annual Military Appreciation Luncheon, Nov. 5, at Prime Osborn Convention Center in Jacksonville, Fla., kicking o Week of Valor to honor military members, veterans and their families. Today is the rst day of ... a week long salute to the service and the sacrice of our military members, our veterans and family who support them, said Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. I believe that is very appropriate, that the rst of what will be terric events planned this week is led by Jax Chambers. During the luncheon, Brown pledged the citys continued dedi cation to the military, highlighting that the military is a large part of Jacksonvilles economy and way of life. e military delivers an economic impact of 12.2 billion dollars here in Jacksonville, Brown said. In the city of Jacksonville, the military helps dene who we are and the high value we place on civic responsibility, service and sacrice. My administration is focused on making Jacksonville the most military friendly city in the nation. Keynote speaker Lt. Gen. William M. Faulkner, deputy commandant for Installations and Logistics United States Marines Corps, took the podium and highlighted programs the city provides for service members, veterans. He thanked the mayor and the city for their work on behalf of the military. Initiatives like your Jobs for Vets Web site designed to connect job seeking veterans to veteran-friendly employers in the city, is an impressive template for other cities around the United States to emulate, Faulkner said. With the support of a grateful nation and proud and faithful Americans, such as the citizens of Jacksonville who recognize the sacrice of our brave warriors, were condent that we continue to be ever faithful in meeting the nations need for military crisis response. As the luncheon concluded, the master-of-ceremony 2012 Chamber Chair Chairman and President and CEO of e Main Street America Group Tom Van Berkel asked everyone to show their continued appreciation by going to a designated table at the luncheon to write postcards for service members serving overseas. Up Periscope Historic veteran leaders who have impressed Page 9 Coming home After 46 years, Nam MIA laid to rest Page 9 Sea Cadets International Exchange through participants eye Pages 4, 5Check us out Online! kingsbayperiscope.com Gators, Hoyas in Navy-Marine Classic Capt. Lawrence Hill new relief for Capt. Richard Verbeke Trident Ret Facility held a change of command ceremony aboard Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Nov. 9. Capt. Lawrence D. Hill relieved Capt. Richard E. Verbeke as the commanding ocer of TRF, responsible for multi-faceted and complex planning, execution and maintenance of ballisticmissile, guided-missile and fast attack submarines in the Atlantic Fleet. After receiving an introduction from Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander, Submarine Group 10, Verbeke, a Jeerson Township, N.J. native, said he received too much credit from the Admiral on his commands success as he sat on the shoulders of giants. What I am most proud of here at TRF is having had the opportunity to command what I rmly believe to be the very best maintenance facility and having had the privilege to work with the most dedicated and exceptionally skilled artisans of TRFs work force, Verbeke said. During Verbekes tour, TRF has received the Meritorious Unit Commendation and has been an awardee in the CNO Jacksonville rolls out red carpet for military, veterans Game called at halime due to dew on basketball court on USS BataanSailors aboard the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5) attended the Navy-Marine Corps Classic basketball game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgetown Hoyas, at Naval Station Mayport, Nov. 9. However, before the players could nish the contest, condensation on the court caused ocials to stop the game out of concern for player safety. e game came to a close after 20 minutes of playing time with the Florida Gators leading 27 to 23. We wanted to play, Georgetown Coach John ompson III told reporters. We saw a lot of things I thought we could capitalize on in the second half. But once I walked from the baseline to half-court, I realized this is not a safe surface. e kids safety, both their team and our team, means too much. Over the course of the preceding week, Bataans ight deck was transTRF changes command

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the secretary said. His leadership has been instrumental in achieving the signicant progress that ISAF, working alongside our Afghan partners, has made in bringing greater security to the Afghan people, Panetta added, and in ensuring that Afghanistan never again becomes a safe haven for terrorists. He is entitled to due process in this matter. Allen took over as ISAF commander and commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan in July 2011. President Barack Obama recently nominated him to succeed Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis as commander of U.S. European Command and as NATOs supreme allied commander for Europe. Obama also nominated Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., now assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, to succeed Allen in Afghanistan. Panetta said he has asked the president, who has agreed, to put Allens nomination on hold until the relevant facts are determined. e secretary also said he has asked the ranking members of the Senate Armed Services Committee Sen. Carl Levin, a Democrat from Michigan, and Sen. John McCain, a Republican from Arizona that they delay a conrmation hearing scheduled for Nov. 15 on Allens pending nomination. I respectfully requested that the Senate act prompt ly on [Dunfords] nomina tion, Panetta added. Panetta is traveling in the Asia-Pacic region. e developments come in the wake of former Army Gen. David H. Petraeus resignation as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, Nov. 9. After being married for over 37 years, I showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital aair, Patraeus wrote in his resignation. Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organization such as ours. Petraeus is one of the most well-known generals of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He commanded the 101st Airborne Division at the beginning of Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Multinational Security Transition Command-Iraq, Multinational Forces-Iraq, U.S. Central Command and NATOs International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan. Petraeus retired from the Army in 2011 to become the director of the CIA. www.cia.gov and www. army.mil contributed to this report. e Career Management System Interactive Detailing application phase was scheduled to begin Nov. 8, and remain open until 5 a.m. Nov. 20 for Sailors in their permanent change of station orders negotiation window. CMS/ID is the web-based program enlisted Sailors use to review and apply for PCS orders when its time to transfer duty stations. Sailors may access the site at www.cmside.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc. navy.mil. Sailors are in their orders negotiation window when they are within nine through seven months from their projected rotation date. is is the rst application phase for Sailors with an August 2013 PRD, the second application phase for Sailors with a July 2013 PRD and the last application phase for Sailors with a June 2013 PRD. ese Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS/ID during the application phase and apply for up to ve jobs, either directly using CMS/ID or through a command career counselor. e application phase is typically 10 days, allowing Sailors time to review available jobs, research billets and discuss options with their family and chain of command before making applications before the application phase closes. Updated detailing business rules announced earlier this year in NAVADMIN 226/12 eliminated red zone and green zone job advertisements in CMS/ID and now detailers ll all advertised activeduty billets each month using the available Sailors who are in their orders-negotiation window. Sailors can be more proactive in getting an assignment of their choice by maximizing their choices. Data shows that Sailors rarely apply for more than two advertised jobs. Ocials recommend using all ve choices when applying. CMS/ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and community, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to ll billets using a Sailors desired selections rst; however, Fleet readiness requirements are the guiding factor in lling billets. Detailers must also follow seashore ow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 201/11, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Florida or California may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle as the Navy seeks to ll gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into high-priority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer must weigh when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualications, career progression and cost to the Navy. Detailers wont assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMS/ID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. e Navy announced a new program Nov. 5 to allow greater exibility for enlisted Sailors transitioning from Active Duty or Full Time Support to the Selected Reserve. According to NAVADMIN 329/12, the Active Component and Full Time Support to Selected Reserve Delayed Aliation Program allows Sailors to delay in-rate aliation with the Reserve Component for up to six months after their Soft Expiration of Active Service through a quota reservation system. e program is targeted towards Sailors who desire a delay in their afliation into the Selected Reserves, or who are unable to obtain a SELRES in-rate perform to serve quota at SEAOS. As part of the Navys Continuum of Service initiative, the DAP program is designed to streamline Sailors transition between reserve and active service, while enabling the Navy to manage its force so it is best prepared to meet current and future warghting needs. DAP enables this continuum by oering participating Sailors a exible aliation option, and helping to solidify Sailors reserve aliation decisions by providing them a predictable SELRES start date. By allowing Sailors more ability to time their transition into the reserves, this program will allow greater exibility for Active and FTS Sailors to extend their Navy careers, said Rear Adm. Anthony Kurta, director of military personnel plans and policy. Not only will this program benet our people, it also enables our Navy to retain the skills and talents of our highly-trained and experienced Sailors, making us more ready to meet the mission. Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP up to 90 days prior to their SEAOS through their chain of command. All separating AC and FTS Sailors are eligible to apply for DAP. Sailors will have up to six months from their AC/FTS separation to aliate with the SELRES. e number and timing of Sailors selected will be determined based on current and projected manning needs for the given rating. Sailors must also meet the age, service time, and physical qualications required of all those entering the SELRES. In return for a quota reservation, Sailors shall satisfactorily participate in a Voluntary Training Unit or a Variable Participation Unit of the Individual Ready Reserve. While in the IRR, Sailors may take advantage of continued benets such as Servicemembers Group Life Insurance, access to base commissaries and exchanges, and use of Morale, Welfare, and Recreation services. e Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay smoking policy includes regular smoking methods, smokeless tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems. e use of any form of electronic nicotine delivery system, for example the E-Cigarette, E-Pipe, and ECigar, is governed by the no smoking policy as they are considered tobacco products. e use of smokeless tobacco is prohibited during briengs, meetings, classes, formations, inspections, while on watch and in all other situations listed above where proper decorum is required. e Fleet and Family Support Center, the Branch Medical Clinic Kings Bay and the Health and Wellness Center at the Fitness Center offer current tobacco use information, cessations encouragement and professional assistance to those wishing to stop using tobacco. ey also address the use of smokeless tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems and ensure that restrictions on smoking do not promote increased use of smokeless tobacco or the fundamentally unhealthy practice of swallowing its residue. Reminder, suitable receptacles for discarding smoking materials shall be provided in all areas where smoking is permitted. Only cigarette and cigar butts, other tobacco remnants and spent matches shall be placed in such receptacles. Outdoor-designated smoking areas shall be clearly dened and maintain the highest standard of housekeeping. In addition, smoking will not be permitted in the following areas: Within 100 feet of any explosiveladen rail car or vehicle. Inside NSB buildings, government owned vehicles, and in the immedi ate vicinity of facility entrances, exits and supply air intakes. Unoccupied spaces, attics, lofts, roofs and mechanical rooms. Transportations facilities, wood piers and wharfs, barges loaded with ammable or combustible materials, loading platforms and ramps, beds of trucks or trailers while loading or unloading combustible materials, open storage areas and in station ambulances. Within 50 feet of ammable liquids or ammable storage areas. Where plastic coating is being applied. Immediate vicinity of battery charging rooms. Within 50 feet of any vent from a gasoline or oil storage tank. Within 25 feet of grease pits, engine overhaul racks, solvent cleaning operations and oil drum storage rack. THEKINGS BA Y, GEORGIA Local news and views Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Ga. Navy-Marine Relief in new sitee Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Kings Bay relocated to its permanent oce at Building 1062, Nov. 6. NMCRS and the Uniform Locker hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Fri day. For more information regarding NMCRS programs, services or to schedule an appoint ment for nancial assistance, call 573-3928.Free Thanksgiving at churchA free anksgiving Day meal will be served 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., ursday, Nov. 22, in Fellowship Hall at St. Marys United Methodist Church, 106 East Conyers St. For more information, call (912) 882-5505, ext. 4 or e-mail smumc@stmarysumc.org. Suggestions for The Periscope?Do you see an event on base you think deserves coverage in the Periscope? Let us know by calling editor Bill Wesselho at 573-4719 or e-mail periscopekb@comcast.net. Now hear this! Safety says take care when smoking NSB Kings Bay Safety Flexibility added to transition cases Personnel Command New phase open for seeking PCS Personnel Command Allen 2 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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formed from a launching and landing zone for six dierent types of aircraft during ight quarters, to a basketball court with bleachers holding more than 1,000 people. e Navy-Marine Corps Classic was the highlight of the city of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Jacksonville and the surrounding communities have a long tradition of supporting Sailors and Marines. Jacksonville has always been a great Navy town, said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy. We are moving an amphibious ready group, including a ship like this, to Jacksonville. It is one of the ways we connect the ship to the city and the U.S. Navy to the American peo ple, because when we are doing our job we are usu ally a long way from home. During the rst half of the game, the audience got an inside look at Navy life when the SECNAV reenlisted seven Sailors. After the re-enlistment oath, players from both teams shook the hands of the reenlistees. Fewer than one percent of America serves in the uniform, they keep the other 99 percent of us safe, said SECNAV. ese seven Sailors who reenlisted are some of the best we have. ank you everyone for making this event possible, said ompson. ank you for hosting us, and to all the Sailors who represent us out here. Its been an unbelievable experience for our guys just to be a part of this event and the fact that the game is ending doesnt take away from that. Players from both teams agreed the game was a small way for them to give back to the Sailors who defend America. Its an amazing experience just to have the opportunity to come out here on a ship, said Otto Porter, team member of the Georgetown Hoyas. Its just one of those things where we got to come out here and support the Navy and soldiers back home. Sailors also savored the experience of the NavyMarine Corps basketball game. I thought the game was wonderful, said Cryptologic Technician Seaman Brianna Williams, a Bataan Sailor. I was amazed that they turned our ship into a stadium. Classic Shore Safety Award Program for three consecutive years with a 34 percent reduction in safety mishaps. Hill, a Greensboro, N.C. native, previously served as deputy shipyard commander at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. I ask three things of our Sailors and employees, Hill said. Be the best at what you do. Pursue your pro fessional development and continue to improve your self, which supports the continuous improvement of the command. Give back and fully support the community and environment we live and work in. e TRF team works to fulll one single mission; to provide quality industrial and logistics support for the incremental overhaul, modernization and repair of the Trident submarines and to provide global submarine support. TRF THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 3

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4 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 Every summer, the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps sponsors numerous trainings all over the country. One of these trainings is the International Exchange Program. IEP allows cadets from all over the world a unique opportunity to visit each others countries and experience their cultures. e International Exchange Program makes the world a smaller place, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael L. Campbell, NSCC, director, InternaSea Cadets International Exchange Program Sea Cadet Megan Hendricks drives a DUKW in Boston Harbor. Photos by and courtesy of Megan Hendricks

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THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 5 tional Exchange Program of the US Naval Sea Cadet Corps. It creates friends for life and gives everyone who participates a better understanding of how similar we are. e program strengthens us as a global community. is year one of Kings Bay Division UNSCC cadets attended IEP at Naval Station Newport, RI. While I did not go to another country, there were plenty of opportunities to experience other cultures. e IEP program was fortunate to have more than 40 people visiting from other countries this year. ey included ocers and cadets from Canada, Bermuda, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Ghana, the Netherlands, Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia. Capt. Ernest Chan, commanding ocer of the Hong Kong Sea Cadets, also was part of the assembled group. ese people, covering a broad spectrum from around the globe brought together by the International Sea Cadet Association, participated in a 14 day submersion in American culture. During the training, cadets from all over the world experienced rsthand what it was like to live in America. From touring our nest cities, including Boston and New York, to our sodas and our snacks, the cadets were exposed to everything that is American, including our Independence Day. Some of them were amazed at how large our rework displays and other things are. Everything in America is so huge said Cadet 2Lt. Mustakim Shamima of Singapore. Even your roads are huge. Other cadets were more fascinated by our climate and weather. Upon picking up the Singapore cadets from the airport, Cadet Abdul Halim asked, Is it always so cold here? To contrast that, Cadet Bernadette Woodley of the United Kingdom asked, Is it always so hot? e trainings-packed days included a tour of Newport, R.I., and the Tall Ships, a tour the New London Submarine Base and simulators, the USS Nautilus Museum, the New London Coast Guard Academy, an overnight stay on the USS Massachusetts for Independence Day, as well as kayaking at Wood River and rock climbing at Rock Spot in Lincoln, R.I. Cadets even had the opportunity to see the Broadway play Mama Mia during their overnight stay in New York City. In all, it was an awesome experience for all the cadets in attendance, our American cadets and sta included. Is it always so cold here? Abdul Halim Singapore Sea Cadet Is it always so hot here? Bernadette Woodley United Kingdom Sea Cadet

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Dominos Pizza wants to say thanks for a great year. So on ursday, Nov. 15, Dominos will be oering a large one topping pizza for $4.99! is oer is for carry out only and is good from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Nov. 15 only at the Kings Bay Dominos! Movie Under the Stars at 6 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 17 the new venue for the movie will be at the Adult Football Field, across from the Youth Soccer Fields. From the Stimson Gate, take the first right onto USS Daniel Boone Avenue, and then another first right onto USS Lewis & Clark Road to the parking area by the fields. Admission is free for Brave, rated PG. Dominos will be offer any size, any toppings pizza for $10. Bring your blankets, your lawn chairs and dont forget the kids. For more information call (912) 573-4564. Toys for Tots 5K Run Its Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Kings Bay Fitness Complex, sponsored by Kings Bay Fitness Staff and USMC. Registration is at 6:30 a.m., with a race start at 7 am. All participants are encour aged to bring a new, unwrapped toy or give a $5 donation. All commands, family members and civilians are encouraged to run. For more information call (912) 573-3990. Fitness Center The hours at the Fitness Complex have increased to 5 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 7 p.m., Sundays and holidays. All fitness classes are free for all military and their family, retirees and their families. Authorized civilians, contractors and guests will continue to pay appropriate fees for classes. NFL Sunday Ticket Every Sunday at the Big EZ Sports Zone watch your favorite teams on the many TVs and the featured game on the big screen! Snacks will be provided and beverages available for purchase. For more information call (912) 573-4548. Liberty and the Big EZ Check out the latest for September with trips, pool and card tournaments, and the Sports Zone. For more information call (912) 573-4548 for details. Free Bowling Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesdays at Rack-N-Roll Lanes, active duty, reservists and retirees can enjoy free bowling. Shoe rental is $2. Need more information? Call (912) 573-9492. Trident Lakes Golf Early Bird Special e early bird gets the deal at Trident Lakes Golf Course with 15 percent o rates, 7 to 10:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Its $22 for active duty, retirees and $24 for others. is oer is not valid on weekends or holidays. Book your tee time as early as seven days in advance by calling Trident Lakes at (912) 573-8475. Game on Come in and see Rack-N-Roll Lanes new gaming room and enjoy skeeball, bas ketball and more. Save tickets for prizes. For more information call (912) 573-9492. Invitation for sealed bids Kings Bay Outdoor Adventure Center has the following equip ment in fair/poor working con dition: Jon Boat 16-foot No. 7475j667 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. 482H586 in fair working con dition; Jon Boat 16-foot No. BF8173G192 in fair working condition; Car Vehicle Trailer No. 447750 in poor working con dition with following problems, some rust on trailer and two bad tires (tire info 22575R15). All the above equipment can be physi cally seen and sealed bid appli cations may be picked up at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 1029 Henry Stimson Road., Kings Bay, GA 31547. Make sure sealed bid is written on the bottom of the envelope and dropped off at the Outdoor Adventure Center, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The sealed bids process will begin on at 9 a.m. Nov. 9 and they must be received or postmarked by Dec. 6. Bids will be opened at 9 a.m. Dec. 10. For more information, call the Outdoor Adventure Center manager at (912) 573-8103 If you are the successful bidder you will be notified when and where you may pick-up your equip ment. Morale, Welfare and Recreation happenings Winter Break Camp 2012 at the Youth Center from Dec. 21 to Jan. 8, but is closed Christmas Day and New Years Day. Its for kindergarten to 12 year olds. School Age Care patrons, single/dual military, wounded/fallen warriors, and Individual Augmentees registration begins Monday, Dec. 3. Active duty with working or student spouses and DoD employee registration begins Monday, Dec. 10 and DoD contractors and all others will start on Monday, Dec. 17. You can register 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5:30 p.m Monday through Friday, excluding closed holidays. Cost is based on total family income. A most recent Leave and Earnings Statement/pay stub for sponsor and spouse or student letter of enrollment must be provided. A birth certicate must be available for conrmation of age. IAs must provide orders. Single/Dual Military must provide dependent care form at time of registration. Breakfast, lunch and snacks will be provided. No outside food is allowed. For more information, call (912) 573-2380. Navy Child & Youth programs welcome children of all abilities. Free movies for kids At 1 p.m. Nov. 17 and 18 is Marmaduke, Nov. 19 The Smurfs, Nov. 20 Yogi Bear, Nov. 21 Rio, Nov. 23 Brave and Nov. 24 and 25 Furry Vengence. All youths under 18 must be accompanied by a parent or adult. Snacks foods and beverages are available for purchase. If 15 minutes after start time no one comes in to view the kids movie, the movie area will be for open viewing. The movie schedule is listed on Facebook under the events tab on mwrkingsbay page.Winter Camp nears Just for kids Liberty call Pizza biz shows appreciation 6 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Stress management covered at workshopEvents, schedules, daily pres sure and many other items can cause stress in your life. Stress may or may not be good for your health depending on how you manage that stress. This work shop is slated for 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 15. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Anger management seminar Nov. 28Anger is not an effective method for getting what you want and is often a smoke screen for other emotions. This workshop is slated for 8:30 a.m. to noon, Nov. 28. It can help you focus on identifying the feelings anger hides and explore behaviors help ful in resolving primary issues. Pre-registration is required. Call 573-4512 for details.Parenting classes offered on MondaysAre you frustrated with your children? Would you like suggestions on how to stop temper tantrums or how to get your teen to complete chores without asking them 14 times? We believe parents are the experts on their children. But, children dont come with a manual! So, sometimes you need help to figure out what to do with them. Meet with the parenting class from 9 to 11 a.m. on Mondays, Nov. 19 and 26. Enrollment in this sixweek class is ongoing. Attendees must complete all six weeks in order to receive a certificate. A minimum of six participants is needed in order for a new class to start. Registration required at 573-4512.Transition Assistance Program seminar comingTAP is a seminar for those separating, retiring or contemplating leaving the military that provides information on ben efits, job search skills, employment resources, resume writing, interviewing and other related transition skills. Spouses are encouraged to attend. The seminars are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 5 to 9 for separation and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 26 to 30 for retirement. You must be registered by your Command Career Counselor. For more informa tion call 573-4513.Ombudsman Assembly Meeting Nov. 26The Ombudsman Assembly Meeting will be held for all OMB, COs, XOs, CMCs and COBs at the Kings Bay Community Center at 6 p.m., Nov. 26. For more infor mation, call 573-4513.Million Dollar Sailor program upcomingThe Million Dollar Sailor Program is personal wealth building for sailors and their families. This course assists those attending on how to navigate successfully through financial challenges that accompany them. This training was created to specifically combat the most common financial issues fac ing sailors today. It will provide you with financial management skills that can be used over their lifetime. This training is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29. Registration is recommended. For more information call 573-9783.Smooth Move Workshop CONUS/OCONUS soonSmooth Move Workshops are designed to help person nel with military relocations and transfers. Areas covered include transportation, travel pay, allowances, and important forms and documents, housing referral office and relocation services. All service members and their spouses are encouraged to attend six months before their transfer date. Due to limited seating, please do not bring children. The workshop will be for CONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 20 and for OCONUS moves 2 to 4 p.m., Nov. 27. For more information, call 573-4513. Deployment Return and Reunion class setThis workshop addresses the challenges of deployment and offers tools and techniques to managing the cycle of deployment those challenges. It also prepares family members for reunion so that problems will be minimized and the positive aspects of reunion can be maximized. Topics include expec tations, communication and financial awareness, and hints for a happy homecoming. The class is 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13. For more information or to register, call 573-4513.Military Resumes: Your record in private sectorTake two hours to build a successful document for your postmilitary job search. Participants should bring a copy of his or her Verification of Military Experience and Training, at least three evaluations and information on any licenses or certifications held. Optional documents are award letters and transcripts. This workshop is, 1 to 3 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration is required. For more information, call 573-4513.Job search workshop scheduled for Nov. 15A job search workshop will be 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 15. It provides an overview of local and national employment trends and recommends strategies to expand your job search network. Open to active duty, retired, reserve and separating military and family members of relocating civil service personnel. Registration is required, call 573-4513.SAVI/SAPR advocate initial training classes setThe command Sexual Assault Prevention and Response point of contact is responsible for coordinating mandated, annual awareness training, main taining and providing current information on and referral to base and community pro grams for victims and ensuring the mandated collection and maintenance of sexual assault data per OPNAVINST 1752.1B. Individuals attending the training are appointed by their command and will represent the command in all sexual assault cases. This training is 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 13 to 16. Registration is required by calling 573-4512.Sponsorship Training teaches skillsThe Fleet and Family Support Center is offering Sponsorship Training to all Command Representatives. This training will cover topics to include let ter writing, transportation, tem porary lodging, orientation to installation and explanation of command mission. The work shop is scheduled at the Fleet and Family Support Center from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Nov. 15. Registration is recommended, as class is limited to 20 seats. For more informa tion call 573-4513.New Moms and Dads Support Group to meetA New Moms and Dads Support Group meets every other Tuesday at the Fleet and Family Support Center throughout the month. This workshop is sched uled for 10 a.m. to noon, Nov. 13, 20 and 27. This workshop is an opportunity to share experiences, meet and gain support from oth ers, and exchange new ideas. To register, call 573-4512.Ten Steps to a Federal job examinedGain information on the federal employment process, salaries, benefits how to interpret job announcements and deter mine whether you are eligible to apply. Attendees will be pro vided information, samples and tips on completing the electronic Federal resume. This class is from 1 to 4 p.m., Nov. 13. Registration required by calling 573-4513. Fleet & Family Support Center workshops THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 7

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Its still the week of Veterans Day, so I thought Id pose the question: Who is a famous American military leader that you admire? One guy who impresses me is Army Gen. Billy Mitchell. This visionary air pioneer said he could build 1,000 bombers for the price of one battleship, and they could sink that battleship. In 1921 he proved it, and the Navys relationship with the airplane began to turn a corner. Later, he was court-martialed for speaking his mind and resigned. Up eriscope with Bill Wesselho Tim Key Navy veteran Aiken, S.C. FDR (Franklin Delino Roosevelt), his leadership, and he really helped turn the country around at a time when we needed it. Farran Fullilove Marine Corps veteran New York Robert E. Lee and his honesty and greatness. A lot of people dont know his history before the Civil War. Lt. j.g. Conor Shippee USS Florida Blue King George, Va. Adm. (James) Stockdale was in the Hanoi Hilton for 7 or 8 years. He exhibited leadership under the most extreme conditions and came home with honor. Lt. j.g. Don Mills USS Florida Blue Ashville, N.C. George Washington. It was one of our most hopeless times and he got the men to follow him, and we made it through. MASN Brian Fredette Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Syracuse, N.Y. Abraham Lincoln. He preserved the union. MASN Carl Martin Marine Corps Security Force Battalion Heavner, Okla. George Washington. What didnt he do? Vietnam MIA laid to rest An air commando who died when his C-123 Provider are ship was shot down over Ahn Khe, Vietnam, was laid to restOct. 26at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery, Texas. e 310th Air Commando Squadron loadmaster, Airman 1st Class Jerry Mack Wall, 24, was killed when his plane was hit by enemy re and crashed into the central highlands, May 18, 1966. Until recently Wall, who was one of ve crew members, was listed as Missing in Action. In an intense recovery operation, three of the other Airmens remains were recovered shortly after the crash by soldiers of the 7th Cavalry Regiment. e ight engineer, Bill THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 9

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Moore, remains missing. I thought there was a possibility Jerry and Bill were still alive, said retired Senior Master Sgt. Gary omas, a volunteer with Walls unit. at situation stuck with me for my whole life. at situation involved a small, tight-knit group of aircrew volunteers from various backgrounds. omas, a rst sergeant with the 14th Munitions and Maintenance Squadron, spent a few months with Wall. Wall trained omas and several others as are kickersloading the 200 or so, 27 poundares. Jerry was so cool and calm, he was one heck of a guy, omas said. He had already been into battle and was highly trained. When I rst trained with him, it really shocked me to go into battle, and when he started going over how those ares could blow up and kill us ... eres a lot of heroism in the 310th Air Commandos. e night of the fateful crash, omas was scheduled to y, but was sidelined due to an ear infection. e lead scheduler, Master Sgt. Raymond C. Jajtner took his place. omas said everyone knew the danger of ying those missions, loaded with highly ammable magnesium ares. Walls ight was hit with a 40mm round according to witness statements. When youre in combat and when you make friends, even if its for a very short time, its a real brotherhood, omas said. It never goes away. Air Commandos provided combat air patrol and airlift to the soldiers, delivering ammo, food, supplies and troops. ey also ew out wounded and killed in action GIs, as well as prisoners, but one of the most harrowing jobs was the candlestick mission. During those missions, loadmasters and are kickers would load, unload and drop hundreds of ares from the skies over southern Vietnam, illuminating the enemy. It was a reght, the Viet Cong loved to attack, he said. We had B52s dropping bombs right outside our wings, ground artillery coming up, everybody is unloading. It got to be like the 4th of July, but of course you were scared. e Defense Prisoner of War and Missing Personnel Oce notes that since 1973, the remains of more than 900 Americans killed in the Vietnam War have been identied and returned to their families for burial with full military honors. Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command conducted a mission in June 2007 and identied a site that was recommended for recovery. In March 2011 and March 2012 JPAC conducted recovery operations at the site and recovered human remains and material evidence at the site, according to the press release. For more than a decade the United States has conducted joint eld activities with the governments of Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia to recover the remains of missing Americans, according to their Web site. roughout those countries, teams continue to investigate crash and burial sites, as well as interview locals to gain additional knowledge. Today, more than 1,600 Americans remain unaccounted for from the conict. Im so very proud of my nation that persevered for so long in searching for my fathers remains, Lea Ann Wall McCann said. Its been a long journey home. omas and several of Walls family members greeted the ag-draped casket as it arrived to San Antonio Oct. 24, on American Airlines Flight 497. Passengers on the plane watched from their windows as the re department honored the ight with a water cannon salute and as the Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Honor Guard carried Walls remains to an awaiting hearse. Everyone involved in making this happen has been wonderful to our family, from the sergeant who escorted his body to San Antonio, to the VA and the VFW, to the color guard, Wall McCaansaid. Pirates Cove MIA 10 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Navy College educational information 12 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Robotics contest big hit e Navys Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacic, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology Lego League Qualifying Tournament at Eastlake High School in Chula Vista, Calif., was Nov. 4. SSC Pacic co-hosted the event with the National Defense Education Program, Eastlake Education Foundation, the Sweetwater Union High School District, and Eastlake High Schools FIRST Robotics team, the TitanBOTs. is years tournament hosted 24 student teams from across San Diego County, with the outcome of the tournament determining who would move forward to the Southern California Championship Dec. 1 and 2 at the LEGOLAND California Resort. Rear Adm. Patrick H. Brady, commander of Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, was on hand to welcome students, their families and members of the community to the event. Brady highlighted the importance of technology in support of the Navys mission, and the need for current students to pursue science, technology, engineering and math degrees, eventually replacing the current STEM workforce when they retire. Most of the 9,000 people in my command have technical degrees but they will be eligible for retirement near 2020, around the time that you will be graduating, said Brady, as he spoke to the audience. We need you to be the next generation that helps us take things to the bottom of the ocean, satellites into space, and build stealth aircraft. Adding additional Navy air were SSC Pacics Color Guard and the Navy Band Southwest, along with more than 60 civilian and uniformed SPAWAR personnel who volunteered their time to act as speakers, judges, referees, coaches and mentors. Carmela Keeney, executive director at SSC Pacic, participated as one of the robot inspectors. Keeney noted how impressed she was with the condence level of the students and their approach when it came to building their robots and communicating as a team. SSC Pacic is very interested in robotics, said Keeney. We use unmanned vehicles, unmanned undersea vehicles, ground vehicles, and air vehicles, so its great to see these kids interest in robotics at a young age; their interest is very important to the Navy and Department of Defense. Once the opening ceremony was completed, robotics teams moved forward in their quest for triumph, competing in multiple rounds with each other until the top 12 were left to move onto the championship event. FLL is an international robotics program for students ages nine to 16 and is designed to provide children with an opportunity to explore science and technology while also discovering employment opportunities, career paths and life skills. Every year, the program focuses on a specic theme, around which teams design their required components. Senior Solutions is the theme of this years challenge, requiring FLL teams to solve a problem faced by seniors as they age. Groups competed in three areas, the Robot Game, Core Value s and the Research Project. SSC Pacic has a robust education outreach program. is year, the organization sponsored 40 FLL teams, with 16 competing at this event. SSC Pacic collaborated with local organizations to sponsor the FLL Qualifying Tournament as a venue for local teams to come together to compete in an entertaining environment to promote science, technology, engineering and math. Saudis visit Great Lakes Royal Saudi Naval Force members, in conjunction with, the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity toured the Navys only boot camp, Recruit Training Command, Nov. 7. e group consisted of seven naval ocers from the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, who toured RTC to observe Navy training and see how civilians are transformed into Sailors. e tour included Battle Stations 21, which is the culmination of eight weeks of training by recruits. Battle Stations 21 is a grueling 12-hour test of a recruits skills in several shipboard scenarios, including reghting, combating ooding and transporting casualties. It is held on board the 210-foot-long Arleigh Burke-class destroyer replica, USS Trayer (BST-21), the Navys largest simulator. Rear Adm. Dawi Mohammed Saad Al-Otaibi was the ranking ocer of the visiting delegation. He and his ocers are involved and responsible for their navys training in Saudi Arabia. Being able to compare training at RTC, along with follow-on instruction at A and C schools around the United States, with the training in Saudi Arabia is a major reason for the visit and for the NETSAFA course. What we have seen is a wonderful thing, said Al-Otaibi. I was most im pressed with Battle Stations 21 and the USS Trayer. e visiting ocers are part of the Saudi Arabia navys Technical Institute of Naval Tactics and the admiral is responsible for their recruit and training. NETSAFA classes also are given the opportunity to see ocer training at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., visit Ofcer Training Command at Naval Station Newport, R.I., tour other secondary enlisted training at learning centers on Navy bases. e Saudi ocers also visited the USS Missouri Small Arms Marksmanship Trainer on RTC. While there they had the opportunity to see how recruits learn to handle and re the Navys standard issue M9 Berretta pistol and the Mossberg 500 12-gauge shotgun. SAMT uses red laser lights and pneumatic air to simulate the ring and hits on a computer target. After visiting SAMT they observed how recruits take their weapons familiarization and apply it ring actual weapons in the USS Wisconsin Live Fire Indoor Range. Before visiting SAMT and USS Wisconsin, the delegation toured the largest building on RTC, the Freedom Hall Physical Fitness Trainer. e 173,000-squarefoot three story structure is where every year more than 35,000 recruits run their Physical Fitness Assess ments, work out and hold Captains Cup competition. e delegation also visited a recruit barracks, or ship, to see where recruits live, study and eat. ey ended their visit at RTCs in-processing building where recruits begin their Navy careers, then a stop at the USS Indianapolis Combat Training Pool where recruits pass their third class swim qualications and nally a visit to the USS Chief Fire Fighting Trainer where recruits learn about damage control and how to ght and extinguish shipboard res. THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 13

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14 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012 In the United States, Veterans Day pays homage to service men and women of the nations military, those who currently wear the uniform and those who came before. e day, which rst garnered national prominence in 1919 when President Woodrow Wilson signed Armistice Day into eect, is to recognize those whose acts of courage, selessness, and heroism kept this country safe. If several Marines were asked to name a highprole Marine of the past, one whos done something of historic signicance, or someone to emulate, theres a high chance youll hear a common answer. e name would be Chesty Puller: an enlisted man, a commissioned ofcer, a recipient of ve Navy Crosses and an overall hero in the Corps. Every recruit going through Marine Corps boot camp learns about those whove served before them. Marines are taught to emulate traits of those who have proven themselves to be heroes and exceptional, fearless leaders. Lt. Gen. Lewis Chesty Puller was the embodiment of the traits Marines are taught to manifest. As a Marine for more than 30 years, from World War II to the Vietnam War, Puller became one of the most decorated and recognizable gures in military history. He was cut from a different bolt of cloth. He exemplied so many traits we want to follow, said Danny Strand, director of Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstows Safety and Emergency Services. He was one of the most decorated Marines in history. His troops loved him too, the Deer Lodge, Tenn., native added. Many attribute Pullers exemplary leadership qualities to his ability to relate to the troops he led. Once an enlisted man himself, Puller made sure his Marines were well taken care of. Chesty showed everyone you didnt need a college education to lead Marines. He was one of them at one point so he understood what they would go through, Strand said. I think this is why most people liked him as much as they did, he added. Puller was recognized for many dauntless tasks while serving in the Marine Corps. He was awarded his rst Navy Cross for leading his forces into engagements against superior numbers. roughout 1930, Puller led forces in the Nicaraguan National Guard in several battles against bandits in which the outnumbered national guard forces routed the enemy each time. In the entirety of 1930, Puller lost nine men. Subsequently, he was awarded four more Navy Crosses for equal feats of extraordinary heroism. Tales of valor such as these have made it easy for Marines to remember why hes become the gure he is today. With these many counts of bravery under his belt, it was only a matter of time before tall tales of Pullers deeds began to spread. ere are Marines today who have a hard time separating fact from ction. eres a lot of myth and legends that follow [Puller] now, said Sgt. Michael Pressler, an artillery mechanic with Fleet Support Division aboard MCLB Barstow. A lot of it has gotten blown way out of proportion but, with him, I could see how. Its hard to tell whats real and whats been fabricated, he added. Puller has become known for more than his acts of valor during his time serving. His words and actions out of battle have garnered him fans within the ranks as well. He held himself to a higher standard than anyone else he knew, said Strand. During his time, an accidental discharge of your weapon was twenty dollars. He once ned himself one hundred dollars for one, the fellow mustang [enlisted man becoming commissioned as an ocer] and retired lieutenant colonel added. Although its hard to say whether the sayings are true, many people attribute some of their favorite quotes to Puller as well. My favorite quotes from Chesty are ones that have to do with common sense. Now, I know were not supposed to put our hands in our pockets but Chesty once said a Marine with cold hands and warm pockets is a fool, said Sgt. Jacey Marks, assistant training chief with Headquarters Battalion, MCLB Barstow. I mean, you dont go walking around with your hands in your pockets. ats not professional. Pullers approach to situations with common sense and understanding play a large role in the reasons service members hold him in high regard. Puller earned the respect from those he served with through the lessons he taught by word or action and have stood the test of time. Its good men and women like this we honor on Veterans Day each year. A recent Iranian attack on a U.S. drone occurred over international waters, but the aircraft suered no damage and returned safely to base, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Nov. 8. Speaking to Pentagon reporters, Little said the Iranian aircraft red on the drone and followed it as it ew over the Arabian Gulf last week. I can conrm that on November 1, at approximately 4:50 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time, an unarmed, unmanned MQ-1 U.S. military aircraft conducting routine surveillance over the Arabian Gulf, was intercepted by an Iranian SU-25 Frogfoot aircraft and was red upon with guns, he said. e incident occurred over international waters, approximately 16 nautical miles o of the Iranian coastline, Little said. e MQ-1 was not hit, and returned to its base safely. Little provided further details regarding the Iranian attack. e aircraft, once it came under re at approximately the 16 nautical mile range, moved further out, he said. e Iranian aircraft continued to pursue the MQ-1 for some period of time before letting it return to base. We believe they red at least twice and made at least two passes, Little added. e press secretary conrmed both Congress and the White House were notied of the incident, and the U.S. responded to Iran through the Swiss protective powers. e United States has communicated to the Iranians that we will continue to conduct surveillance ights over international waters, over the Arabian Gulf, consistent with long standing practices and our commitment to the security of the region, Little said. Little emphasized the U.S. can respond using a wide range of options, from diplomatic to military, to protect our military assets and our forces in the region, and will do so when necessary. Our aircraft was never in Iranian airspace. It was always ying in international airspace, he said. e internationally recognized territorial limit is 12 nautical miles o the coast, and we never entered the 12 nautical-mile limit. Little said Defense Department ocials believe this is the rst time an unmanned aircraft has been shot at over international waters in the Arabian Gulf. ere is absolutely no question that the aircraft red on the U.S. military aircraft, he said. Corps salutes Puller on Vets Day Iran res on drone, every shot a miss

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16 THE PERISCOPE, NSB KINGS BAY, Thursday, November 15, 2012